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Lifestyle Changes For Diabetes Type 1

6 Lifestyle Changes To Control Your Diabetes

6 Lifestyle Changes To Control Your Diabetes

Working closely with your doctor, you can manage your diabetes by focusing on six key changes in your daily life. 1. Eat healthy. This is crucial when you have diabetes, because what you eat affects your blood sugar. No foods are strictly off-limits. Focus on eating only as much as your body needs. Get plenty of vegetables, fruits, and whole grains. Choose nonfat dairy and lean meats. Limit foods that are high in sugar and fat. Remember that carbohydrates turn into sugar, so watch your carb intake. Try to keep it about the same from meal to meal. This is even more important if you take insulin or drugs to control your blood sugars. 2. Exercise. If you're not active now, it’s time to start. You don't have to join a gym and do cross-training. Just walk, ride a bike, or play active video games. Your goal should be 30 minutes of activity that makes you sweat and breathe a little harder most days of the week. An active lifestyle helps you control your diabetes by bringing down your blood sugar. It also lowers your chances of getting heart disease. Plus, it can help you lose extra pounds and ease stress. 3. Get checkups. See your doctor at least twice a year. Diabetes raises your odds of heart disease. So learn your numbers: cholesterol, blood pressure, and A1c (average blood sugar over 3 months). Get a full eye exam every year. Visit a foot doctor to check for problems like foot ulcers and nerve damage. 4. Manage stress. When you're stressed, your blood sugar levels go up. And when you're anxious, you may not manage your diabetes well. You may forget to exercise, eat right, or take your medicines. Find ways to relieve stress -- through deep breathing, yoga, or hobbies that relax you. 5. Stop smoking. Diabetes makes you more likely to have health problems like heart disease Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Print Diagnosis Diagnostic tests include: Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells (hemoglobin). The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates diabetes. If the A1C test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions that can make the A1C test inaccurate — such as pregnancy or an uncommon form of hemoglobin (hemoglobin variant) — your doctor may use these tests: Random blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken at a random time and may be confirmed by repeat testing. Blood sugar values are expressed in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Regardless of when you last ate, a random blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or higher suggests diabetes, especially when coupled with any of the signs and symptoms of diabetes, such as frequent urination and extreme thirst. Fasting blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken after an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it's 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes. If you're diagnosed with diabetes, your doctor may also run blood tests to check for autoantibodies that are common in type 1 diabetes. These tests help your doctor distinguish between type 1 and type 2 diabetes when the diagnosis is uncertain. The presence of ketones — byproducts from the breakdown of fat — in your urine also suggests type 1 diab Continue reading >>

Lifestyle Modifications In The Management Of Type 1 Diabetes: Still Relevant After All These Years?

Lifestyle Modifications In The Management Of Type 1 Diabetes: Still Relevant After All These Years?

Lifestyle Modifications in the Management of Type 1 Diabetes: Still Relevant After All These Years? Department of Psychiatry and Neurobehavioral Sciences, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia. Address correspondence to:, Linda Gonder-Frederick, Center for Behavioral Medicine Research, P.O. Box 800-223, Charlottesville, VA 22908, E-mail:Email: [email protected] Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer As we progress into the 21st century, the landscape of research and treatment in type 1 diabetes (T1D) is undergoing a massive transformation, characterized by rapid advances on numerous scientific fronts, including insulin and other hormonal therapies, technologies for blood glucose (BG) monitoring and insulin delivery, stem cell therapies, genetic engineering, -cell transplantation, and even xenotransplantation. Clearly, these scientific advances have enormous implications for future diabetes management. These rapid developments and cutting-edge discoveries may also have important, but not always obvious, implications for our perspectives on how different aspects of diabetes management should be prioritized in research and patient care. For example, with the enthusiasm generated by recent technological breakthroughs, especially those associated with closed-loop control (CLC) or the artificial pancreas (AP), is there a reason to be concerned that more traditional (and perhaps less exciting) aspects of T1D management, such as lifestyle modifications, will receive less attention in research and diabetes care? How relevant are lifestyle factors, including diet and exercise, to contemporary views and practice of T1D treatment? What role will they play in future diabetes management? This column explores the potential impact of r Continue reading >>

What Lifestyle Changes Are Necessary For People With Type 1 Diabetes?

What Lifestyle Changes Are Necessary For People With Type 1 Diabetes?

What lifestyle changes are necessary for people with type 1 diabetes? Having type 1 diabetes requires significant lifestyle changes that include: People with type 1 diabetes can lead long, active lives if they carefully monitor their glucose, make the needed lifestyle changes, and adhere to the treatment plan. Frequent testing of your blood sugar levels American Diabetes Association: "Frequently Asked Questions about Pre-Diabetes." American Diabetes Association: "Type 2 Diabetes." American Diabetes Association: "The Dangerous Toll of Diabetes." American Diabetes Association: "Gestational Diabetes." American Diabetes Association: "About Insulin and Other Drugs." National Library of Medicine: "Diabetes." National Diabetes Education Project: "About Diabetes and Pre-Diabetes." National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse (NDIC): "National Diabetes Statistics, 2011." Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on January 17, 2017 American Diabetes Association: "Frequently Asked Questions about Pre-Diabetes." American Diabetes Association: "Type 2 Diabetes." American Diabetes Association: "The Dangerous Toll of Diabetes." American Diabetes Association: "Gestational Diabetes." American Diabetes Association: "About Insulin and Other Drugs." National Library of Medicine: "Diabetes." National Diabetes Education Project: "About Diabetes and Pre-Diabetes." National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse (NDIC): "National Diabetes Statistics, 2011." Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on January 17, 2017 When should you call a doctor or podiatrist about your diabetes-related skin issues? THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatmen Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 diabetes diet definition and facts In Type 1 diabetes the pancreas can do longer release insulin. The high blood sugar that results can lead to complications such as kidney, nerve, and eye damage, and cardiovascular disease. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure he impact of a food on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly, and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. Meal timing is very important for people with type 1 diabetes. Meals must match insulin doses. Eating meals with a low glycemic load (index) makes meal timing easier. Low glycemic load meals raise blood sugar slowly and steadily, leaving plenty of time for the body (or the injected insulin dose) to respond. Skipping a meal or eating late puts a person at risk for low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Foods to eat for a type 1 diabetic diet include complex carbohydrates such as brown rice, whole wheat, quinoa, oatmeal, fruits, vegetables, beans, and lentils. Foods to avoid for a type 1 diabetes diet include sodas (both diet and regular), simple carbohydrates - processed/refined sugars (white bread, pastries, chips, cookies, pastas), trans fats (anything with the word hydrogenated on the label), and high-fat animal products. Fats don't have much of a direct effect on blood sugar but they can be useful in slowing the absorption of carbohydrates. Protein provides steady energy with little effect on blood sugar. It keeps blood sugar stable, and can help with sugar cravings and feeling full after eating. Protein-packed foods to include on your menu are beans, legumes, eggs, seafood, dairy, peas, tofu, and lean meats and poultry. The Mediterranean diet plan is often recommended for people with type 1 diabetes because it is full of nut Continue reading >>

Influence Of Lifestyle On The Course Of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Influence Of Lifestyle On The Course Of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Go to: Clinical course of type 1 diabetes Since the first therapeutic use of insulin the clinical course of type 1 diabetes (T1DM) has changed dramatically from a disease with very short life expectancy to a chronic condition, the course of which is influenced largely by the development of chronic complications. The clinical onset of T1DM is preceded by a preclinical phase of variable duration, characterized by progressive autoimmune destruction of beta cells and presence of specific autoantibodies. In genetically susceptible individuals, this autoimmune reaction seems to be initiated and modulated by exposure to various environmental triggers and regulators, which might include viral infections or introducing cow's milk or cereals into the diet [1]. According to the accelerator hypothesis [2], an increased rate of β-cell apoptosis and insulin resistance modulate the timing of clinical onset and subsequent course of autoimmune diabetes. However, the autoimmune process is thought to be the main accelerator of β-cell destruction both before and after onset of T1DM [3]. Clinical manifestation of T1DM varies considerably in severity with greater insulin deficiency and greater risk of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in children and adolescents than in adults [4]. After introduction of insulin treatment, many patients enter clinical remission of the disease with partially restored endogenous insulin secretion and near-normoglycemia on very low doses of exogenous insulin. In many patients with phenotypic T1DM residual insulin secretion can be maintained for over 30 years, and is associated with better metabolic control, including decreased incidence of both hyper- and hypoglycemia, and decreased risk of chronic complications when compared with patients without detectable insulin Continue reading >>

Living With

Living With

If you have type 1 diabetes, it's important to look after your own health and wellbeing, with support from those involved in your care. Your diabetes care team As type 1 diabetes is a long-term condition, you'll be in regular contact with your diabetes care team. Your GP or diabetes care team will also need to check your eyes, feet and nerves regularly because they can also be affected by diabetes. You should also be tested regularly – at least once a year – to check how well your diabetes is being controlled over the long term. A blood sample will be taken from your arm, and the HbA1c test will be carried out. It measures how much glucose is in the red blood cells, and gives your blood glucose levels for the previous two to three months. For help managing your diabetes on a day-to-day basis, check out the mumoActive app in our Digital Apps Library. Lifestyle changes Healthy eating Eating a healthy, balanced diet is very important if you have diabetes. However, you don't need to avoid certain food groups altogether. You can have a varied diet and enjoy a wide range of foods as long as you eat regularly and make healthy choices. You can make adaptations when cooking meals, such as reducing the amount of fat, salt and sugar you eat, and increasing the amount of fibre. You don't need to completely exclude sugary and high-fat foods from your diet, but they should be limited. The important thing in managing diabetes through your diet is to eat regularly and include starchy carbohydrates, such as pasta, as well as plenty of fruit and vegetables. If your diet is well balanced, you should be able to achieve a good level of health and maintain a healthy weight. Read more about healthy recipes. Diabetes UK has more dietary advice and cooking tips. Regular exercise As physical Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management Guidelines

Diabetes Management Guidelines

Source: American Diabetes Association. Standards of medical care in diabetes—2016. Diabetes Care. 2016;39(suppl 1):S1-S106. Available here. Refer to source document for full recommendations, including class of recommendation and level of evidence. Jump to a topic or click back/next at the bottom of each page Lifestyle Changes Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT) The ADA acknowledges that there is no one-size-fits-all eating pattern for individuals with type 2 diabetes. MNT is recommended for all individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes as part of an overall treatment plan, preferably provided by a registered dietitian skilled in diabetes MNT Goals of MNT: A healthful eating pattern to improve overall health, specifically: Achievement and maintenance of weight goals Attainment of individualized glycemic, blood pressure, and lipid goals Type 2 diabetes prevention or delay Attain individualized glycemic, blood pressure, and lipid goals Achieve and maintain body weight goals Delay or prevent diabetes complications Nutrition guidelines from the ADA are available. Click here for summary recommendations on coordinating foods with diabetes medications, eating patterns, and more. Physical Activity Adults with diabetes Exercise programs should include ≥150 min/wk moderate-intensity aerobic activity (50%-70% max heart rate), spread over ≥3 days/wk with no more than 2 consecutive days without exercise Resistance training ≥2 times/wk (in absence of contraindications)* Reduce sedentary time = break up >90 minutes spent sitting Evaluate patients for contraindications prohibiting certain types of exercise before recommending exercise program† Consider age and previous level of physical activity Children with diabetes, prediabetes ≥60 min physical activity/day *Adults with typ Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Diabetes: Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Treatment Of Diabetes: Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is becoming an increasing health concern for many individuals in the population, especially as risk factors including obesity, unhealthy diets, and lack of activity contribute to the expression of the disease. Although both types of diabetes involve the manner in which the body digests, utilizes, and balances sugars in the blood stream, onset, triggers, and treatment can differ. However, it is also important to be aware that similarities between the two types of conditions also means that practical treatment measures that include lifestyle changes can be applicable to both. Further, even medical interventions and drugs that are used for treatment may need to be specifically tailored in dosage and protocols based on the individual’s physiology, regardless of what type of diabetes they suffer from. Comparing and Contrasting Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes is generally characterized as a lifetime disease, in that is often diagnosed in early to late childhood. Unlike type 2 diabetes, type 1 is not necessarily associated with excess body weight as an indicator or risk factor, and insulin injections or a pump are absolutely required throughout the lifetime. In contrast, type 2 diabetes tends to develop later in life, usually in people who are in their 30s. For this reason, type 2 is frequently referred to as adult onset diabetes. Although some individuals with adult onset diabetes are with a perfectly healthy body weight, obesity is a definite risk factor for this type of the disease. High blood pressure and cholesterol are also associated with adult onset diabetes, although it is not clear whether this is a causative factor or simply a concurrent one that has resulted from the excess weight. Although some individuals with type 2 diabetes may still requi Continue reading >>

You Can Prevent Diabetes With A Healthy Lifestyle

You Can Prevent Diabetes With A Healthy Lifestyle

Even though type 2 Diabetes is not an infectious disease, we’re in in the midst of an epidemic. Once called as adult-onset diabetes, this difficult disease is striking an ever-growing number of teens and adults alike. More than 24 million Americans have diabetes; of those, about 6 million don’t know they have the disease. Yes, the numbers are alarming. And this leads us to an importance question: Can diabetes be prevented? But the good news is that type 2 diabetes is largely preventable. More than half the cases could be avoided by taking several simple steps: keeping weight under control, exercising more, eating a healthy LCHF diet, quit smoking, improve sleep pattern and quality, taking a few dietary supplements can all go a long way towards preventing Diabetes Type 2. This is even more important if you are genetically predisposition to risk of diabetes type 2 or are already pre-diabetic. Here are a few simple tips that can help you prevent diabetes. Changing the habits of a lifetime isn’t easy, but it’s worth the effort. Understanding Diabetes Before we tell you how to prevent type 2 diabetes, it’s important to understand Diabetes. Diabetes occurs when the body can’t make enough insulin or can’t properly use the insulin it makes. There are 3 main kinds of diabetes: 1. Diabetes Type 1 The body attacks beta cells in the pancreas until they can no longer produce insulin. Type 1 diabetics are insulin dependent. 2. Diabetes Type 2 Associated with insulin resistance, where the body is making insulin but it’s not enough. Diabetes Type 2 is preventable as well as reversible with simple lifestyle changes. 3. Gestational Diabetes Gestational diabetes is a temporary condition, marked by elevated blood sugar levels during the course of pregnancy. However, gestati Continue reading >>

5 Ways You Can Reverse Your Type 2 Diabetes

5 Ways You Can Reverse Your Type 2 Diabetes

Lifestyle changes and in some cases, surgery, can be effective ways to put type 2 diabetes into remission. Learn more about what you can do to get off medication and get in control. Reversing your type 2 diabetes–or at least putting it into remission for years—is possible, according to George King, MD, research director and chief scientific officer at the Joslin Diabetes Center. “The strongest support comes from bariatric surgery,” says Dr. King, author of Reverse Your Diabetes in 12 Weeks. “Of people who undergo bariatric surgery and who have been on diabetes medications for years, fully 50 to 60% percent of these people can go off all medications in five years.” Without surgery, Dr. King says that it has long been known that at least five to 10% of people who go on a very changed diet, lose weight and increase their activity can get off all medications for type 2 diabetes and stay off them for ten to 20 years. “What that tells me is that it’s definitely possible to reverse type 2 diabetes; you just need to find the correct path,” says Dr. King The only caveat, he says, is how long you’ve had the disease. Diabetes is a condition in which the pancreas cannot properly produce insulin to regulate levels of glucose in your body. Over time, this can cause the beta cells in the pancreas to burn out, making it more difficult to compensate for the body’s inability to use insulin effectively. “But most people with type 2 diabetes have enough residual beta cells that if they take the pressure off their beta cells with diet and exercise, their health will improve,” says Dr. King. Getting Started Experts suggest a number of steps to help reverse type 2 diabetes including: Changing Up Your Diet With the goal of scoring a hemoglobin A1C below 6.5, Dr. King Continue reading >>

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes: What’s The Difference?

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes: What’s The Difference?

There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Both types of diabetes are chronic diseases that affect the way your body regulates blood sugar, or glucose. Glucose is the fuel that feeds your body’s cells, but to enter your cells it needs a key. Insulin is that key. People with type 1 diabetes don’t produce insulin. You can think of it as not having a key. People with type 2 diabetes don’t respond to insulin as well as they should and later in the disease often don’t make enough insulin. You can think of this as having a broken key. Both types of diabetes can lead to chronically high blood sugar levels. That increases the risk of diabetes complications. Both types of diabetes, if not controlled, share many similar symptoms, including: frequent urination feeling very thirsty and drinking a lot feeling very hungry feeling very fatigued blurry vision cuts or sores that don’t heal properly People with type 1 diabetes may also experience irritability and mood changes, and unintentionally lose weight. People with type 2 diabetes may also have numbness and tingling in their hands or feet. Although many of the symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are similar, they present in very different ways. Many people with type 2 diabetes won’t have symptoms for many years. Then often the symptoms of type 2 diabetes develop slowly over the course of time. Some people with type 2 diabetes have no symptoms at all and don’t discover their condition until complications develop. The symptoms of type 1 diabetes develop fast, typically over the course of several weeks. Type 1 diabetes, which was once known as juvenile diabetes, usually develops in childhood or adolescence. But it’s possible to get type 1 diabetes later in life. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes may have simi Continue reading >>

Lifestyle Changes For Diabetes: 6 Habits That Help Lower Blood Sugar

Lifestyle Changes For Diabetes: 6 Habits That Help Lower Blood Sugar

Lifestyle Changes for Diabetes: 6 Habits that Help Lower Blood Sugar These tweaks give your pancreas a helping hand. Medication and blood glucose meters play important roles in type 2 diabetes management, but dont turn a blind eye to your everyday habits. In fact, the right lifestyle changes could be enough to keep blood sugar levels in a healthy range, without medication. Heres what lifestyle changes endocrinologists and other health experts recommend to manage type 2 diabetes. Clean up your diet. Limit sugar, white flour and other refined grains, and starchy vegetables, which can spike blood glucose levels. Instead, choose non-starchy vegetables and whole grains as much as possible. Get moving. In addition to helping manage weight, exercise improves the bodys ability to use up glucose for energy, which reduces the excess sugar in the bloodstream, according to Joan Pagano, an exercise physiologist in New York City. The official recommendation is 150 minutes of exercise a week. Learn more about exercising with diabetes here. Lose weight. Excess weight can make diabetes symptoms worse, and losing just 5 to 7 percent of your body weight can help regulate blood sugar levels and improve insulin resistance. Make sleep a priority. If youre not sleeping well, during the day you feel sluggish, youre tired, and then you get more cravings, says Sandra Arvalo, RDN, a spokesperson for the American Academy of Diabetes Educators. Lets be honest: Few of us opt to munch on broccoli when were falling asleep at their desk; were usually more drawn to the quick, carby foods like chips or sweets. The more carbohydrates you eat, the higher your numbers are, so its a vicious cycle, says Arvalo. Reduce stress. Both emotional and physical stress produce hormones that can worsen insulin resista Continue reading >>

Treating Type 1 Diabetes

Treating Type 1 Diabetes

en espaolEl tratamiento de la diabetes tipo 1 If your child or teen has been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes , the next step is to create a diabetes management plan to help him or her manage the condition and stay healthy and active. Treatment plans for type 1 diabetes are based on each child's needs and the suggestions of the diabetes health care team . Treatment approaches differ in, among other things, the types of insulin given and the schedules for giving insulin given each day. The advantages and disadvantages of a plan should be considered for each child. The blood glucose level is the amount of glucose in the blood. Glucose is the main source of energy for the body's cells and is carried to each cell through the bloodstream. The hormone insulin allows the glucose to get into the cells. In type 1 diabetes, the body can no longer make insulin, so the glucose can't get into the body's cells. This makes the blood glucose level rise. Treatment goals for kids with diabetes are to control the condition in a way that minimizes symptoms; prevents short- and long-term health problems; and helps them to have normal physical, mental, emotional, and social growth and development. To do this, parents and kids should aim for the goal of keeping blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible. In general, kids with type 1 diabetes need to: eat a healthy, balanced diet, paying special attention to the amount of carbohydrates in each meal and the diabetes meal plan check blood sugar levels several times a day Following the treatment plan helps kids stay healthy, but treating diabetes isn't the same as curing it. Right now, there's no cure for diabetes, so kids with type 1 diabetes will need treatment for the rest of their lives. But with proper care, they should look and feel h Continue reading >>

Lifestyle Changes To Manage Type 1 Diabetes

Lifestyle Changes To Manage Type 1 Diabetes

Lifestyle Changes to Manage Type 1 Diabetes DISCLAIMER: This Health Library is for educational purposes only and does not necessarily reflect the services provided by this practice/facility. Main Page Risk Factors Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Screening Complications Reducing Your Risk Talking to Your Doctor Living With Type 1 Diabetes Resource Guide What and how much you eat, when and how much insulin you take, and how much you exercise are major factors in diabetes management that you can control. It is important for you to learn how to eat a healthful diet and to incorporate regular exercise into your daily life. The dietary guidelines for managing diabetes can seem complicated. However, you will see that the recommendations are the same as those for general good health, and you can eat the same foods as everyone else. A nutritionist can help you make sense of these guidelines and help you develop healthy eating patterns that will work for you. Ask your doctor for a referral to a certified diabetes educator (CDE) registered nutritionist. The basic eating guidelines for people with type 1 diabetes are: Eat 3 balanced meals per day and do not skip meals. Try to eat meals at the same time each day, with about the same amount of carbohydrate, protein, and fat as the same meal the day before. In case a meal is delayed, keep snacks with you at all times. Your blood sugar rises and falls in response to your eating patterns. Therefore, by eating about the same amount and types of food at the same times each day, you can easily predict when your blood sugar level will rise. This makes it easier to match your insulin dose with these rises in blood sugar. To make sure that you are getting the nutrients that you need, follow the US Department of Agricultures ChooseMyPlate guidel Continue reading >>

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