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Life Expectancy With Heart Disease And Diabetes

Life Expectancy Substantially Lower With Combination Of Diabetes, Stroke, Or Heart Attack

Life Expectancy Substantially Lower With Combination Of Diabetes, Stroke, Or Heart Attack

Life Expectancy Substantially Lower With Combination of Diabetes, Stroke, or Heart Attack EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: 11 A.M. (ET) TUESDAY, JULY 7, 2015 Media Advisory: To contact co-author Emanuele Di Angelantonio, M.D., email [email protected] . To place an electronic embedded link to this study in your story This link for the study will be live at the embargo time: Life Expectancy Substantially Lower With Combination of Diabetes, Stroke, or Heart Attack In an analysis that included nearly 1.2 million participants and more than 135,000 deaths, mortality associated with a history of diabetes, stroke, or heart attack was similar for each condition, and the risk of death increased substantially with each additional condition a patient had, according to a study in the July 7 issue of JAMA. The prevalence of cardiometabolic multimorbidity (defined in this study as a history of 2 or more of the following: diabetes mellitus, stroke, myocardial infarction [MI; heart attack]) is increasing rapidly. Considerable evidence exists about the mortality risk of having any 1 of these conditions alone. However, evidence is sparse about life expectancy among people who have 2 or 3 cardiometabolic conditions at the same time, according to background information in the article. John Danesh, F.Med.Sci., of the University of Cambridge, England, and colleagues estimated reductions in life expectancy associated with cardiometabolic multimorbidity. Age- and sex-adjusted mortality rates and hazard ratios (HR) were calculated using individual participant data from the Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration (689,300 participants; 91 cohorts; years of baseline surveys: 1960-2007; latest mortality follow-up: April 2013; 128,843 deaths). The hazard ratios from this study population were compared with tho Continue reading >>

Life Expectancy Substantially Lower With Combination Of Diabetes, Stroke Or Heart Attack

Life Expectancy Substantially Lower With Combination Of Diabetes, Stroke Or Heart Attack

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Life expectancy substantially lower with combination of diabetes, stroke or heart attack In an analysis that included nearly 1.2 million participants and more than 135,000 deaths, mortality associated with a history of diabetes, stroke or heart attack was similar for each condition, and the risk of death increased substantially with each additional condition a patient had, according to a study. In an analysis that included nearly 1.2 million participants and more than 135,000 deaths, mortality associated with a history of diabetes, stroke, or heart attack was similar for each condition, and the risk of death increased substantially with each additional condition a patient had, according to a study in the July 7 issue of JAMA. The prevalence of cardiometabolic multimorbidity (defined in this study as a history of 2 or more of the following: diabetes mellitus, stroke, myocardial infarction [MI; heart attack]) is increasing rapidly. Considerable evidence exists about the mortality risk of having any 1 of these conditions alone. However, evidence is sparse about life expectancy among people who have 2 or 3 cardiometabolic conditions at the same time, according to background information in the article. John Danesh, F.Med.Sci., of the University of Cambridge, England, and colleagues estimated reductions in life expectancy associated with cardiometabolic multimorbidity. Age- and sex-adjusted mortality rates and hazard ratios (HR) were calculated using individual participant data from the Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration (689,300 participants; 91 cohorts; years of baseline surveys: 1960-2007; latest mortality follow-up: April 2013; 128,843 deaths). The hazard ratios from this study population were Continue reading >>

Diabetes Life Expectancy

Diabetes Life Expectancy

Tweet After diabetes diagnosis, many type 1 and type 2 diabetics worry about their life expectancy. Death is never a pleasant subject but it's human nature to want to know 'how long can I expect to live'. There is no hard and fast answer to the question of ‘how long can I expect to live’ as a number of factors influence one’s life expectancy. How soon diabetes was diagnosed, the progress of diabetic complications and whether one has other existing conditions will all contribute to one’s life expectancy - regardless of whether the person in question has type 1 or type 2 diabetes. How long can people with diabetes expect to live? Diabetes UK estimates in its report, Diabetes in the UK 2010: Key Statistics on Diabetes[5], that the life expectancy of someone with type 2 diabetes is likely to be reduced, as a result of the condition, by up to 10 years. People with type 1 diabetes have traditionally lived shorter lives, with life expectancy having been quoted as being reduced by over 20 years. However, improvement in diabetes care in recent decades indicates that people with type 1 diabetes are now living significantly longer. Results of a 30 year study by the University of Pittsburgh, published in 2012, noted that people with type 1 diabetes born after 1965 had a life expectancy of 69 years.[76] How does diabetic life expectancy compare with people in general? The Office for National Statistics estimates life expectancy amongst new births to be: 77 years for males 81 years for females. Amongst those who are currently 65 years old, the average man can expect to live until 83 years old and the average woman to live until 85 years old. What causes a shorter life expectancy in diabetics? Higher blood sugars over a period of time allow diabetic complications to set in, su Continue reading >>

Active Life Expectancy Of Americans With Diabetes: Risks Of Heart Disease, Obesity, And Inactivity

Active Life Expectancy Of Americans With Diabetes: Risks Of Heart Disease, Obesity, And Inactivity

Volume 107, Issue 1 , January 2015, Pages 37-45 Active life expectancy of Americans with diabetes: Risks of heart disease, obesity, and inactivity Author links open overlay panel Sarah B.Laditkab Few researchers have studied whether diabetes itself is responsible for high rates of disability or mortality, or if factors associated with diabetes contribute importantly. We estimated associations of diabetes, heart disease, obesity, and physical inactivity with life expectancy (LE), the proportion of life with disability (DLE), and disability in the last year of life. Data were from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (1999-2011 and 1986, African American and white women and men ages 55+, n=1,980, 17,352 person-years). Activities of daily living defined disability. Multinomial logistic Markov models estimated disability transition probabilities adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, and the health factors. Microsimulation measured outcomes. White women and men exemplify results. LE was, for women: 3.5 years less with diabetes than without (95% confidence interval, 3.14.0), 11.1 less (10.312.0) adding heart disease, 21.9 less with all factors (15.328.5), all p<0.001. Corresponding results for men: 1.7 years (0.92.3, not significant), 8.2 (6.89.5) and 18.1 (15.620.6), both p<0.001. DLE was, for women: 23.5% (21.725.4) with no risk factors, 27.1% (25.728.6) with diabetes alone, 34.6% (33.136.1) adding heart disease, 52.9% (38.966.8) with all factors, all p<0.001; for men: 13.2% (11.714.6), 16.3% (14.8-17.8, p<0.01); and 22.1% (20.523.7), 36.4% (25.047.8), both p<.001. Among people with diabetes, those with other conditions were much less likely to have no disability in the final year of life. Much of the disability and mortality with diabetes was due to heart diseas Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Early Heart Disease, Death

Diabetes: Early Heart Disease, Death

Type 2 Diabetes Cuts After-50 Survival by 8 Years June 11, 2007 - People with type 2 diabetes get heart disease about eight years earlier than other people -- and lose about eight years from their life span. The finding comes from a hard look at long-term data from the Framingham Heart Study, that wealth of data from more than 5,000 men and women studied every two years since 1951. Oscar H. Franco, MD, PhD, of University Medical Center in Rotterdam, Netherlands, and Unilever Corporate Research in Sharnbrook, England, and colleagues analyzed data on 50-year-olds with and without diabetes . "We saw a very important and significant effect of diabetes in that people with diabetes live approximately eight years less," Franco tells WebMD. "This effect of diabetes is already apparent at age 50. Diabetes is provoking early heart disease in these people." Men tend to suffer heart disease earlier than women do, and they tend to die sooner. So the effects of diabetes on survival and on time to heart disease differ between the sexes. On average, 50-year-old men with diabetes : Have a life expectancy of 21.3 years -- 7.5 years less than other men. Develop heart disease in 14.2 years -- 7.8 years sooner than other men. Live with heart disease for 7.1 years -- slightly longer than other men due to younger age at onset. On average, 50-year-old women with diabetes : Have a life expectancy of 26.5 years -- 8.2 years less than that of other women. Develop heart disease in 19.6 years -- 8.4 years sooner than other women. Franco says that people with diabetes suffer heart disease sooner if they have high blood pressure and if they have very little physical activity . This means that while it's important to prevent diabetes in the first place, it's nearly as important to adopt a healthy lif Continue reading >>

Life Expectancy Reduced With Early Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosis

Life Expectancy Reduced With Early Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosis

Life Expectancy Reduced With Early Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosis Patients diagnosed at a young age with type 1 diabetes have a far greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease and dying early compared with the general population than has previously been appreciated, with such patients losing more than a decade of life, new registry data reveal. Araz Rawshani, MD, PhD, department of molecular and clinical medicine, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden, studied more than 27,000 patients with type 1 diabetes and 135,000 matched controls. The research was published online in the Lancet on August 9. They found that patients diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at 0 to 10 years of age had quadruple the risk of dying early from any cause compared with controls and were over seven times as likely to die from cardiovascular disease, leading to a loss in life expectancy of approximately 18 years in women and 14years in men. Moreover, patients with type 1 diabetes were 30 times more likely to develop coronary heart disease and myocardial infarction than controls. They were also 12 times more likely to end up with heart failure and 11 times more likely to have a stroke. These estimates are far higher than those included in a recent statement by the American Heart Association (AHA) and American Diabetes Association (ADA), which did not include age as a risk stratifier. The magnitude of loss of life expectancy in individuals diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at ageup to 10 years in this new study "is something that we did not fully appreciate before," noted coauthor Naveed Sattar, MD, Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow, UK, in a Lancet press release. Patients Diagnosed in Childhood Must Take Cardioprotective Drugs Earlier One of the mo Continue reading >>

What You Need To Know About Heart Disease Life Expectancy

What You Need To Know About Heart Disease Life Expectancy

What You Need To Know About Heart Disease Life Expectancy Finding out you have heart disease is scary. Symptoms vary, and your heart disease life expectancy depends on the type and severity of your heart condition. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. It accounts for 1 in every 3 deaths. But there are about 92 million American adults living with some form of cardiovascular disease or the after-effects of stroke. So, being diagnosed with heart disease does not have to be a death sentence, but you have to want to do something about it. Here is a list of the 8 types of heart disease, life expectancy, and what you can do to decrease your risk. The gradual buildup of plaque on the inside of your coronary arteries causes coronary artery disease. In other words, your heart's major blood vessels are damaged and less blood is getting to your heart. The good news is symptoms can be managed effectively with a combination of lifestyle changes, medicine and, in some cases, surgery. If you have high blood pressure, the force of the blood against your artery walls is too high. This can cause your arteries to become stiff over time. High blood pressure increases your risk for stroke, congestive heart failure, kidney failure, and heart attack. High blood pressure combined with excess weight, high cholesterol, smoking, or diabetes, increases the risk exponentially. Talk to your doctor about ways to lower your blood pressure; including: This is a chronic condition and means your heart doesn't pump blood as well as it should. Although there have been recent improvements in congestive heart failure treatment, researchers say the prognosis for people with the disease is still bleak, with about 50 percent having an average life expectancy of less than five years. Continue reading >>

How Long Can You Live With Congestive Heart Failure?

How Long Can You Live With Congestive Heart Failure?

A congestive heart failure diagnosis doesn’t mean that your heart doesn’t work anymore. It means that your heart isn’t pumping blood as well as it should, and could get worse if you don’t take steps to slow or halt the problem. “Heart failure is a scary term,” says Maria Mountis, DO, a staff cardiologist in the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine at Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. That’s because it’s urgent that you address the problem, but it doesn’t mean your life is over. Congestive heart failure, sometimes just known as “heart failure,” happens when there's a reduction in blood flow throughout the body because blood flow out of the heart has slowed down. That means blood returning to the heart through the veins backs up, causing congestion in the body's tissues. That congestion may cause swelling in their ankles, legs, or stomach, as well as fluid in the lungs that causes trouble breathing. Congestive heart failure life expectancy varies depending on the severity of heart failure, age, and other factors. Estimates suggest 50 percent of individuals diagnosed with heart failure survive at least five years, and 10 percent survive at least 10 years, according to research published in an August 2013 issue of the journal Circulation Research. It's also important to note that over time survival rates have improved thanks to better heart failure treatments. And that's why even though heart failure has no cure, managing the condition with medication and lifestyle changes can greatly impact someone's prognosis. Here’s what you should know about the different stages of heart failure, what to expect after a diagnosis, and what you can do to live a long, active life if you have the condition: The Stages of Congestive Heart Failure Regardless of the "stage" of Continue reading >>

Obesity And Heart Disease's Role In U.s. Life Expectancy - Newsobesity Medicine Association

Obesity And Heart Disease's Role In U.s. Life Expectancy - Newsobesity Medicine Association

> U.S. Life Expectancy Drops: The Role of Obesity and Heart Disease U.S. Life Expectancy Drops: The Role of Obesity and Heart Disease Growing prevalence of obesity and heart disease may be impacting more than quality of life for the first time in decades, average life expectancy in the U.S. decreases. New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows an increase in deaths in 2015 from eight of the top ten leading causes of death: heart disease, stroke, Alzheimer's disease, respiratory disease, kidney disease, diabetes, unintentional injury, and suicide. Without knowing exactly what caused increases in mortality in these eight areas, obesity could be partly to blame. Obesity is a complex, chronic disease that often contributes to the onset or progression of many other chronic diseases. Obesity could play a role in the increased rates of mortality for heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. Experts agree that whatever the cause, the trend is cause for concern. This is the first time in decades that life expectancy in the U.S. has decreased. Continue reading >>

Combination Of Diabetes And Heart Disease Substantially Reduces Life Expectancy

Combination Of Diabetes And Heart Disease Substantially Reduces Life Expectancy

Combination of diabetes and heart disease substantially reduces life expectancy Combination of diabetes and heart disease substantially reduces life expectancy Life expectancy for people with a history of both cardiovascular disease and diabetes is substantially lower than for people with just one condition or no disease, a new study harnessing the power of big data has concluded. Our results highlight the importance of preventing heart disease and stroke amongst patients with diabetes, and likewise averting diabetes amongst heart disease patients Researchers at the University of Cambridge analysed more than 135,000 deaths which occurred during prolonged follow-up of almost 1.2 million participants in population cohorts. They used this to provide estimates of reductions in life expectancy associated with a history of different combinations of diabetes, stroke, and/or myocardial infarction heart attack so-called cardiometabolic diseases. Their results are published today in JAMA (The Journal of the American Medical Association). The team analysed data from the Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration (ERFC) from almost 700,000 participants recruited between 1960 and 2007, taken from a total of 91 prospective cohorts that have recorded mortality during prolonged follow-up. They compared the results with those from the UK Biobank, a prospective cohort of just under 500,000 participants recruited between 2006 and 2010. Previous studies have estimated that around 10 million adults in the United States and the European Union are living with more than one cardiometabolic illness. In this new study, the researchers found that around one person in a hundred from the cohorts they analysed had two or more conditions. We showed that having a combination of diabetes and heart disease is Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Diabetes, Hypertension, Asthma, Heart Disease, And Stroke On Quality-adjusted Life Expectancy - Sciencedirect

The Effects Of Diabetes, Hypertension, Asthma, Heart Disease, And Stroke On Quality-adjusted Life Expectancy - Sciencedirect

The Effects of Diabetes, Hypertension, Asthma, Heart Disease, and Stroke on Quality-Adjusted Life Expectancy Author links open overlay panel HaomiaoJiaPhD1 Quality-adjusted life expectancy (QALE) is a summary measure that combines mortality and health-related quality of life across different stages of life. The objective of this study was to estimate QALE loss due to five chronic diseasesdiabetes mellitus, hypertension, asthma, heart disease, and stroke. Health-related quality of life scores were from the 1993-2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Using age-specific deaths from the Compressed Mortality File, this study constructed life tables to calculate losses in life expectancy and QALE due to each of the five diseases from 1993 through 2009 and for 50 US states and the District of Columbia. In 2009, the individual-level QALE loss for diabetic people, compared with nondiabetic people, was 11.1 years; for those with hypertension, 6.3 years; for those with asthma, 7.0 years; for those with heart disease, 10.3 years; and for those with stroke, 12.4 years. At the population level, diabetes, hypertension, asthma, heart disease, and stroke contributed 1.9, 2.2, 0.8, 1.2, and 0.8 years of population QALE loss at age 18 years, respectively. Persons with each of the five diseases had significantly lower life expectancy and QALE. Because the prevalence of diabetes and hypertension has increased significantly in the United States in the last two decades, the burdens of these two conditions, measured by population QALE losses, had increased 83% and 29% from 1993 to 2009, respectively. Also, by examining changes in population QALE loss at different ages, policymakers can identify age groups most affected by particular diseases and develop the most cost-effective inter Continue reading >>

Early Onset Type 1 Diabetes Linked To Heart Disease, Shorter Life

Early Onset Type 1 Diabetes Linked To Heart Disease, Shorter Life

FRIDAY, Aug. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- People with type 1 diabetes have a much greater risk of serious heart problems and early death, especially if they were diagnosed before age 10, new research suggests. But the study only found an association, and didn't prove cause and effect. More than 27,000 type 1 diabetics in Sweden were followed for an average of 10 years. The patients were compared with a control group of more than 135,000 people without diabetes. Compared with the control group, life expectancy averaged 16 years less for people diagnosed with diabetes before age 10. Those diagnosed at an older age died, on average, 10 years earlier than people without diabetes. The investigators also found that people with type 1 diabetes were much more likely to have serious heart problems. Still, study co-leader Araz Rawshani, a researcher at the University of Gothenburg, in Sweden, stressed that "although the relative risk of cardiovascular disease is increased after an early diabetes diagnosis, the absolute risk is low." Compared with the control group, patients diagnosed with diabetes before age 10 had a 30 times greater risk of serious heart problems. Risk levels were about six times higher for people whose type 1 diabetes was diagnosed between ages 26 and 30. People with younger-onset diabetes were also four times more likely to die early from any cause, and their risk of dying from heart disease was more than seven times higher than the control group. Those diagnosed between ages 26 and 30 had triple the risk of early death from heart disease or other causes, the findings showed. With roughly half of type 1 diabetics diagnosed by age 14, earlier and wider use of heart protection measures such as cholesterol-lowering statins and blood pressure-lowering drugs might Continue reading >>

Heart Attack, Stroke And Diabetes 'can Shorten Life By 23 Years'

Heart Attack, Stroke And Diabetes 'can Shorten Life By 23 Years'

"Suffering from heart disease, stroke and type two diabetes could knock 23 years off life," The Daily Telegraph reports, covering the stark conclusion of a major new UK study. The good news is many chronic diseases, such as stroke, are preventable. As The Guardian reports, having a history of both heart attack and type 2 diabetes – increasingly common chronic conditions – can shorten life by around a decade. Researchers looked at more than 130,000 deaths over 50 years. They then estimated the life-shortening effects of different diseases alone and in combination, and found these big three conditions significantly shortened lifespan. The researchers used a large group and long timespan to make their estimates, giving us confidence in their main conclusions. But they are based on averages. Each person's risks and lifespan is individual, and it is never too late to improve your health, even if you do have one or more chronic conditions: you can work towards maintaining a healthy weight, exercising more, eating healthily, not smoking, and not drinking too much alcohol. Where did the story come from? The study was carried out by researchers from the Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration co-ordinated by the University of Cambridge. It was funded by the UK Medical Research Council, the British Heart Foundation, the British Heart Foundation Cambridge Cardiovascular Centre of Excellence, the UK National Institute for Health Research Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre, the European Research Council, and the European Commission Framework Programme 7. A number of study authors declared potential financial conflicts of interest relating to funding from pharmaceutical companies, health trust funds and not-for-profit research organisations. The study was published in the peer-revi Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Life Expectancy: What Effect Does Type 2 Diabetes Have?

Diabetes And Life Expectancy: What Effect Does Type 2 Diabetes Have?

Diabetes can cause serious health complications and have an impact on life expectancy. How much a person's life is reduced depends on a combination of factors, such as the severity of the case, additional complications, and response to treatment. After being diagnosed, most people with diabetes want to know how the condition will affect the length and quality of their life. Each individual varies, but maintaining healthy blood sugar levels often has the largest influence on life expectancy. Relatively few studies have examined the link between diabetes and life expectancy, especially on a large scale. As a result, doctors aren't entirely sure how diabetes relates to how long people with the condition will live. This article will explore more. Fast facts on diabetes and life expectancy: While some estimates exist, there is no way to know exactly how diabetes will affect life expectancy. Type 2 diabetes is thought to have less of an effect on life expectancy than type 1 because people typically develop the condition much later in life. Generally, anything that helps maintain or contribute to healthy blood sugar levels can reduce the toll diabetes takes. What is the life expectancy of people with type 2 diabetes? A 2010 report by Diabetes UK claims type 2 diabetes reduces life expectancy by roughly 10 years. The same report states that type 1 diabetes may reduce life expectancy by at least 20 years. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the average life expectancy in 2014 for American men was 76.4 years and women 81.2 years. A 2012 Canadian study found that women aged 55 years and over with diabetes lost on average 6 years of life while men lost 5 years. Also, a 2015 study concluded that the risk of death associated with type 2 diabetes could b Continue reading >>

Life Expectancy Reduced By Stroke, Diabetes And Heart Attack Combo

Life Expectancy Reduced By Stroke, Diabetes And Heart Attack Combo

Life expectancy reduced by stroke, diabetes and heart attack combo Having a history of diabetes, stroke or heart attack can lower life expectancy significantly, according to new research, while a combination of two or more of these conditions - defined as cardiometabolic multimorbidity - can reduce it even further. Researchers estimate that 40-year-olds with a history of diabetes, stroke and heart attack may experience a 23-year reduction in life expectancy. According to study co-author John Danesh, of the University of Cambridge in the UK, and colleagues, the prevalence of cardiometabolic multimorbidity is on the rise. It affects around 10 million adults within the US and the European Union (EU), they say. Previous studies have established that a history of stroke , heart attack or diabetes alone can increase mortality risk. But Danesh and colleagues say few studies have looked at how a history of two or more of these conditions may impact life expectancy. They note that to reach valid estimations of this, such studies need to compare individuals with cardiometabolic multimorbidity with those in the same cohorts who are free of such conditions at study baseline. "However, few population cohorts have had sufficient power, detail and longevity to enable such comparisons," they add. "We aimed to provide reliable estimates of the associations of cardiometabolic multimorbidity with mortality and reductions in life expectancy." The team analyzed data from the Emerging Rick Factors Collaboration, involving 689,300 participants from cohorts conducted between 1960 and 2007. This data were compared with that from the UK Biobank, involving 499,808 participants from cohorts conducted between 2006 and 2010. Data from the Emerging Rick Factors Collaboration included 128,843 deaths, Continue reading >>

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