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Levemir To Lantus

Lantus Vs. Levemir

Lantus Vs. Levemir

font size A A A 1 2 Next Are Lantus and Levemir the Same Thing? Lantus (insulin glargine [rdna origin]) and Levemir (insulin detemir [rDNA origin] injection) are man-made forms of a hormone produced in the body used to treat type 1 (insulin-dependent) or on some rare occasions, type 2 (non insulin-dependent) diabetes. What Are Possible Side Effects of Lantus? Side effects of Lantus include: headache, hunger, weakness, sweating, tremors, irritability, trouble concentrating, rapid breathing, fast heartbeat, fainting, or seizure (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal). What Are Possible Side Effects of Levemir? Common side effects of Levemir include: injection site reactions (e.g., pain, redness, irritation), swelling of the hands/feet, thickening of the skin where you inject Levemir, weight gain, headache, back pain, stomach pain, flu symptoms, or cold symptoms such as stuffy nose, sneezing, sore throat. Tell your doctor if you experience serious side effects of Levemir including: signs of low potassium level in the blood (such as muscle cramps, weakness, or irregular heartbeat). What is Lantus? Lantus is a long-acting man-made insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults with diabetes mellitus. Lantus is not for use to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. It is not known if Lantus is safe and effective in children less than 6 years of age with type 1 diabetes. It is not known if Lantus is safe and effective in children with type 2 diabetes. What is Levemir? Levemir is a man-made insulin that is used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. Levemir is not meant for use to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. font size A A A Previous 1 2 Lantus vs. Levemir (cont.) Read the detailed Instructions for Use that come with your Lantus SoloStar disposable prefi Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Levemir Vs Lantus Insulin?

What Is The Difference Between Levemir Vs Lantus Insulin?

Both levemir and lantus are basal insulins, meaning that once injected, they keep working in the background to keep your blood glucose levels under control during the entire day. They are both used to treat high blood glucose levels in people with diabetes. As long acting insulins, both medications work longer compared to other insulins, and are used to replace the natural hormone in the body. These medicines are not supposed to be used together to treat patients with diabetes. Even though these drugs are both long acting insulins, they should not be used interchangeably without the doctor’s advice. Both drugs have different formula concentrations, meaning that there is a small difference in how they work to control blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. Because of this, they must be prescribed separately and not together. Whether you are prescribed to take levemir or lantus, they should work well in controlling your blood sugar. The medications usually come in regimens that includes short acting insulins or rapid acting insulins. What is Levemir? Levemir or insulin detemir is a man made form of insulin which works by lowering blood glucose levels in people with diabetes. Do not use this medication if it has changed colors. Patients can use this medication once or twice every day. In case it is taken once, it should be administered with the evening meal. If taken twice, you should take the dose with the morning meal and evening meal. The evening dose should be 12 hours after the morning dose. What is Lantus? Lantus or insulin glargine is a long acting acting insulin which works by replacing human insulin, which is produced by the pancreas. Insulin glargine comes in injectible form and is usually administered subcutaneously in the upper arm, stomach or thigh. Simi Continue reading >>

How To Switch From Levemir To Lantus

How To Switch From Levemir To Lantus

Lantus and Levemir are both types of long-acting insulin known as basal insulin; diabetics on insulin injection therapy typically administer a dose of basal insulin twice daily to provide a small, continuous amount of insulin to the body throughout the day and night. Lantus is composed of dissolved glargine (a synthetic derivative of human insulin), while Levemir contains dissolved detemir. While they both provide long-acting (12 to 24 hour) insulin, they deliver insulin throughout the bloodstream in different ways. Switching between the two for cost or effectiveness purposes is not difficult, but requires extra monitoring and may require adjusting your current insulin regimen. Make an appointment with your doctor to discuss your desire to switch to Lantus. In most states, you will need a new prescription from your doctor to switch from Levemir to Lantus; it is not the same as simply switching from a formulary to a generic drug, or just switching between different manufacturers. Inject the same number of units of Lantus at the same time periods as you were injecting Levemir. The two insulins have a 1:1 ratio. Monitor your blood glucose closely between the 12 and 24 hours after your initial Lantus injection, and discuss any changes with your doctor. Technically, it is suggested that Levemir be administered twice a day but Lantus only be administered once daily; however, many healthcare professionals, like Dr. Richard Bernstein, believe that both should be injected every 12 hours for optimal control. It takes two hours for either Levemir or Lantus to begin working, and each lasts for 18 to 24 hours in the bloodsteam. This can mean you run higher between hours 18 and 24 on a once-daily injection regimen; since different bodies reach to Levemir and Lantus in slightly differ Continue reading >>

High-alert Medications - Levemir (insulin Detemir)

High-alert Medications - Levemir (insulin Detemir)

The leaflets are FREELY available for download and can be reproduced for free distribution to consumers. Or, if you are a facility or organization, you can order professional pre-printed leaflets shipped directly to you. Extra care is needed because Levemir is a high-alert medicine. High-alert medicines have been proven to be safe and effective. But these medicines can cause serious injury if a mistake happens while taking them. This means that it is very important for you to know about this medicine and take it exactly as directed. Top 10 List of Safety Tips for Levemir When taking your medicine 1. Know your insulin. Levemir is a long-acting insulin that should be injected below the skin once or twice daily. (When taken in smaller doses, Levemir may be considered an intermediate-acting insulin.) When Levemir is taken once daily, inject the insulin with the evening meal or at bedtime. When taken twice daily, the evening dose should be taken with the evening meal, at bedtime, or 12 hours following the morning dose. 2. Prepare your insulin. A rapid- or short-acting insulin is often prescribed with Levemir. However, Levemir should never be mixed in the same syringe with other insulins before injection. Do not vigorously shake insulin before use. 3. Don't reuse or recycle. Discard used syringes/needles, pens, and lancets in a sealable hard plastic or metal container (e.g., empty detergent bottle, sharps container from your pharmacy). When the container is full, seal the lid before placing it in the trash. Don't reuse or recycle syringes, needles, or lancets. 4. Don't share. Even if you change the needle, sharing an insulin pen or syringe may spread diseases carried in the blood, including hepatitis and HIV. To avoid serious side effects 5. t Avoid mix-ups. If you use more t Continue reading >>

Interactive Dosing Calculator

Interactive Dosing Calculator

Lantus® is a long-acting insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Lantus® should be administered once a day at the same time every day. Limitations of Use: Lantus® is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Contraindications Lantus® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or one of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Insulin pens, needles, or syringes must never be shared between patients. Do NOT reuse needles. Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Modify insulin regimen cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment in concomitant oral antidiabetic treatment. Do not dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. If mixed or diluted, the solution may become cloudy, and the onset of action/time to peak effect may be altered in an unpredictable manner. Do not administer Lantus® via an insulin pump or intravenously because severe hypoglycemia can occur. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin therapy, including Lantus®, and may be life-threatening. Medication errors, such as accidental mix-ups between basal insulin products and other insulins, particularly rapid-acting insulins, have been reported. Patients should be instructed to always verify the insulin label before each injection. Severe life-threatening, generalized allergy, including anaphylaxis, can occur. Discontinue Lantus®, treat and monitor until symptoms resolve. A reduction in the Lantus® dose may be re Continue reading >>

Compare Levemir Vs. Lantus

Compare Levemir Vs. Lantus

Insulin is the most effective blood sugar lowering medication, as it lowers A1c (average blood sugar over time) up to 2 or 3%. When used correctly, it'll prevent the harmful effects of high blood sugar levels on your organs and blood vessels. Levemir (insulin detemir) is a long lasting insulin that provides consistent, all-day blood sugar control with less risk of low blood sugar. Doses can be easily adjusted to make a customized regimen that's tailored to your body's needs. Starting insulin early in the treatment of type 2 diabetes can maintain your body's insulin producing cells and slow down disease progression. Levemir (insulin detemir) can be used in people with liver or kidney problems. Insulin is one of the most effective blood sugar-lowering medication and can lower your A1c (average blood sugar over time) by up to 2-3%. Lantus (insulin glargine) is a long-lasting insulin that provides consistent, all-day sugar control with just once or twice daily dosing. Dose can be easily adjusted to make a customized regimen that's tailored to your body's needs. Lantus (insulin glargine) can be used with liver or kidney problems. 130 reviews so far Have you used Levemir (insulin detemir)? Leave a review 584 reviews so far Have you used Lantus (insulin glargine)? Leave a review Continue reading >>

Levemir Vs Lantus: What's The Difference?

Levemir Vs Lantus: What's The Difference?

Levemir and Lantus are both long-acting forms of insulin that work for most of the day. Levemir Vs Lantus: Both human insulin analogs Levemir is a brand name for insulin detemir. Levemir takes at least one hour to start working (some sources state up to three hours), and its effects are dependent on the initial dosage given. Dosages of 0.1 units per kg may last only six hours whereas dosages equal to or greater than 0.8 units/kg last approximately 22 to 24 hours. Levemir has a relatively peakless profile but may be more slowly absorbed from the thigh compared to the deltoid (arm) and the abdomen after subcutaneous administration. Lantus is the brand name for insulin glargine. Lantus takes approximately an hour to start working and lasts for an average of 24 hours; however, there is some variability and in some people, it may only act for just over 10 hours, whereas for others it may last longer than 24 hours. Lantus releases consistently, so doesn't really have a peak effect. Levemir Vs Lantus: Differences in formulation account for some differences in action Both Levemir and Lantus are made by modifying human insulin. Both should be clear solutions before they are injected (discard if cloudy). Insulin glargine (Lantus) tends to be absorbed more slowly and for longer than detemir ( Levemir) because it is not as soluble once injected just under the skin. This means it has a longer duration of action and an insignificant peak effect - instead, it delivers consistent blood levels of insulin. Insulin detemir (Levemir) remains soluble after injection but is able to bind to protein in the tissue and bond to itself which gives it a prolonged action. How do Levemir and Lantus compare to NPH insulin? Both Levemir and Lantus were created to improve on NPH insulin, and to better m Continue reading >>

Levemir Versus Lantus

Levemir Versus Lantus

For people who are struggling to control their diabetes and require regular insulin injections, two of the most common long-lasting options are Levemir and Lantus. In the Levemir vs Lantus debate, both are intended for daily use and neither one is intended to help with an immediate spike of blood sugar should it occur. Neither one won’t treat ketoacidosis should it occur either. When both insulin options are considered, the risks of side effects and the benefits they provide are also the same. With so little between these two injections, are there any differences that can help to decide which one is better to take? Here are some answers to some common comparison questions. 1. How Often Does An Injection Need To Occur? Levemir can be taken either once or twice per day. The doses must be spread out over the course of 12 hours to prevent low blood sugar levels from forming. For those who inject Levemir just once per day, it should be taken around bedtime or at dinner so that it can provide the best results possible. Lantus is only taken once per day. It doesn’t matter what time of day that it is taken, but a routine should be established so that one dose occurs every 24 hours or so. Taking it in the morning one day and then in the evening the next day is not recommended. 2. What About Weight Gain? Levemir has been shown to lessen the risks of gaining weight while taking insulin injections. This may be beneficial to those who are working to control their Type 2 diabetes especially. Lantus provides a higher overall risk of weight gain, but people can gain weight while using either product. Lantus, on the other hand, was developed to produce fewer injection site reactions when used regularly. There is less of a risk of developing a rash or other similar skin reaction when Continue reading >>

Levemir Vs. Lantus: Similarities And Differences

Levemir Vs. Lantus: Similarities And Differences

Levemir and Lantus are both long-acting injectable insulins that can be used for long-term management of diabetes. Insulin is a hormone that is naturally produced in the body by the pancreas. It helps convert the glucose (sugar) in your bloodstream into energy. This energy is then distributed to cells throughout your body. With diabetes, your pancreas produces little or no insulin or your body is unable to use the insulin correctly. Without insulin, your body can’t use the sugars in your blood and can become starved for energy. The excess sugar in your blood can also damage different parts of your body, including your blood vessels and kidneys. Everyone with type 1 diabetes and many people with type 2 diabetes must use insulin to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Levemir is a solution of insulin detemir, and Lantus is a solution of insulin glargine. Both are basal insulin formulas. That means that they work slowly to lower your blood sugar levels. They’re both absorbed into your body over a 24-hour period. They keep blood sugar levels lowered for longer than short-acting insulins do. Although the formulations are slightly different, Levemir and Lantus are very similar drugs. There are only a few differences between them. Children and adults can use both Levemir and Lantus. Specifically, Levemir can be used by people who are 2 years or older. Lantus can be used by people who are 6 years or older. Levemir or Lantus can help with daily management of diabetes. However, you may still need to use short-acting insulin to treat spikes in your blood sugar levels and diabetic ketoacidosis (a dangerous buildup of acids in your blood). Learn more: All about diabetic ketoacidosis » Administration Both Levemir and Lantus are given through injection in the same way. You can gi Continue reading >>

Long-acting Insulins

Long-acting Insulins

Rapid-Acting Analogues Short-Acting Insulins Intermediate-Acting Insulins Long-Acting Insulins Combination Insulins Drug UPDATES: TRESIBA ®- insulin degludec injection [Drug information / PDF] Click link for the latest monograph Dosing: Click (+) next to Dosage and Administration section (drug info link) Initial U.S. Approval: 2015 Mechanism of Action: The primary activity of insulin, including TRESIBA, is regulation of glucose metabolism. Insulin and its analogs lower blood glucose by stimulating peripheral glucose uptake, especially by skeletal muscle and fat, and by inhibiting hepatic glucose production. Insulin also inhibits lipolysis and proteolysis, and enhances protein synthesis. TRESIBA forms multi-hexamers when injected into the subcutaneous tissue resulting in a subcutaneous insulin degludec depot. The protracted time action profile of TRESIBA is predominantly due to delayed absorption of insulin degludec from the subcutaneous tissue to the systemic circulation and to a lesser extent due to binding of insulin-degludec to circulating albumin. INDICATIONS AND USAGE: TRESIBA is indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with diabetes mellitus. Limitations of Use TRESIBA is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Dosing: Individualize dose based on type of diabetes, metabolic needs, blood glucose monitoring results and glycemic control goal. Rotate injection sites to reduce the risk of lipodystrophy. Do not dilute or mix with any other insulin or solution. Administer subcutaneously once daily at any time of day. Do NOT perform dose conversion when using the TRESIBA U-100 or U-200 FlexTouch pens. The TRESIBA U-100 and U-200 FlexTouch pens dose window shows the number of insulin units to be delivered and NO conversion is needed. HOW SUPPLIE Continue reading >>

Lantus And Levemir: What’s The Difference?

Lantus And Levemir: What’s The Difference?

Lantus and Levemir have a lot in common. Both are basal insulin formulas, which means that they last for a long time in the body and act as background insulin, with a slow feed that mimics the constant low output of insulin produced by a healthy pancreas. Both are insulin analogues, which means that their insulin molecules are analogous to human insulin, but engineered, or recombined, with slight differences that slow their absorption. Lantus is a clear formula made with glargine, a genetically modified form of human insulin, dissolved in a special solution. Levemir is also a clear formula, but it contains dissolved detemir, a different form of genetically modified insulin. Human insulin is made of two amino acid chains, called A and B, that have two disulfide bonds between them. In glargine, one amino acid has been switched out, and two extra amino acids have been added to one end of the B chain. The modifications make glargine soluble at an acidic pH, but much less soluble at the neutral pH that’s found in the body To make Lantus, first the glargine is produced by a vat of E. coli bacteria. Then it’s purified and added to a watery solution containing a little zinc and some glycerol; a dash of hydrochloric acid is also added to make it acidic, bringing its pH down to about 4. At that degree of acidity, glargine completely dissolves into the watery solution, which is why the vial is clear. After you inject it into your subcutaneous tissue, the acidic solution is neutralized by your body to a neutral pH. Because glargine is not soluble at a neutral pH, it precipitates out into a form that’s not soluble in subcutaneous fat, and there forms a relatively insoluble depot. From that pool, or depot, of precipitated glargine in the tissues, small amounts slowly move back Continue reading >>

Ada: Once-daily Dosing With Lantus And Levemir Similar For Type 2 Diabetes But Different For Type 1

Ada: Once-daily Dosing With Lantus And Levemir Similar For Type 2 Diabetes But Different For Type 1

WASHINGTON, June 13 — Long-acting insulin analogs Levemir (insulin detemir) and Lantus (insulin glargine) appear equal for once-daily use in type 2 diabetes, yet Lantus may have an edge for type 1 diabetes. The two head-to-head comparisons of the metabolism activity of the long-acting insulins, presented at the American Diabetes Association meeting here, are virtually the first reports of their kind for these drugs. Both agents are FDA-approved. "We do not have any pharmacodynamic studies in type 2 diabetes for either insulin," said Tim Heise, M.D., CEO of clinical science at Profil Institute for Metabolic Research in Neuss, Germany, "and up to this conference we had no direct comparison between these two long-acting agents at all." In an oral presentation, Dr. Heise reported the results of a study that randomized 13 patients with type 2 diabetes to Levemir and 14 to receive Lantus. Both agents were given at 0.4, 0.8, and 1.4 U/kg doses to "cover the dose range" used by clinicians, with periodic 24-hour glucose monitoring under glucose clamp conditions. "There is no difference in the time-action profiles between glargine and detemir with regard to the duration of action and mean metabolic impact," he said. The groups had similar baseline characteristics with an average body mass index (BMI) of about 30 kg/m and an HbA1c of about 7.6%. The researchers included only patients with fasting C-peptide levels below 1 nmol/L to eliminate endogenous insulin production as a confounding factor. Also, all participants were male, which Dr. Heise said was to control for the differences in glucose metabolism that occur during the menstrual cycle. The researchers found that "there is really no difference" in glucose infusion rates between the Lantus and Levemir. The only differe Continue reading >>

An Analysis Of Dosing Equivalence Of Insulin Detemir And Insulin Glargine: More Evidence?

An Analysis Of Dosing Equivalence Of Insulin Detemir And Insulin Glargine: More Evidence?

Current guidelines for the management of type 2 diabetes call for the use of basal insulin when glycemic targets are not achieved, despite the use of oral antihyperglycemic medications.1,2 Controversy remains in the medical literature regarding the comparative efficacy of insulin detemir and insulin glargine, both of which have demonstrated superiority over neutral protamine Hagedorn insulin. While two published studies have demonstrated noninferiority of insulin detemir and insulin glargine, both studies were designed to dose insulin detemir twice daily if predinner glucose levels were elevated, whereas insulin glargine was only dosed once daily regardless of predinner glucose levels.3,4 A third study is underway with a similar design,5 but does not address the comparative efficacy of once-daily administration of these two basal insulins. In this issue of Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, Dr. Allen King provides further important details of his previously published trial that provides important data in addressing this issue.6,7In this randomized, double-blinded, crossover trial, once-daily insulin detemir was compared with insulin glargine in 29 patients with type 2 diabetes under relatively good glycemic control (average hemoglobin A1c 7.1%). Several design features help provide new information about the use of both of these basal insulins. First, both insulins were restricted to once-daily use in the evening at 8 pm, whereas previous comparison trials allowed for twice-daily usage of insulin detemir. No mealtime insulins were administered in the trial. Second, the crossover design allowed for the patients to serve as their own controls, i.e., each patient used both forms of insulin in the trial. Third, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) was used to more cl Continue reading >>

Changing Over To Levemir From Lantus

Changing Over To Levemir From Lantus

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Had a DSN appointment this morning g to discuss a run of high BS readings. Ironed out most issues all except for FBS being too high upon waking in the mornings and the occasional afternoon hypo. Upshot of it all is I seem to need more basal overnight and less in the afternoon, now lantus was never going to offer that flexibility, answer is try switching to Levimer I was taken 16u lantus at 11pm and once the high FBS had been corrected upon waking, that held Mr pretty steady I am thinking of splitting my new Levimer as 10 units at 11pm before bed, 6 units at 11am I have been on Levimer for a number of years. I was taking 16 in morning and 6 at night. I weigh just under 11 stone. But what is good for one is not good for all, everyone is different. The night time dose deffinately adjusted my during the night basal. Take care, best to get advice from your DSN I have spoken with the dsn, was just after other people's experiences really, I would always adjust my own insulin on my own ideas/thoughts/readings, valid point well made tho, we are all different and it certainly isn't a one size fits all regime Why not try splitting Lantus before moving on to trying Levemir? I suggested that but the hospital were not keen on that idea and started saying it was only licensed for once a day etc etc, I wasn't in a particularly argumentative mood to push my point over this morning lol At those doses Levemir does tail off after 8 hours. I would expect the overnight to meet your needs on managing the highs but keep an eye on the evenings as the 11am lower dose may run out of legs. At those doses Levemir does tail off after 8 hours. I would expect the overnight to meet y Continue reading >>

Lantus Vs. Levemir

Lantus Vs. Levemir

What is Lantus? What is Levemir? 3 How do Lantus and Levemir work? Lantus is a Brand name for a man-made hormone product form called insulin glargine. It works by lowering glucose levels in blood. It is a long-acting form of insulin, a slightly different from other insulin forms that are not man-made. Lantus is used to for the treatment of diabetes type 1 and type 2. Levemir is a Brand name for a man-made hormone product form of insulin called insulin detemir. It works by lowering glucose levels in blood. It is a long-acting form of insulin, a slightly different from other insulin forms that are not man-made. Levemir is used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in adults. Levemir can be also used to treat type 1for the treatment of diabetes type 1 in adults and children who are at least 2 years old. Lantus and Levemir do have many similarities but they are not the same thing. They are both man-made long-acting form of insulin and they are both used for the treatment of diabetes type 1 and 2, and they are intended for daily management. Studies showed no significant difference in the effectiveness and safety of Lantus and Levemir for the treamtnent of type 2 diabetes. They’re both absorbed slowly over a 24-hour period. Both products are basal insulin formulas, which mean that sugar levels in blood are lowered more slowly but they last much longer. They act as background insulin, with a slow feed that mimics the constant low insulin output produced by a healthy pancreas. They are not used to correct sugar spikes or to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis treatment requires short-acting insulin. However, there are some differences. Levemir is an insulin detemir solution, while Lantus is an insulin glargine solution. Insulin glargine -Lantus is made by recombinant DNA Continue reading >>

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