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Leukemia And Diabetes Type 2

Could Common Diabetes Drugs Help Fight Leukemia?

Could Common Diabetes Drugs Help Fight Leukemia?

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Common diabetes drugs might help eradicate drug-resistant cancer cells in a certain form of leukemia when added to standard treatment, a small new study suggests. Researchers found that patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) who received a glitazone -- a class of drug for type 2 diabetes -- along with the standard CML drug imatinib remained disease-free for up to nearly five years. Imatinib, known commercially as Gleevec , boasts an impressive track record in controlling chronic myeloid leukemia and allowing patients to lead virtually normal lives. But despite its effectiveness, dormant, drug-resistant leukemic cells typically lay in wait in bone marrow. They can later transform into highly aggressive cells. "Gleevec can control the disease but never get rid of the source of the disease," said Lee Greenberger, chief scientific officer for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, who wasn't involved in the new research. "But adding in these glitazones, [the research] claims you can eliminate the disease entirely," said Greenberger. "These are still early days for this work, however." Actos and Avandia are two well-known glitazones. Chronic myeloid leukemia is a cancer that originates in the blood-forming cells of the bone marrow and invades the blood supply. More than 6,600 cases are expected to be diagnosed in the United States this year, and about 1,140 people will die from the condition, according to the American Cancer Society. Seen mostly in adults, chronic myeloid leukemia tends to be slow-growing, but can transform into a rapidly growing form that can quickly kill. Together with his team, study author Dr. Philippe Leboulch, a professor of medicine and cell biology at the University of Paris, temporarily administered piog Continue reading >>

Scientists Find Accidental Cure For Type 2 Diabetes: Imatinib

Scientists Find Accidental Cure For Type 2 Diabetes: Imatinib

Scientists Find Accidental Cure for Type 2 Diabetes: Imatinib The cancer drug, best known as a game-changer for chronic myeloid leukemia, lowers insulin resistance through a similar mechanism as TZDs without the negative effects. The cancer drug imatinibmarketed as Gleevec and known as a game-changer for conditions like chronic myeloid leukemiamay prove the same in type 2 diabetes (T2D), according to a study published recently in Diabetes. Researchers in the United States and in South Korea found that imatinib controls PPARy, which lowers the level insulin resistance and thus reduces the risk of hyperglycemia and obesity. PPARy affects how the body metabolizes glucoses and stores fat, and also affects immune and inflammatory responses. This same mechanism of action was at work with the class of drugs known as the thiazolidinediones or TZDs, the most famous of which was rosiglitazone, or Avandia. Risks reported in the New England Journal of Medicine forced Avandia off the market and others in the class followed, although a followed up trial exonerated the drug. The study team noted that the phosphorylation of PPARy is related to developing diabetes; taking away the phosphoric acid from PPARy has an anti-diabetic effect. In the laboratory, the team found that imatinib had the same blocking effect on PPARy phosphorylation but without some of the effects seen in the TZDs. Researchers can see the what but dont understand the why just yet. Although studies have shown that (imatinib) treatment may show improved insulin sensitivity and decreased blood glucose in patients with known diabetes, the exact cause hasnt been proven yet, said Jang Hyun Choi, PhD, assistant professor. Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), in South Korea. The team tested imatinib i Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Leukemia Powerpoint

Diabetes & Leukemia Powerpoint

1. DIABETES &LEUKEMIABy Samantha Deno 2. Part 1: Diabetes Mellitus 3. Types of Diabetes•Type 1 Diabetes (Juvenile Diabetes)•Type 2 Diabetes (adult onset) 4. Type 1 Diabetes (A.K.A. Juvenile Diabetes)• An autoimmune disease in which a persons pancreas stops producing insulin• Sudden Onset• Presents in children & adults but mostly in children• Insulin Dependent 5. Signs & Symptoms of Type 1 Diabetes• Extreme Thirst• Frequent urination• Drowsiness or lethargy• Increased appetite• Sudden weight loss• Sudden vision changes 6. Type 1 Diabetes Statistics• About 8.3% of the United States population (25.8 million) has diabetes• 7 million people are undiagnosed• In 2010, 1.9 million new cases of Diabetes were diagnosed in people ages 20 years old and older.• About 1 in every 400 children & teens have diabetes 7. Complications of Diabetes• Heart disease & Stroke• High Blood Pressure• Blindness• Kidney disease and/or kidney failure• Neuropathy• Amputation 8. Type 2 Diabetes (adult onset)• The most common form of diabetes• Either the body does not produce enough insulin or the cells ignore the insulin.• Persons 45 years of age or older are at highest risk 9. Signs & Symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes• Increased thirst• Increased hunger• Dry mouth• Nausea and occasional vomiting• Frequent urination• Fatigue• Blurred vision• Numbness or tingling of the hands and/or feet• Sores that are slow to heal 10. Those who are at highest risk of Type 2 Diabetes are…• 45 years of age or older• Are obese or overweight• Have had Gestational Diabetes• Have family members who have Type 2 Diabetes• Have prediabetes• Are inactive• Have high blood pressure 11. Complications associated with Type 2 Diabetes• Retinopathy: Damage Continue reading >>

Co-morbidity Between Early-onset Leukemia And Type 1 Diabetes Suggestive Of A Shared Viral Etiology?

Co-morbidity Between Early-onset Leukemia And Type 1 Diabetes Suggestive Of A Shared Viral Etiology?

Co-Morbidity between Early-Onset Leukemia and Type 1 Diabetes Suggestive of a Shared Viral Etiology? We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Co-Morbidity between Early-Onset Leukemia and Type 1 Diabetes Suggestive of a Shared Viral Etiology? Kari Hemminki, Richard Houlston, [...], and Xiaochen Shu Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are common early-onset malignancies. Their causes are largely unknown but infectious etiology has been implicated. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease for which infectious triggers of disease onset have been sought and increasing pointing to enteroviruses. Based on our previous results on co-morbidity between leukemia and T1D, we updated the Swedish dataset and focused on early onset leukemias in patients who had been hospitalized for T1D, comparing to those not hospitalized for T1D. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for leukemia in 24,052 patients hospitalized for T1D covering years 1964 through 2008. T1D patients were included if hospitalized before age 21 years. Practically all Swedish children and adolescents with T1D are hospitalized at the start of insulin treatment. SIR for ALL was 8.30 (N = 18, 95% confidence interval 4.9113.14) when diagnosed at age 10 to 20 years after hospitalization for T1D and it was 3.51 (13, 1.866.02) before hospitalization for T1D. The SIR for ALL was 19.85 (N = 33, 13.7427.76) and that for AML was Continue reading >>

Increased Incidence Of Non-hodgkin Lymphoma, Leukemia, And Myeloma In Patients With Diabetes Mellitus Type 2: A Meta-analysis Of Observational Studies

Increased Incidence Of Non-hodgkin Lymphoma, Leukemia, And Myeloma In Patients With Diabetes Mellitus Type 2: A Meta-analysis Of Observational Studies

Increased incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, leukemia, and myeloma in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2: a meta-analysis of observational studies 1 Nikhil Mull ,2 John L. Reagan ,1 Saed Nemr ,2 and Joanna Mitri 3 1Division of Hematology and Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital/The Miriam Hospital, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI; 2Department of Medicine, The Miriam Hospital, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI; and 1Division of Hematology and Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital/The Miriam Hospital, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI; 2Department of Medicine, The Miriam Hospital, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI; and 1Division of Hematology and Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital/The Miriam Hospital, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI; 2Department of Medicine, The Miriam Hospital, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI; and 3Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Tufts University Medical School, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA Received 2011 Jun 24; Accepted 2012 Mar 28. Copyright 2012 by The American Society of Hematology This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Hematologic malignancies are a heterogeneous group of conditions with an unclear etiology. We hypothesized that diabetes mellitus type 2 is associated with increased risk of developing lymphoma, leukemia, and myeloma. A literature search identified 26 studies (13 case-control and 13 cohort studies) evaluating such an association. Outcome was calculated as the odds ratio (OR) using a random effects model. Heterogeneity and publication bias were evaluated using the I2 index and the trim-and-fill Continue reading >>

Mysterious Link Connects Diabetes And Cancer

Mysterious Link Connects Diabetes And Cancer

Mysterious Link Connects Diabetes And Cancer Mysterious Link Connects Diabetes And Cancer Most people wouldn't think diabetes and cancer have anything to do with each other. But a group of experts from the American Cancer Society and the American Diabetes Association thinks they do. A consensus statement from that panel says there's accumulating evidence that people with diabetes are, in fact, more prone to certain cancers. The analysis is published in the latest CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians. It turns out that diabetics are twice as likely to get cancer of the liver, pancreas and uterine lining. Their risk of colon, breast and bladder cancer is 20 to 50 percent higher than non-diabetics'. There doesn't seem to be any higher risk for others, such as lung cancer. And the risk of prostate cancer is actually lower among diabetics. Doctors have noticed since the 1950s that their diabetic patients seem to get cancer more often than usual. But it wasn't until last year that researchers pulled together data from various studies and found an association. Also last year, several epidemiology studies got a lot of attention when they suggested that a synthetic long-acting insulin called glargine seems to increase the risk of cancer. But that's still highly debatable. Other studies indicate that metformin , the most common drug for Type 2 diabetes, may actually reduce the risk of getting cancer or dying from it. And just how might diabetes increase the risk of cancer? On that point there's only speculation. Here are some possibilities: Shared risk factors: Both cancer and diabetes become more common as people age; gain weight; eat diets poor in fruits, vegetables and whole-grain cereals; or smoke. Men have higher risk of both diabetes and cancer. Off-kilter metabolism: Many Continue reading >>

Full Length Article Glucose Metabolism Abnormalities Among Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Survivors: Assessment And Relation To Body Mass Index And Waist To Hip Ratio

Full Length Article Glucose Metabolism Abnormalities Among Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Survivors: Assessment And Relation To Body Mass Index And Waist To Hip Ratio

Abstract As survival rates of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) improve, attention is turning to side and late effects of therapy including glucose metabolism abnormalities. To asses the presence of abnormal glucose metabolism in pediatric ALL survivors and its possible relation to body mass index (BMI), waist to hip ratio and treatment related factors. Retrospective study with a prospective follow-up of 12 ALL survivors who had been off chemotherapy for >9 months was done. Fifteen healthy sex and age matched children were involved as controls. Body mass index (BMI) waist to hip ratio (WHR), and Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were performed with assessment of glycated hemoglobin (Hb A1C) and insulin sensitivity indices. At study time the mean BMI, WHR, all components of the OGTT (except the 2 h post load glucose), all indices of insulin sensitivity and the mean Hb A1C% were significantly higher compared to those of the controls. Two survivors (16.6%) developed transient hyperglycemia during therapy, one (8.3%) had pre-diabetes, seven (58.3%) had a risk level of Hb A1C but no one had diabetes mellitus (DM) or insulin resistance (IR). At study time the two survivors with transient hyperglycemia during therapy had a significantly high WHR compared to the remainders. WHR of the survivors at study time correlated significantly with fasting plasma glucose and area of insulin under the curve (AUC). The 2 h post-prandial plasma glucose correlated with the duration after therapy completion. WHR may play a better role than BMI in the prediction of insulin resistance in those patients. Hb A1C may increase earlier than other indices of glucose tolerance. Continue reading >>

Leukemia Drug Could Treat Type 2 Diabetes | Asian Scientist Magazine | Science, Technology And Medical News Updates From Asia

Leukemia Drug Could Treat Type 2 Diabetes | Asian Scientist Magazine | Science, Technology And Medical News Updates From Asia

Leukemia Drug Could Treat Type 2 Diabetes A drug currently used for leukemia has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity while causing less side effects than other drugs. AsianScientist (Apr. 8, 2016) The cancer treatment drug imatinib, otherwise known as Gleevec, is approved to treat chronic myeloid leukemia and some other forms of cancer. However, researchers have stumbled onto another possible use for ittreating type 2 diabetes. Their findings were published in Diabetes. The team of scientists from Seoul National University and Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has identified for the first time that Gleevec lowers the level of insulin resistance, thereby reducing the risk of both hyperglycemia and obesity. Among insulin-sensitizing drugs, thiazolidinediones (TZD) are a therapeutic class that are selective agonists for PPAR, which plays a central role in how the body metabolizes glucose, stores fat, and controls immune and inflammatory responses. Although TZD-based medicines work effectively at improving glucose uptake by skeletal muscle and other peripheral tissues, due to increased risk of adverse effects, they have been withdrawn from the market, said study team leader Professor Choi Jang Hyun from the School of Life Sciences at UNIST. In order to develop new type of medications that have fewer side effects, we have have discovered a new compound that can maintain stable blood sugar levels. In the study, the team observed that the phosphorylation of PPAR is closely related to developing diabetes. They also discovered that the removal of phosphoric acid from PPAR shows anti-diabetic effects. To determine whether phosphoric acid is bound to PPAR, the team developed a new chemical screening procedure. Using high throughput phosphorylation s Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Linked To Increased Blood Cancer Risk

Type 2 Diabetes Linked To Increased Blood Cancer Risk

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Type 2 diabetes linked to increased blood cancer risk A new meta-analysis reveals patients with type 2 diabetes have a 20 percent increased risk of developing blood cancers. Patients with type 2 diabetes have a 20 percent increased risk of developing blood cancers, such as non-Hodgkin lymphoma, leukemia and myeloma, according to a new meta-analysis led by researchers at The Miriam Hospital. The findings, published online in the journal Blood, the journal of the American Society of Hematology, add to the growing evidence base linking diabetes and certain types of cancer. "I think when most people think about diabetes-related illnesses, they think of heart disease or kidney failure, but not necessarily cancer," said lead author Jorge Castillo, M.D., a hematologist/oncologist with The Miriam Hospital. "But when you consider that more than 19 million Americans have been diagnosed with diabetes -- not to mention the millions more who are either undiagnosed or will be diagnosed in the future -- a 20 percent increased risk of blood cancer is quite significant." While diabetes has been previously associated with other types of cancer, such as liver and pancreatic cancer, there have been few connections to blood cancers. Researchers are still unclear what causes the vast majority of these malignancies, which include cancers of the blood, bone marrow, and lymph nodes and affect more than 100,000 Americans each year. Castillo and colleagues analyzed 26 previously published research articles on the association between type 2 diabetes -- the most common form of the disease -- and the incidence of lymphoma, leukemia and myeloma. The meta-analysis included more than 17,000 cases of type 2 diabetes and blood Continue reading >>

Leukemia: Cancer Cells Killed Off With Diabetes Drug

Leukemia: Cancer Cells Killed Off With Diabetes Drug

Scientists may have found an innovative way to kill off cancer cells in acute myeloid leukemia, all the while preserving and regenerating healthy red blood cells. The new study was carried out by researchers from the McMaster Stem Cell and Cancer Research Institute at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada. Mick Bhatia — a professor of biochemistry and biomedical sciences at McMaster University and director of the McMaster Stem Cell and Cancer Research Institute — led the investigation, and the findings have been published in the journal Nature Cell Biology. As the scientists explain, conventional methods for treating leukemia focus on targeting leukemic cells, paying little attention to preserving red blood cells. But the production of healthy blood cells in the bone marrow is crucial for preventing leukemia patients from having anemia or fatal infections. First study author Allison Boyd — a postdoctoral fellow at the McMaster Stem Cell and Cancer Research Institute — says, "Our approach represents a different way of looking at leukemia and considers the entire bone marrow as an ecosystem, rather than the traditional approach of studying and trying to directly kill the diseased cells themselves." "These traditional approaches have not delivered enough new therapeutic options for patients," she continues. "The standard-of-care for this disease hasn't changed in several decades." The American Cancer Society (ACS) estimate that 21,380 people will be diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in 2017. Most of these will be adults, as AML tends to target seniors. Almost half of these patients will die from the disease. How a diabetes drug kills off cancer cells To change these dire survival prospects, Boyd and colleagues collected bone marrow samples from 34 "genet Continue reading >>

Type 2 Drug Class Glitazones Could Fight Off Leukemia

Type 2 Drug Class Glitazones Could Fight Off Leukemia

Type 2 drug class glitazones could fight off leukemia Type 2 drug class glitazones could fight off leukemia Type 2 diabetes drug Jardiance might protect against heart attacks 21 August 2015 A class of drugs for type 2 diabetes could help fight against chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a rare blood cancer . A study team led by Dr. Philippe Leboulch, Professor of Medicine and Cell Biology at the University of Paris, observed that patients with CML who received glitazones alongside imatinib, a standard CML drug , were free of the disease for nearly five years. In type 2 diabetes, glitazones reduce the body's resistance to insulin so that blood glucose levels can be more effectively controlled. Pioglitazone (marketed as Actos) is the only drug in this group available in the UK. The CML drug imatinib, which is commercially known as Gleevec, is used to inhibit signals within cancer cells that make them expand. This enables patients to live as normal lives as possible. 24 patients with active CML were used in the study. They received pioglitazone and standard treatment - after 12 months, over 50 per cent of the patients were in remission. The first three patients to be given the combination treatment had no recurrence of CML within five years. Lee Greenberger, Chief Scientific Offer for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, who wasnt involved in the study, said: "Gleevec can control the disease but never get rid of the source of the disease. But adding in these glitazones, [the research] claims you can eliminate the disease entirely. These are still early days for this work, however." The researchers did not uncover how the leukemia cells were killed using this combination therapy, but an accompanying editorial said the cells are "probably either killed directly or driven to exit Continue reading >>

Detecting Small-area Similarities In The Epidemiology Of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia And Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1: A Bayesian Approach

Detecting Small-area Similarities In The Epidemiology Of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia And Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1: A Bayesian Approach

Detecting Small-Area Similarities in the Epidemiology of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1: A Bayesian Approach Correspondence to Dr. Patricia A. McKinney, Pediatric Epidemiology Group, Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Leeds, 30 Hyde Terrace, Leeds LS2 9LN, United Kingdom (e-mail: [email protected] ). Search for other works by this author on: American Journal of Epidemiology, Volume 161, Issue 12, 15 June 2005, Pages 11681180, Richard G. Feltbower, Samuel O. M. Manda, Mark S. Gilthorpe, Mel F. Greaves, Roger C. Parslow, Sally E. Kinsey, H. Jonathan Bodansky, Patricia A. McKinney; Detecting Small-Area Similarities in the Epidemiology of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1: A Bayesian Approach, American Journal of Epidemiology, Volume 161, Issue 12, 15 June 2005, Pages 11681180, Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and diabetes mellitus, type 1, have common epidemiologic and etiologic features, including correlated international incidence and associations with infections. The authors examined whether the diseases' similar large-scale distributions are reflected in small geographic areas while also examining the influence of sociodemographic characteristics. Details of 299 children (014 years) with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 1,551 children with diabetes diagnosed between 1986 and 1998 were extracted from two registers in Yorkshire, United Kingdom. Standardized incidence ratios across 532 electoral wards were compared using Poisson regression, confirming significant associations between population mixing and the geographic heterogeneity of both conditions. Bayesian methods analysis of spatial correlation between diseases by modeling a bivariate outcome based on their Continue reading >>

Diabetologia Croatica 28-2, 1999

Diabetologia Croatica 28-2, 1999

Key words: diabetes mellitus, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, comorbidity Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a form of leukemia that most frequently occurs in Western countries. Its prevalence in diabetic patients is unknown. In an 81-year-old male diabetic patient who presented with severe inguinoscrotal ulceration, the presence of CLL made the diagnosis of diabetes and its complications questionable and aggravated the course of infection. The development of diabetes in the patient could be attributed to corticosteroid therapy, however, the hyperglycemic effect of chemotherapy could not be excluded either. Chemotherapy could also cause renal function impairment and polyneuropathy. The synergistic suppressive effect of diabetes and CLL on the infection fighting white cells contributed to the higher risk of infection and aggravated its course. The high prevalence of diabetes and CLL comorbidity, further studies are needed to assess the effect of chemotherapy on the level of glucose and development of diabetic complications. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a very common form of leukemia, accounting for 30%-40% of all cases of leukemia in Western countries. Its incidence increases with age and longer life expectancy of the general population (1). The etiology is unknown, however, the genetic basis is highly likely. There is no relationship between CLL and exposure to radiation or cytotoxic agents (2). According to literature data, the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in patients with CLL has not yet been evaluated. In these patients, the development of diabetes is generally attributed to the hyperglycemic effect of corticosteroid therapy (3). There is no evidence that common chemotherapeutics such as chlorambucil, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, fludarabin and vincri Continue reading >>

How Does Having Diabetes Affect My Cancer Treatment?

How Does Having Diabetes Affect My Cancer Treatment?

More than 25 million people in the United States have been diagnosed with diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Among people 65 and older, nearly 27 percent have diabetes. The vast majority of diabetes cases are type 2 diabetes, which is associated largely with older age and being overweight as well as family history. Older age and obesity also are risk factors for developing cancer, which means that people with type 2 diabetes are diagnosed with cancer more often than those in the general population. Having diabetes can complicate cancer treatment due to a number of factors. At the same time, some treatments for cancer, including certain newer targeted therapy drugs, can spur the development of diabetes, especially in patients who already had a propensity toward developing the disease, although this effect is usually reversible. Azeez Farooki is a Memorial Sloan Kettering endocrinologist who specializes in treating cancer patients who also have diabetes. We spoke with Dr. Farooki about what special considerations are taken into account when treating this group of patients. A Disease of Blood Sugar “Diabetes is a disease in which a person has increased levels of glucose, or sugar, in the blood,” Dr. Farooki explains. “It can occur because the pancreas does not produce enough insulin — the hormone that allows glucose to be absorbed — or because cells do not respond to the insulin that is produced. Cells should normally take in sugar from the blood; if they don’t, then high blood sugar or ‘hyperglycemia’ results.” The majority of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight, which often causes the body to become resistant to the effects of insulin. Type 2 disease may be treated with insulin injections, other hormonal inject Continue reading >>

My Life With Cancer & Diabetes

My Life With Cancer & Diabetes

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. This upcoming Sunday is National Cancer Survivors Day , a worldwide observance the first Sunday in June, dedicated to "showing the world that life after a cancer diagnosis can be meaningful and productive." We almost hate to mention it, but there is some question about a possible link between cancer and diabetes and there are many people out there dealing with both. There's no real proof that one causes the other, yet there are a lot of studies linking the two . Results suggest that anywhere from 8 to 18% of people with cancer also have diabetes. One recent study published in Diabetes Care showed that 16 out of every 100 men with diabetes and 17 out of every 100 women with diabetes said they had cancer, compared to just 7 out of 100 men and 10 out of 100 women without diabetes. So maybe there is some connection...? We're not pointing this out to scare anybody, but rather to pay homage to the folks who are dealing with both illnesses. Despite the stats cited, there's hardly any available literature on treating this combination. One of the few things we found was a 2006 Diabetes Spectrum article by Helen Psarakis, a diabetes nurse practitioner at Yale New Haven Hospital. She states that cancer patients who are on glucocorticoids a steroid used in short term, high-dose chemo treatments often suffer with high blood sugar. In fact, patients at risk for diabetes who begin taking glucocorticoids during cancer treatment are often quickly diagnosed with diabetes too. Insulin is recommended to treat steroid-induced blood sugar, as patients "may require two to three times their usual dose(s) of insulin." Woah. Helen points out a f Continue reading >>

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