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Leg Cramps And Diabetes

Magnesium And Diabetes (type 2)

Magnesium And Diabetes (type 2)

I first came across the benefits of magnesium years ago when I bought the book “Magnesium: The Miracle Mineral” by Dr Sandra Cabot. It's had good use over the years and it never ceases to amaze me just how many benefits magnesium really has, for everyone, and for diabetics too. Magnesium deficiency has been linked to atherosclerosis/ heart disease and heart attack, alterations in blood lipids/ cholesterol, alterations in blood sugar, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, kidney stones, premenstrual syndrome and psychiatric disorders, and the list goes on. If you look up ‘Diabetes and Magnesium' on Google Scholar or PubMed, you'll find lots of studies on the different ways type 2 diabetes and magnesium intake are connected (sorry to exclude type 1s from this discussion). It's even been shown in large studies that low magnesium intake increases your risk for developing type 2 diabetes in the first place, which is quite surprising. Studies suggest that over the past 100 years our intake has gone from 500 mg day to 175-225 mg day, which is less than half of what we were consuming. Why such a decrease? As usual it comes down to our modern lifestyles and the reasons point to the use of fertilizer, nutrient depleted soils, plus excessive consumption of processed and packaged foods. So what makes magnesium so special anyway? Let's find out. Miracle Magnesium Mineral Magnesium is an electrolyte that's involved in over 300 cellular processes in the body, meaning this mineral is a busy little body indeed! Half of the body's magnesium is in the bones and the other half is in the muscles and soft tissues of the body – organs, cells and so forth. Magnesium is essential for: Energy metabolism Glucose utilization Protein synthesis Fatty acid synthesis and breakdown Muscle contraction Continue reading >>

What Causes Muscle Cramps And How To Prevent It

What Causes Muscle Cramps And How To Prevent It

Muscle cramps occur when a skeletal muscle contracts. The muscle cramps might be uncomfortable, and some might be painful. The cramps usually occur in the thighs, feet, and calf, and sometimes the arms. Not only that they can be problematic during the day, but also might wake you up in the middle of the night. Moreover, this muscle cramping is common in people who have diabetes. What Causes Muscle Cramps? Drugs Substances and drugs which contribute to the development of muscle cramps are alcohol, insulin, cholesterol-lowering drugs, oral contraceptives, beta-agonists, and antihypertensives. Circulation and Nerves Complications related to diabetes might activate muscle cramps. Nerve damage and poor circulation might trigger spasms, people with peripheral neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease might be prone to experiencing cramps. Electrolytes and Glucose The proper relaxation and contraction of the muscles need a fuel source like glucose, and also balanced electrolytes exchange through the cell membranes such as magnesium, sodium, potassium, and calcium. When blood glucose is low, the muscles might starve for fuel. And on the other hand, when the blood glucose is high the body excretes addition glucose through the urine which leads to electrolytes depletion and dehydration. These kinds of imbalances lead to cramping, active people without proper hydration and conditioning, in athletes who have extended strenuous exercise, in sedentary or active people with fluctuating blood sugar. Other Causes The muscle cramps are also linked to pregnancy, thyroid disease, fatigue, poor flexibility, hemodialysis, spinal nerve compression and lying, sitting and standing in one position for long periods of time. How to Prevent Cramps Practice yoga to maintain your joints and muscles Continue reading >>

Complications Of Diabetes Insipidus

Complications Of Diabetes Insipidus

Having a doctor say that the diagnosis is diabetes insipidus (DI) can be a scary experience. When the word “diabetes” is heard, many people think of insulin shots, finger pokes for blood tests, and a life of avoiding sugary products that will spike their blood sugar. None of that exists with diabetes insipidus. This disease affects the kidneys and how fluids are reabsorbed or expelled from the body. Why is it called diabetes? Diabetes insipidus is in many ways the exact opposite of Type I or Type II diabetes. Instead of having too much sugar in the body and the kidneys trying to remove it by placing a bunch of sugar into the urine, DI causes the urine to be clear, like water. It is dull and lifeless. If one were to compare the two types of urine, Type I or Type II diabetes would create sugary urine, like overly sweetened iced tea. Diabetes insipidus creates urine that the average person would mistake for water. Although diabetes insipidus isn’t necessarily life-threatening or shorten a person’s expected lifespan, there are some concerns that should be noted and observed when this diagnosis is received. Here are the complications that may happen and how to properly respond to them. 1. Increased Thirst. Many people with diabetes insipidus find that they feel more thirsty than normal. This is caused by the increased need for the body to push fluids through the body. Because the kidneys aren’t concentrating urine on their own, the body responds by requesting more fluids to make that happen. To resolve this situation, a doctor may recommend the following options. Drink more fluids if the increased thirst is not bothersome or causing more frequent bathroom trips. Recommend Desmopressin treatments to encourage urine concentration. Add diuretics and NSAID medications Continue reading >>

Prevalence Of Muscle Cramps In Patients With Diabetes

Prevalence Of Muscle Cramps In Patients With Diabetes

There are limited epidemiological studies addressing the prevalence of muscle cramps in the general population and diseases like diabetes (1). Common long-term complications of diabetes, such as neuropathy and nephropathy, have been associated with higher rates of muscle cramps (2). We aimed to determine the prevalence and characteristics of muscle cramps in patients with diabetes compared with healthy volunteers. Frequency, severity (using visual analog scale [VAS]), duration, and disability due to muscle cramps were evaluated, as is standard in clinical trials. Information about each patient’s clinical status was collected, including patient demographics, neuropathy (diagnosed using established clinical and electrophysiological criteria and quantitated using the Toronto Clinical Neuropathy Score) (3), diabetes complications, duration and type of diabetes, concurrent cramp-inducing (β-blockers, diuretics, statins) and cramp-protecting (quinine, calcium channel blockers, antiepileptics) medications, and markers of glycemic control (HbA1c). Baseline demographics and cramp characteristics for 269 patients with diabetes (type 1 diabetes, n = 87; type 2 diabetes, n = 144) or healthy volunteer (n = 38) status are presented in Table 1. The age-adjusted prevalence of cramps was higher in patients with type 2 diabetes (65.2 vs. 45.5%; P = 0.009) but not type 1 diabetes (61.2 vs. 45.5%; P = 0.13) compared with healthy volunteers. Patients with type 1 diabetes (5.8 vs. 3.8 out of 10 on VAS; P = 0.006) and type 2 diabetes (6.7 vs. 3.8 out of 10 on VAS; P < 0.001) had more severe cramps than healthy volunteers. More type 2 diabetes patients reported that cramps were disabling compared with healthy volunteers (33.3 vs. 0%; P = 0.0008). In patients with diabetes, neuropathy (odds Continue reading >>

7 Natural Diabetic Neuropathy Treatments That Work

7 Natural Diabetic Neuropathy Treatments That Work

Diabetes itself is extremely common, affecting about one in every three adults in the U.S., and diabetic neuropathy is one of the most likely complications to develop as a side effect because high blood sugar levels affect nerve fibers throughout the body. Neuropathy is a pathological condition that encompasses more than 100 different forms and manifestations of nerve damage, both in people with diabetes and those without. (1) Diabetic neuropathy (also sometimes called peripheral neuropathy) is the term for nerve damage caused by diabetes, a chronic condition that occurs when the body doesn’t use the hormone insulin properly. Neuropathy can form anywhere but is most likely to affect nerves running through the limbs, hands and feet. Not every person with diabetes symptoms develops complications such as neuropathy, but many do. In fact, up to 60 percent to 70 percent of all diabetics experience some form of neuropathy. For some people, only mild symptoms develop from nerve damage, such as tingling or numbness in the limbs. But for others, neuropathy causes a good amount of pain, digestive issues, problems with the heart and blood vessels, the inability to go about life normally, and even death if major organs are affected badly enough. Diabetic neuropathy can trigger a cascade of events that lead to even more serious complications. Just like with diabetes itself, there is no known “cure” for peripheral neuropathy, only ways to manage it and stop progression, similarly to the natural treatments for diabetes. It’s a dangerous problem to have, but fortunately most people are able to keep it under control by regulating their blood sugar levels, changing their diets and adopting healthier lifestyles overall, all of which help control their diabetes. 7 Natural Remedies Continue reading >>

Caring For Diabetes-related Nerve Disorders (neuropathy)

Caring For Diabetes-related Nerve Disorders (neuropathy)

What is diabetic neuropathy? Some diseases consume the body like wildfire. Others are more like a slow burn. Diabetes is a malady that takes its time. If not controlled, diabetes slowly eats away at the body's cells, especially nerve cells. Doctors call the gradual breakdown of nerve cells "neuropathy." At first, nobody misses a few dead cells here and there. But after a decade or two, the damage can be impossible to ignore. Many patients suffer numbness or the opposite, extreme pain. As a result of decreased sensation, many people with diabetes may not be aware when they've broken the skin or suffered a cut or scrape on one of their feet. Bacteria can then set up housekeeping -- an invasion aided by impaired circulation and small vessel disease caused by diabetes. In some cases, these unnoticed infections can lead to raging infections and loss of the limb. Despite many recent advances in diabetes treatment, neuropathy remains frighteningly common. About 60 to 70 percent of people with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes will eventually develop nerve damage, though not all of them will have symptoms. But if you have diabetes, remember this: the key to avoiding nerve damage is prevention. By carefully controlling your blood sugar, you can help keep your nerve cells out of harm's way. What causes diabetic neuropathy? When people with diabetes experience pain, tingling, numbness or other sensory symptoms, typically in the feet, high blood sugar seems to be the real culprit. In general, nerve cells only start dying when blood sugar stays too high over a long period of time. Nobody knows why extra sugar is so toxic. Perhaps it upsets the chemical balance in the nerves. Or perhaps the sugar slows down blood circulation and cuts off the oxygen supply to the nervous system. Expert Continue reading >>

Leg Cramps And Diabetes: 5 Signs Of Complications For Diabetics

Leg Cramps And Diabetes: 5 Signs Of Complications For Diabetics

Diabetes is a disease that can lead to a variety of complications because of the detrimental impact high blood sugar has on the body. Leg cramps can occur because elevated blood sugar causes excessive urination and subsequent dehydration. Limb pain is another common complication of the disease and signals a serious condition that, without treatment, can become debilitating. Leg cramps are not just a sign of dehydration. In combination with pain in the arms and legs, they are a sign of diabetic neuropathy, which is damage to nerves as the result of high blood sugar levels. These nerves are very sensitive to everything from changes in temperature, to vibrations, and even a light touch. Sometimes the nerves are so damaged that "They might send signals of pain when there is nothing causing pain, or they might not send a pain signal even if something is harming you," reports Healthline. Urgent: Assess Your Heart Attack Risk in Minutes. Click Here. Dr. Laurence Kinsella, professor of neurology at Saint Louis University says, "Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a so-called minor complication of diabetes, but not to the people who live with the pain it creates," reports WebMD. Here are five signs that may indicate a peripheral neuropathy complication of diabetes: 1. Numbness or tingling in the feet and lower legs: These symptoms can feel like the limb as fallen "asleep." On the other hand, they can feel like a "buzzing or shocking sensation," according to Healthline. 2. Impaired sense of touch: The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke addresses sensory nerve damage. "Since this is felt most in the hands and feet, people may feel as if they are wearing gloves and stockings even when they are not. This damage to larger sensory fibers may contribute to the loss o Continue reading >>

Running With Diabetes

Running With Diabetes

I was just 9 miles into the Cheesehead Half Marathon in Hilbert, Wis., and the feeling was unmistakable. My body had hit the wall. “C’mon now,” any serious runner would say. There is no way that a person hits the wall at 9 miles of anything. Serious oxygen debt, muscle cramps, the heavy legs of a hot-weather day perhaps; these things are believable. But the wall? That is reserved for 20 miles or more in the marathon. To say you have hit the wall at mile 9 of a half marathon either makes you a weakling or completely ignorant about serious endurance running. Let me assure you, however, that after 9 finishes of marathon distance, including an effort under 3 hours, the barrier I slammed into at mile 9 of the Cheesehead was the same that I experienced 20 miles into Milwaukee’s Lakefront Marathon, 22 into the Quad City Marathon, and at mile 23 in Green Bay. As the concrete blocks solidified around my feet between 8 miles and 9, nobody could have been more perplexed about the development than I. Perhaps it was the heat: 80 degrees with high humidity. Perhaps I had gone out too fast; 6:30 for the first mile might have been a hair aggressive for a guy barely exceeding 30 miles a week. Yet in my mind none of the variables added up to feeling this atrocious. Perhaps something more serious was at play. Thank heaven for the portajohn just past the ninth mile marker. I desperately needed a break. So for the third time in less than an hour, I stopped for relief. Sweating amid the stifling heat and foul fragrances of the plastic outhouse, it appeared again: the dark brown stream that had panicked me the first time I saw it, and had since become mundane. For the amount of Gatorade that I’d consumed, the darkness of my urine should have sounded the alarm. But my doctor explaine Continue reading >>

What Causes Leg Cramps At Night?

What Causes Leg Cramps At Night?

Leg cramps at night are common. And it's important to make a distinction between leg cramps causes and other causes of leg pain at night. Why? Because there are several conditions that can cause leg pain at night: fibromyalgia sciatica arthritis night leg cramps varicose veins Use of statins for lowering cholesterol lower extremity arterial disease (atherosclerosis). So what causes leg cramps at night? The cramp, or charley horse, is due to the muscle contracting (shortening and tightening) in a sudden and violent way. These nocturnal leg cramps usually occur in the calf muscle. But foot and leg cramps do happen at night also. Cramps in the thighs are less common. One main reason for the pain is because blood flow to the muscle is restricted. Waste products also build up within the muscle tissue. Here are nine conditions that may cause muscles to contract The underlying causes of leg cramps are unknown. However, here are nine possible suspects: Dehydration. Not staying hydrated with enough water during the day may be one of the big causes of leg cramps at night. This is most likely due to fluid imbalances of electrolytes (mainly sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium). Overuse of the muscles, perhaps from exercising, gardening or other physical activities. Night leg cramps during pregnancy affect about 30% of women. In the next article, I have a big caution regarding relief for leg muscle cramps in pregnancy. (You can see a link to that article at the bottom of this page.) Concrete. This sounds a little far fetched to me, but I've read that standing on concrete for long periods of time can lead to leg pain at night. When I was 17, I went to work in a steel factory. It was tough, sweaty, physical labor. We all stood on concrete for eight hours a day, day after day, wo Continue reading >>

Relief For Pregnancy Leg Cramp Sufferers

Relief For Pregnancy Leg Cramp Sufferers

Does this sound familiar? You’re pregnant and also you’ve lastly gone to rest. It took a great deal of throwing as well as transforming prior to you located the best location but your eyes have ultimately closed. You did have to rise to pee twice however rest has ultimately taken over. You did find it a bit unpleasant at initially as a result of acid indigestion yet now your tired body has ultimately dropped off to sleep … Until … AAGGHHH!!!! A leg crowded!!! Oops Ouch Ouch Oops OOPS !! Is there a much more uncomfortable means to get up than with a leg cramp? If your sleep is interrupted by leg cramps when you’re expecting you’re not alone. About a third of expecting females experience leg cramps as well as, baseding on a current study by Crampeze Australia on the Bub Hub, 76.8 per-cent of those claim they experience them during the night. Their pains are most obvious in the 3rd trimester (67.8 percent of respondents) although 30.7 per-cent additionally experience them in the 2nd trimester. And 80 percent of the participants say their aches remain in the calf muscle with simply 19 per cent in the thigh. So what specifically are evening leg aches and why are they so common in pregnancy? Leg aches are qualified by an abrupt movement in the leg muscular tissues which causes an excruciating involuntary tightening. They can last from a few seconds up to a couple of minutes. There are many recommended reasons of leg cramps in pregnancy including: Increased blood volume Nutrient deficiencies – Reduced degrees of specific minerals Mineral imbalances Fluid retention Poor circulation High blood pressure Growing child placing much more stress on the blood vessels What can you do to alleviate pregnancy leg cramps? Until now there has been little pregnant ladies could Continue reading >>

The Role Of Palmitoylethanolamide, An Autacoid, In The Symptomatic Treatment Of Muscle Cramps: Three Case Reports And Review Of Literature

The Role Of Palmitoylethanolamide, An Autacoid, In The Symptomatic Treatment Of Muscle Cramps: Three Case Reports And Review Of Literature

Jan Keppel Hesselink* and David J. Kopsky Institute for Neuropathic Pain, The Netherlands *Corresponding Author : Jan M Keppel Hesselink Institute for Neuropathic Pain, Netherlands Tel: 0031-6-51700527 E-mail: [email protected] Received February 06, 2016; Accepted March 20, 2016; Published March 25, 2016 Citation: Hesselink JMK, Kopsky DJ (2016) The Role of Palmitoylethanolamide, an Autacoid, in the Symptomatic Treatment of Muscle Cramps: Three Case Reports and Review of Literature. J Clin Case Rep 6:744. doi:10.4172/2165-7920.1000744 Copyright: © 2016 Hesselink JMK, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Visit for more related articles at Journal of Clinical Case Reports Abstract Physicians frequently see patients suffering from muscular cramps. Diagnosis of muscular cramps in general is not complex and can mostly be based on history and physical examination only. However, there is no clear evidence for the efficacy of pharmacological or other treatments for muscular cramps, apart from magnesium salts in pregnancy-associated cramps. New therapies are therefore urgently needed. We present three patients with treatment-refractory muscular cramps who responded favorably to treatment with the supplement and endogenous lipid messenger, the autacoid palmitoylethanolamide (PEA). Keywords Muscular cramps; Palmitoylethanolamide; Idiopathic; Leg cramps; Diabetes; Autacoid; Treatment Introduction Secondary and primary idiopathic leg cramps are common. More than half of all adults reports nocturnal leg cramps [1]. Cramps can disrupt sleep and have a substantial negative impact o Continue reading >>

40iu Or 100iu Insuline Dose For Diabetes Type Two

40iu Or 100iu Insuline Dose For Diabetes Type Two

by kapil (india) I am suffering from type-2 diabetes and am new to insulin. I am from India and would like to know if 40IU or 100 IU is better for dose and why? I would be very thankful to you people to guide me. Answer Hi Kapil, Alba here from All-About-Beating-Diabetes.com Actually, the first line of treatment for type 2 diabetes is by some natural steps. However, if you fail in these ways to beat diabetes naturally, then it comes to oral drugs. In your case, you're using insulin, that means you have not succeed in the above steps. It's a pity, however you must follow the dosage of insulin your doctor prescribed to you. "DO NOT USE INSULIN BY YOUR OWN!!!" Always consult your doctor, because he/she knows your health condition much better than me and may have noticed something that I am not aware of. For the dosage, it depends on your blood sugar levels and severity of the symptoms of type 2 diabetes you might experiencing. Thus, cannot tell you which dose is better for you. Take care! Click here to post comments or follow up Ask the Doctor now? Simply click here to return to Type 2 diabetes information. Leg Cramps & Insulin! Diabetic Leg Cramps Causes QUESTION: I am a 55 year old female from South Africa (of Indian decent). Was diagnosed as Type 2 +/- 5 years ago. On tablet medication to control my diabetes. Now I'm having problems with leg cramps. Would going onto Insulin help with the legs cramps. Many thanks. ANSWER: Hi, It is bad that you are experiencing leg cramps, which supposedly could be a complication of diabetes. However, there are many factors contributing to your problem: - Diabetes and related arterial disease. - Other metabolic conditions, such as hypothyroidism, Addison's disease, cirrhosis, chronic kidney failure, alcoholism. - Muscle fatigue, dehydrat Continue reading >>

Diabetes - A Major Risk Factor For Kidney Disease

Diabetes - A Major Risk Factor For Kidney Disease

Diabetes mellitus, usually called diabetes, is a disease in which your body does not make enough insulin or cannot use normal amounts of insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone that regulates the amount of sugar in your blood. A high blood sugar level can cause problems in many parts of your body. The most common ones are Type 1 and Type 2. Type 1 diabetes usually occurs in children. It is also called juvenile onset diabetes mellitus or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In this type, your pancreas does not make enough insulin and you have to take insulin injections for the rest of your life. Type 2 diabetes, which is more common, usually occurs in people over 40 and is called adult onset diabetes mellitus. It is also called non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In Type 2, your pancreas makes insulin, but your body does not use it properly. The high blood sugar level often can be controlled by following a diet and/or taking medication, although some patients must take insulin. Type 2 diabetes is particularly prevalent among African Americans, American Indians, Latin Americans and Asian Americans. With diabetes, the small blood vessels in the body are injured. When the blood vessels in the kidneys are injured, your kidneys cannot clean your blood properly. Your body will retain more water and salt than it should, which can result in weight gain and ankle swelling. You may have protein in your urine. Also, waste materials will build up in your blood. Diabetes also may cause damage to nerves in your body. This can cause difficulty in emptying your bladder. The pressure resulting from your full bladder can back up and injure the kidneys. Also, if urine remains in your bladder for a long time, you can develop an infection from the rapid growth of bacteria in urine that h Continue reading >>

Are Leg Cramps Common In Type 2 Diabetics?

Are Leg Cramps Common In Type 2 Diabetics?

Question Originally asked by Community Member maay Are Leg Cramps Common In Type 2 Diabetics? Can you tell me if leg cramps are common in people with diabetes? Answer Diabetes doesn’t cause leg pains or cramps. Diabetes does cause ANY complications. Only UNCONTROLLED diabetes cause leg pain and cramps. They are a result of diabetic peripheral neuropathy where years of high blood sugar damage the nerves of our legs. We have a choice of several drugs that can mask the pain but no drug can reverse the neuropathy. Only bringing your blood sugar down to a normal level and keeping it there can do that. I have written about this at Reversing Painful Diabetic Neuropathy. You should know Answers to your question are meant to provide general health information but should not replace medical advice you receive from a doctor. No answers should be viewed as a diagnosis or recommended treatment for a condition. Continue reading >>

5 Common Pregnancy Concerns For Women

5 Common Pregnancy Concerns For Women

Expecting a baby can be a wonderful time in your life,during which you will experience several changes in your body as your baby grows. While prenatal tests can help prevent health problems or spot them in the early stages, you should always discuss all of your health concerns with your doctor. The following are some of the most common health concerns expectant mothers may experience, as well as some tips for reducing health risks. 1. Gestational Diabetes Gestational diabetes is a form of diabetes that only occurs when a women is pregnant. When an individual has diabetes, her blood sugar levels are too high because the body does not produce enough insulin or does not use the insulin produced appropriately. The symptoms of gestational diabetes can include extreme thirst, fatigue and hunger, which resemble pregnancy symptoms. As a result, the best way to diagnose gestational diabetes is with a blood test at a physician’s office. If you have gestational diabetes, your doctor may instruct you to exercise regularly, follow a meal plan, take prescription medications and monitor your blood sugar levels regularly. This form of diabetes can affect your circulation, particularly in your legs, and your doctor may also suggest you wear maternity compression stockings to help prevent or alleviate swelling and pressure. 2. High Blood Pressure If you had high blood pressure before becoming pregnant or developed high blood pressure during pregnancy – a condition known as gestational hypertension – your doctor will take extra precautions to monitor the health of you and your baby. High blood pressure during a pregnancy can cause dangerous conditions such as preeclampsia, premature delivery or low birth weight. If your doctor diagnoses you with high blood pressure during your pregn Continue reading >>

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