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Learnabout Diabetes

Step 1: Learn About Diabetes

Step 1: Learn About Diabetes

Past Issues / Fall 2014 Table of Contents If you are living with diabetes or have a loved one with the disease, it's important to work together to manage diabetes to stay healthy and prevent complications. Managing diabetes is not easy, but support from family members can make it much easier. The NDEP has resources for making healthy lifestyle choices that not only help people with diabetes manage the disease, but also help keep the whole family healthy! Here are four key steps to help you control your diabetes and live a long, active life. Diabetes means that your blood glucose (blood sugar) is too high. There are two main types of diabetes. the body does not make insulin. Insulin helps the body use glucose from food for energy. People with type 1 need to take insulin every day. the body does not make or use insulin well. People with type 2 often need to take pills and or insulin. Type 2 is the most common form of diabetes. may occur when a woman is pregnant. Gestational diabetes raises her risk of getting another type of diabetes, mostly type 2, for the rest of her life. It also raises her child's risk of being overweight and getting diabetes. You may have heard people say they have "a touch of diabetes" or "your sugar is a little high." These words suggest that diabetes is not a serious disease. That is not correct. Diabetes is serious, but you can learn to manage it! All people with diabetes need to make healthy food choices, stay at a healthy weight, and be physically active every day. Taking good care of yourself and your diabetes can help you feel better. It may help you avoid health problems caused by diabetes, such as: eye problems that can lead to trouble seeing or going blind. nerve damage that can cause your hands and feet to feel numb.Some people may even Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Contents What is diabetes? How can you get it? What problems does it cause? What happens next? How to help your friend What some kids who live with diabetes say Did you know? What is diabetes? Diabetes happens when someone's body does not have enough insulin. A car needs fuel to give it the energy to keep working. Our bodies need fuel to give them the energy to keep working. We get the fuel from our food. Carbohydrates in food get changed into glucose, the main energy that our bodies use. This change happens in our gut and in our liver. Enzymes help this change (they are not the same enzymes as the ones in washing powder). These enzymes come from several different parts of our body including the pancreas [say pan-kree-ass]. The glucose travels around our bodies inside blood vessels but it cannot be used as energy until it gets into our body cells. Insulin is the key that lets the glucose go through the cell wall into our cells. Insulin is a hormone. If there is not enough insulin there can be a lot of glucose travelling around in the blood, but the cells do not have enough energy to work well, which makes people sick. Lots of small clumps of cells in the pancreas make insulin. These cells are called 'islets' because they are like little islands in the pancreas. The rest of the pancreas makes enzymes. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Children and young people usually get type 1, sometimes called 'juvenile diabetes'. (Juvenile [say joo-ven-ile is a word that means child or young person). People who get diabetes when they are older usually get type 2 diabetes. But more young people are getting Type 2 diabetes because they are overweight or obese. Dogs can get diabetes too! How can you get it? Type 1 diabetes happens when the 'islet' cells in the pan Continue reading >>

Learn About Diabetes

Learn About Diabetes

For most people with diabetes, their quality of life depends on how much they know about the disease and how well they use this knowledge to manage it. That's why UPMC Centers for Diabetes Education and Support gives you the tools you need to lead a healthy life with diabetes. Reducing risks of long-term complications UPMC Centers for Diabetes Education and Support also offers a variety of resources to help you understand and better manage diabetes. Our comprehensive Diabetes Self-Management Education program has been specially recognized by the American Diabetes Association for quality care. UPMC Centers forDiabetes Education and Support offer a spectrum of educational sessions and events for people with diabetes. UPMC | Affiliated with the University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences | Supplemental content provided by Healthwise, Incorporated. To learn more, visit www.healthwise.org For help in finding a doctor or health service that suits your needs, call the UPMC Referral Service at 412-647-UPMC (8762) or 1-800-533-UPMC (8762). Select option 1. UPMC is an equal opportunity employer. UPMC policy prohibits discrimination or harassment on the basis of race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, age, sex, genetics, sexual orientation, gender identity, marital status, familial status, disability, veteran status, or any other legally protected group status. Further, UPMC will continue to support and promote equal employment opportunity, human dignity, and racial, ethnic, and cultural diversity. This policy applies to admissions, employment, and access to and treatment in UPMC programs and activities. This commitment is made by UPMC in accordance with federal, state, and/or local laws and regulations. Medical information made available on UPMC.com is not Continue reading >>

Learning About Diabetes : Learning About Diabetes, Inc

Learning About Diabetes : Learning About Diabetes, Inc

Over 100 programs in English and Spanish. Learning About Diabetes, Inc., is a non-profit charity providing easy-to-understand diabetes-care information in English and Spanish. A special interest is using art and design in novel ways that help those with diabetes better understand and manage their care. This service is very helpful, because during illness days medications are irreplaceable, and relatives can not always promptly help with their acquisition. For Health-Care Professionals, Educators and Organizations Printable PDFs for distribution. $25 per pdf ordered grants unlimited use. Not for use by healthcare professionals, educators or organizations. Important Reminder: Always speak with your doctor before making any change in your diabetes treatment plan. Consumers may download, copy, and use the programs on www.learningaboutdiabetes.org as long as they do not modify them in any way. Organizations and health care professionals can not use our programs without first obtaining use-rights for a small fee. Click here for information about use-rights. 2018 Copyright Learning About Diabetes, Inc. All rights reserved. Web Design Tucson by Tagline Media Group. Continue reading >>

Hey Kids, Learn About Blood Sugar And Diabetes

Hey Kids, Learn About Blood Sugar And Diabetes

Children and teens need to watch what they eat for a lot of reasons. One of them is that a healthy diet can help prevent diabetes, a dangerous disease that increases your risk of heart disease and stroke. Your digestive system breaks down foods and beverages that contain carbohydrates — like grains, fruits and vegetables — down into sugar. Certain foods, like whole grains, many fruits and vegetables and other high-fiber foods, take longer to digest. This helps keep the amount of sugar in your blood from going too high. But refined grains, potatoes and foods high in added sugar are digested fast and are quickly delivered into the bloodstream as sugar. If your blood sugar goes high too often, it can overwork your body’s ability to keep your blood sugar in healthy ranges, and you’re more likely to develop diabetes. What is diabetes? In diabetes, the body has problems either using or making a hormone called insulin. Insulin is important because it helps your body turn sugar and other food into energy. When the body doesn’t have enough insulin, it causes too much sugar to build up in your blood, which can cause damage to your heart and other parts of your body. There are two main types of diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2. Type 1 diabetes means the body does not make enough insulin to function properly. It is the type of diabetes that occurs mostly in very young people and comes on very suddenly. Type 2 diabetes often develops in a person over time because of bad habits. Being overweight and not getting enough regular physical activity are two bad habits that can lead to developing diabetes. Teenagers are now starting to develop type 2 diabetes. Once a person has type 2 diabetes, they are at risk for problems with almost every part of their body if they don’t take good Continue reading >>

14 Ways To Learn About Diabetes

14 Ways To Learn About Diabetes

These books offer a wealth of info for newbies and veterans alike American Diabetes Association Guide to Raising a Child with Diabetes by Jean Betschart Roemer, MN, MSN, CRNP, CDE (2011, American Diabetes Association) Living with type 1 diabetes for 45 years and raising three kids has made Jean Betschart Roemer, a diabetes educator, the kind of expert who knows diabetes facts and figures and also understands the everyday challenges that come with the condition. Along with basic information about diabetes management, this book tackles topics such as coping with the diagnosis and encouraging kids to cooperate in their care. Sections on listening to kids feelings regarding their diabetes and tips for divorced parents of a child with diabetes are particularly helpful. The Diabetes Answer Book: Practical Answers to More Than 300 Top Questions by David K. McCulloch, MD (2008, Sourcebooks) David McCullochs book contains a ton of useful information about diabetes, but the way its presentedin question-and-answer formatmakes this book especially readable. The setup makes for easy skimming. Questions range from the typical (What are ketones?) to the interesting but not often asked (Can people who dont have diabetes get hypoglycemia ?), and many are topics missing from other diabetes books. The First Year: Type 2 Diabetes: An Essential Guide for the Newly Diagnosed by Gretchen Becker (2006, Da Capo Press) Gretchen Becker, who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes nearly two decades ago, takes the stress out of learning about the complex condition. Instead of asking readers to devour 300 pages of facts and insight directly after diagnosis, she breaks the book into manageable sections, leading readers day by day, week by week, and month by month. The book offers an in-depth discussion Continue reading >>

The Johns Hopkins Patient Guide To Diabetes | Helping Patients And Their Families

The Johns Hopkins Patient Guide To Diabetes | Helping Patients And Their Families

There is a lot of medical terminology related todiabetes. In this section you can look up any terms that may be unfamiliar. The website also has links to the glossary in text. Living with diabetes can sometimes be overwhelming.This section focuses on practical informationabout diabetes.Experts in various fields related to diabetes willgive advice about day-to-day living.These topics will change regularly, so check back often to meet our new experts! Which celebrity did you NOT know has diabetes? Continue reading >>

Learn About Diabetes Complications

Learn About Diabetes Complications

Heart disease is one of the most common diabetes complications . In office visits, your doctor may perform various tests to check for heart disease and help you prevent any serious heart -related problems. At every visit, your health care provider will check your blood pressure . Your cholesterol level and triglycerides may be checked at your first visit. A baseline EKG should also be obtained as part of a complete medical record. Learn more about personal risk factors you have for heart disease, such as a family history or whether you smoke, and work out a prevention plan that includes weight loss , regular exercise , and stress management , as well as keeping your blood pressure, cholesterol , and triglycerides at normal levels. Signs and symptoms of stroke include sudden weakness on one side of the face or body; numbness in the face, arm, or leg; difficulty speaking; trouble seeing with both eyes ; or dizziness . If you have any of these symptoms, see a doctor immediately. You may be referred to a neurologist or other stroke specialist. Read more about the warning signs of stroke and also be aware of ways to prevent this serious problem from happening to you. If you have diabetes , urine testing should be performed yearly to look for diabetic nephropathy -- kidney disease. A baseline creatinine blood test should also be done to determine your kidney function. Your health care provider will also check your blood pressure regularly, because control of high blood pressure is essential in slowing kidney disease. Blood pressure should be less than 130/80. Read about other symptoms of kidney disease in this health topic, such as persistent leg or feet swelling. Find out when to call your doctor to prevent serious problems. Over time, diabetes can cause nerve damage that p Continue reading >>

Learn About Diabetes

Learn About Diabetes

When you have diabetes, your body has difficulty regulating blood sugar. The two most common types of diabetes are type 1 and type 2. Both forms result from the body's inability to either produce or use insulin. A third type, gestational diabetes, occurs only during pregnancy and may lead to type 2 diabetes. Insulin is the hormone that controls the movement of glucose from the blood into cells. Insulin is produced by the pancreas. Glucose also called blood sugar constantly moves through the bloodstream in order to supply the body with the energy needed for muscle contractions and metabolism. The job of insulin is to make sure the glucose actually moves into the body's cells. Without insulin, glucose builds up in the bloodstream. Over time, elevated glucose levels can damage the linings of blood vessels, leading to damage to the eyes, kidneys and other sensitive tissues. This vascular damage can cause blindness (diabetic retinopathy), impotence, kidney failure (diabetic nephropathy and end-stage renal disease), increased risk for heart attack and the deterioration of nerves or blood vessels. It also can cause insufficient blood flow to the arms and legs, resulting in amputation. Diabetes is the leading cause of new blindness in adults. It is also the most common condition leading to dialysis and kidney transplants and the most common reason for below-the-knee amputations. A Tempo InDepth report about diabetes, below, aired on PBS 39 in September 2012. Lehigh Valley Health Network endocrinologist Robert McCauley, MD , is featured in the program, along with Camp Red Jacket , the health networks free, three-day camp for children with type 1 diabetes . A diabetes-friendly cooking demonstration is included, featuring Sodexo executive chef James Lambert and clinical dietitian Continue reading >>

4 Steps To Manage Your Diabetes For Life

4 Steps To Manage Your Diabetes For Life

This publication has been reviewed by NDEP for plain language principles. Learn more about our review process. Actions you can take The marks in this booklet show actions you can take to manage your diabetes. Help your health care team make a diabetes care plan that will work for you. Learn to make wise choices for your diabetes care each day. Step 1: Learn about diabetes. What is diabetes? There are three main types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes – Your body does not make insulin. This is a problem because you need insulin to take the sugar (glucose) from the foods you eat and turn it into energy for your body. You need to take insulin every day to live. Type 2 diabetes – Your body does not make or use insulin well. You may need to take pills or insulin to help control your diabetes. Type 2 is the most common type of diabetes. Gestational (jest-TAY-shun-al) diabetes – Some women get this kind of diabetes when they are pregnant. Most of the time, it goes away after the baby is born. But even if it goes away, these women and their children have a greater chance of getting diabetes later in life. You are the most important member of your health care team. You are the one who manages your diabetes day by day. Talk to your doctor about how you can best care for your diabetes to stay healthy. Some others who can help are: dentist diabetes doctor diabetes educator dietitian eye doctor foot doctor friends and family mental health counselor nurse nurse practitioner pharmacist social worker How to learn more about diabetes. Take classes to learn more about living with diabetes. To find a class, check with your health care team, hospital, or area health clinic. You can also search online. Join a support group — in-person or online — to get peer support with managing your Continue reading >>

Learn About Diabetes

Learn About Diabetes

Glucose, or blood sugar, is a simple sugar and the bodys preferred energy source. Its different from sucrose, which is more commonly known as table sugar. In order for our body to utilize glucose, we need insulin which is secreted by our pancreas. When you eat food, beta cells in our pancreas are alerted and ordered to secrete insulin. Insulin acts as a key for glucose, allowing it into our cells. Diabetes occurs when our body is unable to produce sufficient insulin, or when our cells no longer respond to insulin. Instead of being utilized by our cells, glucose stays in our blood stream. This is where the phrase high blood sugar comes from. High blood sugar, known as hyperglycemia, can cause long term complications if not adequately managed. These can include heart failure, kidney failure, as well as damage to the eyes, skin, feet, and other organs. Despite being a relatively healthy state, Hawaii too has felt the effects of diabetes. While diabetes can lead to serious health concerns, nearly 1 in 4 Americans living with diabetes do not realize they have diabetes. Who is most at risk? Those who have obesity, family history of diabetes, as well as certain minority groups are more susceptible to diabetes. In fact, nearly 1 in 2 adults living in Hawaii has diabetes or pre-diabetes. Symptoms can vary from mild to severe, and include hunger, thirst, fatigue, frequent urination, and blurred vision. If you experience these symptoms, make sure to schedule an appointment with your physician as soon as possible. A stands for A1C levels a measure of your average blood sugar levels over the past three months. It is different from your daily blood sugar test. High levels of blood sugar can harm your eyes, feet, heart and kidneys. B stands for blood pressure. If your blood pressure Continue reading >>

Learn About Diabetes - Northern Michigan Diabetes Initiative - Munson Healthcare

Learn About Diabetes - Northern Michigan Diabetes Initiative - Munson Healthcare

Millions of people have diabetes mellitus, commonly called diabetes. You may be surprised to know that many of these people dont even know they have it. Diabetes is a serious disease and should not be ignored. If you have it, correct treatment can help you live a long and healthy life. If you have diabetes, your body cant make or use insulin. Insulin helps change sugar into energy to keep you alive. There are different kinds of diabetes. The main ones are type 1 and type 2. Daily monitoring and careful control of blood sugar levels are the most important steps to take for people with diabetes. If not treated, diabetes can cause: High blood sugar. This could make you thirsty, tired, lose weight, urinate often, or give you infections that wont go away. Many serious health problems. This could hurt your eyes, kidneys, nerves, or heart. The best way to take care of your diabetes is to make sure the levels or amount of sugar in your blood are near the normal range. This will make you feel better and help you stay healthy. Your doctor will tell you how often to check your blood sugar level. To do this, you will need to take a drop of your blood and place it on a special test strip. Then a device, called a blood glucose meter, reads the strip. This device measures the amount of sugar in your blood. Writing down this level, along with the time and date, will help you see how well your treatment plan is working. Check with your doctor before starting any exercise program. You may need a snack before or during the activity to avoid having low blood sugar while you exercise. Good management of your diabetes can lead to a long and healthy life. Your healthcare provider can help. Did you know if you have diabetes you can request more time when taking a test? As someone living with Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes

Managing Diabetes

You can manage your diabetes and live a long and healthy life by taking care of yourself each day. Diabetes can affect almost every part of your body. Therefore, you will need to manage your blood glucose levels, also called blood sugar. Managing your blood glucose, as well as your blood pressure and cholesterol, can help prevent the health problems that can occur when you have diabetes. How can I manage my diabetes? With the help of your health care team, you can create a diabetes self-care plan to manage your diabetes. Your self-care plan may include these steps: Ways to manage your diabetes Manage your diabetes ABCs Knowing your diabetes ABCs will help you manage your blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol. Stopping smoking if you smoke will also help you manage your diabetes. Working toward your ABC goals can help lower your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes problems. A for the A1C test The A1C test shows your average blood glucose level over the past 3 months. The A1C goal for many people with diabetes is below 7 percent. Ask your health care team what your goal should be. B for Blood pressure The blood pressure goal for most people with diabetes is below 140/90 mm Hg. Ask what your goal should be. C for Cholesterol You have two kinds of cholesterol in your blood: LDL and HDL. LDL or “bad” cholesterol can build up and clog your blood vessels. Too much bad cholesterol can cause a heart attack or stroke. HDL or “good” cholesterol helps remove the “bad” cholesterol from your blood vessels. Ask your health care team what your cholesterol numbers should be. If you are over 40 years of age, you may need to take a statin drug for heart health. S for Stop smoking Not smoking is especially important for people with diabetes beca Continue reading >>

Learn About Diabetes

Learn About Diabetes

Welcome to the Diabetes Daily Learning Center! Our goal is to help you understand how diabetes works so you can achieve your goals. You can use the dropdown menu at the top each page to navigate. If you have questions, you can ask ask them in the comment form at the bottom of each page. We regularly read and reply, though it may take a day or two for us to respond. We also encourage you to ask questions in the diabetes forum. You’ll find a welcoming community that’s happy to share their experiences and answer every one of your questions in great detail. As always, remember that this is the internet and you should check with your health care provider before making any changes. Prefer to read a book? Check out our step-by-step guide, Thriving with Diabetes, available in paperback and eBook formats! Continue reading >>

Taking Steps To Manage Your Type 2 Diabetes.

Taking Steps To Manage Your Type 2 Diabetes.

Taking care of yourself when you have type 2 diabetes starts with learning everything you can about your body and your treatment. To help you begin, we’ve pulled together some useful information and tools for you. In this section, you’ll learn everything from basics and beyond. You know the saying, “knowledge is power”? In the case of type 2 diabetes, that may very well be true. Learning the Basics Do you wish you knew more about type 2 diabetes? Learn more about what causes type 2 diabetes. And what steps you can take to help manage your condition. Insulin is a hormone made in the pancreas. It helps sugar move out of the bloodstream and into many cells of the body, where it is used for energy. If you have type 2 diabetes, your body does not make enough insulin, and the insulin that your body produces does not work as well as it should. Both of these situations can lead to too much sugar in your blood. Although there is no cure for type 2 diabetes, there are steps you can take to help manage it. These include working with your health care team to reach your blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol goals. Taking medicines as prescribed by your doctor. Making healthier food choices. And being physically active. Continue reading >>

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