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Leaky Gut And Diabetes

Do You Have A

Do You Have A "leaky Gut"? - Diabetes Self-management

The term leaky gut sounds awfully similar to having, say, a leaky pipe or a leaky faucet. And in a way, it is. Leaky gut doesnt have a whole lot to do with diabetes, but its a condition that is being recognized more and more commonly by both alternative and traditional medicinal practitioners, so its something that you may want to familiarize yourself with. Leaky gut, or, more formally, intestinal permeability, isnt a disease. Rather its a condition in which the lining of the small intestine becomes permeable. A healthy digestive tract breaks down the food that you eat into various sized particles. Glucose, amino acids, vitamins, and minerals are small molecules that are absorbed through the wall of the small intestine. And in healthy individuals, the cells that line the small intestine are tightly joined together. But if you have a leaky gut, spaces form between the cells in the small intestinal wall, letting large molecules (food, bacteria, heavy metals, toxins, and allergens, for example) sneak through. Normally, these large molecules are either digested (in the case of food) or keep right on going through to the large intestine and (hopefully) get excreted. But not if you have a leaky gut. The problem with large molecules slipping through the lining of the small intestine is that it may trigger an immune response in the body. Again, in healthy individuals, an immune response is normal because it means that your body can fight off invaders, like viruses, bacteria, and other pathogens that can lead to serious harm. But if molecules that arent supposed to slip through the intestinal wall actually DO slip through, its thought that the immune response thats triggered goes into overdrive. This causes an inflammatory response in the body, and inflammation is a precursor t Continue reading >>

Leaky Gut And Diabetes: Whats The Connection?

Leaky Gut And Diabetes: Whats The Connection?

Leaky Gut and Diabetes: Whats the Connection? Leaky Gut and Diabetes: Whats the Connection? Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are complicated and an extremely difficult condition to handle. The high levels of blood glucose caused by diabetes can lead to several other problems in the body of the diabetic patients . One such problem is the problem of a leaky gut or intestinal permeability as it is so called. Diabetes, particularly type 1 diabetes is known to have a strong connection with the condition of leaky gut. We shall analyze this relationship further in the article that follows. So, come and join in for the article Leaky Gut and Diabetes: Whats the Connection? What is a Leaky Gut and What Are Its Symptoms? The leaky gut condition is also known as intestinal permeability. In this condition, the lining of the intestine becomes permeable. In a person who is healthy, the cells of the intestine are held close together and the glucose from the various food that we eat is absorbed by the cells to produce the much-needed energy in the body. However, if you are someone who is suffering from a leaky gut problem, you will have spaces between these cells. These spaces enable bacteria, toxins, as well as various allergy-causing substances to enter the small intestine, causing various problems and complications. When you have a leaky gut, you tend to experience the following warning signs: It also causes the joints and muscles to pain Must Read: Does Diabetes Cause Weight Loss? Relationship Between Diabetes and Leaky Gut Several types of research conducted by various experts over the years have found out the strong link between leaky gut and diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is mainly considered to be an autoimmune disease in which the immunity of the body weakens. As a result, the immun Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Naturopathic Doctor News And Review

Type 1 Diabetes Naturopathic Doctor News And Review

The worldwide statistics regarding diabetes are frightening. In 2011, 366 million people around the world were diagnosed with diabetes, and it is projected that, by 2030, up to 552 million people will have itnearly 10% of the worlds adult population. In the US, there are 29 million people with diabetes, and approximately 1.25 million have type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), including 1 out of every 300 children. In fact, the most recent US data indicates the occurrence of T1DM increased by 21% between 2001 and 2009. Worldwide, there are 70,000 new cases annually, and T1DM occurrence is rising by an estimated 3% each year. Around 24% of T1DM pediatric patients live in European countries; 23% are in Southeast Asia, and 19% are in North America and the Caribbean. Unfortunately, in Sub-Saharan countries where insulin may be difficult to get and use, there is a high mortality rate of 42.6 deaths per 100,000, while in the US, there are only 0.63 deaths per 100,000.1 Aside from pediatric-onset T1DM, adult-onset T1DM is also growing. Known as latent autoimmune diabetes of the adult, or LADA, this type of T1DM is still commonly mistaken for type 2 diabetes. Occurring in patients generally over 35 years old, around 4-14% of patients diagnosed with T2DM have diabetes-associated antibodies or LADA.2 What is driving the increasing incidence of T1DM? There are many factors that are being studied. There are multiple HLA genes associated with turning on the auto-immune activity directed against the pancreatic beta cells, leading to the lack of insulin secretion that is the keynote characteristic of T1DM. Nonetheless, T1DM is not considered to be hereditary: 80% of children with a parent who has T1DM will not develop T1DM. When T1DM seems to transcend multiple family generations, investig Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

According to the 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report, over 30 million people living in the United States have diabetes. That’s almost 10 percent of the U.S. population. And diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, causing, at least in part, over 250,000 deaths in 2015. That’s why it’s so important to take steps to reverse diabetes and the diabetes epidemic in America. Type 2 diabetes is a dangerous disease that can lead to many other health conditions when it’s not managed properly, including kidney disease, blindness, leg and food amputations, nerve damage, and even death. (1) Type 2 diabetes is a completely preventable and reversible condition, and with diet and lifestyle changes, you can greatly reduce your chances of getting the disease or reverse the condition if you’ve already been diagnosed. If you are one of the millions of Americans struggling with diabetes symptoms, begin the steps to reverse diabetes naturally today. With my diabetic diet plan, suggested supplements and increased physical activity, you can quickly regain your health and reverse diabetes the natural way. The Diabetes Epidemic Diabetes has grown to “epidemic” proportions, and the latest statistics revealed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that 30.3 million Americans have diabetes, including the 7.2 million people who weren’t even aware of it. Diabetes is affecting people of all ages, including 132,000 children and adolescents younger than 18 years old. (2) The prevalence of prediabetes is also on the rise, as it’s estimated that almost 34 million U.S. adults were prediabetic in 2015. People with prediabetes have blood glucose levels that are above normal but below the defined threshold of diabetes. Without proper int Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Linked To Gut Inflammation, Bacteria Changes

Type 1 Diabetes Linked To Gut Inflammation, Bacteria Changes

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Type 1 diabetes linked to gut inflammation, bacteria changes People with Type 1 diabetes exhibit inflammation in the digestive tract and gut bacteria, a pattern that differs from individuals who do not have diabetes or those who have celiac disease, according to a new study. People with Type 1 diabetes exhibit inflammation in the digestive tract and gut bacteria -- a pattern that differs from individuals who do not have diabetes or those who have celiac disease, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body produces little to no insulin. The hormone plays a crucial role in carrying blood sugar to the body's cells. Type 1 diabetes tends to begin affecting people at a young age. It typically develops when the body's own immune system attacks the pancreas and prevents the gland from producing insulin. As a result, Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition. Among every 1,000 American adults, between one and five people have Type 1 diabetes, according to the Society's Endocrine Facts and Figures report. "Our findings indicate the individuals with Type 1 diabetes have an inflammatory signature and microbiome that differ from what we see in people who do not have diabetes or even in those with other autoimmune conditions such as celiac disease," said the study's senior author, Lorenzo Piemonti, MD, of the Diabetes Research Institute at San Raffaele Hospital in Milan, Italy. "Some researchers have theorized that the gut may contribute to the development of Type 1 diabetes, so it is important to understand how the disease affects the digestive system and microbiome." The study examined the microbiome Continue reading >>

The Truth About Diabetes: The Relationship Between Gut Health And Disease

The Truth About Diabetes: The Relationship Between Gut Health And Disease

Over the past several years, research into diabetes has found a link between diabetes, intestinal permeability, and gut bacteria. (1) It turns out that the microflora in your digestive tract may play a role in the development of diabetes. Healthy gut bacteria can nurture the lining of your digestive tract, while harmful bacteria can cause inflammation to spread throughout your whole body - leaving you at risk for serious conditions like diabetes. In a 2012 study, a team of researchers induced poor gut function in mice by giving them a drug we use in Western medicine called Tamoxifen. The Tamoxifen was able to completely disrupt the inner ecology of the mice. (2) Scientists discovered a strong similarity between the intestinal linings of the mice fed Tamoxifen and those with diabetes. Both groups showed improvement when given insulin. According to the group of scientists, this means that there is a noteworthy relationship between gut bacteria, gut mucosa, and diabetes. Other previous studies have found that certain external stressors have a similar effect. (3)(4) External stressors that influence microbial residents and have been linked to diabetes are things like: Antibiotic use Environmental toxins Common prescription medications While scientists are still piecing together the puzzle, so far what they do know is that external stressors can do enough damage to the lining of the gut to change its microbial residents. These changes not only effect digestion, but they can also have a systemic, or whole-body, effect. Our Inner Ecology: Just How Important Is It? Interest in the bacteria that we harbor in and on our bodies has been growing, especially since 2008 when the Human Microbiome Project (HMP) was launched. This initiative supports a full-scale investigation into cate Continue reading >>

The Trouble With Leaky Gut And What To Do Aboutit?

The Trouble With Leaky Gut And What To Do Aboutit?

The trouble with leaky gut and what to do aboutit? The difference between the healthy and the leakygut. People who have an autoimmune disease must have heard or were asked at least once about leaky gut. Science tries to decipher what leaky gut is, what causes it, what problems it causes in turn and how to fixit. What are your experiences with leaky gut? Participate in our science survey and uncover the patterns of Hashimotos. Our entire digestive system is protected by a thin layer of cells: the intestinal wall. The intestinal wall is the first-line barrier against the food and bacteria in our gut. It keeps the contents of our gut and our abdominal cavity separate [1]. This helps to maintain the balance between oral tolerance to food we eat and an immune reaction to the food, also called food sensitivity. Leaky gut happens after a damage to the intestinal wall. This damage changes the wall thickness, or creates gaps between the cells in the wall. Leaky gut leads to losing oral tolerance and the onset of food sensitivities. Mutations in our genes predispose us to develop leaky gut. Environmental factors can trigger the damage. Daily consumption of an industrialized-world diet is the biggest trigger of leaky gut. Our diet has changed a lot in the past hundred years. It has changed especially in urban areas, where there are no fields to harvest, or wild meat to catch. The food is not eaten only in the harvest season. Crop fields became bigger, and the development of chemical pesticides and insecticides followed. To scale up the production of meat and milk, animals are fed with hormones and antibiotics. Most of these end up in human food too. In order for food to be eaten out of season, or in the areas where it does not naturally grow, a lot of artificial preservatives wer Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Originates In The Gut But Probiotics Could Offer Cure

Type 1 Diabetes Originates In The Gut But Probiotics Could Offer Cure

Two separat e pieces of research have found that the development of type 1 diabetes is likely caused by the gut, and therefore, a type of probiotic could be the cure. Scientists from several European and US institutions studied 33 Finnish infants over three years from birth who were genetically predisposed to type 1 diabetes. Their study, entitled “The Dynamics of the Human Infant Gut Microbiome in Development and in Progression toward Type 1 Diabetes” is published in the journal Cell Host & Microbe. They discovered that four children in the group that developed type 1 diabetes had 25% less types of bacteria in their guts than other children. The same four infants were also found to have more amounts of a specific bacteria that is known to trigger gut inflammation. This could be a prelude to type 1 diabetes as the bacteria causes the immune system to mistakenly attack and destroy beta cells in the pancreas that usually make insulin and monitor glucose levels. “We know from previous human studies that changes in gut bacterial composition correlate with the early development of type 1 diabetes, and that the interactions between bacterial networks may be a contributing factor in why some people at risk for the disease develop type 1 diabetes and others don’t,” said Jessica Dunne, Director of Discovery Research at Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF), a UK charity which funded the study. “This is the first study to show how specific changes in the microbiome are affecting the progression to symptomatic T1D.” By being able to understand how the community of microorganisms in our guts (known as a microbiome) and which species are absent in the gastrointestinal tracts of children, the researchers believe they can slow down the progression of type 1 diabet Continue reading >>

Diet And The Gut

Diet And The Gut

A number of dietary factors have been studied in association with the development of type 1 diabetes, including possible risk factors like cow's milk and the gluten in wheat, as well as possible protective factors such as breastfeeding and various nutrients. See the appropriate pages for information on these foods. (Other factors that also involve diet, including vitamin D deficiency and nitrate/nitrite, are covered in other sections). Much of the focus of these studies have been diet in early life, since the autoimmune antibodies that are associated with the development of type 1 diabetes can often be detected very early in life (Hummel and Zeigler, 2011). The results of these studies have been mixed. After reading them, you might agree with the title of this editorial in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA): "Infant diets and type 1 diabetes: too early, too late, or just too complicated?" (Atkinson and Gale 2003). Knip et al. (2010) review the findings of studies on infant feeding and type 1 diabetes, and conclude that while no specific dietary factor or nutrient has been conclusively found to play a role in the development of type 1 diabetes, data do indicate that certain dietary factors may predispose to or protect against the disease. One factor linked in a few studies is the early introduction (before 3 months of age) of solid food. One long-term study found that early solid food was associated with type 1-related autoimmunity development by age 3, but not after that (Hakola et al. 2018). A Leaky Gut? It may be that foods like cow's milk and gluten have been associated with type 1 diabetes development for the same reason: because of a malfunctioning intestine (gut). Vaarala (2002) points out that the intestinal walls of people with type 1 diabete Continue reading >>

Is Type 2 Diabetes Caused By Bacteria In The Gut? Toxins Trigger Insulin Resistance And High Blood Sugar Levels, Study Finds

Is Type 2 Diabetes Caused By Bacteria In The Gut? Toxins Trigger Insulin Resistance And High Blood Sugar Levels, Study Finds

Bacteria responsible for common skin infections, food poisoning and MRSA could also trigger one of the most prevalent diseases of our time - type 2 diabetes. Researchers in the US discovered exposure to Staphylococcus aureus bacteria causes hallmark symptoms of the disease in rabbits. They hope their findings will help pave the way for new anti-bacterial therapies or vaccines to prevent or treat type 2 diabetes. In 2012, an estimated 1.5 million deaths were directly caused by diabetes, according to the World Health Organisation. Type 2 diabetes comprises 90 per cent of all people with diabetes, the WHO adds. Scientists at the University of Iowa found that prolonged exposure to a toxin produced by the S.aureus bacteria causes rabbits to develop insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and systemic inflammation. Professor Patrick Schlievert, who led the study, said: 'We basically reproduced type 2 diabetes in rabbits simply through chronic exposure to the staph superantigen. The findings suggest that therapies aimed at eliminating staph bacteria might prove a potential treatment for the condition. Obesity is a known risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes. But being obese can also alter a person's microbiome - the ecosystem of bacteria that colonise a person's gut, and affect their health. Professor Schlievert said: 'What we are finding is that as people gain weight, they are increasingly likely to be colonised by staph bacteria - to have large numbers of these bacteria living on the surface of their skin. 'People who are colonised by staph bacteria are being chronically exposed to the superantigens the bacteria are producing.' Professor Schlievert's past research has shown that superantigens - the toxins produced by all strains of staph bacteria - disrupt the immune s Continue reading >>

How’s Your Blood Sugar? 15 Signs That You Have Insulin Resistance

How’s Your Blood Sugar? 15 Signs That You Have Insulin Resistance

by Dr. Will Cole A staggering 50 percent of us are now either prediabetic or have full-blown type 2 diabetes. No, that is not a typo; one out of two of us have some serious blood sugar problems, making a condition that was once a rarity completely commonplace. Much of the blood sugar problems we see today are due to one thing: insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone that directs blood sugar into cells to create energy in the form of ATP, but when you become resistant to its effects, your cell receptor sites are blunted and you’re left with a backup of insulin and blood sugar, which is no bueno. If this condition goes on for too long without intervention, you could get diabetes, which is one of the leading causes of heart attacks and strokes! Know the signs of blood sugar imbalance If more than one of these is true for you, I suggest getting your blood sugar levels checked stat. You crave sweets or breads and pastries….a lot! Eating sweets doesn’t relieve your sugar cravings and even increases them. You become irritable and “hangry” if you miss a meal. You find yourself needing caffeine to get through the day. You become lightheaded if you miss a meal. Eating makes you exhausted and in need of a nap. It’s difficult for you to lose weight. You feel weak, shaky, or jittery pretty frequently. You have to pee a lot. You get agitated, easily upset, or nervous, out of proportion to the reason for these feelings. Your memory is not what it used to be. Your vision is blurry. Your waist measurement is equal to or larger than your hip measurements. You have an atypically low sex drive. You’re always thirsty. Natural ways to improve blood sugar balance You don’t have to settle for a future of diabetes. Intervene now with these tips for restoring a healthy blood sug Continue reading >>

5 Clues That Leaky Gut May Be At The Root Of Your Health Issues

5 Clues That Leaky Gut May Be At The Root Of Your Health Issues

Dr. Doni explains how leaky gut is extensively researched yet under-diagnosed—and could be the underlying cause of any number of chronic health problems. Considering that chronic diseases such as diabetes, autoimmunity, and liver failure, as well as common symptoms, like eczema, anxiety, fatigue, weight gain, bloating, and muscle/joint pain, can all be caused by leaky gut syndrome (otherwise known as LGS or intestinal permeability), it is imperative that you determine whether it may be occurring in your body. Leaky gut is not well recognized by most practitioners, and is not found with the usual tests, not even with an endoscopy or colonoscopy. Still, there are close to 11,000 research studies about intestinal permeability from the past sixty years that clearly indicate that this is real health issue, including 35 studies released in just the past month. For many, identifying leaky gut can be life changing because it is a condition that can be addressed with diet changes, nutrients, herbs, enzymes, and probiotics that help the intestinal lining to heal. In a medical system where people often find themselves reliant on medications, it is empowering to discover that there are natural solutions to address not only leaky gut, but challenging health concerns throughout their body. 5 Reasons to Think You Might Have Leaky Gut I want to help you to know whether leaky gut could be an issue for you, so I’ve sorted through the research and pulled out five reasons to think that you might have leaky gut. Tired, Achy, Bloated, and/or Anxious While leaky gut can cause digestive troubles such as IBS, diarrhea, bloating, heartburn and stomach pain, it is quite possible that you won’t experience any digestive distress at all. Instead, it is more more common to feel worn out, in pai Continue reading >>

No Diabetes Without Leaky Gut

No Diabetes Without Leaky Gut

0 comments Recent research shows that you can have all the genetic predispositions to developing diabetes, but you won’t actually become diabetic unless you have a leaky gut as well. According to Wikipedia, leaky gut is a name used to describe intestinal or bowel hyperpermeability. For those of us without medical degrees, leaky gut means pretty much what you think it means – something is wrong with your digestive system that lets stuff circulate in your body that should have stayed in your intestines until eliminated in the normal way. It causes problems, and lots of them: bowel diseases, arthritis, skin rashes, eczema, psoriasis, food allergies, IBS, chronic fatigue syndrome, hepatitis, pancreatitis, and more. Dr. Leo Galland of the Foundation for Integrated Medicine adds that it “stimulates classic hypersensitivity responses to foods and to components of the normal gut flora; bacterial endotoxins, cell wall polymers and dietary gluten may cause “non-specific” activation of inflammatory pathways mediated by complement and cytokines.” Dr. Andrew Weil points out that it’s “not generally recognized by conventional physicians.” It certainly should be. Recently The Healthy Skeptic published a fascinating article. The leadoff stated: “Genetics play a significant role in type 2 diabetes and obesity but, recent evidence shows that genetics alone don’t cause diabetes without environmental triggers and a leaky gut.” [The emphasis is mine.] Wow! If this is true, it means there is one part of the equation that you have a fair amount of control over. You can’t control your genes, and you can’t control most environmental triggers. Control a leaky gut? Yes, you can! Once you fix your gut, you’ll be amazed at how much more energy you have and how much bet Continue reading >>

Leaky Gut And Diabetes Mellitus: What Is The Link?

Leaky Gut And Diabetes Mellitus: What Is The Link?

Obes Rev. 2011 Jun;12(6):449-58. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-789X.2010.00845.x. Epub 2011 Mar 8. Leaky gut and diabetes mellitus: what is the link? Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology-Hepatology, Maastricht University Medical Centre+, Maastricht, the Netherlands. Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease requiring lifelong medical attention. With hundreds of millions suffering worldwide, and a rapidly rising incidence, diabetes mellitus poses a great burden on healthcare systems. Recent studies investigating the underlying mechanisms involved in disease development in diabetes point to the role of the dys-regulation of the intestinal barrier. Via alterations in the intestinal permeability, intestinal barrier function becomes compromised whereby access of infectious agents and dietary antigens to mucosal immune elements is facilitated, which may eventually lead to immune reactions with damage to pancreatic beta cells and can lead to increased cytokine production with consequent insulin resistance. Understanding the factors regulating the intestinal barrier function will provide important insight into the interactions between luminal antigens and immune response elements. This review analyses recent advances in the mechanistic understanding of the role of the intestinal epithelial barrier function in the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Given our current knowledge, we may assume that reinforcing the intestinal barrier can offer and open new therapeutic horizons in the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diabetes Association | Healthy Gut

Low Carb Diabetes Association | Healthy Gut

Diabetes and The Health of the Intestinal Tract Healing the Gut and its microbiome is the 5th Essential of the Low Carb Diabetes Association. The intestinal microbiome is the collection of bacteria, viruses, fungi and archea organisms; but, mostly, its many different forms of bacteria that by far make up most of the species. A healthy microbiome means there is a great deal of diversity in the organisms and plenty of the ones considered by science to be beneficial to a healthy gut. There are around 300-1000 different species and trillions of bacteria in our gut; gut microorganisms make up 60% of dry fecal weight. Beneficial intestinal bacteria do many things: they help with nutrient breakdown and absorption, can turn food into usable nutrients, produce some nutrientslike Vitamin K, B vitamins, Biotinon their own, ferment indigestible fibers into short chain fatty acids that feed the lining of the colon. They breakdown and help excrete dietary toxins and carcinogens, prevent the growth of harmful species, and they are associated with helping the rest of the body, as well. A healthy microbiome means a person has a better immune system, less risk of developing an auto-immune disease, reduced inflammation, are more insulin sensitive, and perhaps can be happier with less depression and anxiety, since studies do show a brain-gut connection. Certain beneficial bacteria are probably familiar to many: Lactobacillus species, Bifidobacteria species, Sacromycces boulardii, as those are commonly in probiotic products. However, the most common phyla in the human gut are Firmicutes, Bacteriodetes, Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria. Did you know that babies that are breast fed have healthier and different gut organisms than those fed by a bottle, one of many good reasons to strive for Continue reading >>

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