diabetestalk.net

Lawsuit Metformin Lactic Acidosis

Metformin Makes Headline News

Metformin Makes Headline News

Metformin is the first-line drug of choice in the treatment of type II diabetes. It was first approved in Europe in 1958.1 Americans had to wait until 1994 to legally obtain metformin.1 The holdup in approving metformin goes beyond the FDA. It is an indictment of a political/legal system that will forever cause needless suffering and death unless substantively changed. When Life Extension® informed Americans about drugs like metformin in the 1980s, the FDA did everything in its power to incarcerate me and shut down our Foundation.2 FDA propaganda at the time was that consumers needed to be "protected" against "unproven" therapies. As history has since proven, the result of the FDA's embargo has been unparalleled human carnage. So called "consumer protection" translated into ailing Americans being denied access to therapies that the FDA now claims are essential to saving lives. Today's major problem is not drugs available in other countries that Americans can't access. Instead, it is a political/legal system that suffocates medical innovation. Headline news stories earlier this year touted the anti-cancer effects of metformin, data that Foundation members were alerted to long ago.3 The problem is that it is illegal for metformin manufacturers to promote this drug to cancer patients or oncologists. It's also illegal to promote metformin to healthy people who want to reduce their risk of cancer, diabetes, vascular occlusion, and obesity. This fatal departure from reality continues unabated, as our dysfunctional political/legal system denies information about metformin that could spare countless numbers of lives. Type II diabetics suffer sharply higher rates of cancer4-7and vascular disease.8-11 The anti-diabetic drug metformin has been shown in numerous scientific studies Continue reading >>

Glyburide And Metformin (oral Route)

Glyburide And Metformin (oral Route)

Precautions Drug information provided by: Micromedex It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure this medicine is working properly. Blood tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects. Under certain conditions, too much metformin can cause lactic acidosis. The symptoms of lactic acidosis are severe and quick to appear. They usually occur when other health problems not related to the medicine are present and very severe, such as a heart attack or kidney failure. The symptoms of lactic acidosis include abdominal or stomach discomfort; decreased appetite; diarrhea; fast, shallow breathing; a general feeling of discomfort; muscle pain or cramping; and unusual sleepiness, tiredness, or weakness. If you have any symptoms of lactic acidosis, get emergency medical help right away. It is very important to carefully follow any instructions from your health care team about: Alcohol—Drinking alcohol may cause severe low blood sugar. Discuss this with your health care team. Other medicines—Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This especially includes nonprescription medicines such as aspirin, and medicines for appetite control, asthma, colds, cough, hay fever, or sinus problems. Counseling—Other family members need to learn how to prevent side effects or help with side effects if they occur. Also, patients with diabetes may need special counseling about diabetes medicine dosing changes that might occur because of lifestyle changes, such as changes in exercise and diet. Furthermore, counseling on contraception and pregnancy may be needed because of the problems that can occur in patients with diabetes during pregnancy. Travel—Keep your recent prescription and your medical history with yo Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Metformin is a prescription drug used to treat type 2 diabetes. It belongs to a class of medications called biguanides. People with type 2 diabetes have blood sugar (glucose) levels that rise higher than normal. Metformin doesn’t cure diabetes. Instead, it helps lower your blood sugar levels to a safe range. Metformin needs to be taken long-term. This may make you wonder what side effects it can cause. Metformin can cause mild and serious side effects, which are the same in men and women. Here’s what you need to know about these side effects and when you should call your doctor. Find out: Can metformin be used to treat type 1 diabetes? » Metformin causes some common side effects. These can occur when you first start taking metformin, but usually go away over time. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or cause a problem for you. The more common side effects of metformin include: heartburn stomach pain nausea or vomiting bloating gas diarrhea constipation weight loss headache unpleasant metallic taste in mouth Lactic acidosis The most serious side effect metformin can cause is lactic acidosis. In fact, metformin has a boxed warning about this risk. A boxed warning is the most severe warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious problem that can occur due to a buildup of metformin in your body. It’s a medical emergency that must be treated right away in the hospital. See Precautions for factors that raise your risk of lactic acidosis. Call your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms of lactic acidosis. If you have trouble breathing, call 911 right away or go to the nearest emergency room. extreme tiredness weakness decreased appetite nausea vomiting trouble breathing dizziness lighthea Continue reading >>

How Much Do You Know About Metformin?

How Much Do You Know About Metformin?

Metformin is a drug commonly used in the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. It is sold as a generic and under several brand names, including Glucophage, Glumetza, Riomet, and Fortamet. Both the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) recommend metformin as a cornerstone of therapy for Type 2 diabetes when exercise and dietary changes aren’t enough to keep blood glucose levels in target range. The low cost of the generic forms along with a long history of use make it a good choice for many individuals with Type 2 diabetes. Although metformin has helped many people lower their blood glucose levels, it does have some potential side effects that are worth knowing about. Understanding the risks and benefits of metformin is key to using it successfully. Take this quiz to test your knowledge of this popular diabetes medicine. (You can find the answers later in the article.) Q 1. How does metformin work to lower blood glucose levels? A. It stimulates the pancreas to make more insulin. B. It decreases the amount of glucose produced by the liver and makes it easier for cells to accept glucose from the bloodstream. C. It slows the digestive system’s breakdown of carbohydrates into glucose, allowing more time for insulin to work. D. It suppresses appetite, slows stomach emptying, and inhibits the release of glucagon (a hormone that raises blood glucose levels). 2. In addition to lowering blood glucose, metformin sometimes causes moderate weight loss. TRUE FALSE 3. In research studies, metformin use was associated with which of the following benefits in people with Type 2 diabetes? A. Reduced risk of morning high blood glucose. B. Reduced neuropathy (nerve damage). C. Reduced retinopathy (damage to the retina, a membrane in Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Metformin May Cause Problems With Thinking: Study

Side Effects Of Metformin May Cause Problems With Thinking: Study

The findings of a new study raises potential concerns about the side effects of meformin, suggesting that the popular diabetes drug may impair brain functions and cause users to experience problems thinking. Metformin is a widely used medication for treatment of type 2 diabetes, which is also known under the brand names Glumetza, Riomet, Fortamet and Glucophage. It is also part of several popular combination therapies, including the blockbuster medication Janumet, which combines metformin with the top selling diabetes drug Januvia. In a report published by the journal Diabetes Care, researchers compiled data from several different studies, including the Primary Research in Memory (PRIME) study; Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle (AIBL) study and data from the Barwon region of southeastern Australia. Researchers found that participants with diabetes performed worse on cognitive performance than those who did not have diabetes, with individuals taking a metformin drug performing significantly worse. More than 1,300 patients were evaluated who had Alzheimer’s disease, mildly impaired brain function and no cognitive impairments; along with a subset group which also had type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose intolerance. Patients who suffered a stroke or had neurodegenerative diseases other than Alzheimer’s were not included in the study. Patients with type 2 diabetes performed poorly on cognitive impairment tests and those who took metformin performed even worse. Researchers found metformin was associated with a vitamin B12 deficiency, which in turn resulted in impaired cognitive performance. Patients with vitamin B12 levels less than 250 pmol/L had the worst cognitive performance. Conversely, patients with type 2 diabetes taking metformin, but who also took calc Continue reading >>

Metformin In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Metformin In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Go to: Abstract Metformin is widely viewed as the best initial pharmacological option to lower glucose concentrations in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, the drug is contraindicated in many individuals with impaired kidney function because of concerns of lactic acidosis. To assess the risk of lactic acidosis associated with metformin use in individuals with impaired kidney function. In July 2014, we searched the MEDLINE and Cochrane databases for English-language articles pertaining to metformin, kidney disease, and lactic acidosis in humans between 1950 and June 2014. We excluded reviews, letters, editorials, case reports, small case series, and manuscripts that did not directly pertain to the topic area or that met other exclusion criteria. Of an original 818 articles, 65 were included in this review, including pharmacokinetic/metabolic studies, large case series, retrospective studies, meta-analyses, and a clinical trial. Although metformin is renally cleared, drug levels generally remain within the therapeutic range and lactate concentrations are not substantially increased when used in patients with mild to moderate chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rates, 30-60 mL/min per 1.73 m2). The overall incidence of lactic acidosis in metformin users varies across studies from approximately 3 per 100 000 person-years to 10 per 100 000 person-years and is generally indistinguishable from the background rate in the overall population with diabetes. Data suggesting an increased risk of lactic acidosis in metformin-treated patients with chronic kidney disease are limited, and no randomized controlled trials have been conducted to test the safety of metformin in patients with significantly impaired kidney function. Population-based studies d Continue reading >>

Metformin Overdose Causes Severe Lactic Acidosis

Metformin Overdose Causes Severe Lactic Acidosis

Lactic Acidosis is a common cause of metabolic acidosis. Metabolic acidosis has several effects on human physiology, the most serious of which is the lowering of the ventricular fibrillation threshold of the heart. Lactic acidosis in popular literature is connected to excessive exercise, but there are other causes for lactic acidosis including dehydration, starvation, severe anemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, and other conditions. The paper that follows is a case study published in a 2012 issue of J. Med having to do with an overdose of Metformin, an oral hypoglycemic agent used to treat Type II diabetics. It is a very interesting toxicology case. Lactic Acidosis Secondary to Metformin Overdose A Case Report Simon Timbrell, Gary Wilbourn, James Harper, Alan Liddle J Med Case Reports. 2012;6(230) Abstract and Introduction Abstract Introduction: Metformin is a commonly used treatment modality in type 2 diabetes mellitus, with a well documented side effect of lactic acidosis. In the intensive care setting lactate and pH levels are regularly used as a useful predictor of poor prognosis. In this article we highlight how high lactate levels are not an accurate predictor of mortality in deliberate metformin overdose. Case presentation: We present the case of a 70-year-old Caucasian man who took a deliberate metformin overdose of unknown quantity. He had a profound lactic acidosis at presentation with a pH of 6.93 and a lactate level of more than 20mmol/L. These figures would normally correspond with a mortality of more than 80%; however, with appropriate management this patient's condition improved. Conclusion: We provide evidence that the decision to treat severe lactic acidosis in deliberate metformin overdose should not be based on arterial lactate and pH levels, as would be th Continue reading >>

Glucophage / Metformin

Glucophage / Metformin

Glucophage, also known as metformin, is indicated for the treatment of type II diabetes, a serious disorder of blood sugar control. In people with diabetes, the pancreas does not produce enough insulin to control blood sugar, which then rises to harmful levels. Glucophage lowers these blood sugar levels by increasing the body's response to its own insulin. The drug decreases the amount of sugar the liver makes and the amount of sugar the intestines absorb. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Glucophage, made by Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, in 1994. Common side effects of Glucophage use include, but may not be limited to, a metallic taste in the mouth, diarrhea, nausea and upset stomach. Glucophage should not be used by patients with kidney disease or by those taking medications for heart failure . A boxed warning indicates that Glucophage may cause lactic acidosis (buildup of lactic acid in the blood), which is serious and can be fatal. This occurs mainly in people whose kidneys are not functioning properly. Patients given Glucophage should be made aware of lactic acidosis symptoms -- malaise, rapid breathing, shortness of breath and severe weakness. Lactic acidosis can be diagnosed with laboratory tests and requires that Glucophage therapy be stopped immediately and proper supportive care initiated. A report published in the May 2002 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association revealed that doctors prescribe a significant number of patients Glucophage even though the patients suffer from heart and kidney disorders. The study, which involved 100 patient prescriptions from a University of North Carolina hospital pharmacy, found that one-fourth of the users were inappropriately prescribed Glucophage. Researchers involved in the study fear doctors Continue reading >>

Metformin And Fatal Lactic Acidosis

Metformin And Fatal Lactic Acidosis

Publications Published: July 1998 Information on this subject has been updated. Read the most recent information. Dr P Pillans,former Medical Assessor, Centre for Adverse Reactions Monitoring (CARM), Dunedin Metformin is a useful anti-hyperglycaemic agent but significant mortality is associated with drug-induced lactic acidosis. Significant renal and hepatic disease, alcoholism and conditions associated with hypoxia (eg. cardiac and pulmonary disease, surgery) are contraindications to the use of metformin. Other risk factors for metformin-induced lactic acidosis are sepsis, dehydration, high dosages and increasing age. Metformin remains a major reported cause of drug-associated mortality in New Zealand. Of the 12 cases of lactic acidosis associated with metformin reported to CARM since 1977, 2 occurred in the last year and 8 cases had a fatal outcome. Metformin useful but small risk of potentially fatal lactic acidosis Metformin is a useful therapeutic agent for obese non-insulin dependent diabetics and those whose glycaemia cannot be controlled by sulphonylurea monotherapy. Lactic acidosis is an uncommon but potentially fatal adverse effect. The reported frequency of lactic acidosis is 0.06 per 1000 patient-years, mostly in patients with predisposing factors.1 Examples of metformin-induced lactic acidosis cases reported to CARM include: A 69-year-old man, with renal and cardiac disease, was prescribed metformin due to failing glycaemic control on glibenclamide monotherapy. He was well for six weeks, then developed lactic acidosis and died within 3 days. Post-surgical lactic acidosis caused the death of a 70-year-old man whose metformin was not withdrawn at the time of surgery. A 56-year-old woman, with no predisposing disease, died from lactic acidosis following major Continue reading >>

Invokana Compared To Metformin And Januvia

Invokana Compared To Metformin And Januvia

Every year, the American Diabetes Association updates its “standards of medical care in diabetes.” The 2016 edition, which is 119 pages long, is available here. The most important part for type 2 diabetics is found on page 61, which has a chart showing the therapies used to treat diabetes. First step is always metformin. Metformin is highly effective and low-risk, with side effects that are uncomfortable but typically not dangerous, like stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea. (Some patients, however, develop lactic acidosis.) When another drug is added to metformin (called “dual therapy”), there are a variety of options, including insulin, sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones, DPP-4 inhibitors, GLP-1 receptor agonists, and SGLT-2 inhibitors. Invokana is a SGLT-2 inhibitor. Januvia is a DPP-4 inhibitor. SGLT-2 inhibitors like Invokana treat diabetes by acting on the kidneys, where they block the reabsorption of glucose, leading to less glucose in the blood. DPP-4 inhibitors treat diabetes by acting on the pancreas, where they help maintain higher levels of GLP-1, a hormone which triggers the production of insulin by the pancreas. As the American Diabetes Association says, “Drug choice is based on patient preferences, as well as various patient, disease, and drug characteristics, with the goal of reducing blood glucose levels while minimizing side effects, especially hypoglycemia.” Obviously, you should discuss all of these issues with your doctor, and carefully consider their advice. But when it comes to the “patient preferences,” what should you know? As the Invokana website points out, there was indeed a clinical trial where Invokana was shown to be modestly better than Januvia in reducing A1C levels. Similarly, a “retrospective matched-control coh Continue reading >>

Metformin Induced Acute Pancreatitis

Metformin Induced Acute Pancreatitis

Go to: Case Report Nineteen year-old-man, known case of Type 2 Diabetes mellitus for 4 y on 1 g metformin twice daily since diagnosis of his diabetes. He was in his usual state of health till he presented to the emergency department reporting nausea, vomiting and epigastric pain for 3 d. On physical examination, his height was 170 cm and body weight 99 kg; body mass index (BMI) 34.3 kg/m2, looked mildly dehydrated. Vitals signs were stable. Systemic examination was unremarkable, apart from mild epigastric tenderness. Laboratory investigations showed HbA1c 7.7%, Creatinine 58 µmol/L, Amylase 462 units/l (normal range < 100), Lipase 1378 units/l (0–60), white blood cells 16.8/mm3 (4–11) 80% of which was neutrophils, CRP 258 mg/l (0–5), Mg 0.76 mmol/l (0.7–1.05), Ca 2.17 mmol/l (2.2–2.6), AST 18 units/l (< 39), ALT 34 units/l (< 41), TG 0.95 mmol/l (< 2.3), Lactate 1.4 mmol/l (0.5–1.6). Abdominal Ultrasound and ERCP were done for the patient, results showed no gallstones and clear biliary tract, respectively. CT confirmed the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis, with no identifiable cause. The patient was admitted to ICU for close monitoring and further investigation. Normalization of Amylase and Lipase was reached after Metformin cessation, and Supportive treatment in the form of IV insulin and IV fluids. Other potential causes of pancreatitis were excluded. Patient was discharged home in stable condition after 2 weeks. Few days later, after re-exposure to Metformin, he presented with recurrence of his previous symptoms, and elevation of Amylase and Lipase was documented. As a result, Metformin was suspended with improvement of his symptoms and biochemical profile. Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects

Metformin Side Effects

shakiness dizziness or lightheadedness sweating nervousness or irritability sudden changes in behavior or mood headache numbness or tingling around the mouth weakness pale skin hunger clumsy or jerky movements If hypoglycemia is left untreated, severe symptoms may develop: confusion seizures loss of consciousness Call your doctor immediately if you have any of the following symptoms of hyperglycemia or high blood sugar: extreme thirst frequent urination extreme hunger weakness blurred vision If high blood sugar is not treated, a serious, life-threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis could develop. Call your doctor immediately if you have any of these symptoms: dry mouth nausea and vomiting shortness of breath breath that smells fruity decreased consciousness Metformin may cause other side effects: diarrhea bloating stomach pain gas constipation unpleasant metallic taste in mouth heartburn headache sneezing cough runny nose flushing of the skin nail changes muscle pain Some side effects can be serious: chest pain rash Continue reading >>

Janumet Lawsuit | Janumet Lawyer, Janumet Attorney

Janumet Lawsuit | Janumet Lawyer, Janumet Attorney

The FDA is evaluating a potential signals of a serious risk and new safety information linking DPP4 diabetes drugs and rhabdomyolysis . This potentially life-threatening kidney side effect was identified by the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) between April and June 2017. UPDATE: FDA Warning Links Janumet and Severe Joint Pain August 28, 2015 The FDA is warning that Janumet may cause severe, disabling joint pain. Click here to read more. August 26, 2013 The U.S. Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation (JPML) has centralized more than 50 lawsuits involving diabetes drugs into the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of California. Plaintiffs allege that Janumet caused their pancreatic cancer or the wrongful death of a family member. Click here to read more. March 15, 2013 FDA publishes Safety Alert regarding potential risk of pancreatic cancer. Click here to read more. February 26, 2013 Study published in JAMA Internal Medicine links Januvia (sitagliptin), Byetta (exenatide), and other GLP-1 diabetes drugs to a doubled risk of pancreatitis. Click here to read more. Janumet (sitagliptin / metformin) is used along with diet and exercise to treat patients with type-2 diabetes. It was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in April 2007. Janumet manufactured by the drug company Merck, which created sitagliptin (sold alone as Januvia). Sitagliptin is the first anti-diabetic medication that works by inhibiting the enzyme DPP-4, which causes the pancreas to secrete extra insulin. More insulin in the body lowers blood-sugar levels. Janumet contains a combination of the following medications: Sitagliptin: DPP-4 inhibitor, causes the pancreas to secrete more insulin. Has been linked to an increased risk of acute pancreatitis, hemorrhagic pan Continue reading >>

Full List Of Metformin Recalls, Fda 2012-2017

Full List Of Metformin Recalls, Fda 2012-2017

Metformin is a popular generic, widely used and generally well tolerated for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. If you use sharps check out this helpful article on Sharps Container Disposal. Despite being made by dozens of manufacturers around the world, to date there have been only 15 recalls of the popular drug, with most being minor. The exceptions are a 27,000 kilo recall from Smruthi Organics in early 2014, and a recall of 117,049 sample cartons from Bristol-Myers Squibb in 2012. The next biggest Metformin recall after that came from Actavis Laboratories and affected 13,284 bottles in 2015. Metformin Recalls There have been 15 total recalls of Metformin from 2012 through 2017. The Metformin recalls involved a grand total of over 150,000 bottles of the popular diabetes medication. The most recent was a Class II event in late 2016 from Ascend Laboratories. Several other companies have been the focus of Metformin recalls. Most of the incidents were relatively small, in the sub-7,000 bottles range. The biggest by pill count was a 2012 recall from Bristol-Myers Squibb that affected over 117,000 sample packs. Metformin Facts Metformin is a diabetes medication in oral form that helps manage blood sugar levels. It’s used in cases of type 2 diabetes. It’s sometimes given along with insulin and other medications. It’s not meant for type 1 diabetes. Serious side effects can include allergic reaction with difficulty breathing or facial swelling, and dangerous or even fatal lactic acidosis marked by numbness, fatigue, slow heart rate, and vomiting. More common side effects are nausea, upset stomach, vomiting, and diarrhea. Major Metformin Recalls There have been three major Metformin recalls and several minor ones. The biggest in terms of bottles/cartons was a 2012 recall Continue reading >>

Glucophage Lawsuit

Glucophage Lawsuit

If this is your first visit, be sure tocheck out the FAQ by clicking thelink above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages,select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. Hi everyone, I don't post very often. But I ran across some very interesting information. I found out that there is going to be a lawsuit against the makers of glucophage because of all of the side effects. I was told that if you have been on this medication for more than 6 months with any of the normal side effects that, this lawsuit is worth looking into. If you want more information I would be glad to answer any questions. Please let me know what you found out about the med. I have been on it over a year now. I have been on this for 2 years now. I have problems with my liver function tests now. I love this medicine and am still taking it, to keep what little hair I have left ( it seems anyway). It also helped me to lose some weight and I had a surprise baby with it too! I hope they are not looking into long term side effects!!!!!!AHHH! The only thing I could find involving Met/Gluc and a lawsuit was a suit between to pharmaceutical companies for copy right infringement. If anyone find anything else, please let us know! DD: *Eleanor Alexandra* 13 months (born 13 weeks early on January 31, [emailprotected] 2lbs 2.6oz) Can someone look into this and find out if there's any credibility to this? i haven't had any big side effects but am concerned if there is something dangerous that we don't know about. Thanks! -Infertile/Treatment Resistant (Clomid/injectables) I'm posting this link not because I believe that there is anything to worry about, but because several of you seem interested. I truly think that Met/Gl Continue reading >>

More in diabetes