diabetestalk.net

Latest Type 1 Diabetes Cure

Dr Bart Roep: The Man Who Wants To Cure Type 1 Diabetes Within Six Years

Dr Bart Roep: The Man Who Wants To Cure Type 1 Diabetes Within Six Years

'The C-word is controversial within diabetes circles, yet the City of Hope had no reticence about making the claim.' - Jack Woodfield. Dr Bart Roep is the director of the diabetes research facilityat the City of Hope's Diabetes and Metabolism Research Institute. Born in the Netherlands, he leads a team whose mission is to cure type 1 diabetes, and while their ambitions are lofty, so is their early success. In March, Dr Roep's team published the results of a 14-year-boy with type 1 diabetes who underwent stem cell transplantation. The boy has since been free from insulin without any side effects for eight years. This, Dr Roep said, was the first definitive proof that type 1 diabetes can be cured. But there are still several critical questions to be answered. Dr Roep acknowledges that cure is "a dangerous word to use" in regard to type 1 diabetes research. "What we are trying to do is understand why people get type 1 diabetes and to translate this to find a cure," Roep said. "That is, of course, a dangerous word to use. But we think that we are onto a couple of leads." One of these leads is islet cell transplantation, a procedure that involves transplanting islet (insulin-producing) cells into patients from donor pancreases. In some cases, the transplants can help a patient come off insulin, but other times the cells are rejected or attacked by the immune system unless immunosuppressant drugs are also given, which can cause side effects. Dr Roep's team made a significant discovery along the way: by reading the immune signatures of patients they were able to predict how successful transplantation would be. Dr Roep says this is the first step towards personalising medicine in type 1 diabetes. "It turns out we can predict before surgery who has a fantastic chance of lasting Continue reading >>

Novo Expands Type 1 Diabetes R&d

Novo Expands Type 1 Diabetes R&d

Novo Nordisk has edged closer to finding a cure for type 1 diabetes and will expand its stem cell research into other chronic disease areas. The Copenhagen-based companys commitment to expand its focus to serious chronic diseases, as well as type 1 diabetes, has been made possible through its collaboration with the University of California San Francisco (UCSF). The company has revealed that it has made major progress in its development of human embryonic stem cell lines. A cure for type 1 diabetes will have an obvious impact on the company, which is one of the worlds biggest producers of insulin products and other diabetes treatments, with the latter accounting for most of its $17.5bn annual sales. But, despite this, Mads Krogsgaard Thomsen, Novo Nordisks executive vice president and chief science officer, said, Finding a cure for diabetes is part of Novo Nordisks vision and recent progress in our stem cell research and the access to robust and high-quality cell lines raises hopes for people with type 1 diabetes. The stem cell therapy involves replacing the beta cells that are lacking in people with type 1 diabetes. If the advances in this type of therapy continue to fruition, it could mean that sufferers of the disease will not rely on insulin. Thomsen continued, Our collaboration with UCSF is also expected to accelerate current and future partnerships to develop stem cell-based therapies for treatment of other serious chronic diseases. The agreement with UCSF has enabled Novo Nordisk to licence a technology to enable the generation of good manufacturing practice (GMP) compliant human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines, as well as the rights to develop these into regenerative medicine therapies. Researchers from Novo and UCSF will work together on the cell lines that th Continue reading >>

New Type 1 Diabetes Treatment And Prevention Options On The Horizon

New Type 1 Diabetes Treatment And Prevention Options On The Horizon

There’s new hope on the horizon for those with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Biopharmaceutical company TetraGenetics is working on an innovative drug therapy that can stop or prevent the body’s immune system from attacking its own pancreas. How T1D Develops Most people who develop T1D do so as a result of a particular virus that triggers an exaggerated autoimmune response. In the pancreas, the cells that produce insulin are called beta cells. In people that have a particular type of gene associated with T1D, the beta cells have a quality (an antigen) that closely resembles the antigens found in the virus. When you are exposed to the virus, your immune system activates its T cells to start combating the infection by creating antibodies. However, these antibodies can’t distinguish between the beta cells and the virus cells. They look too similar, so the antibodies destroy them all in an attempt to protect against the viral infection. Unfortunately, by killing off your beta cells, your immune system has also eliminated your body’s ability to produce insulin. You are now diabetic. Both Genes and Virus Necessary for T1D to Develop There are four viruses that can cause the autoimmune cascade that results in T1D: German measles, mumps, rotavirus, and the B4 strain of the coxsackie B virus. These viruses all possess antigens that are similar to the antigens in the beta cells of the pancreas. It’s important to note that not everyone who is exposed to these viruses will develop T1D. You have to already possess the genetic makeup associated with T1D. If you do carry the T1D genes but don’t get any of these viruses, you may never actually develop the disease. You have to have both. In other words, if you do have these genes and you contract one of the viruses, then you will li Continue reading >>

Looking To Cure Type 1 Diabetes, Investors Front $114m To Launch A Pioneering Human Study At Semma

Looking To Cure Type 1 Diabetes, Investors Front $114m To Launch A Pioneering Human Study At Semma

Three years ago, Harvard’s Doug Melton published a landmark study outlining how he had successfully used stem cells to create insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells that were inserted in bulk into mice and successfully protected from an immune response — a breakthrough in regenerative medicine that bore real promise to provide a curative approach for Type 1 diabetes that could conceivably end a lifetime of insulin shots. It was the culmination of 23 years of lab work, launched when his son was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. And that achievement marked the beginning of something new in biotech. That same year Semma Therapeutics would be launched — with a $44 million A round landing in 2015 — in pursuit of a mission to complete one of the most ambitious preclinical programs in the regenerative med field. And after working on all the nitty gritty research needed to see if this tech could be scaled up to human size, an expanded syndicate of venture investors have put together a whopping $114 million round with plans to take this into humans for a first-of-its-kind proof-of-concept study. One of the big challenges Semma faced in scaling up, Melton tells me, was to create a membrane specifically designed with pores that were large enough for molecules to pass through but too small for immune cells to penetrate. Using some calculations from the lab, Melton and his colleagues estimated that they would need some 150 million cells — possibly ranging up to three times that amount — in order to provide the natural insulin needed to eliminate the shots. Melton compares the membrane to a tea bag, but one that couldn’t be overloaded. The replacement cells, he said, “will only secrete the right amount depending on the level of sugar in the blood.” The big round mark Continue reading >>

Possible Cures For Type-1 In The News (december)

Possible Cures For Type-1 In The News (december)

Here are some "bits and pieces" updates for December. Update on Dr. Faustman's Phase-II Trial of BCG Dr. Faustman's lab has published their Fall 2017 newsletter, which you can read here: This newsletter includes more information on her research, especially from the 3rd International BCG conference, The BCG Working Group, and the 2nd edition of the BCG and Autoimmunity book she edited. There are three pieces of new news there: The phase-II trial was fully enrolled in Summer of 2017. This is important because we now know when the trial will end. Since this is a five year study, they should finish collecting data in Summer of 2022 and publish before Summer of 2023. They have given BCG to the three untreated patients from their phase-I trial, so they will have data from six people to report in the future. The lab is going to be recruiting for more studies in the future, so would like to hear from anyone who is interested in participating. No details on future trials were provided. Another piece of news is that Dr. Faustman is branching out, and trying to apply BCG treatment to Fibromyalgia. This research is being done in collaboration with EpicGenetics, and they hope to start the trial in early 2018. If anything applicable to the type-1 world comes up in this research, I'll report it. Since Fibromyalgia is not generally considered an autoimmune disease, I'm not sure how much "cross pollination" of results there will be. You can read more about it here: DILfrequency Trial Completed There is a lot of research ongoing on IL-2 which is part of the immune system. About 18 months ago, I summarized all this research here: with an update here: One of those clinical trials was called "DILfrequency" and that trial has finished, and the results published. The purpose of that trial was Continue reading >>

A Cure For Type 1 Diabetes? Massachusetts General Hospital Study Finds Generic Drug Promising

A Cure For Type 1 Diabetes? Massachusetts General Hospital Study Finds Generic Drug Promising

A cure for type 1 diabetes? Massachusetts General Hospital study finds generic drug promising Research at Massachusetts General Hospital looks increasingly like a long-term cure for type 1 diabetes, with a newly released study on Thursday showing patients have normal blood sugar levels eight years after a clinical trial. In research published Thursday in journal npj Vaccines, patients who had been treated with the bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine -- an inexpensive, generic vaccine used around the world to prevent tuberculosis -- had normal blood sugar levels eight years after the trial ended. While it took three years for patients to see results from the vaccine, two doses of the drug spaced four weeks apart were still having a lasting impact eight years later. "It's kind of big news," said Dr. Denise Faustman, director of the Massachusetts General Hospital immunobiology laboratory and principal investigator of the trial. "It's the first trial showing (long-term reversal of diabetes), and more trials are on the way. But scientifically it's pretty cool." The recently published study also details how the vaccine genetically alters the body's white blood cells so they process glucose, making up for the pancreas' inability to produce insulin to do the same. In type 1 diabetes -- referred to in the past as juvenile diabetes -- the immune system damages the pancreas and blocks the cells from producing insulin. "It's not only the discovery that something cheap in new cohorts brings down blood sugar, but why. We've discovered new pathways for lowering blood sugar," Faustman said. "It's an important discovery for the basic science of diabetes care. And by the way, we have a cheap BCG vaccine that seems to be doing it." Faustman has been working for over a decade on trials Continue reading >>

Novo Nordisk Expands Cell Therapy R&d, Says Type 1 Diabetes Cure A Step Closer

Novo Nordisk Expands Cell Therapy R&d, Says Type 1 Diabetes Cure A Step Closer

Novo Nordisk expands cell therapy R&D, says type 1 diabetes cure a step closer Company has reached milestone in stem cell therapy as it looks to broaden range beyond diabetes Novo Nordisk has unveiled an increased investment in stem cell-based therapies and an expansion beyond its current focus on type 1 diabetes into other serious chronic diseases. The Copenhagen, Denmark-based company is one of the worlds biggest producers of insulin products and other diabetes treatments, with these products accounting for most of its $17.5bn annual sales. Now it says it has reached a milestone in the development of a stem cell therapy which replaces the beta cells missing in type 1 diabetes patients - bringing it one step closer to a cure which could one day free patients from their dependence on insulin. This would of course be the ultimate disruptive innovation for Novo Nordisk and its business, but the company says it wants to be at the forefront of this expected breakthrough. "Finding a cure for diabetes is part of Novo Nordisk's vision and recent progress in our stem cell research and the access to robust and high-quality cell lines raises hopes for people with type 1 diabetes, said Mads Krogsgaard Thomsen, Novo Nordisks executive vice president and chief science officer. Novo says it has reached a milestone in producing high-quality stem cells lines for transplantation through its partnership with the University of California San Francisco (UCSF). Thomsen added: Our collaboration with UCSF is also expected to accelerate current and future partnerships to develop stem cell-based therapies for treatment of other serious chronic diseases. Funding in the wider field of cell and gene therapies is now increasing rapidly, with groundbreaking CAR-T products and Spark's Luxturna reach Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: Could Modified Blood Stem Cells Lead To A Cure?

Type 1 Diabetes: Could Modified Blood Stem Cells Lead To A Cure?

Increasing levels of a certain protein in blood stem cells so that the immune system stops attacking insulin cells in the pancreas could be a way to halt type 1 diabetes, according to a new study reported in Science Translational Medicine. Researchers led by those at Harvard Medical School's Boston Children's Hospital in Massachusetts found that they could reverse hyperglycemia in diabetic mice by modifying their defective blood stem cells to increase production of a protein called PD-L1. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas fails to produce enough insulin. Without sufficient insulin, the body cannot convert blood sugar, or glucose, into energy for cells, with the result that it builds up in the bloodstream. Over time, high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, leads to serious complications such as vision problems and damage to blood vessels, nerves, and kidneys. Immune system attacks beta cells Around 5 percent of the 23.1 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the United States have type 1 diabetes. The body produces insulin in the pancreas, which is an organ that sits just behind the stomach. It contains insulin-producing beta cells that normally sense glucose levels in the blood and release just the right amount of insulin to keep sugar levels normal. In type 1 diabetes, a fault in the immune system makes inflammatory T cells — which usually react to "foreign" material — attack beta cells in the pancreas. Nobody knows exactly how this comes about, but scientists suspect that a virus, or some other trigger in the environment, sets it off in people with certain inherited genes. The "holy grail" of scientists seeking a cure for type 1 diabetes is to find a way to prevent or stop the immune attack on the beta cells. Several approaches have been tried, including "cytostatic Continue reading >>

8 Amazing Breakthroughs In Diabetes Research That Are Giving Us Hope

8 Amazing Breakthroughs In Diabetes Research That Are Giving Us Hope

8 Amazing Breakthroughs in Diabetes Research That Are Giving Us Hope According to recent research , we're not entirely sure how many diseases the label 'diabetes' covers. But no matter what causes our bodies to struggle with their blood sugar levels, it's a serious condition that requires daily care. Scientists have been working hard to find cures, new treatments, and better management techniques for the millions of people worldwide dealing with diabetes. Here are some of the latest developments you need to know about. 1. Insulin producing implants made from stem cells Clinical trials began last year for testing for ViaCyte's PEC-Direct device ; a credit-card sized implant containing insulin-producing cells derived from stem cells. Previous research had shown the implants could mature and function inside patients. Together with a cohort of volunteers who started testing in January, the new research should tell us soon whether the technology can help people with type-1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes develops when a person's immune system wipes out insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. But it turns out that another type of immature beta cell has been hiding in our pancreases all along, and scientists think it might be possible to use these 'virgin beta cells' to restore the functionality of the pancreas. A drug on the World Health Organisation's list of essential drugs could have another purpose ; blocking a molecule implemented in the autoimmune response that can give rise to type-1 diabetes. Called methyldopa, the compound already has an important job treating high blood pressure in pregnant women and children. It's left to be seen if it could help reduce the incidence of diabetes in some way, but the fact it's already being used - rather than being stuck in the lab Continue reading >>

Has A British Man Really Been Cured Of Type 1 Diabetes?

Has A British Man Really Been Cured Of Type 1 Diabetes?

I have been living with type 1 diabetes for 25 years now. The relentlessness of type 1, and the fact that I will probably live with this non-preventable condition for the rest of my life never goes away, but I have almost made peace with it. A few days ago, I saw something that gave me pause. “British man with type 1 diabetes to receive tests after coming off insulin,” read Diabetes.co.uk’s headline. The article goes onto say that, “Daniel Darkes, from Daventy in Northamptonshire, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes seven years ago. But his recent tests have baffled doctors as his pancreas has shown signs of working properly again.” My first thoughts upon reading this were, “this can’t be true,” and “what’s the real explanation here?” There are many types of diabetes including type 2, LADA, and monogenic. Maybe he actually had one of those types instead of type 1. Usually, tests can determine this quickly though, so why was it not the case with Dan? I live in the UK and I wanted to get to the bottom of things. I managed to get in touch with ‘Miracle Dan’, as he’s been called by his friends. Although he is saving the specific details of his recent test results from the U.S. for an upcoming exclusive interview with another media outlet, he spoke to me and answered some of my questions about everything that has been happening. Please tell us a bit about yourself and your diabetes. When were you diagnosed? I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes back in February 2011 at the age of 23, after just leaving the army. I started a new engineering job and within two weeks of starting, I noticed the traditional symptoms of type 1 diabetes: thirst, weight loss, blurry vision, and a lot of vomiting. I collapsed and was taken by ambulance to hospital where I wa Continue reading >>

Stem Cells For Type 1 Treatment Could Be Found On The Tip Of Your Tongue

Stem Cells For Type 1 Treatment Could Be Found On The Tip Of Your Tongue

Stem cells for type 1 treatment could be found on the tip of your tongue Stem cells for type 1 treatment could be found on the tip of your tongue Immune disorder identified that could lead to type 1 diabetes treatment 31 January 2018 A pioneering research project will discover whether the secret to treating type 1 diabetes could lie in your tongue. 90 participants are being recruited to take part in the trial, which will focus on picking out stem cells from taste buds found in the mouth. The study will be led by researchers from the National Institute of Ageing based in America. The research will investigate whether stem cells taken from the tongue can be transformed and bred into cells capable of producing insulin in response to fluctuating levels of glucose. Five samples will be taken from each participant's tongue to provide material for the research . The stem cells will be fed a complex molecular mix under tightly-controlled conditions in an attempt to turn them into insulin-producing cells. If successful, the process could help towards developing specially-tailored treatments capable of replacing insulin-producing beta cells lost from the pancreas. The new cells could either be transplanted directly into the patient or put into the body using a state-of-the-art capsule as part of an encapsulated islet cells treatment. Researchers believe that, in the longer term, the beta-like cells could be produced directly from the patient's own taste buds providing a bespoke treatment that may also eliminate the need for strong drugs to suppress a patient's immune response following a transplant. The procedure could make transplants a more viable form of treatment for people with type 1 diabetes . However, there is a long way to go with many years of further research expected Continue reading >>

Actobio's Cheese-producing Bacteria Could Reverse Type 1 Diabetes

Actobio's Cheese-producing Bacteria Could Reverse Type 1 Diabetes

ActoBio Therapeutics has received permission from the FDA to start a clinical trial for a type 1 diabetes treatment that uses a bacterial strain also used in cheese production. After being cleared by the FDA,ActoBio,based in Belgium, plans to begin a PhaseIb/IIa study for its drug, AG019, to treat early-onset type 1 diabetes. What makes this treatment special is that it consists of an oral capsule containingLactococcus lactis, a type of bacteria used to produce cheese and buttermilk. The bacteria used by ActoBio are engineered to expressIL-10 and the autoantigen human proinsulin, which together prime the production of regulatory T cells thatrestorethe immune systems tolerance to insulin-producing cells and stop attacking and destroying them. The reason why the treatment is delivered using bacteria is that they can produce the drugs locally where they are needed, sparing the rest of the body and therefore reducing possible side effects. ActoBio also hints that using bacteria might be a more cost-effective solution compared to traditional approaches where biological products are directly injected. Currently, type 1 diabetics are dependent on glucose monitoring and insulin injections for the rest of their lives. What ActoBio is proposing could actually reverse the course of the disease if given early enough, by protecting the remaining insulin-producing cells that have not yet been destroyed. Preclinical tests have shown that AG019 brought blood sugar levels back to normal in around 60% of mice tested. And when combined with an antibody against the T cell receptor CD3, the treatment reversed diabetes in 89% of mice if the treatment was started at an early stage of the disease. ActoBios approach reflects an increasing interest in using bacteria to deliver treatments. For e Continue reading >>

Targeting A Cure For Type 1 Diabetes

Targeting A Cure For Type 1 Diabetes

How Long Will We Have To Wait? about the book Every person touched by diabetes wants to know when there will be a cure. A lot of work is going on, but what are the chances of a breakthrough? Targeting a Cure for Type 1 Diabetes is diaTribe's comprehensive overview of where we are and where we're headed in that search. Rich in detail and written for patients and their families, the report features the latest information on the most promising approaches for curing diabetes. These include immune therapeutics, islet and pancreas transplantation, beta cell regeneration and survival agents, and the artificial pancreas. With an introduction by Dr. Aaron Kowalski of the JDRF, and with concluding remarks by our Editor in Chief, Kelly Close, Targeting a Cure for Type 1 Diabetes is essential reading for anyone who wants to know more about what a cure might look like or when it will be available. Although a cure may not be right around the corner, this book lays bare the possibilities of all the exciting research now underway. To buy a copy of Targeting a Cure, visit the ADA's store. critical acclaim "Targeting a Cure for Type 1 Diabetes will give you hope that someday struggling with the management of type 1 diabetes will only be a memory."- Richard M. Bergenstal, MD (Executive Director, International Diabetes Center, Minneapolis, MN) “After reading about Kelly Close and her teams’ incredible journey of discovery, we cannot only continue to dream, but we can open our eyes each morning to a reality that brings us closer, inch by inch, discovery by discovery, to a day when glucose control will be automatic and people with type 1 diabetes will be ‘cured.’”- Francine R. Kaufman, MD (Chief Medical Officer and Vice President, Global Medical, Clinical & Health Affairs, Medtroni Continue reading >>

Rare Tumor Could Help Produce Insulin For Type-1 Diabetics, Studyshows

Rare Tumor Could Help Produce Insulin For Type-1 Diabetics, Studyshows

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) Researchers have a found a surprising potential ally in the search for a cure for Type-1 diabetes. Its a rare tumor that produces a lot of what diabetics are missing insulin. Type-1 diabetics have two problems. Their own immune system destroys the beta-cells that make insulin. To cure diabetes, you have to stop that autoimmune attack and then replace the destroyed beta-cells. CBS2s Dr. Max Gomez first met diabetic Alecia Wesner shortly after she was diagnosed with Type-1 diabetes at age 6. Her continuous glucose monitor and a small insulin pump have made managing her blood sugar easier, but not easy. Theres no break from Type-1 diabetes, theres no vacation, she said. Trying to manage all of this with a lot of things that beep to wake me up if something has gone too high or two low is a tremendous amount of work. What gives Alecia a lot of hope for the future is whats being done in the lab of Dr. Andrew Stewart at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. He explains that even though Alecia has had diabetes for almost four decades, she still has a few beta-cells left. The key to getting them to replicate Alecias destroyed beta-cells, says Dr. Stewart, may lie in the DNA of rare benign tumors called beta-cell insulinomas. Those small insulinoma tumors in the pancreas have the genomic recipe, if you will, Dr. Stewart said. They now have the genomic wiring diagram or roadmap for knowing how to make beta-cells replicate. By sequencing every gene in these tumors, Dr. Stewart found the ones that put the brakes on beta-cell regeneration. As it turns out, certain drugs can take the brakes off the genes in normal beta-cells so they can start to divide. We found lots of candidates and were in the process now of screening drugs that take off these other br Continue reading >>

Could A Vaccine Be The End Of Type 1 Diabetes?

Could A Vaccine Be The End Of Type 1 Diabetes?

Could a Vaccine Be the End of Type 1 Diabetes? A doctor at City of Hope in Duarte is working on a revolutionary cure If the human body were like the economy, your blood sugar would be the local currency. Its value should be stable like the dollar, but type 1 diabetes makes it boomerang like Bitcoin. Sugar too high? You could go into a coma. Too low and you could die in your sleep. Its a horrible disease, says Dutch immunologist Bart Roep. The symptoms often manifest in childhood, and if you are diagnosed before age five, your prognosis is worse than if you had leukemia, he adds. Determined to improve those odds, Roep left the Netherlands to join City of Hope hospital in Duarte in 2016 and now leads a project with the goal of curing type 1 diabetes (T1D) in six years. Such a tight timetable may sound, at best, ambitious, but City of Hope backs it with a $50 million grant and plenty of academic street cred. Although better known for its cancer treatment, the institution benefits from a legacy of pioneering diabetes research dating to the 1970s, when two of its scientists helped develop the first synthetic human insulin, the protein that regulates blood sugar. That insulin, which T1D patients must administer daily via syringes or pumps, has saved millions of lives, but it sheds no light on the diseases origins. An autoimmune disorder, T1D arises when the immune system lays siege to the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. (This is quite different from type 2 diabetes, which usually appears later in life, doesnt involve the immune system, and is linked to lifestyle issues like obesity.) About 1.5 million Americans are affected by T1D, and the search for the root cause has turned up a skein of possible hereditary and environmental factors. For example, although more tha Continue reading >>

More in diabetes