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Type 1 Diabetes And The Magic Cure

Type 1 Diabetes And The Magic Cure

See how Spartans make a difference in Michigan It can be easy to be misled by unscientific remedies. Learn how to manage this disease with research-based information. Posted on December 28, 2017 by Kris Swartzendruber , Michigan State University Extension As a diabetes educator, I have heard many people who have type 1 diabetes in my classes share what I refer to as magic cures for their disease. These remedies often come from television and/or radio advertisements, but there also books written by so-called experts promoting an herb, plant-based food or pill that will miraculously reverse the symptoms associated with diabetes, curing those afflicted with this disease forever. Unfortunately, there is no current, research-based, cure for diabetes. However, there are ways to manage the disease that can help prevent or delay complications and allow those with type 1 to live long and healthy lives. In order to better understand the challenges associated with type 1 diabetes, its important to know more about this disease. Type 1 diabetes is most prevalent in children, teenagers and young adults, but anyone can be affected by this disease. The exact cause of type 1 diabetes is not known, but genetics, environmental influences and other factors can play a role in the development of the disease. Little or no insulin is produced by the pancreas so a person with type 1 must treat their disease with insulin, diet and exercise. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA) , when a person is diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, the core to proper management is composed of the following elements: Medication: Type 1 diabetes means the pancreas is no longer producing insulin, therefore, insulin injections either by insulin pens, syringes or an insulin pump will be required. The amou Continue reading >>

City Of Hope Aims To Cure Type 1 Diabetes In Six Years

City Of Hope Aims To Cure Type 1 Diabetes In Six Years

It’s an extraordinary goal powered by an extraordinary gift. City of Hope’s Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute is committed to developing a cure for type 1 diabetes (T1D) within six years, fueled by a $50 million funding program led by the Wanek family. It seems an audacious goal for a comprehensive cancer center, but City of Hope has a long history of groundbreaking work in diabetes. Research conducted by City of Hope led to the development of synthetic human insulin, which is still used today by many of the estimated 1.5 million Americans with T1D and 27 million with type 2 diabetes (T2D). “City of Hope is best positioned to take on this challenge,” said Robert W. Stone, president and chief executive officer of City of Hope. “This is thanks to our 40-year institutional legacy of pioneering treatment and research advances in diabetes.” The funding for the transformative research needed to embark on such an endeavor is led by a gift from the Wanek family, which owns Ashley Furniture Industries, the world’s largest home furniture manufacturer. “City of Hope scientists’ research has revolutionized the understanding and treatment of diabetes,” said Todd Wanek, chief executive officer of Ashley Furniture, speaking on behalf of his family. “It continues today as physicians and scientists gain systemic understanding of diabetes as a complex, multifaceted disease.” Through the generosity of the family and gifts from an anonymous donor, City of Hope will be able to devote more than $50 million over the next six years to an unprecedented research effort: The Wanek Family Project for Type 1 Diabetes at City of Hope. A Multifaceted Approach The Wanek Family Project will result in the creation of a series of highly focused programs at City of Hope. The Continue reading >>

Israeli, Harvard Researchers To Improve Insulin Management For Type-1 Diabetics - Health & Science - Jerusalem Post

Israeli, Harvard Researchers To Improve Insulin Management For Type-1 Diabetics - Health & Science - Jerusalem Post

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page. Currently, there is no available data on the insulin injection habits of this type 1 population, Atlas said. In the age of smart connected devices in which insulin injections will be registered on the patients smartphone and data will be gathered in cloud-based platforms we see an opportunity to collect accurate data on the majority of type 1 patients and to develop a product that will help them better control their disease. Founded in 2014, DreaMed develops health solutions and provides decision support tools for patients with both type 1 and type 2, or adult-onset, diabetes, using algorithms to optimize intensive insulin therapy, according to the company. The start-ups first product, GluocoSitter licensed to Irish medical device company Medtronic is an artificial pancreas technology that provides around-the-clock monitoring of glucose levels for insulin pumps. Its most recent product, Advisor, is an on-demand personalized tool that uses machine learning to help patients make treatment decisions by analyzing their existing glucose readings. The Israeli and American collaborators will be working to develop automated algorithms for insulin management and will evaluate the new technology in a clinical setting, explained Dr. Eyal Dassau, a senior research fellow in biomedical engineering at Harvards John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and a principal study investigator. This collaborative work, he said, will enable the team members to develop a novel dosing support system for patients on multiple daily injections and to improve care for many that are not using insulin pumps. The engineering schools dean, Prof. Francis J. Doyle III, whose past work includes design of drug-delivery devices for diabetes, i Continue reading >>

Curing Type 1 Diabetes: An Interview With Dr. Faustman

Curing Type 1 Diabetes: An Interview With Dr. Faustman

Curing Type 1 Diabetes: An Interview with Dr. Faustman Denise Faustman, M.D., PhD., is the director of the Immunobiology Laboratories at Mass General in Boston, Massachusetts. Dr. Faustman is currently in the midst of leading a trial at The Faustman Lab that uses the BCG vaccine (which has traditionally been used to vaccinate against tuberculosis) to improve A1c results in long-term diabetics with a little tiny bit of C-Peptide. Beyond Type 1 recently spoke with Dr. Faustman about conducting her research and the main takeaways of her efforts to make a difference in the world of diabetes. Find out about the research shes willing to bet her career on! The trial, which is in phase II, is set to go on for about five years. Its a big trial, Dr. Faustman says. Its a 150-cohort trial, randomized 2-1, so two people get the vaccine, and one person is the placebo. And its a long trial its a five-year-long trial. Why do we go five years? The endpoint of the trial is a tough endpoint that is hard to achieve: its a decrease in hemoglobin A1C greater than 10%. Were looking for a clinical effect that is also a therapeutic effect. Nobody sought out people with five years, 10 years, 15 years [of living with diabetes] for these kinds of immuno-intervention trials, Dr. Faustman says. This is one of the rare trials of the world where we dont think we need to intervene at the moment you end up in the emergency room with new onset Type 1 diabetes . This trial is aiming to achieve a novel and safe intervention for people with Type 1 diabetes . People who have diabetes look at the landscape and see that everybody is only trying these interventions in recent onsets, and they turn around and think, What about me? Theres a lot of new pumps , a lot of new meters, but what about the innovation tha Continue reading >>

Possible Cures For Type-1 In The News (december)

Possible Cures For Type-1 In The News (december)

Here are some "bits and pieces" updates for December. Update on Dr. Faustman's Phase-II Trial of BCG Dr. Faustman's lab has published their Fall 2017 newsletter, which you can read here: This newsletter includes more information on her research, especially from the 3rd International BCG conference, The BCG Working Group, and the 2nd edition of the BCG and Autoimmunity book she edited. There are three pieces of new news there: The phase-II trial was fully enrolled in Summer of 2017. This is important because we now know when the trial will end. Since this is a five year study, they should finish collecting data in Summer of 2022 and publish before Summer of 2023. They have given BCG to the three untreated patients from their phase-I trial, so they will have data from six people to report in the future. The lab is going to be recruiting for more studies in the future, so would like to hear from anyone who is interested in participating. No details on future trials were provided. Another piece of news is that Dr. Faustman is branching out, and trying to apply BCG treatment to Fibromyalgia. This research is being done in collaboration with EpicGenetics, and they hope to start the trial in early 2018. If anything applicable to the type-1 world comes up in this research, I'll report it. Since Fibromyalgia is not generally considered an autoimmune disease, I'm not sure how much "cross pollination" of results there will be. You can read more about it here: DILfrequency Trial Completed There is a lot of research ongoing on IL-2 which is part of the immune system. About 18 months ago, I summarized all this research here: with an update here: One of those clinical trials was called "DILfrequency" and that trial has finished, and the results published. The purpose of that trial was Continue reading >>

See More Of Type 1 Diabetes Cure Related Research News On Facebook

See More Of Type 1 Diabetes Cure Related Research News On Facebook

Stanford researchers devise method for bone marrow transplants without using chemotherapy. "Once a patient's blood and immune system can safely be replaced, any disease caused by the patient's own blood and immune cells could potentially be cured by a one-time application of blood stem cell transplantation, they said. Safely replacing a patient's blood and immune cells will get rid of the cells that attack their own tissues and produce disease like rheumatoid arthritis and Type 1 diabetes." Tightly and automatically matching the release of hormones such as insulin to control blood sugar levels for Type 1 diabetics is the Holy Grail in the development of an artificial pancreas. Now researchers may have come one step closer with a fully implantable insulin delivery and glucose sensing system that is guided by a novel algorithm. The device is intended to be implanted in the intraperitonea... See More Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Print Diagnosis Diagnostic tests include: Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells (hemoglobin). The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates diabetes. If the A1C test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions that can make the A1C test inaccurate — such as pregnancy or an uncommon form of hemoglobin (hemoglobin variant) — your doctor may use these tests: Random blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken at a random time and may be confirmed by repeat testing. Blood sugar values are expressed in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Regardless of when you last ate, a random blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or higher suggests diabetes, especially when coupled with any of the signs and symptoms of diabetes, such as frequent urination and extreme thirst. Fasting blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken after an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it's 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes. If you're diagnosed with diabetes, your doctor may also run blood tests to check for autoantibodies that are common in type 1 diabetes. These tests help your doctor distinguish between type 1 and type 2 diabetes when the diagnosis is uncertain. The presence of ketones — byproducts from the breakdown of fat — in your urine also suggests type 1 diab Continue reading >>

A Mother's Mission To Find Cure For Type 1 Diabetes

A Mother's Mission To Find Cure For Type 1 Diabetes

Farmington, Ark. - Stephanie Lovell's son, Beau, was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes three years ago. To help find a cure for Beau and others battling the disease, Stephanie organizes Hometown Walk every year in Farmington. People will gather at a vacant lot behind Sonic and walk to the Sports Complex and back. Registration will happen before the walk starting at 8:00 a.m. The event will also feature a bouncy house and silent auction. Fund will be donated to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. For more information on the Hometown Walk, click here. Continue reading >>

A Startup Looking To Reverse Type 1 Diabetes Just Raised $114 Million

A Startup Looking To Reverse Type 1 Diabetes Just Raised $114 Million

Semma Therapeutics cofounder Doug Melton. Courtesy Semma Therapeutics Semma Therapeutics, a startup developing treatments with an aim to cure type 1 diabetes, just raised $114 million. It is using stem cells to make beta cells, which are key to regulating blood sugar in the body. In people living with type 1 diabetes, the body has destroyed these cells. If it works, it could lead to other regenerative medicine treatments. A startup that wants to change the way we treat type 1 diabetes just raised $114 million. Semma Therapeutics, a company that got its start in 2014, is researching ways to use stem cells that act like key cells responsible for regulating blood sugar levels in the bodies of healthy people. The aim is to treat — and effectively cure — type 1 diabetes. The latest funding round was co-led by Eight Roads Ventures and Cowen Healthcare Investments, while existing investors MPM Capital, F-Prime Capital Partners, ARCH Venture Partners, Novartis, Medtronic and JDRF's T1D Fund also invested as part of the round. The $114 million, combined with $49 million the company raised previously, brings Semma's total funding to $163 million. The plan is to use this funding to get Semma's treatment, which has been tested in animals, into human trials. About 30 million Americans have a form of diabetes, a condition in which the body can't process sugar in the blood correctly. For the roughly 1.25 million people living with type 1 diabetes, the condition is an autoimmune disease in which the body mistakenly kills beta cells found in the pancreas that are supposed to make insulin, a hormone that helps people absorb and process the sugar in food. Treating type 1 diabetes is — in theory — straightforward: If you could find a way to replace the beta cells in the body, the b Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Can Be Cured By New Drug : Latest News, Information, Pictures, Articles

Type 1 Diabetes Can Be Cured By New Drug : Latest News, Information, Pictures, Articles

New drug for Type 1 diabetes 'developed': Scientists Scientists claim to have achieved a major breakthrough in the fight against Type 1 diabetes by developing a treatment which would save the sufferers from a lifetime of insulin injections. Dogs can sniff out low blood sugar in diabetes patients: Study London: Dogs can be trained to spot the warning sign of diabetes in patients by sniffing a chemical found in our breath which provides a flag to warn of dangerously-low blood sugar levels, a new study has found. Psychological stress can triple Type-1 diabetes risk in kids London: Serious life events in childhood, such as death or illness in the family, divorce separation, a new child or adult in the family, and conflicts in the family can triple the risk of subsequently developing Type-1 diabetes (T1D), a new research has found. Artificial pancreas can treat diabetes efficiently Toronto: Compared to conventional diabetes treatment, an external artificial pancreas can improve glucose control and treatment of Type-1 diabetes, shows a study. Melbourne: Researchers, using mathematical models, have defined for the first time how powerfully immune cells respond to infection and disease. New drug for controlling diabetes discovered Washington: In a breakthrough, Indian-origin scientists have identified a potential new therapeutic target for controlling high blood sugar - a finding that could help millions suffering from type 2 diabetes worldwide. 3D printing to help treat Type 1 diabetes London: Researchers have explored how 3D printing can be used to help treat Type 1 diabetes. The 3D printing technique, known as bio-plotting, has taken researchers a step closer to being able to help patients who experience severe hypoglycemic situation. Type 2 diabetes drug may protect agains Continue reading >>

Human Study Re-ignites Debate Over Controversial Diabetes

Human Study Re-ignites Debate Over Controversial Diabetes "cure"

* TB vaccine seen attacking disease-caused autoimmunity * Long-term type 1 diabetes patients produce insulin again * Effect lasts for a week, further trials to boost dosing NEW YORK, Aug 8 (Reuters) - A controversial experimental cure for type 1 diabetes, using a tuberculosis vaccine invented a century ago, appears to temporarily vanquish the disease, according to a study in a handful of patients led by a scientist long criticized by her peers. There is no guarantee the results from this early-stage trial, published on Wednesday in the journal PLoS One, will stand up in larger studies, which are now under way. Other diabetes researchers criticized it for going beyond the evidence in its claims about what caused the observed effects. If the findings do hold up, however, they would mean that the generic bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine, in use since 1921, can regenerate insulin-secreting cells in the pancreas, whose loss causes the disease. "We think we're seeing early evidence of effectiveness," said immunology researcher Denise Faustman of Massachusetts General Hospital, who led the trial. "This simple, inexpensive vaccine attacks the autoimmunity underlying type 1 diabetes." That autoimmunity, in which the immune system turns on the body's own cells rather than invaders, destroys insulin-producing "islet" cells in the pancreas. As a result, patients have to regularly inject themselves with insulin to control their blood sugar, or glucose. Also known as juvenile diabetes, the disease affects as many as 3 million Americans, estimates JDRF (formerly the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation). Another 30,000 people in the United States, half of them adults, are diagnosed every year with the disease, which has long been considered incurable. "We found that even low do Continue reading >>

Looking To Cure Type 1 Diabetes, Investors Front $114m To Launch A Pioneering Human Study At Semma

Looking To Cure Type 1 Diabetes, Investors Front $114m To Launch A Pioneering Human Study At Semma

Three years ago, Harvard’s Doug Melton published a landmark study outlining how he had successfully used stem cells to create insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells that were inserted in bulk into mice and successfully protected from an immune response — a breakthrough in regenerative medicine that bore real promise to provide a curative approach for Type 1 diabetes that could conceivably end a lifetime of insulin shots. It was the culmination of 23 years of lab work, launched when his son was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. And that achievement marked the beginning of something new in biotech. That same year Semma Therapeutics would be launched — with a $44 million A round landing in 2015 — in pursuit of a mission to complete one of the most ambitious preclinical programs in the regenerative med field. And after working on all the nitty gritty research needed to see if this tech could be scaled up to human size, an expanded syndicate of venture investors have put together a whopping $114 million round with plans to take this into humans for a first-of-its-kind proof-of-concept study. One of the big challenges Semma faced in scaling up, Melton tells me, was to create a membrane specifically designed with pores that were large enough for molecules to pass through but too small for immune cells to penetrate. Using some calculations from the lab, Melton and his colleagues estimated that they would need some 150 million cells — possibly ranging up to three times that amount — in order to provide the natural insulin needed to eliminate the shots. Melton compares the membrane to a tea bag, but one that couldn’t be overloaded. The replacement cells, he said, “will only secrete the right amount depending on the level of sugar in the blood.” The big round mark Continue reading >>

From Stem Cells To Billions Of Human Insulin-producing Cells

From Stem Cells To Billions Of Human Insulin-producing Cells

Giant step toward new diabetes treatment Harvard stem cell researchers today announced that they have made a giant leap forward in the quest to find a truly effective treatment for type 1 diabetes, a condition that affects an estimated 3 million Americans at a cost of about $15 billion annually: With human embryonic stem cells as a starting point, the scientists are for the first time able to produce, in the kind of massive quantities needed for cell transplantation and pharmaceutical purposes, human insulin-producing beta cells equivalent in most every way to normally functioning beta cells. Doug Melton, who led the work and who 23 years ago, when his then infant son Sam was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, dedicated his career to finding a cure for the disease, said he hopes to have human transplantation trials using the cells to be underway within a few years. “We are now just one pre-clinical step away from the finish line,” said Melton, whose daughter Emma also has type 1 diabetes. A report on the new work has today been published by the journal Cell. Felicia W. Pagliuca, Jeff Millman, and Mads Gurtler of Melton’s lab are co-first authors on the Cell paper. The research group and paper authors include a Harvard undergraduate. “You never know for sure that something like this is going to work until you’ve tested it numerous ways,” said Melton, Harvard’s Xander University Professor and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator. “We’ve given these cells three separate challenges with glucose in mice and they’ve responded appropriately; that was really exciting. “It was gratifying to know that we could do something that we always thought was possible,” he continued, “but many people felt it wouldn’t work. If we had shown this was not pos Continue reading >>

Will Rhode Island Win The Race To Cure Diabetes?

Will Rhode Island Win The Race To Cure Diabetes?

Will Rhode Island Win the Race to Cure Diabetes? Local scientists have worked for decades to develop technology that could cure diabetes. Consultant John Mills (left), Bri Bintz, Moses Goddard, Chris Thanos. Photography by James Jones. This article originally appeared in our May, 2017 issue. Leonard Thompson was fourteen years old and near death when he helped make medical history. It was 1922, and though what became known as diabetes dated back to ancient times the Chinese called it sugar urine disease the only treatment for the illness at the time was the starvation diet. Thompson weighed sixty-five pounds when he was admitted to Toronto General Hospital. A young surgeon named Dr. Frederick Banting convinced his father to let him inject his son with a new drug he was testing in dogs called insulin. Thompsons health improved dramatically, and news of the medical miracle made the front pages of newspapers around the globe. The next year, the drug manufacturer Eli Lilly began making insulin to treat diabetes. But though the technology for treating the disease has improved over time, for an estimated three million Americans many of them children a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes remains a life sentence. They manage it by monitoring their blood sugar throughout the day and administering insulin. But severe complications later in life can include heart disease, blindness, nerve damage and even amputation. The disease costs an estimated $15 billion a year to treat. Thats why researchers and investors have long considered finding a way to transplant cells that could regulate insulin without getting rejected by the immune system, a holy grail. Scientists in Rhode Island are among those who have been working on and off for decades on achieving it. About three years ago, Harvards Continue reading >>

Finding A Cure For Type 1 Diabetes

Finding A Cure For Type 1 Diabetes

In the U.S. alone, about 200,000 people under 20 are diagnosed with diabetes. In hopes of finding a cure, Sanford Health is partnering with a biopharmaceutical company for a clinical trial involving only children. According to the CDC, type 1 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes in young people. "We treat it with insulin but that doesn't do anything about the underlying process. So what we're trying to do is rebalance the immune system a little bit and stop that attack on the tissues that it's supposed to be leaving alone, Sanford Health Dr. Kurt Griffinsaid. A new clinical trial, referred to as The Sanford Project: T-Rex Study, is specifically looking at patients ages 8 to 17, recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. "This is a time where they're still making plenty of insulin and we're really trying to jump on that before the immune system gets any further down that path," Griffin said. The study will focus on whether a child's own cells can fight the disease. "Kids to the blood bank. Take a good volume of blood out so we get enough of these regulatory t-cells. These are the cells that put the brakes on the immune system. Kids with type 1 diabetes don't have as many as the rest of us, and the ones they have don't work well," Griffin said. The cells are then sent to labs to be grown. "They're purified. Expanded over two weeks to where we have billions of them now. Then we give them back to the same kid they came from," Griffin said. With no known cause for diabetes, researchers hope this clinical trial will give them answers. "We're not sure if it's going to work. We have some good ideas as to what we think may work. But this is how we figure it out. If you look at any other drug that's been approved for any indication, it's been through a process like this," Continue reading >>

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