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Stem Cell Treatment For Diabetes

Stem Cell Treatment For Diabetes

Diabetes is an Autoimmune medical condition subtly affecting our health. Since symptoms of frequent urination and greater thirst do not seem to be dangerous; diabetes is highly ignored in the initial stage. And the gravity of the situation is realized only in advanced stages. Diabetes is mainly classified into type I and type 2. Type 1 develops when the body's immune system sees its own cells as foreign and destroys them. As a result, insulin producing islets cells of the pancreas are lost and thus insulin production is stopped. In the absence of insulin, glucose intake by cells is impaired and it gets accumulated in the blood stream. In type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance is developed due to which cells are unable to utilize insulin for glucose metabolism. Diabetes when uncontrolled can lead to blindness, kidney failure, heart diseases and stroke. Therefore it is very necessary to keep excessive high level of glucose in the blood stream under check. Conventionally, there is no permanent diabetes cure except for medications and insulin injections. However,Stem cells technology has practically fulfilled the promise of dead cell replacements with the new one. With this unique transdifferentiation ability of stem cells, it is possible to develop insulin producing beta cells that are lost from the body. Symptoms Major Manifestations of Diabetes in patients include the following: Always tired, thirsty, hungry Vaginal infections Sexual problems Numb or tingling hands or feet Sudden weight loss Frequent urination Wounds that won't heal Blurry vision So,it is important to take charge of your condition in Diabetes. Diabetes can affect almost every organ of the body for example: Diabetic Retinopathy, Heart Disease, Diabetic kidney and Diabetic foot are all fall outs of Diabetes w Continue reading >>

Scientists Discover A New Way To Treat Type 2 Diabetes

Scientists Discover A New Way To Treat Type 2 Diabetes

Medication currently being used to treat obesity is also proving to have significant health benefits for patients with type 2 diabetes. A new study published today in Molecular Metabolism explains how this therapeutic benefit for type 2 diabetes is achieved by acting in our brain. Scientists from the University of Aberdeen Rowett Institute, in collaboration with teams from the Universities of Cambridge and Michigan, have discovered that the medication Lorcaserin acts in the brain to improve type 2 diabetes by modifying the activity of neurones that help to regulate blood glucose levels. Lorcaserin is prescribed to help patients lose weight and works by regulating how hungry we feel. However, researchers have discovered that as well as doing this, the drug can also reduce glucose levels in the body and increase the body's cells sensitivity to insulin. When the body fails to produce enough insulin or the body's cells fail to react to insulin this leads to Type 2 diabetes meaning that glucose remains in the blood rather than being used as fuel for energy. Professor Lora Heisler, who is leading the Aberdeen team, explains: "Current medications for type 2 diabetes improve symptoms of this disease by acting in the body. We have discovered that this obesity drug, lorcaserin, acts in the brain to improve type 2 diabetes. "Lorcaserin targets important brain hormones called pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) peptides, which are responsible for regulating appetite. So as well as sending messages telling us we are full and no longer need to eat, leading to weight loss, the POMC hormones also activate a different brain circuit that helps keep our blood glucose in check. "This discovery is important because type 2 diabetes is an incredibly prevalent disease in the modern world and new treat Continue reading >>

New Type 2 Diabetes Medications

New Type 2 Diabetes Medications

Even if you can manage your diabetes now by just eating well and being active, you may need medication someday. We've come far since the 1920s, when insulin was first used to treat diabetes. There's no magic pill yet, but you have more options than ever before to help control your blood sugar. And more are coming. Most type 2 diabetes drugs work by helping your body make insulin or use it better. Some new medicines are different because they don't have anything to do with insulin. Your kidneys try to keep glucose, a kind of sugar your cells use for energy, out of your pee. Proteins called sodium-glucose transporters (SGLTs) help your kidneys keep glucose in your blood instead of your pee. But with type 2 diabetes, if your blood sugar level is already creeping up, you don't need the glucose in your body. Pills known as SGLT2 inhibitors turn off one of those proteins so that you pee it out instead. Canagliflozin (Invokana) Dapagliflozin (Farxiga) Empagliflozin (Jardiance) These drugs have some extra benefits, says John B. Buse, MD, PhD, director of the Diabetes Care Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. "You're losing calories through urine, so there is weight loss -- usually about 5 to 10 pounds in 6 to 12 months." When you take them, you lose a little bit of salt, too, which can help with your blood pressure. These drugs aren't perfect, he says. "The downside is that, because there is sugar in your nether regions, women have a higher risk of yeast infections, and uncircumcised men can get foreskin infections." To avoid the risk of dehydration, Buse says that elderly people with kidney disease and people who are taking diuretics, pills that make you pee out extra water, shouldn't take SGLT2 inhibitors. Another downside in taking SGLT2 inhibitors is t Continue reading >>

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible?

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible?

Katy Wiley began her struggle with Type 2 diabetes in 1990, when she was pregnant with her second child. The disease progressed, and at eight weeks she started insulin treatment, hoping that once her son was born, the diabetes would disappear. Instead, her condition steadily declined. Vision problems and nerve damage, common complications of diabetes, began to appear. Her A1C blood glucose (sugar) levels were increasing, she was at least 50 pounds overweight and the medication metformin had been added to her daily therapy routine of insulin injection. That's when she read about a Type 2 diabetes study at Cleveland Clinic that was recruiting patients to participate in one of three arms of treatments to study the effectiveness of methods to treat and possibly reverse Type 2 diabetes. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) says that Type 2 diabetes usually begins with insulin resistance or the inability of the fat, muscle and liver cells to use the insulin produced in the pancreas to carry sugar into the body's cells to use for energy. At first, the pancreas will work harder to make extra insulin, but eventually it won't be able to keep making enough to maintain normal blood glucose levels, and glucose will build up in the blood instead of nourishing the cells. That's when diabetes Type 2 has developed and needs to be treated. In the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control, 29.1 million people — 9.3 percent of the population — have diabetes. About 95 percent of those people have Type 2 diabetes, a disease that can be prevented, reversed and maybe even cured. "While lifestyle factors of obesity, poor diet and exercise are risk factors for Type 2 diabetes, a genetic component frequently predisposes an individual t Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetic Patients And Exercise: How Much Of What Kind?

Type 2 Diabetic Patients And Exercise: How Much Of What Kind?

Our mental picture of the usual “adult-onset” diabetic encompasses a sedentary lifestyle, a fondness for simple carbohydrates and all things sweet, and a body habitus that can range from overweight to morbidly obese. That picture fails to consider a notable minority of these patients, perhaps lost in the shadows or out of focus. Among all the people in the United States with type 2 diabetes, and there are 30,000,000 of them, 20 percent or 6,000,000 are, surprisingly, of normal weight. Besides spoiling our perfect picture of the type 2 diabetic population, this subgroup also falls victim to the obesity paradox in that they have a greater risk of mortality than obese diabetics. These facts have led Clinical Professor Latha Palaniappan, MD, MS (General Medical Disciplines), to design a randomized clinical trial among Stanford patients with type 2 diabetes and normal weight to see which type of exercise is best for them. Patients will undergo nine months of structured exercise, either aerobic or weight training or combined aerobic and weight training. Palaniappan explains the scientific thinking behind the trial, which is funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Normal weight diabetics may be more insulin resistant than other diabetics. We think it might be due to sarcopenia, lack of muscle mass. When we eat, 80 percent of our glucose gets put in our muscles through GLUT4 receptors. If we don’t have enough muscle, we don’t have enough GLUT4 receptors to get the glucose out of the blood and into the muscle. “The Strength Training Regimen for Normal Weight Diabetics (STRONG D) study is testing whether strength training, aerobic training, or a combination might be best for type 2 diabetics who have normal weight.” This stud Continue reading >>

The Cure For Type Ii Diabetes

The Cure For Type Ii Diabetes

If you are already on insulin, absolutely do not stop taking insulin, and do not stop measuring your glucose levels, without your doctor's permission. Surprisingly, medical researchers, such as from Medical News Today, consider Type 2 diabetes to be an immune problem whereby the immune system attacks the body's own cells. Type 2 diabetes is in the process of being redefined as an autoimmune disease rather than just a metabolic disorder, said an author of a new study published in Nature Medicine this week, the findings of which may lead to new diabetes treatments that target the immune system instead of trying to control blood sugar. … The researchers believe that insulin resistance, the hallmark of type 2 diabetes (unlike type 1 diabetes where it is the insulin-producing cells that are destroyed), is the result of B cells and other immune cells attacking the body's own tissues. This discovery is nothing new to some natural medicine researchers. Treatments that do the things necessary to build the immune system have been curing type 2 diabetes for years. Some of these treatments are “electromedicine” treatments which use gentle electrical waves to do the things necessary to rebuild the immune system. But these gentle electrical waves do not directly build the immune system, rather they remove the “root cause” of why the immune system is dysfunctional in the first place. Think of the school bully. Instead of fixing the students he beats up every week, the school might just kick the bully out of school. By doing this the school is not dealing with the “symptoms” of the bully (i.e. the injured students) they are dealing with the “root cause” of the injuries (i.e. the bully). So what is the “root cause” of why the immune system is weak? To understand th Continue reading >>

Study: Heavy Mouthwash Use Linked To Higher Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Study: Heavy Mouthwash Use Linked To Higher Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Unable to play video. Neither flash nor html5 is supported! Could obsessing over fresh breath lead to needing insulin shots? A new study out of Harvard University makes a baffling connection between mouthwash and type 2 diabetes. While mouthwash kills off the bacteria that create bad breath and cause cavities, they can also smother good bacteria. One of the good bacteria mouthwash can kill is nitric oxide, which is important for regulating the metabolism and blood sugar levels - a major factor in diabetes. Of the 1,206 people who participated in the study, the researchers found those who used mouthwash two or more times per day were 55 percent more likely to develop diabetes over a three year period. The British Dental Association does not list mouthwash as an essential component to good oral health, and the American Dental Association warns while mouthwash “may be a helpful addition to the daily oral hygiene routine for some people,” it is “not a replacement for daily brushing and flossing.” "This may mean you need to cut back on the mouthwash, but for all of our sakes, please don't stop brushing!" RELATED: 10 myths about diabetes and food More from Aol.com: 3 coffees a day linked to more health than harm: study Mom goes to prison after son, 7, dies from strep throat because she didn't take him to the doctor One-fifth of cancer patients found to have PTSD, study says Continue reading >>

Type Ii Diabetes News

Type Ii Diabetes News

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. It accounts for about 90 to 95 percent of all cases of diabetes in the United States. Most people with type 2 diabetes become insulin resistant, which means the body produces insulin but doesn't use it properly to help transfer glucose, or blood sugar, from the blood into the cells. This causes blood sugar to rise and can lead to a number of complications. Type 2 diabetes was formerly called "adult-onset diabetes" because it typically develops in adulthood. Causes Type 2 diabetes can sometimes be prevented, but not always. Risk factors for the disease include a family history of diabetes, racial or ethnic background, old age, obesity and inactivity, among others. Over time, certain lifestyle factors such as obesity and inactivity can lead to insulin resistance and ultimately to developing type 2 diabetes. Symptoms Sometimes people with type 2 diabetes have few symptoms early on. But some warning signs to look for include unexplained weight loss, extreme hunger or thirst, frequent urination, fatigue, numbness in the hands or feet, dry skin, frequent infections and sores that heal slowly. Anyone who begins to experience any of these symptoms should be checked by a doctor. That's because diabetes can be diagnosed with simple blood tests, but left untreated, it can over time lead to serious and life-threatening complications. These can include eye and foot problems, stroke and heart disease, among others. Treatment People with type 2 diabetes often have to check their blood sugar frequently to make sure it is under control. This is done with a tool called a blood glucose monitor. Healthy eating and regular exercise also play a critical role in managing type 2 diabetes. Also, medications are often necessary to help with re Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Is 'reversible Through Weight Loss'

Type 2 Diabetes Is 'reversible Through Weight Loss'

Many doctors and patients do not realize that weight loss can reverse type 2 diabetes. Instead, there is a widespread belief that the disease is "progressive and incurable," according to a new report published in the BMJ. This is despite there being "consistent evidence" that shedding around 33 pounds (15 kilograms) often produces "total remission" of type 2 diabetes, note Prof. Mike E. J. Lean and other researchers from the University of Glasgow in the United Kingdom. The thrust of their paper is that greater awareness, when combined with better recording and monitoring of remissions, could result in many more patients no longer having to live with type 2 diabetes and a massive reduction in healthcare costs. The global burden of type 2 diabetes has nearly quadrupled over the past 35 years. In 1980, there were around 108 million people with the disease, and by 2014, this number had risen to 422 million. The vast majority of diabetes cases are type 2 diabetes, which is a disease that results when the body becomes less effective at using insulin to help cells to convert blood sugar, or glucose, into energy. Excess body weight is a main cause of this type of diabetes. In the United States, an estimated 30.3 million people, or around 9.4 percent of the population, have diabetes - including around 7.2 million who do not realize it. Diabetes accounts for a high portion of the national bill for taking care of the sick. The total direct and indirect cost of diagnosed diabetes in the U.S. was estimated to be $245 billion in 2012. In that year, of the $13,700 average medical spend for people with diagnosed diabetes, more than half (around $7,900) was directly attributed to the disease. Treatment 'focuses on drugs' Prof. Lean and colleagues note that the current management guideli Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Reversed In Just Four Months, Trial Shows

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Reversed In Just Four Months, Trial Shows

Type 2 diabetes can be reversed in just four months by cutting calories, exercising and keeping glucose under control, a trial has shown. Although the condition is considered to be chronic, requiring a lifetime of medication, Canadian researchers proved it was possible to restore insulin production for 40 per cent of patients. The treatment plan involved creating a personalised exercise regime for each trial participant and reducing their calories by between 500 and 750 a day. The participants also met regularly with a nurse and dietician to track progress and continued to take medication and insulin to manage their blood sugar levels. After just four months, 40 per cent of patients were able to stop taking their medication because their bodies had begun to produce adequate amounts of insulin again. The researchers at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada, said the programme worked because it gave the insulin-producing pancreas ‘a rest.’ "The research might shift the paradigm of treating diabetes from simply controlling glucose to an approach where we induce remission and then monitor patients for any signs of relapse," said the study's first author, Dr Natalia McInnes, of McMaster. "The idea of reversing the disease is very appealing to individuals with diabetes. It motivates them to make significant lifestyle changes. “This likely gives the pancreas a rest and decreases fat stores in the body, which in turn improves insulin production and effectiveness." About | Diabetes The number of people in the UK with type 2 diabetes has trebled over the last two decades, rising from 700,000 in the 1990s to 2.8 million today, according to new figures from Cardiff University. The condition costs the NHS around £14 billion a year, but if the intervention worked at the same Continue reading >>

Patients Scrambling To Try Type 2 Diabetes Drug That Could Extend Longevity

Patients Scrambling To Try Type 2 Diabetes Drug That Could Extend Longevity

What if there were a way to stave off the creaks and calamities of old age? Nir Barzilai, director of the Institute for Aging Research at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, is working on it. With word leaking out, seniors from all over the globe have been hounding Dr. Barzilai and his colleagues to get in on the action—with many writing to prove their worthiness. Never mind that formal patient recruitment is still perhaps a year away. One 71-year-old sent a photo of himself along with a note: “still do 100 push ups every day!” A retired engineer disclosed his schedule: “Completing 2 crosswords a day; walking for 30-45 minutes daily; playing the piano for one hour a day; consuming 1000 mg of turmeric.” “I constantly worry, how long will I be able to work; will I ever be able to retire and will I be able to care for myself when I’m older?” another prospective volunteer wrote. “All humankind is waiting and watching,” wrote a 76-year-old who teaches “Introduction to Twitter” at a senior center in Las Vegas. Would-be participants—from Cherry Hill, N.J., the Four Corners area of New Mexico, the Netherlands and beyond—have inundated Dr. Barzilai with calls and letters. Other researchers in the project have been swamped as well. Behind the mania is a widely used, inexpensive generic pill for Type 2 diabetes called metformin. Scientists are planning a clinical trial to see if the drug can delay or prevent some of the most devastating diseases of advanced age, from heart ailments to cognitive decline to cancer. To test the pill, gerontologists at 14 aging centers around the U.S. will follow 3,000 seniors for six years. Half the seniors involved would get the drug, while the others would receive a placebo. Click for more from the Wall Street Journ Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes Naturally?

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes Naturally?

Are you suffering from Type 2 Diabetes? How would you react if you came to know that diabetes has been categorized as “epidemic” and “progressive” by the American Diabetes Association? Even if you don’t have diabetes, do you know that by 2050, 1 in 3 American adults WILL have Type 2 Diabetes (Center for Disease Control)! According to the latest studies, we have collected some frightening facts and statistics for this disease that will bound to make you think thrice before you think about those cheesy dips and beef burgers! The CDC reports 70,000 annual deaths in the US due to diabetes! Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death 2 out of 3 patients with diabetes will die of heart stroke or cardiovascular disease. Out of every $5 spent on healthcare, $1 is spent on diabetic patients. $174 billion dollars are spent annually on diagnosed diabetes. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness, kidney and liver failures today. 57 million citizens of America are pre-diabetic. Scared? We haven’t even started to list the major side effects of diabetes yet! Blood pressure, kidney problems, neuropathy, Alzheimer’s disease are the side effects that tops the list but the risk of amputation is what gives diabetic patients nightmares! What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that occurs due to elevated blood sugar levels. Normally in a healthy body, the pancreas releases a hormone called Insulin that helps the body store and use the sugar and fats from the food we intake. Diabetes occurs when the pancreas produces little or no Insulin or when the body undergoes insulin resistance. Till date, there is no cure for the disease but changes in the lifestyle and medication is a temporary way of tackling the disease. Types of Diabetes There are two major types of Diabetes, Type 1 Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Reversed By Strict Weight Loss Programme Without Medication, Study Finds

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Reversed By Strict Weight Loss Programme Without Medication, Study Finds

Type 2 diabetes can be completely reversed by a weight loss programme without any medication, a study has found. The landmark trial of UK adults published in the Lancet showed that 46% of patients on the strict calorie counting programme who lost an average of 10kg were ‘cured’ a year later. That compared to only 4% of a second group which followed the current best practice treatment of GPs’ lifestyle advice and drugs to reduce blood sugar levels. Scientists are hailing the programme of strict calorie control combined with counselling and then gradual increases in exercise as a possible template to reverse diabetes. Almost nine out of 10 participants who lost more than 15kg on programme put their condition into remission. There are 3.6 million people diagnosed with the condition in the UK and a further one million who do not know they have it. The findings suggest, if rolled out nationally, at lest 1.5 million Brits could reverse their diabetes within a year. The NHS currently spends 10% of its budget on treating diabetes and its complications, around £14 billion annually. This is expected to rise to 17% by 2035. Co-author Professor Roy Taylor, of Newcastle University, said: "Rather than addressing the root cause, management guidelines for type 2 diabetes focus on reducing blood sugar levels through drug treatments. "Diet and lifestyle are touched upon but diabetes remission by cutting calories is rarely discussed. "A major difference from other studies is that we advised a period of dietary weight loss with no increase in physical activity, but during the long-term follow up increased daily activity is important. "Bariatric surgery can achieve remission of diabetes in about three-quarters of people, but it is more expensive and risky, and is only available to a Continue reading >>

Radical Diet Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes, New Study Shows

Radical Diet Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes, New Study Shows

A radical low-calorie diet can reverse type 2 diabetes, even six years into the disease, a new study has found. The number of cases of type 2 diabetes is soaring, related to the obesity epidemic. Fat accumulated in the abdomen prevents the proper function of the pancreas. It can lead to serious and life-threatening complications, including blindness and foot amputations, heart and kidney disease. A new study from Newcastle and Glasgow Universities shows that the disease can be reversed by losing weight, so that sufferers no longer have to take medication and are free of the symptoms and risks. Nine out of 10 people in the trial who lost 15kg (two-and-a-half stone) or more put their type 2 diabetes into remission. Prof Roy Taylor from Newcastle University, lead researcher in the trial funded by Diabetes UK, said: “These findings are very exciting. They could revolutionise the way type 2 diabetes is treated. This builds on the work into the underlying cause of the condition, so that we can target management effectively. “Substantial weight loss results in reduced fat inside the liver and pancreas, allowing these organs to return to normal function. What we’re seeing … is that losing weight isn’t just linked to better management of type 2 diabetes: significant weight loss could actually result in lasting remission.” Worldwide, the number of people with type 2 diabetes has quadrupled over 35 years, rising from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014. This is expected to climb to 642 million by 2040. Type 2 diabetes affects almost 1 in 10 adults in the UK and costs the NHS about £14bn a year. Type 2 diabetes is usually treated with medication and in some cases, bariatric surgery to restrict stomach capacity, which has also been shown to reverse the disease. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a condition where the body cannot properly utilise the insulin it produces, resulting in uncontrolled blood glucose levels. South Africans opt for food that is high in energy rather than rich in nutrients – and experts warn that this may lead to obesity and type 2 diabetes. Can a sugar tax be the solution? Researchers found that the more time participants in a study spent cycling, the lower their risk for type 2 diabetes. Experts say that newer medications do not appear to be safer than older drugs, and that metformin is still the safest and most effective type 2 diabetes medication. DietDoc discusses a recent study of nine meta-analyses on the effects of low-carbohydrate diets on type 2 diabetes. Researchers have found that people with type 2 diabetes tend to take more antibiotics in the years leading up to their diagnosis. Type 2 diabetic men who lived with their spouses were also less likely to suffer from metabolic syndrome, a combination of related factors including high blood pressure and high blood sugar. A new study found that people who closely followed a plant-based diet low in animal-based foods had a 20 percent reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. But it may cause thyroid tumors and other side effects, FDA says Diabetes drug liraglutide has been approved by the FDA for weight loss, but not to treat diabetes. A study has found that smoking worsens diabetes complications but quitting may help. load more Continue reading >>

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