diabetestalk.net

Latent Autoimmune Diabetes In Adults

I've Been Diagnosed With Lada — Latent Autoimmune Diabetes In Adults. What's The Difference Between It And Other Forms Of Diabetes?

I've Been Diagnosed With Lada — Latent Autoimmune Diabetes In Adults. What's The Difference Between It And Other Forms Of Diabetes?

Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is a slow progressing form of autoimmune diabetes. Like the autoimmune disease type 1 diabetes, LADA occurs because your pancreas stops producing adequate insulin, most likely from some "insult" that slowly damages the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. But unlike type 1 diabetes, with LADA, you often won't need insulin for several months up to years after you've been diagnosed. Many researchers believe LADA, sometimes called type 1.5 diabetes, is a subtype of type 1 diabetes. Other researchers believe diabetes occurs on a continuum, with LADA falling between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. People who have LADA are usually over age 30. Because they're older when symptoms develop than is typical for someone with type 1 diabetes and because initially their pancreases still produce some insulin, people with LADA are often misdiagnosed with type 2 diabetes. If you've been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and you're lean and physically active or you've recently lost weight without effort, talk with your doctor about whether your current treatment is still the best one for you. At first, LADA can be managed by controlling your blood sugar with diet, weight reduction if appropriate, exercise and, possibly, oral medications. But as your body gradually loses its ability to produce insulin, insulin shots will eventually be needed. More research is needed before the best way to treat LADA is established. Talk with your doctor about the best LADA treatment options for you. As with any type of diabetes, you'll need close follow-up to minimize progression of your diabetes and potential complications. Continue reading >>

Fatty Fish Consumption And Risk Of Latent Autoimmune Diabetes In Adults

Fatty Fish Consumption And Risk Of Latent Autoimmune Diabetes In Adults

It has been suggested that intake of fatty fish may protect against both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Hypotheses rest on the high marine omega-3 fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid+docosahexaenoic acid (EPA+DHA) and vitamin D contents, with possible beneficial effects on immune function and glucose metabolism. Our aim was to investigate, for the first time, fatty fish consumption in relation to the risk of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA). Analyses were based on data from a Swedish case–control study with incident cases of LADA (n=89) and type 2 diabetes (n=462) and randomly selected diabetes-free controls (n=1007). Diabetes classification was based on the onset of age (⩾35), glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibodies, and C-peptide. A validated food frequency questionnaire was used to derive information on previous intake of fish, polyunsaturated long-chain omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) and supplementation of fish oil and vitamin D. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using logistic regression, adjusted for age, gender, body mass index (BMI), family history of diabetes, physical activity, smoking, education, and consumption of alcohol, fruit, vegetables and red meat. Weekly fatty fish consumption (⩾1 vs <1 serving per week), was associated with a reduced risk of LADA but not type 2 diabetes (OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.30–0.87, and 1.01, 95% CI 0.74–1.39, respectively). Similar associations were seen for estimated intake of n-3 PUFA (⩾0.3 g per day; LADA: OR 0.60, 95% CI 0.35–1.03, type 2 diabetes: OR 1.14, 95% CI 0.79–1.58) and fish oil supplementation (LADA: OR 0.47, 95% CI 0.19–1.12, type 2 diabetes: OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.08–2.31). Our findings suggest that fatty fish consumption may reduce the risk of LADA, possibly t Continue reading >>

Prevalence Of Latent Autoimmune Diabetes In Adults In China: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Prevalence Of Latent Autoimmune Diabetes In Adults In China: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Abstract Studies of the prevalence of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults in China have reported inconsistent findings. We did a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults in China. For the systematic review, we searched PubMed, Embase, China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database, and Wanfang Medicine Database to identify studies investigating the prevalence of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults in China. In our meta-analysis we included hospital-based studies that recruited patients with newly diagnosed (less than 1 year from diagnosis) type 2 diabetes or population-based studies, which assessed the prevalence of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults in China and used a radioimmunoassay to test for glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibodies. Subgroup analyses were done by study design, sex, and types of autoantibodies. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to pool the prevalence rate with 95% CIs. Ethical approval was granted by the ethical committee of our hospital This study was registered at PROSPERO, number CRD42016040163. 12 studies with a total of 21 576 individuals were included. There were three population-based studies and nine hospital-based studies recruiting patients with newly diagnosed types 2 diabetes. The meta-analysis of 12 studies showed that the prevalence of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes was 7·4% (95% CI 6·5–8·5; 21 576 participants from 12 studies), which was similar to that in white populations (6·8%, 5·6–8·3; 28 415 participants from 15 studies). The prevalence of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults from the population-based studies was 6·7% (95% CI 5·4–8·3; 12 144 participants from three studies) and the prevalence of la Continue reading >>

Interventions For Latent Autoimmune Diabetes (lada) In Adults

Interventions For Latent Autoimmune Diabetes (lada) In Adults

LADA is a condition that at diagnosis looks like type 2 diabetes (non-insulin requiring diabetes mellitus) but actually is a type 1 diabetes, where the patient will become insulin requiring. In the UK approximately 3.6% of people who look like they have type 2 diabetes actually have type 1 diabetes, while other studies suggest the prevalence is higher and treatment for these patients may need to be different from that used in type 2 diabetes. We identified 15 publications (10 studies) looking at 1019 patients who were followed between three months to 10 years. We found many of the publications had poor quality of reporting and had small numbers of participants. However, there does seem to be evidence from this review that the drug sulphonylurea (like glibenclamide or glyburide, gliclazide) could make patients insulin dependent sooner and it does not control blood sugar as well as insulin. Therefore, this suggests that this drug should not be a first line treatment for patients with LADA. In addition, insulin combined with vitamin D, or Chinese herbs may maintain natural insulin production better than insulin alone. Similarly, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) may maintain natural insulin production. However, there was no conclusive evidence that any of the other remaining treatment methods were better than each other. Studies on oral agents or insulin reported no adverse events in terms of severe hypoglycaemic attacks. This review represents very early days of our understanding of the best way to treat LADA. It is limited by the poor reporting quality of the studies, small sample sizes, no clear single definition of LADA and many of the studies being carried out in different ethnic groups (China, Japan, Cuba, UK, Sweden) with different clinical care systems. None of t Continue reading >>

Latent Autoimmune Diabetes In Adults (lada): Usefulness Of Anti-gad Antibody Titers And Benefit Of Early Insulinization

Latent Autoimmune Diabetes In Adults (lada): Usefulness Of Anti-gad Antibody Titers And Benefit Of Early Insulinization

Abstract ROSARIO, Pedro Weslley S. et al. . Arq Bras Endocrinol Metab [online]. 2007, vol.51, n.1, pp.52-58. ISSN 1677-9487. OBJECTIVE: To determine the clinical and laboratory parameters and the progression to insulin requirement in two groups of LADA patients separated according to GADA titers, and to evaluate the benefit of early insulinization in patients at high risk of premature beta-cell failure (high GADA titers). METHODS: Among the diabetic adults seen at our service and screened for GADA at diagnosis, 54 were diagnosed with LADA and classified as having low (> 1 U/ml and < 17.2 U/ml) or high (> 17.2 U/ml) GADA titers. Fifty-four patients with type 2 diabetes (GADA-) were selected for comparison. In addition, 24 patients who had GADA titers > 20 U/ml and who were not initially insulinized were compared to 16 patients who were insulinized at diagnosis. RESULTS: Insulin resistance was higher in the GADA- group, followed by patients with low GADA titers. BMI and the frequency of arterial hypertension, elevated triglycerides and reduced HDL cholesterol were lower in the high GADA+ group, with no difference between the GADA- or low GADA+ groups. The high GADA+ group showed a greater reduction and lower levels of C-peptide and required insulin earlier during follow-up. Patients with GADA titers > 20 U/ml and insulinized early presented no significant variation in C-peptide levels, had better glycemic control and required a lower insulin dose than patients who were insulinized later. CONCLUSION: We agree that patients with LADA should be differentiated on the basis of GADA titers and that patients with GADA titers > 20 U/ml benefit from early insulinization. Keywords : GADA titers; LADA; Insulinization. Continue reading >>

Latent Autoimmune Diabetes In Adults (lada)

Latent Autoimmune Diabetes In Adults (lada)

Type 1 diabetes diagnosed in adulthood may be a form of slowly-progressing diabetes called latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA). LADA is also known as slow-onset type 1 diabetes, type 1.5 diabetes, late-onset autoimmune diabetes of adulthood, and even “double diabetes,” since it has elements of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. LADA patients, however, are closer to type 1 patients, because they will test positive for antibodies against insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. LADA is more common than classic childhood type 1 diabetes, and is similar to type 1 diabetes, but presents more slowly—and therefore does not require insulin therapy as early in the course of treatment. Most LADA patients do eventually require insulin; the key difference between LADA and type 1 diabetes is not the age of disease onset, but rather the progression of the disease. People with type 1 diabetes tend to be completely insulin-dependent within a few months of diagnosis, while people with LADA can sometimes survive for years without needing to take insulin. Because they still produce some insulin, and because the disease usually occurs in people over the age of thirty without severe symptoms, many LADA patients are initially misdiagnosed with type 2 diabetes. In fact, researchers estimate that up to 10 percent of people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes have LADA. LADA can be distinguished from type 2 diabetes by antibody tests. Patients who are antibody-positive have an autoimmune reaction similar to that of type 1 diabetes, but which is not found in type 2 diabetes. Researchers still don’t know whether autoimmune diabetes in adults is due to the same underlying disease process as type 1 diabetes in children, and there are many LADA questions that still need answers. In an Continue reading >>

Latent Autoimmune Diabetes Of Adults (lada)

Latent Autoimmune Diabetes Of Adults (lada)

a subgroup of patients diagnosed earlier as type 2 diabetes (around 12%) (1) has circulating autoantibodies circulating autoantibodies are to islet cell cytoplasmatic antigens (ICA) and more frequently to glutamic acid decarboxilase (GAD, GADab) (2) patients were reported earlier as type 1 diabetes, but according to the WHO Classification of diabetes mellitus it is called now Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults (LADA) (3 and 4) LADA could be a part of the type 2 diabetes since its onset is in the adulthood, LADA shows some characteristics of type 2 diabetes, which is a heterogenous disease that results from a combination of abnormalities in both insulin secretion and insulin action LADA cases are usually with genuine insulin deficiency, many are non-obese with a beta-cell secretory defect (3). This compares with other cases of type 2 diabetes where hyperinsulinaemia is a characteristic feature in consideration of the genetic factors influencing the development of LADA (5): the most important genetic risk factors for LADA is heterozygosity for DR3-DQ2/DR4-DQ8 followed by heterozygosity for MICA5.0/5.1, and finally to some extent homozygosity for DR3-DQ2 DR15-DQ6 is a protective factor for type 1 diabetes and to some extent for LADA some alternate the terms LADA and type 1.5 diabetes (6) people diagnosed with LADA are usually over age 30 Reference: M. Pietropaolo et al.Evidence of Islet cell autoimmunitiy in elderly patients with Type 2 diabetes. Diabetes 49 (2000): 32-38. P.Z. Zimmet et al.atent autoimmune diabetes mellitus in adults (LADA): the role of autoantibodies to glutamic acid decarboxilase in diagnosis and prediction of insulin dependency. Diabetic Med. 11 (1994):299–303. for the WHO consultation, K.G.M.M. Alberti and P.Z. Zimmet , Definition, diagnosis and c Continue reading >>

Lada Diabetes Symptoms And Treatment

Lada Diabetes Symptoms And Treatment

If you have been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes or prediabetes but standard diets and treatments aren’t helping much, you may have LADA (latent autoimmune diabetes in adults). What causes LADA? What are the symptoms and treatment? What is LADA? We usually hear that there are two types of diabetes. Type 2 is caused primarily by insulin resistance. The insulin isn’t effectively used by the body’s cells, so too much glucose stays in the blood and causes complications. Type 2 comes on slowly and used to be called “adult-onset diabetes.” Type 1 is caused by the body’s immune system destroying the beta cells in the pancreas, which produce insulin. Without insulin, our bodies can’t use glucose, and eventually people with Type 1 will die without injected insulin. Type 1 usually comes on rapidly in childhood or adolescence. LADA is a mixed type. It comes on slowly during adulthood like Type 2, but is caused mostly by an immune system reaction like Type 1. The diabetes website diabetes.co.uk defines LADA as “initially non-insulin requiring diabetes diagnosed in people aged 30–50 years.” It’s a common and serious problem. According to a study in the journal Diabetes, “Among patients [who appear to have] Type 2 diabetes, LADA occurs in 10% of individuals older than 35 years and in 25% below that age.” LADA is often misdiagnosed as Type 2. People with LADA may be denied needed insulin and given advice that doesn’t work. Symptoms of LADA According to diabetes.co.uk, early LADA symptoms may be vague. They include: • Foggy headedness • Feeling tired all the time or feeling tired after meals • Feeling hungry again soon after meals As LADA develops, a person’s ability to produce insulin will gradually decrease, and this may lead to more typical diabete Continue reading >>

Prevalence Of Latent Autoimmune Diabetes Of Adults (lada) In Southern Spain

Prevalence Of Latent Autoimmune Diabetes Of Adults (lada) In Southern Spain

Abstract Objective: To study the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and islet autoantibodies in an adult population from Southern Spain. Research design and methods: A cross-sectional study in Southern Spain of 1226 people, age 18–65 years. Clinical data were obtained and a blood sample taken to measure autoantibodies (glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADAb), tyrosine phosphatase antibodies (IA2Ab), and insulin antibodies (IAA)). An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was also given to 982 of the subjects. Results: The overall prevalence of diabetes mellitus according to the WHO 1979 criteria was 10.9% and according to the ADA 1997 criteria it was 14.7% (8.8% were unaware of their diabetes). The prevalence of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) was 12.4% and of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) 11.5%. The prevalence of GADAb+ in the general population was 0.9% and in the diabetic population 3.7%. There were no significant differences between groups in the prevalence of IA2Ab or IAA (both were 0.8% in the general population). Of the three autoantibodies studied, only GADAb were significantly different in the diabetic population (P=0.0006). Conclusions: The prevalence of Type 2 diabetes and LADA are high in the south of Spain Continue reading >>

Combined Treatment With Sitagliptin And Vitamin D In A Patient With Latent Autoimmune Diabetes In Adults

Combined Treatment With Sitagliptin And Vitamin D In A Patient With Latent Autoimmune Diabetes In Adults

and K Kotsa1 [1] Diabetes Center of 1st Department of Internal Medicine, AHEPA University Hospital , Thessaloniki, Greece [2] 1st Department of Internal Medicine, AHEPA University Hospital , Thessaloniki, Greece Summary Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is a relatively new type of diabetes with a clinical phenotype of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and an immunological milieu characterized by high titers of islet autoantibodies, resembling the immunological profile of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Herein, we report a case of a young male, diagnosed with LADA based on both clinical presentation and positive anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GAD-abs), which were normalized after combined treatment with a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor (DPP-4) (sitagliptin) and cholecalciferol. Anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GAD-abs) titers in young patients being previously diagnosed as type 2 diabetes (T2D) may help establish the diagnosis of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA). Sitagliptin administration in patients with LADA might prolong the insulin-free period. Vitamin D administration in patients with LADA might have a protective effect on the progression of the disease. Background Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is a slowly progressive form of autoimmune diabetes mellitus characterized by older age at diagnosis compared with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and the presence of pancreatic islet cell autoantibodies (1). This results in the development of glucose intolerance and overt clinical disease when the majority of pancreatic cells are not functional due to the chronic autoimmune inflammation. This pathophysiological process is characterized by the presence of circulating antibodies against pancreatic islet cells and islet cell infiltration by mono Continue reading >>

Sweetened Beverage Intake And Risk Of Latent Autoimmune Diabetes In Adults (lada) And Type 2 Diabetes

Sweetened Beverage Intake And Risk Of Latent Autoimmune Diabetes In Adults (lada) And Type 2 Diabetes

Abstract Objective Sweetened beverage intake is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes, but its association with autoimmune diabetes is unclear. We aimed to investigate sweetened beverage intake and risk of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA); autoimmune diabetes with features of type 2 diabetes. Design/methods Data from a Swedish population-based study was used, including incident cases of LADA (n = 357) and type 2 diabetes (n = 1136) and randomly selected controls (n = 1371). Diabetes classification was based on onset age (≥35), glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibodies (GADA) and C-peptide. Sweetened beverage intake information was derived from a validated food frequency questionnaire. ORs adjusted for age, sex, family history of diabetes, education, lifestyle, diet, energy intake and BMI were estimated using logistic regression. Results Daily intake of >2 servings of sweetened beverages (consumed by 6% of participants) was associated with increased risk of LADA (OR: 1.99, 95% CI: 1.11–3.56), and for each 200 mL daily serving, OR was 1.15 (95% CI: 1.02–1.29). Findings were similar for sugar-sweetened (OR: 1.18, 95% CI: 1.00–1.39) and artificially sweetened beverages (OR: 1.12, 95% CI: 0.95–1.32). Similarly, each daily serving increment in total sweetened beverage conferred 20% higher type 2 diabetes risk (95% CI: 1.07–1.34). In type 2 diabetes patients, high consumers displayed higher HOMA-IR levels (4.5 vs 3.5, P = 0.0002), but lower HOMA-B levels (55 vs 70, P = 0.0378) than non-consumers. Similar tendencies were seen in LADA. Conclusions High intake of sweetened beverages was associated with increased risk of LADA. The observed relationship resembled that with type 2 diabetes, suggesting common pathways possibly involving insulin res Continue reading >>

Latent Autoimmune Diabetes In Adults

Latent Autoimmune Diabetes In Adults

Definition, Prevalence, β-Cell Function, and Treatment Abstract Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is a disorder in which, despite the presence of islet antibodies at diagnosis of diabetes, the progression of autoimmune β-cell failure is slow. LADA patients are therefore not insulin requiring, at least during the first 6 months after diagnosis of diabetes. Among patients with phenotypic type 2 diabetes, LADA occurs in 10% of individuals older than 35 years and in 25% below that age. Prospective studies of β-cell function show that LADA patients with multiple islet antibodies develop β-cell failure within 5 years, whereas those with only GAD antibodies (GADAs) or only islet cell antibodies (ICAs) mostly develop β-cell failure after 5 years. Even though it may take up to 12 years until β-cell failure occurs in some patients, impairments in the β-cell response to intravenous glucose and glucagon can be detected at diagnosis of diabetes. Consequently, LADA is not a latent disease; therefore, autoimmune diabetes in adults with slowly progressive β-cell failure might be a more adequate concept. In agreement with proved impaired β-cell function at diagnosis of diabetes, insulin is the treatment of choice. In 1986, Groop et al. (1) reported a subgroup of type 2 diabetic patients who, despite having islet autoantibodies, showed preserved β-cell function. The type of diabetes in these patients was referred to as latent type 1 diabetes, showing clearly different features from classic type 1 and classic type 2 diabetes. Later, Tuomi et al. (2) and Zimmet et al. (3) launched the eponym LADA (latent autoimmune diabetes in adults) for this slowly progressive form of autoimmune diabetes initially managed with diet and oral hypoglycemic agents before becoming insulin Continue reading >>

Latent Autoimmune Diabetes In Adults

Latent Autoimmune Diabetes In Adults

Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is a slowly progressive form of autoimmune diabetes mellitus characterized by older age at diagnosis, the presence of pancreatic autoantibodies, and the lack of an absolute insulin requirement at diagnosis. Although patients with LADA present with more preserved beta cell function than those with classic type 1 diabetes, they tend to have a rapid and progressive loss of beta cell function necessitating intensive insulin intervention. Family physicians care for most patients in the United States with type 2 diabetes and, therefore, should be aware that approximately 10 percent of these patients have LADA.1 Table 1 compares characteristics of type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and LADA.2 Features Type 2 diabetes Type 1 diabetes [ corrected] Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults [ corrected] Ketoacidosis Usually absent Will develop rapidly unless patient receives insulin replacement therapy Absent at diagnosis, but may be present when patient becomes severely insulinopenic Cardiovascular complications Risk 2–4 times higher than individuals who are euglycemic Increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality related to strokes, acute coronary events, and coronary revascularizations; high incidence rates compared with euglycemic individuals, especially in women Same risk as patients with T2DM Microvascular complications (retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy) Increased Increased Increased Pathophysiology Peripheral insulin resistance; reduced pancreatic beta-cell mass and function; reduced insulin secretion Autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta-cells Latent autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta-cells Autoantibodies Negative GAD-65 autoantibodies Islet-cell antigen-2 Insulin autoantibodies note: Unlike LADA, T1DM patie Continue reading >>

Latent Autoimmune Diabetes In Adults

Latent Autoimmune Diabetes In Adults

Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is very similar to type 1 diabetes. It is considered an autoimmune disease, meaning that your own immune system attacks and destroys insulin-producing cells in your pancreas. But LADA also shares genetic similarities to type 2 diabetes. People with LADA are usually older than 35, not obese and were able to control their diabetes initially with meal planning. However, within six months, meal planning no longer controls the diabetes and you become dependent on insulin to survive. There’s another related form of diabetes that’s called type 1.5. It’s a subset of LADA and involves people with similar experiences except that they are obese. The treatment for type 1.5 diabetes is the same as for LADA. Symptoms of LADA may occur suddenly and could include: Extreme thirst Frequent urination Drowsiness or lethargy Sugar in urine Sudden vision changes Increased appetite Sudden weight loss Fruity or sweet odor on the breath Heavy, labored breathing Stupor or unconsciousness If you experience any of these symptoms, contact your health-care provider immediately. Causes The exact causes of LADA are not known, although researchers have identified certain genes that are associated with a higher diabetes risk. Risk Factors Having a close relative with LADA increases your risk of developing the condition. Diagnosis The following tests are used for diagnosing diabetes: Fasting plasma glucose test: Measures your blood glucose after you have fasted for at least eight hours Oral glucose tolerance test: Measures your blood glucose after fasting for at least eight hours — and two hours after you drink a glucose-containing beverage. Random plasma glucose test (also called a casual plasma glucose test): Measures blood glucose without regard to w Continue reading >>

Diabetes Lada

Diabetes Lada

Tweet LADA stands for Latent Autoimmune Diabetes of Adulthood. LADA is a form of type 1 diabetes that develops later into adulthood. LADA tends to develop more slowly than type 1 diabetes in childhood and, because LADA can sometimes appear similar to type 2 diabetes, doctors may mistakenly diagnose LADA as type 2 diabetes. The definition provided by Prof. David Leslie, Principle Investigator of Action LADA, is that in Europe: LADA is defined as initially non-insulin requiring diabetes diagnosed in people aged 30-50 years with antibodies to GAD - glutamic acid decarboxylase. How does LADA compare with other diabetes types? LADA is sometimes referred to as type 1.5 diabetes. This is not an official term but it does illustrate the fact that LADA is a form of type 1 diabetes that shares some characteristics with type 2 diabetes. As a form of type 1 diabetes, LADA is an autoimmune disease in which the body’s immune system attacks and kills off insulin producing cells. The reasons why LADA can often be mistaken for type 2 diabetes is it develops over a longer period of time than type 1 diabetes in children or younger adults. Whereas type 1 diabetes in children tends to develop quickly, sometimes within the space of days, LADA develops more slowly, sometimes over a period of years. The slower onset of diabetes symptoms being presented in people over 35 years may lead a GP to initially diagnose a case of LADA as type 2 diabetes. Symptoms of LADA The first symptoms of LADA include: Feeling tired all the time or regularly tired after meals Foggy headedness Experiencing hunger soon after meals As LADA develops, a person’s ability to produce insulin will gradually decrease and this may lead to symptoms such as: It is important to catch the symptoms at the earliest stage because Continue reading >>

More in diabetes