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Late Diagnosis Of Gestational Diabetes

Late Diagnosis Of Gestational Diabetes…

Late Diagnosis Of Gestational Diabetes…

Well: this gestational diabetes thing has thrown a right spanner in the old works, I can tell you! (Photo above taken in last pregnancy, by the way, after I had polished off two whole desserts. I thought it was brilliantly inappropriate.) I just feel as though I’ve been diagnosed (my blood sugar readings, though not horrific, definitely indicate GD) and then left just to get on with things. No real advice, no explanations as to how the condition could affect the baby, or (more my concern) how my rampantly out-of-control blood sugar levels prior to diagnosis might have affected the baby… So it has been a crazy week or so of intense Google research, and speaking to my Dad and Uncle about how they keep their Type 2 Diabetes in check, and chatting to my oldest friend Tasha about how she coped during her two pregnancies with her Type 1 Diabetes. I’d like to say that it has all been very interesting, and it has to a certain extent, but overall my one word to describe the situation would be: STRESSFUL. Mainly, I think, because the diagnosis has been made so late. (I’m 38 weeks.) And wouldn’t have been made at all had I not sought a second opinion about baby size from a private obstetrician. (Always trust your instincts, people.) So I’m slightly consumed with low-level fury about the fact that I wasn’t given a fasting blood sugar test, despite the fact that my last baby was big and I have an immediate relative with diabetes, but I’m also frustrated and confused because keeping blood sugar under control is actually quite the learning curve, and I’ve been given approximately 14 days altogether to achieve it. In case you are wondering what the hell I’m on about, Gestational Diabetes is a specific kind of diabetes that affects pregnant women only and it usually Continue reading >>

:: Pn :: Perinatology

:: Pn :: Perinatology

This was a retrospective cohort study. The Konkuk University Hospital institutional review board approved the study. Demographic and clinical data were collected through electronic medical record review. Singleton pregnant women who had a history of DM in a first-degree relative and delivered from 2005 to 2012 were included in the study. Women with a history of GDM in a prior pregnancy, multifetal pregnancy, and known impaired glucose metabolism were excluded. In our institution, the GDM screening protocol had been changed for women with a family history of DM. Before 2010, all women with a family history of DM were screened for GDM with a 1-hour 50-g glucose challenge test (GCT) at 2428 gestational weeks. An abnormal GCT was followed by a 3-hour 100-g glucose tolerance test to diagnose GDM. The cut-off value for abnormal GCT was 140 mg/dL and GDM was diagnosed when two abnormal values were obtained using the Carpenter-Coustan criteria. This was defined as the Late-screen GDM group. After 2010, women with a family history of DM underwent a 1-hour 50-g GCT at the initial visit, mostly before 16 weeks of gestation. If results of the first screen performed <16 weeks were normal but the final diagnosis of GDM was made after 24 weeks, women were categorized as the Early-screen GDM group. Women with normal results in both groups were considered as the Normal group. The Low-risk GDM group was defined as women diagnosed with GDM at age <25 years, with normal body weight, no family history of DM, no history of abnormal glucose metabolism, and no history of poor obstetric outcomes. After the diagnosis of GDM, management of patients was based on a multidisciplinary team approach with diverse healthcare professionals including endocrinologists and dieticians to monitor and control Continue reading >>

Pregnancy Diabetes Tests 'too Late', Warn Scientists

Pregnancy Diabetes Tests 'too Late', Warn Scientists

Pregnancy diabetes tests 'too late', warn scientists By James Gallagher Health editor, BBC News website These are external links and will open in a new window Tests for diabetes in pregnancy - which affects the developing baby - are taking place too late, warn scientists. Untreated, the condition can increase the risk of a stillbirth and other complications. Most screening takes place at 28 weeks, but a University of Cambridge study of 4,069 women showed the foetus was already affected by then. Charities said gestational diabetes was involved in a "significant number" of potentially avoidable stillbirths. Gestational diabetes is common and affects up to 18 in every 100 pregnancies. The extra sugar in the bloodstream acts as "baby fuel" leading to rapid growth inside the womb. Most babies are normal and healthy but the condition increases the likelihood of a large baby, which can be difficult to deliver, suffering bone fractures. The babies can also be at higher risks of obesity and diabetes later in life. The study, published in the journal Diabetes Care, showed excessive foetal growth had already started by the usual time of screening. Women testing positive for gestational diabetes at that 28-week stage were twice as likely as other mothers to have an abnormally large foetus. Mothers who were obese as well as having gestational diabetes had five times the risk of a large foetus. Prof Gordon Smith, one of the researchers, told the BBC News website: "The recommendations are that screening should take place at some point between 24 and 28 weeks, but in practice a lot screen at 28 weeks. "Our findings indicate that it should be brought forward to 24 weeks and that would still be consistent with existing guidelines. "And we should possibly be doing a second, earlier, scre Continue reading >>

Pathophysiological Characteristics And Effects Of Obesity In Women With Early And Late Manifestation Of Gestational Diabetes Diagnosed By The International Association Of Diabetes And Pregnancy Study Groups Criteria

Pathophysiological Characteristics And Effects Of Obesity In Women With Early And Late Manifestation Of Gestational Diabetes Diagnosed By The International Association Of Diabetes And Pregnancy Study Groups Criteria

Pathophysiological Characteristics and Effects of Obesity in Women With Early and Late Manifestation of Gestational Diabetes Diagnosed by the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups Criteria Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Unit of Gender Medicine (L.B., L.P., K.L., A.L., S.B.-P., A.K.-W.), A-1090 Vienna, Austria; Search for other works by this author on: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Feto-Maternal Medicine (C.S.G., D.B.-T.), Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna, Austria; Search for other works by this author on: Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Unit of Gender Medicine (L.B., L.P., K.L., A.L., S.B.-P., A.K.-W.), A-1090 Vienna, Austria; Search for other works by this author on: Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Unit of Gender Medicine (L.B., L.P., K.L., A.L., S.B.-P., A.K.-W.), A-1090 Vienna, Austria; Search for other works by this author on: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Feto-Maternal Medicine (C.S.G., D.B.-T.), Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna, Austria; Search for other works by this author on: Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Unit of Gender Medicine (L.B., L.P., K.L., A.L., S.B.-P., A.K.-W.), A-1090 Vienna, Austria; Search for other works by this author on: Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Unit of Gender Medicine (L.B., L.P., K.L., A.L., S.B.-P., A.K.-W.), A-1090 Vienna, Austria; Search for other works by this author on: Metabolic Unit (G.P.), Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Research Council, I-35127 Padova, Italy Search for other works by t Continue reading >>

Diabetes During Pregnancy (gestational Diabetes)

Diabetes During Pregnancy (gestational Diabetes)

Diabetes during pregnancy (Gestational Diabetes) Diabetes during pregnancy (Gestational Diabetes) I have just been diagnosed with gestational diabetes; however, it was detected late in my pregnancy I am at thirty-two weeks. Normally, diagnosis comes at twenty-eight weeks or prior. I am worried that I may have been diabetic for a long period of time, and am worried about how my baby may have been affected so far. All I have learned so far is that it can cause big babies, and potential respiratory problems. I am going to see a health care person at the gestational diabetes clinic tomorrow to be put on a special diet. I would appreciate any information you can provide me with on this topic. Thank you. It's understandable that you're concerned about your and your baby's health; bringing a new life into the world can be both emotionally and physically draining! It's better that you were diagnosed a little later than not at all, however, and the good news is that you now know of your condition and can manage its effects and development to keep you and your baby in the best health possible. Gestational diabetes (GD) occurs when an expectant woman's placental hormones cause her body's cells to be more resistant to insulin and, therefore, glucose absorption. As the baby continues to grow and more hormones are produced, the pancreas cannot produce enough insulin to account for the cells' resistance. About 3 to 5 percent of pregnant women in the United States develop GD, usually after their 20th week of pregnancy. Some risks associated with gestational diabetes include being older than 25 years, overweight, or having a personal or family history of diabetes. Unlike types 1 and 2 diabetes, GD does not usually present itself with typical symptoms such as extreme thirst and increase Continue reading >>

Late Diagnosis Of Gestational Diabetes

Late Diagnosis Of Gestational Diabetes

I just wanted to share my experience about being diagnosed with diabetes in hopes that it might help someone else that may be going through the same thing! At 28 weeks my doctor gave me the routine one hour glucose test which I failed with a 153. We followed it up with the three hour glucose tolerance test at 30 weeks (I didn't get my one hour for over a week so that's why the three hour wasn't done sooner) in which I passed all four blood draws with flying colors. I was so excited until I went to get my ultrasound at 34 weeks and our babies head was measuring about four weeks ahead. My doctor told me there's a good chance I'm just making a big baby as I was also a big baby and so was my husband. However, I couldn't get rid of this nagging intuitive feeling that something else was wrong. I insisted that they retest me for GDM even though the doctor insisted that wasn't necessary. Well sure enough my results came back and I failed two out of four of my blood draws and they diagnosed me diabetic. The point is listen to your doctors and trust them but also listen to your mommy gut feeling! And not everyone develops diabetes by 28 weeks so it's important to pay attention. Has anyone else been diagnosed this late? I'm now 35 weeks and starting the diabetic diet. Thanks! I was diagnosed at 29 wks, started diet at 30 wks and I felt that was late too. I had gd with my first and was tested at 24 weeks, didn't have it with my 2nd, and now have it with my third. I was also concerned with being tested so late (esp since my dr should know my history) drs kept reassuring me it's ok but I don't know if that's their honest answer or just them protecting themselves. I'm sure everything will be fine for you tho, there are plenty of people out there with gd that don't care and actually c Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes definition and facts Risk factors for gestational diabetes include a history of gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy, There are typically no noticeable signs or symptoms associated with gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes can cause the fetus to be larger than normal. Delivery of the baby may be more complicated as a result. The baby is also at risk for developing low blood glucose (hypoglycemia) immediately after birth. Following a nutrition plan is the typical treatment for gestational diabetes. Maintaining a healthy weight and following a healthy eating plan may be able to help prevent or minimize the risks of gestational diabetes. Women with gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes after the pregnancy What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is diabetes, or high blood sugar levels, that develops during pregnancy. It occurs in about 4% of all pregnancies. It is usually diagnosed in the later stages of pregnancy and often occurs in women who have no prior history of diabetes. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is thought to arise because the many changes, hormonal and otherwise, that occur in the body during pregnancy predispose some women to become resistant to insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by specialized cells in the pancreas that allows the body to effectively metabolize glucose for later usage as fuel (energy). When levels of insulin are low, or the body cannot effectively use insulin (i.e., insulin resistance), blood glucose levels rise. What are the screening guidelines for gestational diabetes? All pregnant women should be screened for gestational diabetes during their pregnancy. Most pregnant women are tested between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy (see Continue reading >>

Are We Testing For Gestational Diabetes Too Late?

Are We Testing For Gestational Diabetes Too Late?

A new study shows that babies are already showing the effects of gestational diabetes by the time expectant moms are tested for it. So are we testing too late? No one likes the glucose tolerance test—having to chug down that nasty orange drink, and hoping there are no side effects. Unfortunately, screening for high blood sugar is a necessity in pregnancy, as gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) can cause problems ranging from stillbirth to childhood obesity. But a new study published in journal Diabetes Care suggests that unborn babies are showing the effects of GDM before expectant mothers are even tested for it, throwing the screening's relevance into question. Should pregnant women be tested even earlier? Diagnosis after baby is already affected Researchers looked at data from over 4,000 pregnant women to measure baby's growth, as large size is an indicator of gestational diabetes, and compared that info to the 171 moms who actually developed GDM later on. They also looked at which women were obese, another risk factor for GDM. "Gestational diabetes and obesity were both associated with accelerated growth of the [baby's] abdomen between 20 and 28 weeks," study author Gordon Smith, M.D., Ph.D., the head of the department of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Cambridge in the UK, tells Fit Pregnancy. "In relation to gestational diabetes, measurements were normal at 20 weeks, but were large by 28 weeks. Women who were both obese and had a diagnosis of gestational diabetes were almost five times more likely to have a baby with a large abdominal measurement at 28 weeks." Because GDM wasn't actually diagnosed in the women until 28 weeks, "the effects of gestational diabetes [are] already present at the time we normally make the diagnosis," Dr. Smith says. Alth Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Gestational diabetes refers to diabetes that is diagnosed during pregnancy. Gestational diabetes occurs in about 7 percent of all pregnancies, usually in the second half of the pregnancy. It almost always goes away as soon as your baby is born. However, if gestational diabetes is not treated during your pregnancy, you may experience some complications. Causes Pregnancy hormones cause the body to be resistant to the action of insulin, a hormone made by your pancreas that helps your body use the fuels supplied by food. The carbohydrates you eat provide your body with a fuel called glucose, the sugar in the blood that nourishes your brain, heart, tissues and muscles. Glucose also is an important fuel for your developing baby. When gestational diabetes occurs, insulin fails to effectively move glucose into the cells that need it. As a result, glucose accumulates in the blood, causing blood sugar levels rise. Diagnosis Gestational diabetes is diagnosed with a blood test. Your blood glucose level is measured after you drink a sweet beverage. If your blood sugar is too high, you have gestational diabetes. Sometimes one test is all that is needed to make a definitive diagnosis. More often, an initial screening test is given and, if needed, a longer evaluation is performed. Gestational diabetes usually does not occur until later in pregnancy, when the placenta is producing more of the hormones that interfere with the mother's insulin. Screening for gestational diabetes usually takes place between weeks 24 to 28. However, women at high risk are usually screened during the first trimester. Risk Factors There are a number of risk factors associated with gestational diabetes, including: Being overweight Giving birth to a baby that weighed more than 9 pounds Having a parent or siblin Continue reading >>

Early Diagnosis Of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (edogdm) Study: A Protocol For A Prospective, Longitudinal Cohort Study

Early Diagnosis Of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (edogdm) Study: A Protocol For A Prospective, Longitudinal Cohort Study

Early Diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (EDoGDM) study: a protocol for a prospective, longitudinal cohort study We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Early Diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (EDoGDM) study: a protocol for a prospective, longitudinal cohort study Bin Liu, Yun Xu, [...], and Zilian Wang A diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in low-risk pregnant women is based on an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) between 24 and 28 gestational weeks. However, there is insufficient evidence for why the test is performed in this time period. Moreover, the fetus may be exposed to hyperglycaemia prior to the current testing time frame, making earlier administration potentially advantageous. The main purpose of the present study is to investigate the GDM diagnostic value of an OGTT performed at 1820 gestational weeks. The results of the study may provide scientific insight into the most beneficial time of OGTT for pregnant women. As a prospective, longitudinal cohort study, the Early Diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (EDoGDM) study will recruit 570 pregnant women who meet the inclusion and exclusion criteria outlined below. OGTTs will be performed between 18 and 20 gestational weeks (early OGTT) and 2428 gestational weeks (regular OGTT). Clinical and laboratory information of the mother and their offspring will be collected for analysis. The prevalence of GDM at 1820 gestational weeks Continue reading >>

Diagnosed Gestational Diabetes - Need Advice!!!!

Diagnosed Gestational Diabetes - Need Advice!!!!

Diagnosed Gestational diabetes - need advice!!!! I had a gowth scan at 32 weeks which showed a bigger than expected baby, so I was sent for a GTT. I have only just got the results back and I have GD. I am 35+4. I am having a growth scan next week and have been given a montior to check my sugars throughout the day - and they want me to see how I go for a week, and if I can control through the diet. I see the consultant next tuesday and will have growth result back then too. I'm quite worried that I'm this late on in pregnancy and its only just been discovered. I know nothing about it. MW told me today there is increased risk stillbirth which has really upset me. Why is that? I don't know what the other risks are - can soemone enlighten me and how do we go about reducing those risks. What should be happening? Will being induced earlier prevent risks? Hi there. I am in the same boat. I think the reason that the chance of still born is higher is because the placenta stops being so effective later on due to the sugar. Therefore, induction is more likely on or before your due date. Any reduction in sugar will help your LO. GD is a very common pregnancy issue and there are a lot of posts about this in the gestational complications forum. Really helpful as well. Try not to panic though. If your sugars cannot be controlled by diet then they may give you metformin which is a tablet to help with this. You still have over a month to go, so its not too late. Hi there. I am in the same boat. I think the reason that the chance of still born is higher is because the placenta stops being so effective later on due to the sugar. Therefore, induction is more likely on or before your due date. Any reduction in sugar will help your LO. GD is a very common pregnancy issue and there are a lot Continue reading >>

Late Diagnosis Of Gestational Diabetes At 35w - So Frustrated By Lack Of Support/information12

Late Diagnosis Of Gestational Diabetes At 35w - So Frustrated By Lack Of Support/information12

Had a late GTT at 35 weeks (MW only just noticed I have PCOS and my 2nd DC was 9lbs 13), my levels 2hrs post drink were 8.3 so a diagnosis of GD was made. Have got two DCs, had two very straightforward homebirths with no problems- DC2 was a 2.5hr labour and 9lbs 13oz (no issues with pushing him out or shoulder dystocia etc). My issue is this, I have been given no info about what to do because apparently as I am 35weeks and 'nothing can be done bar a fasting test 6 weeks post birth'. No referral to a dietician or consultant etc. I've scared myself silly by scouring the internet for info re: higher risk of stillbirth, pre eclampsia etc etc Have put myself on a no sugar/GI diet as that seems to be the recommended course of action. says birth shopuld be ok if levels well maintained but I have not been asked to check levels thus have no idea if they will be maintained!!! With regards to the birth I have a serious health anxiety/emetophobia/hospital phobia hence choosing HBs previously so this is a massive deal for me. I noted that the like to induce between 38 and 40weeks but hell will freeze over before I go down the induction route (cascade of intervention and higher likelhood of a c-sec etc). What have been your experiences, any advice etc?? I had my GTT at 28 weeks, and came back just over the limit, was 7.9 cut off is 7.8, so not as high as yours. But I got called into the hospital the following week and got given a finger pricking thing to test my levels 4 times a day. They have not been to bad, but I have still had 2 extra growth scans and have another one at 36 weeks. Have they offered you any of this? I would have thought you should have at least had the growth scans. I have been told even though my GD is being controlled without medication, baby has to be born in Continue reading >>

Raeesa's Story - Late Gd Diagnosis Gestational Diabetes Uk

Raeesa's Story - Late Gd Diagnosis Gestational Diabetes Uk

Sometimes we see ladies come to our group for support where they have had late GD diagnosis. Some have passed multiple tests for gestational diabetes , only to be diagnosed a couple of weeks before baby is due. Raeesa who is a admin and member of our support group found us in her second pregnancy and has kindly shared her birth stories of her two children to compare. Her first story is about her son Zane. During this pregnancy she passed 3 glucose tolerance tests for gestational diabetes and had very late GD diagnosis at 39+5 where she was booked in for a c-section a few days later at 40+1. Raeesa was diagnosed much earlier in pregnancy with her daughter Astrid and found our support group for help. In 2011, I passed 3 GTTs [glucose tolerance tests] 12 weeks, 28 weeks and 32 weeks. At every midwife appointment I complained there was something wrong and I just knew it. I measured big throughout my pregnancy, but as my husband is 6ft 4, the answer was "well of course you are going to have a big baby!" (Im 5ft by the way and pre-pregnancy was a size 6 and weighed 50kgs! So, it was assumed that I had none of the risk factors for GD) I had 2 massive bleeds in my second and third trimester and after 2-week long stays in hospital, I was told its just an anomaly! At 39 weeks, I was struggling to breathe. I felt like baby had gotten so big he was crushing my lungs. The midwife measured me and said maybe I should have another GTT. It was just before Christmas and everywhere was short staffed. They managed to fit me in for a GTT at 39+5. My fasting was super high as were my 1 hour and 2 hour tests. Scans showed my baby was measuring very large and already looked swollen. I was booked in for the next C-Section available which was at 40+1. I was given no advice about my diet or abou Continue reading >>

Failure To Diagnose Gestational Diabetes

Failure To Diagnose Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is unfortunately a common occurrence in pregnancy, affecting thousands of pregnant women in the United States each year. If left undiagnosed and untreated, it can lead to a myriad of medical issues for bother mother and baby. Gestational Diabetes Statistics and Facts According to the American Diabetes Association,gestational diabetes has increased significantly over the past 20 years. The increase has happened for several reasons, including: Increase in maternal obesity Decrease in physical activity Being 25 and older when pregnant Family history of diabetes Excessive amniotic fluid Gestational Diabetes Symptoms In many cases, there are no symptoms at all. Some women may go back to a normal blood sugar within a few weeks after delivery. However, other pregnant women may experience: Frequent infections Fatigue Blurred vision Nausea and/or vomiting Weight loss Increased thirst and urination How Does Gestational Diabetes Affect Infants? If gestational diabetes is untreated or even treated poorly, infants are at risk for several health issues. When gestational diabetes develops, the pancreas must work overtime in order to produce the insulin needed for your body. When this occurs, it not only gives an infant high blood glucose levels, but the infant’s pancreas also creates extra insulin in an attempt to rid the additional blood glucose passed down from the mother. Extra insulin and high blood glucose levels can cause infants to develop fetal macrosomia, also known as “fat baby” syndrome, a condition marked by excessive fetal weight and size. An unusually large infant is at risk for a plethora of birth injuries, including brachial plexus injuries, shoulder dystocia, and more. Additionally, infants are at risk for excessive weight gain later in life Continue reading >>

Lawsuit For Late Diagnosis Of Gestational Diabetes In New Orleans

Lawsuit For Late Diagnosis Of Gestational Diabetes In New Orleans

When a pregnant womans blood glucose levels remain consistently high during the pregnancy, she has gestational diabetes. While the risks to a developing baby are not usually as severe as other conditions may cause, one serious risk is that the extra glucose available to the fetus will result in a baby so large it cant fit through the birth canal. For women in New Orleans who intended to deliver naturally, and who intended to deliver their subsequent children without a C-section, untreated gestational diabetes can represent a significant injury to them. Women count on their physicians to diagnose and treat common medical conditions during pregnancy so every precaution can be taken to protect their babies. Because gestational diabetes is so common, testing should be a routine part of your prenatal care. If your test results showed markers for gestational diabetes and your doctor simply missed it, you may have grounds for a medical malpractice claim. At The Gertler Law Firm, our experienced team of attorneys offers you a free, no risk consultation to evaluate whether you need an attorney for Gestational Diabetes misdiagnosis . Call us today at (504) 581-6411 and talk to an experienced New Orleans medical malpractice attorney today. Continue reading >>

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