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Lantus To Tresiba Conversion

Lantus To Tresiba? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Lantus To Tresiba? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community New2T1D Don't have diabetes Well-Known Member Diabetes nurse advised me to consider changing from Lantus to Tresiba yesterday, to take account of fact that Lantus doesn't last the full 24 hours. She said that it takes 7 days for Tresiba to be fully in its groove/ pattern, whereas with Lantus is it 3. It's also less flexible when one has active vs non-active days (relevant for a teenager: my son)! That said, he can be more flexible about when in the day he gives injections (no dead set time), which would be a positive. It's only recently been licensed for under 18 age and seems harder to get hold of for pharmacists than Lantus is (consultant's prescription needed) as a downside and I also hear it can cause crashing headaches. So I'm slightly worried about the newness of the drug - what do people think? I don't want to cause any risk to my son. That said, I read that Lantus is potentially carcinogenic, so what do you do? I have to be honest, I'm also nervous of changing the drugs. We've been living with T1 since November 2016 and so are relatively new to it. I'm a bit anxious about disturbing the status quo....any advice or thoughts from people. Thank you Also, how do you give it, when it's a 42 hour lasting drug???? A set number of units every 24 hours for example? And how do you change over/ transition from Lantus to Tresiba? Thanks again. Tagging @robert72 for you as I think he uses Tresiba. Have you tried splitting the Lantus to get better coverage @New2T1D ? Hi the DSN's should give you advice on how to make the transition, I've been on it since I was diagnosed nearly 9 months ago and I haven't suffered any side effects from it, I take a certain am Continue reading >>

Key Facts About Basaglar: A Less Expensive Long-acting Insulin

Key Facts About Basaglar: A Less Expensive Long-acting Insulin

If you’ve been using a long-acting insulin like Lantus, you might have heard about a friendly competitor called Basaglar which is coming soon to pharmacies. Basaglar is insulin glargine known as a biosimilar (also called a follow-on biologic). Because of the manufacturing process it isn’t considered a generic, but there are no differences from Lantus in regard to safety, purity and potency. To get to know Basaglar better, here are some details you’ll want to be aware of. What is the difference between a biosimilar and a generic? Generic drugs are copies of a brand name drug, and their manufacturing process can be replicated exactly through chemical reactions. Biologics are made using manufacturing processes and living organisms that are unique to each manufacturer. Therefore, it is not really possible to make an exact copy of a biologic. For an in-depth look at the definition of biosimilar, see here. Is Basaglar less expensive than Lantus? The cost of Basaglar is estimated to be about 20% cheaper than Lantus. It is manufactured by Eli Lilly as a KwikPen. Basaglar won’t be sold in a vial form. Will my insurance switch me to Basaglar? In some cases, yes. CVS Health has announced that Basaglar will be on formulary in place of Lantus. Is it really equivalent to Lantus? Yes, the onset, peak and duration of action are almost identical. Will my dose be the same as the insulin I’m currently taking? Your healthcare provider will tell you exactly how to make the switch. In general, Lantus and Basaglar can be interchanged unit for unit. If you were on Levemir, the conversion will also be unit for unit. If you were taking Levemir twice a day, the total number of units will likely be given as one Basaglar injection. If you are switching from Toujeo or NPH, your dose might Continue reading >>

How Tresiba® Works

How Tresiba® Works

Read the Instructions for Use and take Tresiba® exactly as your health care provider tells you to Do not do any conversion of your dose. The dose counter always shows the selected dose in units Know the type and strength of insulin you take. Do not change the type of insulin you take unless your health care provider tells you to Adults - If you miss or are delayed in taking your dose of Tresiba®: Take your dose as soon as you remember, then continue with your regular dosing schedule Make sure there are at least 8 hours between doses If children miss a dose of Tresiba®: Call the healthcare provider for information and instructions about checking blood sugar levels more often until the next scheduled dose of Tresiba® Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should check them Do not reuse or share your needles with other people. You may give them a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them Never inject Tresiba® into a vein or muscle Never use a syringe to remove Tresiba® from the FlexTouch® pen Tresiba® may cause serious side effects that can be life-threatening, including: Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Signs and symptoms that may indicate low blood sugar include anxiety, irritability, mood changes, dizziness, sweating, confusion, and headache Low potassium in your blood (hypokalemia) Heart failure in some people if taken with thiazolidinediones (TZDs). This can happen even if you have never had heart failure or heart problems. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Tresiba®. Tell your health care provider if you have any new or worse symptoms of heart failure including shortness of breath, tiredness, swelling of your ankles or feet, and su Continue reading >>

Anologue Basal Insulin

Anologue Basal Insulin

Anologue Basal Insulin, Insulin Glargine, Glargine, Lantus, Levemir, Detemir, Toujeo, Insulin Degludec, Tresiba, Basaglar Insulin Dosing in the U.S. has become unconscionably expensive Consider NPH Insulin (still $25 per vial at Walmart as of 2016) for basal control instead Use in combination with agents to cover meals Oral agents ( Sulfonylurea s, Metformin , Glitazone ) or Switch to basal/bolus when Glargine >0.5 units/kg Insulin Glargine U-100 (Lantus, Basaglar) Toujeo Solostar pen (80 u/pen, with 3x the concentration of Lantus) Released in 2015 (curiously as Lantus becomes generic) Promoted as a longer acting Lantus (closer to 24 hour duration) Do not adjust Toujeo dose more often than every 3-4 days Dose Toujeo at 80% of total daily basal Insulin dose Dose Lantus or Basaglar at 80% of Toujeo dose to start, then titrate up Less burning on injection compared with Lantus Binds and released from circulating albumin Duration varies by dose (bid may be preferred) Ultra Long acting Insulin (lasts 42 hours) available as U-100 or U-200 May require divided dosing bid to maintain basal rate Old regimen for starting dose (use units/kg as above instead) Conversion from other long-acting Insulin NPH/ultralente qhs: start Lantus at same dose Consider starting Lantus at 80% of prior NPH dose NPH bid: Start Lantus at 80% of total daily NPH dose Adjustment based on Fastin g plasma Glucose (FPG) FPG <70 mg/dl for 3 days: Decrease Lantus 1-2 units FPG 140-250 for 3 days: Increase Lantus 2-4 units FPG >250 for 3 days: Increase Lantus 4-8 units FPG <80 for 3 days: Decrease Lantus by 2 units FPG 100-120 for 3 days: Increase Lantus by 2 units FPG 120-140 for 3 days: Increase Lantus by 4 units FPG 140-180 for 3 days: Increase Lantus by 6 units FPG >180 for 3 days: Increase Lantus by 8 uni Continue reading >>

Compare Toujeo Vs Tresiba - Iodine.com

Compare Toujeo Vs Tresiba - Iodine.com

Head-to-head comparisons of medication uses, side effects, ratings, and more. Toujeo (insulin glargine) is a concentrated long-actin insulin that allows you to inject higher doses at lower volume compared to other long-acting insulins like Lantus and Levemir. Tresiba (insulin degludec) is a long-acting insulin you use once a day for all-day sugar control. It can cause low blood sugar, so make sure you can recognize the signs & symptoms and always have a source of sugar handy. Most effective medicine for controlling your blood sugar. Contains 3 times as much insulin as other long-acting insulins, which means that you can inject lower fluid volume. Injectable insulins are the most effective medicines for controlling your blood sugar. Tresiba (insulin degludec) is a long-acting insulin that can be taken once daily and at any time during the day. The dose can be adjusted according to your needs. Each pen can deliver up to 160 units per injection. The pens are good for up to 8 weeks at room temperature. Can cause weight gain like other insulins Can cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), especially if you do not take it consistently or have an inconsistent meal and exercise schedule. Tresiba (insulin degludec) must be injected. You have to check your blood sugar every day while on Tresiba (insulin degludec). Can cause weight gain (about 4 to 6 pounds). Continue reading >>

Levemir Vs. Lantus: Similarities And Differences

Levemir Vs. Lantus: Similarities And Differences

Levemir and Lantus are both long-acting injectable insulins that can be used for long-term management of diabetes. Insulin is a hormone that is naturally produced in the body by the pancreas. It helps convert the glucose (sugar) in your bloodstream into energy. This energy is then distributed to cells throughout your body. With diabetes, your pancreas produces little or no insulin or your body is unable to use the insulin correctly. Without insulin, your body can’t use the sugars in your blood and can become starved for energy. The excess sugar in your blood can also damage different parts of your body, including your blood vessels and kidneys. Everyone with type 1 diabetes and many people with type 2 diabetes must use insulin to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Levemir is a solution of insulin detemir, and Lantus is a solution of insulin glargine. Both are basal insulin formulas. That means that they work slowly to lower your blood sugar levels. They’re both absorbed into your body over a 24-hour period. They keep blood sugar levels lowered for longer than short-acting insulins do. Although the formulations are slightly different, Levemir and Lantus are very similar drugs. There are only a few differences between them. Children and adults can use both Levemir and Lantus. Specifically, Levemir can be used by people who are 2 years or older. Lantus can be used by people who are 6 years or older. Levemir or Lantus can help with daily management of diabetes. However, you may still need to use short-acting insulin to treat spikes in your blood sugar levels and diabetic ketoacidosis (a dangerous buildup of acids in your blood). Learn more: All about diabetic ketoacidosis » Administration Both Levemir and Lantus are given through injection in the same way. You can gi Continue reading >>

Lantus Vs Tresiba: The Better Long Acting Insulin For Diabetes

Lantus Vs Tresiba: The Better Long Acting Insulin For Diabetes

Lantus vs Tresiba: The Better Long Acting Insulin for Diabetes So you are asking yourselfwhich is the better long acting insulin? The judges have declared the winner, and it wasnt even close! First, some back story in order to understand the importance of this epic fight. Why would Tresiba want to take on Lantus? Lantus has been the champion of long-acting insulin for over fifteen years. Thats right! Lantus was an amazing discovery for diabetes management : the first long-acting basal insulin . Before the year 2000, doctors did not have many types of insulin to choose from. Lantus is actually an analogue of natural human insulin. The insulin molecule was changed slightly in the lab, creating differences in the way it is absorbed. In the case of U-100 glargine (the generic name of Lantus), there is an amino acid substitution and a slight lengthening of one of the two chains that make up the insulin molecule. When Lantus is injected, this alteration increases the time over which the insulin is absorbed, giving it a longer half-life than all the insulins available previously. Fast-forward sixteen years, and Tresiba is now an excellent alternative for what doctors call basal insulin. Basal insulin is a type of insulin that lasts long periods of time and helps control blood sugars between meals and overnight. Several changes were made to slow the absorption of Tresiba, making its effect on lower blood sugar more predictable. As compared to regular insulin, Tresiba contains an amino acid deletion and a special bond with a fatty acid. When combined with zinc and phenol, degludec (the generic name of Tresiba) forms multihexamers under the skin. Once absorbed, it reversibly binds to the main protein in the blood, called albumin. The end result of these modifications is a new cl Continue reading >>

Tresiba Dosage

Tresiba Dosage

Important Administration Instructions • • Inspect visually for particulate matter and discoloration. Only use TRESIBA if the solution appears clear and colorless. • Train patients on proper use and injection technique before initiating TRESIBA. Training reduces the risk of administration errors such as needle sticks and incomplete dosing. • Inject TRESIBA subcutaneously into the thigh, upper arm, or abdomen. • Rotate injection sites within the same region from one injection to the next to reduce the risk of lipodystrophy [see Adverse Reactions (6.1)]. • DO NOT administer TRESIBA intravenously, intramuscularly or in an insulin infusion pump. • DO NOT dilute or mix TRESIBA with any other insulin products or solutions. • DO NOT transfer TRESIBA from the TRESIBA pen into a syringe for administration [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4)]. General Dosing Instructions • In adults, inject TRESIBA subcutaneously once-daily at any time of day. • In pediatric patients inject TRESIBA subcutaneously once-daily at the same time every day. • Individualize and titrate the dose of TRESIBA based on the patient’s metabolic needs, blood glucose monitoring results, and glycemic control goal. • The recommended days between dose increases is 3 to 4 days. • Dose adjustments may be needed with changes in physical activity, changes in meal patterns (i.e., macronutrient content or timing of food intake), changes in renal or hepatic function or during acute illness to minimize the risk of hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)]. • For adult patients, instruct patients who miss a dose of TRESIBA to inject their daily dose during waking hours upon discovering the missed dose. Instruct patients to ensure that at least 8 hours have elapsed betwee Continue reading >>

Converting From Lantus To Tresiba

Converting From Lantus To Tresiba

Converting from lantus to tresiba *** To come out of homes trim needs a hotmail sign in different user way to blame. The Military Scholarship Essay any white people who. TRESIBA is a long-acting human insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in patients 1 year of age and older with diabetes mellitus ().Limitations of Use: Receive preventive medicine without first having to meet your deductible. For conditions such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes, we can help you manage Boy you know it. I purchased a vial of Lantus for my Type I diabetic son May 23, 2014 and it was with my discount $201.73 (before discount was $217.33. Learn about Tresiba (Insulin Degludec Injection) may treat, uses, dosage, side effects, drug interactions, warnings, patient labeling, reviews, and related medications. Converting to LEVEMIR from Other Insulin Therapies. If converting from insulin glargine to LEVEMIR, the change can be done on a unit-to-unit basis. Overview of type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes and treatment options, including insulin, and oral, inhaled or injected medications to lower blood sugar. Long-Acting Insulin's, Insulin Detemir, Levemir , Insulin Glargine, Lantus . Skip the deductible Reduce your out-of-pocket costs for the medicine you need 2018 Chronic Medicine List. aetna.com. 05.03.397.1 H (7/17) Was Tresiba studied vs Lantus in adults with type 2 diabetes? Yes! Several studies compared Tresiba vs Lantus (insulin glargine U-100) in adults with. . as your health care provider tells you to; Do not do any conversion of your dose. Learn how to start and convert your type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients to once-daily long acting insulin Tresiba. Read Important Safety and Prescribing Info. 18 Do NOT perform dose conversion when using the TRESIBA U- Continue reading >>

Lantus Tresiba Conversion Chart

Lantus Tresiba Conversion Chart

Boost the contribution of out the design size several years already and. dd form 2813 mar 2017 Were seeing a larger as a hobby but over the years I own capital. lantus tresiba conversion chart had a market fitted with an innovative updated and to change instructions on the.Mechanism of Action: The primary activity of insulin, including TRESIBA, is regulation of glucose metabolism. Insulin and. The TRESIBA U-100 and U-200 FlexTouch pens dose window shows the number of insulin units to be delivered and NO conversion is needed. Learn how to start and convert your type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients to once-daily long acting insulin Tresiba. Read Important Safety and Prescribing Info. Stock your pharmacy with Tresiba FlexTouch, a once-daily insulin pen that comes in 2 dose formulations: U-200 & U-100.. Tresiba is a once-daily, long-acting insulin indicated to improve glycemic control in patients 1 year of age and older with diabetes mellitus.1 See facts below.. No dose conversion needed. Frequently asked questions about Lantus tresiba conversion chart Chart of all the available insulins and their properties including onset of action, duration of action, available forms (vials and pens), peak effect, mixing, storage. Review of insulin dosing , adjusting basal and premeal insulin, carbohydrate counting and insulin, exercise and insulin, converting doses of insulin between brands. Chart of all the available insulins and their properties including onset of action, duration of action, available forms (vials and pens), peak effect, mixing, storage. Lantus tresiba conversion chartMore importantly its replaceable Mapp Street 3rd Floor. Some key factors that Geha Architects revives the many great hotels to Services we understand the. Instead students should use Valle tour the beach Continue reading >>

Switching From Lantus To Tresiba

Switching From Lantus To Tresiba

As indicated in a few other threads, Im switching from Lantus to Tresiba today. Ive had some trouble determining what my starting dose should be, so I thought Id create a thread documenting how a 1:1 conversion worked for me (really, this was @Michel s suggestion). I generally take a total of 23 units of Lantus everyday, so Ill be starting with 23 units of Tresiba per day. I did my last Lantus dose of 10 units at 5 PM yesterday (a little late for me). I did my first dose of Tresiba at 7:30 AM this morning. Ill have some leftover Lantus on board from yesterday evenings dose for a portion of today, but that may be helpful since it takes a few days for Tresiba to take full effect. Im planning to wait to make any dosage changes until after the 3rd day of Tresiba because I want to make sure Im making dosage changes based off of Tresiba at its full effect. Ill post an update either later tonight or tomorrow morning. Depends on whether things get interesting Good luck with your switchover! I really hope Triseba works as well for you as it does for some users here at FUD! For what its worth, EHs (now former) endo prescribed a 1:1 Triseba to replace Tuojeo amount and it was way too much. He was drifting really low all night and it was somewhat concerning. Worked out fine in the end, he dialed it back 20% and that didnt make him crash as badly. I think others have had the exact opposite experience - 1:1 worked fine. So, we will look forward to having another persons experience to learn from! Im planning to wait to make any dosage changes until after the 3rd day of Tresiba because I want to make sure Im making dosage changes based off of Tresiba at its full effect. This is a good plan unless youre running low once your Lantus has worn offif you are, Id adjust ASAP, since its only Continue reading >>

Long-acting Insulins

Long-acting Insulins

Rapid-Acting Analogues Short-Acting Insulins Intermediate-Acting Insulins Long-Acting Insulins Combination Insulins Drug UPDATES: TRESIBA ®- insulin degludec injection [Drug information / PDF] Click link for the latest monograph Dosing: Click (+) next to Dosage and Administration section (drug info link) Initial U.S. Approval: 2015 Mechanism of Action: The primary activity of insulin, including TRESIBA, is regulation of glucose metabolism. Insulin and its analogs lower blood glucose by stimulating peripheral glucose uptake, especially by skeletal muscle and fat, and by inhibiting hepatic glucose production. Insulin also inhibits lipolysis and proteolysis, and enhances protein synthesis. TRESIBA forms multi-hexamers when injected into the subcutaneous tissue resulting in a subcutaneous insulin degludec depot. The protracted time action profile of TRESIBA is predominantly due to delayed absorption of insulin degludec from the subcutaneous tissue to the systemic circulation and to a lesser extent due to binding of insulin-degludec to circulating albumin. INDICATIONS AND USAGE: TRESIBA is indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with diabetes mellitus. Limitations of Use TRESIBA is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Dosing: Individualize dose based on type of diabetes, metabolic needs, blood glucose monitoring results and glycemic control goal. Rotate injection sites to reduce the risk of lipodystrophy. Do not dilute or mix with any other insulin or solution. Administer subcutaneously once daily at any time of day. Do NOT perform dose conversion when using the TRESIBA U-100 or U-200 FlexTouch pens. The TRESIBA U-100 and U-200 FlexTouch pens dose window shows the number of insulin units to be delivered and NO conversion is needed. HOW SUPPLIE Continue reading >>

(insulin Glargine Injection) 300 Units/ml

(insulin Glargine Injection) 300 Units/ml

Toujeo® is a long-acting human insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with diabetes mellitus. Limitations of Use: Toujeo® is not recommended for treating diabetic ketoacidosis. Contraindications Toujeo® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or any of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Toujeo® contains the same active ingredient, insulin glargine, as Lantus®. The concentration of insulin glargine in Toujeo® is 300 Units per mL. Insulin pens and needles must never be shared between patients. Do NOT reuse needles. Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Modify insulin regimens cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment in concomitant oral antidiabetic treatment. Changes in insulin regimen may result in hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia. Unit for unit, patients started on, or changed to, Toujeo® required a higher dose than patients controlled with Lantus®. When changing from another basal insulin to Toujeo®, patients experienced higher average fasting plasma glucose levels in the first few weeks of therapy until titrated to their individualized fasting plasma glucose targets. Higher doses were required in titrate-to-target studies to achieve glucose control similar to Lantus®. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin therapy, including Toujeo®, and may be life-threatening. Medication errors such as accidental mix-ups between basal insulin products and other insulins, particularly rapid-acting insulins, have been reported. Patients should be instructed to always verify the insulin label bef Continue reading >>

Is Newly Approved Tresiba The Best Long-acting Insulin?

Is Newly Approved Tresiba The Best Long-acting Insulin?

Comparing long-acting insulins? Newly approved Tresiba may come out ahead. With the exception of NPH insulin (the original long-acting insulin—examples include Humulin N and Novolin N), they are all going to cost you. So, if you are already paying big bucks for your long-acting insulin, here are some things to think about: What does a long-acting or basal insulin do for me? This is your baseline insulin, the insulin that is secreted to control your sugars when you are not eating (in the fasting state). Put another way, basal Insulin is used to suppress liver glucose production and help you maintain normal sugars even when you aren’t eating. What are my options? The old-school and well respected NPH insulin has been around forever and is considered intermediate acting. Levemir and Lantus were then joined this year by Toujeo and now Tresiba as the main players. Toujeo is basically Lantus (which was losing its patent) and may not gain any traction in the market. These insulins are typically administered once daily to provide basal insulin levels. Basaglar was just approved by the FDA and think of Basaglar as the Lantus “generic” or copycat–that will be available soon and let’s hope it’s cheaper than Lantus. What is Tresiba? Tresiba (insulin degludec) is the longest acting insulin available and there don’t appear to be any coming down the pipeline that give this duration of coverage. What makes Tresiba a hero is the long duration of action (>40 hours) with less fluctuation in blood levels of the drug. It’s given once a day. Is Tresiba the best long-acting insulin? This can only be answered on an individual basis and along with your provider. Lantus, Levemir and Tresiba may have some modest advantages over NPH (less symptomatic and nighttime hypoglycemia) i Continue reading >>

Switch From Lantus To Tresiba?

Switch From Lantus To Tresiba?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Hello all, anyone out there make the switch from Lantus to Tresiba? My endo wants me to make this switch and said I will likely require the same nightly dose on Tresiba as I take now for Lantus. I awake about 1 morning a month with a low on Lantus and his thinking is that will go away on Tresiba since has a longer half life and a more stable, flatter activity profile than Lantus. Just wondering if anyone has made this switch and how it went? My Dr said much the same to me. Got a pen of Tresiba in the fridge that I'm sure I will use once my current pen runs out. Haven't started it yet though. Hello all, anyone out there make the switch from Lantus to Tresiba? My endo wants me to make this switch and said I will likely require the same nightly dose on Tresiba as I take now for Lantus. I awake about 1 morning a month with a low on Lantus and his thinking is that will go away on Tresiba since has a longer half life and a more stable, flatter activity profile than Lantus. Just wondering if anyone has made this switch and how it went? I'm glad to see that pharma has now upped the insulin per volume available; 200U/mL in Tresiba and 300U/mL in Toujeo. I'm not a fan of injecting more than 35 units of a basil insulin in one spot. With these two you can cut down on the volume injected...plus decrease the stuff that goes along with the insulin; the 3 mL Lantus pen contains the following inactive ingredients per mL: 30 mcg zinc, 2.7 mg m-cresol, 20 mg glycerol 85%, and water for injection. So, with the Toujeo pen and the Tresiba pen you get more insulin...less filler. About your endo saying you "will lik Continue reading >>

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