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Lantus Solostar And Victoza

Victoza Price

Victoza Price

Victoza is an injectable prescription medication that lowers glucose (sugar) levels in adults afflicted with type 2 diabetes. The medication, when taken accordingly and combined with proper diet, can restore blood sugar to normal level quickly. The drug is classified as belonging to the GLP-1 analogs. When you purchase the medicine it will be in a pre-filled injection pen and your doctor will tell you what needle is to be used. There are different parts in your body where you can inject the drug, but do so only if you know the procedure. The injection is usually done once a day, although your doctor may increase the dosage depending on your condition. You can use the medication any time of the day on an empty or full stomach. Victoza Cost Information A carton of the medicine, which comes with three pens, (18mg/3ml) costs $524.02 in Walmart and Sam’s Club, but the price may vary in other stores. Continue reading >>

Levemir® Flextouch® Is Ready To Use In Just A Few Steps

Levemir® Flextouch® Is Ready To Use In Just A Few Steps

Levemir® FlexTouch®, a prefilled insulin pen with no push-button extension, requires low force to inject at all doses and is ready to use in just a few steps.a In fact, Levemir® FlexTouch® has up to 77% less injection force than Lantus® SoloSTAR®. From the makers of the world’s #1-selling prefilled insulin pen,b Levemir® FlexTouch® is: Accurate—Accurate dosing from 1 to 80 units Prefilled—Each pen is prefilled with 300 units of Levemir® Discreet—Fits in your pocket, purse, or nightstand On the go—Take it with you almost anywherec aPlease see the Patient Information for complete Instructions For Use. cOnce in use, Levemir® FlexTouch® must be kept at room temperature below 86°F for up to 42 days. Injecting with Levemir® FlexTouch® You may have concerns about using an injectable medicine for type 2 diabetes. But it’s important to realize the positive effect it may have on the management of your diabetes. And once you gain a little practice in giving injections on your own, Levemir® injections will become part of your daily routine. If you were given instructions from your health care provider on how to use Levemir® FlexTouch® and you have read the Instructions for Use in the Patient Information, you may be ready for your first injection. Your health care provider will tell you what dose of Levemir® is right for you and how many times to take it each day. Your dose may be adjusted based on your blood sugar. Please consult your health care provider prior to adjusting your dose. No compatible source was found for this video. Levemir® can be injected in the thigh, abdomen, or upper arm. It’s important to change the injection site within your injection area each time you inject and not inject into the exact same spot each time. Rotating where yo Continue reading >>

Mtf Formulary Management For Diabetes Drugs Defense Health Agency Pharmacy Operations Division

Mtf Formulary Management For Diabetes Drugs Defense Health Agency Pharmacy Operations Division

October 2016 Bottom Line • Step therapy exists in most diabetes classes. Patients must first try metformin or a sulfonylurea before use of non-insulin diabetes drugs. • Preferred agents exist within the DPP-4, SGLT2, and GLP1RA subclasses (i.e., sitagliptin, empagliflozin, exenatide once weekly, and albiglutide). • Prior Authorization applies to U-300 insulin, insulin degludec, and inhaled insulin. If A1c target not achieved after ~ 3 months of monotherapy, proceed to two-drug combination (order of medications represents a suggested hierarchy of usage; however, choice of drug is dependent on a variety of patient-specific factors). Efficacy: The Efficacy measure is the extent to which an intervention is helpful in reducing A1C, improving outcomes, of a medical condition. The scale used to measure efficacy is: 5 (Highly effective): Achieves A1C reduction >1.5% 4 (Very effective): Achieves A1C reduction >1.0% 3 (Moderately effective): Achieves A1C reduction >0.5% 2 (Minimally effective): Modest, no, or unknown impact on A1C 1 (Not effective): Provides no benefit Safety: Safety refers to the assessment of the relative likelihood of side effects from an intervention with fewer side effects being scored highly. The scale used to measure safety is: 5 (Usually no meaningful adverse effects): Uncommon or minimal side effects 4 (Infrequent adverse effects): Rare significant side effects or low-grade side effects only 3 (Occasional adverse effects): Mild side effects, such as edema, that interfere with ADLs is common. 2 (Frequent adverse effects): Significant side effects often occur, such as hypoglycemia. Life threatening issues are uncommon. 1 (Severe adverse effects): Usually severe, significant toxicities or life threatening/fatal toxicity often observed. Cos Continue reading >>

Glargine Vs. Liraglutide In Poorly Controlled Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Glargine Vs. Liraglutide In Poorly Controlled Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Both medications lowered HbA1c and both groups of patients lost weight…. This randomized, multinational, open-label trial included subjects treated for T2DM with metformin ± sulphonylurea, who had glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels of 7.5–12%. Subjects were assigned to 24 weeks of insulin glargine, titrated to target fasting plasma glucose of 4.0–5.5 mmol/L or liraglutide, escalated to the highest approved clinical dose of 1.8 mg daily. The trial was powered to detect superiority of glargine over liraglutide in percentage of people reaching HbA1c <7%. The mean [standard deviation (s.d.)] age of the participants was 57 (9) years, the duration of diabetes was 9 (6) years, body mass index was 31.9 (4.2) kg/m2 and HbA1c level was 9.0 (1.1)%. Equal numbers (n = 489) were allocated to glargine and liraglutide. Similar numbers of subjects in both groups attained an HbA1c level of <7% (48.4 vs. 45.9%); therefore, superiority of glargine over liraglutide was not observed (p = 0.44). Subjects treated with glargine had greater reductions of HbA1c [−1.94% (0.05) and −1.79% (0.05); p = 0.019] and fasting plasma glucose [6.2 (1.6) and 7.9 (2.2) mmol/L; p < 0.001] than those receiving liraglutide. The liraglutide group reported a greater number of gastrointestinal treatment-emergent adverse events (p < 0.001). The mean (s.d.) weight change was +2.0 (4.0) kg for glargine and −3.0 (3.6) kg for liraglutide (p < 0.001). Symptomatic hypoglycaemia was more common with glargine (p < 0.001). A greater number of subjects in the liraglutide arm withdrew as a result of adverse events (p < 0.001). The authors concluded that, “Adding either insulin glargine or liraglutide to subjects with poorly controlled T2DM reduces HbA1c substantially, with nearly half of subjects reaching targ Continue reading >>

Spending On Expensive Specialty Drugs Triples Since 2003

Spending On Expensive Specialty Drugs Triples Since 2003

Specialty drugs are a relatively small part of total prescriptions filled at the pharmacy, but they are a dramatically increasing part of total prescription spending. A new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill reveals that just 1.8 percent of drugs make up 43.2 percent of spending in 2014. The work, led by Stacie Dusetzina, an assistant professor at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and Gillings School of Global Public Health, shows a dramatic increase from 2003, when specialty drugs accounted for just 11 percent of the money spent by commercial health plans on prescription drugs obtained at pharmacies. “There’s a story here of very expensive drugs used by relatively small groups of patients for conditions for which there are few options,” said Dusetzina, who is also a member of the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center. “But we also have commonly used drugs for which there might be acceptable substitutes being prescribed for very large groups of patients.” Dusetzina reviewed prescriptions obtained by patients enrolled in commercial insurance plans from 2003 to 2014 to explore trends in the prescribing of specialty drugs using the Truven Health MarketScan Commercial Database. For this study, a “specialty” drug was defined as a product that costs $600 or more for a 30-day supply which is the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services threshold for allowing a product to be placed on a specialty tier. To account for inflation, all costs were adjusted to represent 2014 dollars. Her findings were published in the journal Health Affairs. Dusetzina’s analysis shows that the use of specialty products tripled between 2003-2014, from 0.6 percent of all prescriptions in 2003 to 1.8 percent in 2014. Spending by commercial health plans on Continue reading >>

Pen Needles

Pen Needles

UltiCare® pen needles fit all pens sold in the U.S. Every UltiCare pen needle, regardless of length or gauge, provide universal fit with all diabetes pens and other injection pens listed in the chart below. If you can’t find your pen, please contact us. Safe needle disposal made easy. Safe disposal is important for safety at home and also helps prevent used needles from entering the waste stream, putting individuals handling the trash at risk for accidental needle sticks. The UltiGuard® Safe Pack allows you to easily access our premium quality needles and dispose of them properly. Each UltiGuard safe pack contains 100 premium quality pen needles or syringes. Once a needle has been used you simply pop it in the top, drop and roll it safely out the way. There’s no need to spend more on a separate sharps container. The UltiGuard is the convenient, affordable way to keep your home and community safe. Ask your pharmacist for UltiCare® pen needles with UltiGuard® Safe Pack and help protect your family, environment and community. Learn More » Available in all standard sizes. Available in a 100-count with UltiGuard® Safe Pack or 50-count easy dispense box (Original only available in the 100-count). Continue reading >>

How Long Should You Keep Insulin Pens?

How Long Should You Keep Insulin Pens?

Did you read our blog on insulin vials and think to yourself, does this apply to my insulin pens too? If so, this post is for you! With so many different insulin and insulin-like products out there these days it can be hard keep track of how long each of these pens stays good. Depending on your dose, you may still have insulin left in your pen at the manufacturer-recommended time to throw it away. If this sounds like a familiar situation, know that it is important to throw away your pen regardless of whether you have any leftover. You might think it’s wasteful, but using the medication past the recommended time can actually do you more harm than good. You may notice if you continue to use insulin from a pen that’s past the manufacturers discard date, your blood glucose may be higher or a greater dose may be needed to achieve a normal blood glucose reading. There are several different types of insulin and a variety of other injectable diabetes medications, and they don’t all have the same recommendations. As a quick reminder, the different categories of insulin are: Rapid-acting. Short-acting (regular). There are no short-acting insulin pens available Intermediate-acting. Long-acting. So how long can you hold on to your insulin pen after you start to use it? Rapid-acting insulin Novolog FlexPen: use within 28 days after first use Novolog cartridge (for use in a re-useable pen): use within 28 days after first use Humalog KwikPen: use within 28 days after first use Humalog cartridge (for use in a re-useable pen): use within 28 days after in-use Apidra SoloStar: use within 28 days after first use Intermediate-acting insulin Long-acting insulin Lantus SoloStar: use within 28 days after first use Toujeo SoloStar: use within 28 days after first use Levemir FlexTouch: use Continue reading >>

Rebates And Coupons Run Rampant In Diabetes

Rebates And Coupons Run Rampant In Diabetes

U.S. spending on diabetes medications galloped to $10.1 billion in 2015, a 30% increase over 2014 expenditures, according to the drug spending report that IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics released last month. While there is rapid growth in the utilization of all diabetes medications, especially insulins, the spending figure might be misleading because, according to IMS, manufacturers gave back $8.6 billion in rebates, discounts and other price concessions to health plans, PBMs, and consumers. IMS says as a result, the “net” spending increase on diabetes medications was only $1.6 billion and less than the $2.5 billion increase in net spending between 2013 and 2014. The machinations with prices, rebates, and discounts reflect the intense competition among me-too diabetes agents and manufacturers’ frantic attempts to develop market share for new drugs. The insulins are an example. Sticker-price expenditures on insulins increased by $4.8 billion from 2014 to 2015, but IMS Health says manufacturers gave back more than that in rebates and discounts to position themselves in the market. Diabetes spending growth (in billions of dollars) Express Scripts and CVS Caremark have taken advantage of the therapeutic similarity of insulins as well as their own purchasing power to obtain deep list price discounts by offering exclusivity on their standard formularies. The two giant PBMs have maximized their leverage with the two leading manufacturers, Eli Lilly and Novo Nordisk, by playing them off one another. The stakes are high: Annual sales of insulin approach $20 billion, although that’s the market based on sticker price. CVS Caremark has removed Eli Lilly’s Humalog and Humulin from its formulary in favor of Novo Nordisk’s NovoLog and Novolin. Express Scripts has Continue reading >>

Compare Victoza Vs. Lantus

Compare Victoza Vs. Lantus

Lowers A1c (average blood sugar over time) up to 1.5%. Helps with weight loss and controls appetite. No limitation for people with kidney problems, but close monitoring is recommended. Medicine is ready to use, without need to mix. Insulin is one of the most effective blood sugar-lowering medication and can lower your A1c (average blood sugar over time) by up to 2-3%. Lantus (insulin glargine) is a long-lasting insulin that provides consistent, all-day sugar control with just once or twice daily dosing. Dose can be easily adjusted to make a customized regimen that's tailored to your body's needs. Lantus (insulin glargine) can be used with liver or kidney problems. 22 reviews so far Have you used Victoza (liraglutide)? Leave a review 584 reviews so far Have you used Lantus (insulin glargine)? Leave a review Low blood sugar - self-treatable27% Continue reading >>

Patient Assistance Program—diabetes Care

Patient Assistance Program—diabetes Care

The Novo Nordisk Patient Assistance Program (PAP) is based on our commitment to people living with diabetes and on our philosophy, known as the Novo Nordisk Triple Bottom Line The Novo Nordisk PAP provides free diabetes medicine to those who qualify. If you are approved for the PAP, you may qualify to receive free diabetes medicine from Novo Nordisk for up to a year. Do you qualify for PAP? You may be eligible if: You are a US citizen or legal resident Your total household income is at or below 300% of the federal poverty level (FPL). Visit the Families USA website, which lists the current FPL guidelines You are not eligible if you have: Any private prescription coverage, such as an HMO or PPO Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) prescription benefits Any federal, state, or local program such as Medicare or Medicaid. Exceptions include: Medicare Part D patients who have spent $1,000 on prescription medicine in the current calendar year Patients who have applied for and been denied Medicare Extra Help/Low Income Subsidy (LIS) and are Medicare eligible but do not have Medicare Part D coverage. To apply for LIS, please contact the Social Security Administration (SSA) at 800-772-1213 (TTY 800-325-0778) or go to www.socialsecurity.gov/prescriptionhelp Patients who are Medicaid eligible must have applied for and been denied Medicaid to be eligible for the Novo Nordisk PAP Simple steps for a free 120-day supply of medicine If you would like to find out if you qualify for PAP, please follow these steps: 1. Download the Application (in English or Spanish) 2. Complete the "For Patient," "Patient Signature," and "Date" sections on the Application 3. Make copies of your proof of income a. Your most recent federal income tax return (Form 1040) b. Social Security Form SSA-1099 c. Form Continue reading >>

Lilly Fortifies Its Trulicity Case With New Lantus-beating Combo Data

Lilly Fortifies Its Trulicity Case With New Lantus-beating Combo Data

Eli Lilly & Co. rolled out its weekly GLP-1 drug Trulicity in late 2014, looking to challenge Novo Nordisk’s ($NVO) daily Victoza, which had dominated that market for years. But Lilly ($LLY) hasn’t been resting on its weekly dosing alone. After all, it’s also up against GlaxoSmithKline’s ($GSK) Tanzeum and AstraZeneca’s ($AZN) Bydureon, both dosed at the same frequency. It’s been racking up new Trulicity data in a variety of patient groups to build a broader case for the med. Case in point: The AWARD-9 trial presented on Sunday at the American Diabetes Association’s Scientific Sessions. The study tested Trulicity alongside Sanofi’s (4SNY) Lantus (insulin glargine), and the combo beat Lantus alone at every measure. The new data is important “because it adds to the dataset on Trulicity and how it can be used in a clinical setting,” David Kendall, Lilly’s VP of medical affairs, told FiercePharma at the meeting. “Even patients who’ve progressed to insulin therapy can still benefit” from the drug. The Trulicity-Lantus pair delivered A1C reductions of 1.44%, compared with 0.67% for Type 2 diabetes patients taking Lantus and a placebo. Plus, more than two-thirds of patients taking both drugs hit their A1C goal of less than 7%, while 35% of patients in the Lantus arm did. Fasting blood sugar dropped more in the combo arm, and after 28 weeks of treatment, patients taking Trulicity needed fewer units of Lantus to keep their glucose levels in check. Patients in the combo group also dropped weight--1.91 kg was the median measure--while those in the Lantus arm gained 0.5 kg. On the safety side, hypoglycemia rates were similar. About one-tenth of the Trulicity patients did experience nausea and/or diarrhea, consistent with previous studies of the drug. The Continue reading >>

Reference Bd Needles Reference To Bd Ultra-fineâ„¢ Pen Needles

Reference Bd Needles Reference To Bd Ultra-fineâ„¢ Pen Needles

Drug Manufacturer Pen Name Drug Drug NDC Number Place Where Drug Manufacturers Sanofi-Aventis Apidra® SoloStar® Apidra® 0088-2502-05 Package Insert Patient Instructions for use Patient Toll Free Phone Number “SoloStar® is compatible with all pen needles from Becton Dickinson and Company†Lantus® SoloStar® Lantus® 0088-2219-05 Package Insert User Manual, Device Page, Website “ BD Ultra-Fine™ needles to be used in conjunction with SoloStar® and OptiClik® are sold separately and are manufactured by BD.†“ BD Ultra-Fine™ needles are compatible with SoloStar® . These are sold separately and are manufactured by BD.†Amylin Pharmaceuticals & Eli Lilly and Company Byetta® Byetta® 66780-0212-01 66780-0210-07 Amylin Pharmaceuticals SymlinPen® 60 & 120 Symlin® 66780-115-02 66780-121-02 Eli Lilly and Company HumaPen® LUXURA™ HD Humalog® 3mL 0002-7516-59 User Manual, Website “ HumaPen® LUXURA™ HD is suitable for use with Becton, Dickinson and Company pen needles.†Humalog® KwikPen™ Humalog® Humalog® Mix 75/25® Humalog® Mix 50/50 0002-8799-59 0002-8797-59 0002-8798-59 User Manual, Brochures, Prescribing Card “ When prescribing KwikPen™ prefilled with the Humalog brand of insulins you will need to write a separate prescription for BD needles.†Humulin® Pen Humulin® N Humulin® 70/30 0002-8730-59 0002-8770-59 User Manual, Website “ This device is suitable for use with Becton, Dickinson and Company’s insulin pen needles.†Novo Nordisk, Inc. Victoza® Victoza® N/A NovoLog® Mix FlexPen® NovoLog® Mix 70/30 N/A NovoPen® Junior Novo Nordisk PenFill 3ml N/A Novo Pen® 3 Novo Nordisk PenFill 3ml N/A L Continue reading >>

How Victoza® Works

How Victoza® Works

Victoza® is different from diabetes pills because it works in 3 ways to lower blood sugar. Victoza® works in 3 ways like the hormone GLP-1 (7-37)a to help control blood sugar levels Victoza® slows food leaving your stomach. GLP-1 is normally released from your small intestine when you eat. This slows down the process of food leaving your stomach, which helps control your blood sugar after meals. Victoza® helps prevent your liver from making too much sugar. Victoza® helps the pancreas produce more insulin when your blood sugar levels are high. Victoza® does this by helping important cells work the way they should. These cells are called beta cells and they help control blood sugar by making and releasing insulin. aGLP-1 (7-37) represents <20% of the total circulating GLP-1 produced by your body. Victoza® is not insulin Victoza® is not insulin. But it can be taken with long-acting insulin. When using Victoza® with insulin, take them as separate injections. You may give both injections in the same body area (for example, your stomach area), but you should not give the injections right next to each other. Never mix insulin and Victoza® together. Victoza® may also be taken alone or in combination with one or more common oral type 2 diabetes medications. These include biguanides (such as metformin), sulfonylureas (SUs), and thiazolidinediones (TZDs). While not a weight-loss product, Victoza® may help you lose some weight In clinical studies ranging from 26 to 52 weeks in length, many people lost some weight. In our largest study, when Victoza® was added to metformin, people lost on average up to 6.2 pounds. While many people in clinical trials lost weight, some did gain weight. The American Diabetes Association recommends weight loss as an important goal for over Continue reading >>

Tresiba Safer Than Insulin Glargine, Says Novo Nordisk

Tresiba Safer Than Insulin Glargine, Says Novo Nordisk

Diabetics treated with Novo Nordisk's basal insulin Tresiba have a lower risk of developing low blood sugar compared to Sanofi's Lantus, according to a new trial. The SWITCH 2 study found that type 2 diabetics taking Tresiba (insulin degludec) were less likely to have symptoms of low blood sugar (hypoglycaemia) compared to those taking Lantus (insulin glargine), the most-prescribed basal insulin product. Tresiba was as good as Lantus at reducing haemoglobin A1c levels - a marker for glucose control. However, the rate of symptomatic hypoglycaemia was 186 events per 100 patient years for Novo Nordisk's drug, a 30% reduction on the 265 events per 100 patient years seen with insulin glargine. Similarly, nocturnal low blood sugar episodes were reduced 42% with Tresiba compared to Lantus, although there was no significant difference between the two drugs in the rate of severe hypoglycaemic episodes. Hypoglycaemia is one of the biggest concerns for diabetics and, taken together, the results could give Novo Nordisk additional power as it tries to wrest market share away from $7bn-a-year Lantus. Moreover, it could also differentiate Tresiba from biosimilar copies of Sanofi's drug that are starting to reach the market and threaten to disrupt the basal insulin category. Novo Nordisk had been held back in its efforts to compete with Lantus by a delay to US approval of Tresiba, with the FDA rejecting its marketing application for the drug in 2013, although it has been launched in most other major markets. Last October however the Danish drugmaker finally won US approval for Tresiba and combination product Ryzodeg (insulin degludec and insulin aspart), prompting analysts at Sydbank to increase their peak sales predictions for the franchise to around $3bn. In some markets the drug has Continue reading >>

Fda Approves 2 Injectable Diabetes Drugs

Fda Approves 2 Injectable Diabetes Drugs

Two new diabetes drugs, both long-acting injectable insulin products, were simultaneously approved by FDA. Xultophy 100/3.6 (Novo Nordisk) is a once-daily, combination of Tresiba (insulin degludec injection) and Victoza (liraglutide) injection, indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes. Meanwhile, Soliqua 100/33 (Sanofi) once-daily injection is a combination Lantus (insulin glargine 100 units/mL) and lixisenatide, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, in a once-daily injection for the treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on basal insulin (less than 60 units daily) or lixisenatide. Both Soliqua 100/33 and Xultophy 100/3.6 enter a new class of diabetes treatments that combine a basal insulin and a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist (GLP-1 RA) in a single, once-daily injection. Soliqua 100/33, which will be available in retail pharmacies in January, 2017, will be delivered in a single pre-filled pen for once-daily dosing. Sanofi is utilizing SoloStar technology, which it says is the most frequently used disposable insulin injection pen platform in the world. Meanwhile, Novo Nordisk expects to launch Xultophy 100/3.6 in the US in the first half of 2017. Xultophy 100/3.6 is administered as a once-daily injection from a prefilled pen, and can be taken with or without food. Each Xultophy 100/3.6 dosage unit contains one unit of insulin degludec and 0.036 mg of liraglutide. The approval of Xultophy 100/3.6 is based on efficacy and safety data from the DUAL (Dual Action of Liraglutide and Insulin Degludec in Type 2 Diabetes) clinical development program. In three DUAL trials involving 1,393 adults with type 2 diabetes, patients who were inadequately controlled on liraglutide or basal insulin ther Continue reading >>

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