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Lantus Solostar And Victoza

Levemir® Flextouch® Is Ready To Use In Just A Few Steps

Levemir® Flextouch® Is Ready To Use In Just A Few Steps

Levemir® FlexTouch®, a prefilled insulin pen with no push-button extension, requires low force to inject at all doses and is ready to use in just a few steps.a In fact, Levemir® FlexTouch® has up to 77% less injection force than Lantus® SoloSTAR®. From the makers of the world’s #1-selling prefilled insulin pen,b Levemir® FlexTouch® is: Accurate—Accurate dosing from 1 to 80 units Prefilled—Each pen is prefilled with 300 units of Levemir® Discreet—Fits in your pocket, purse, or nightstand On the go—Take it with you almost anywherec aPlease see the Patient Information for complete Instructions For Use. cOnce in use, Levemir® FlexTouch® must be kept at room temperature below 86°F for up to 42 days. Injecting with Levemir® FlexTouch® You may have concerns about using an injectable medicine for type 2 diabetes. But it’s important to realize the positive effect it may have on the management of your diabetes. And once you gain a little practice in giving injections on your own, Levemir® injections will become part of your daily routine. If you were given instructions from your health care provider on how to use Levemir® FlexTouch® and you have read the Instructions for Use in the Patient Information, you may be ready for your first injection. Your health care provider will tell you what dose of Levemir® is right for you and how many times to take it each day. Your dose may be adjusted based on your blood sugar. Please consult your health care provider prior to adjusting your dose. No compatible source was found for this video. Levemir® can be injected in the thigh, abdomen, or upper arm. It’s important to change the injection site within your injection area each time you inject and not inject into the exact same spot each time. Rotating where yo Continue reading >>

Overview Of Insulin And Non-insulin Delivery Devices In The Treatment Of Diabetes

Overview Of Insulin And Non-insulin Delivery Devices In The Treatment Of Diabetes

Diabetes affects 20.9 million people in the U.S. and 347 million people worldwide.1,2 It is estimated that one in three American adults will have diabetes by 2050.1,3 Serious complications, such as blindness, kidney failure, and amputations, have been associated with chronic hyperglycemia.3 Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death worldwide.2,3 Approximately 5% of diabetes cases in the U.S. are classified as type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), which requires insulin therapy because of β-cell destruction. Of all diabetes cases, 90% to 95% are classified as type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), which results from a progressive insulin secretory defect against a background of insulin resistance.4,5 T2DM is more common in minority populations, the elderly, obese persons, and those with sedentary lifestyles.6,7 In 2011, 17.7 million Americans were being treated with insulin or oral medications.7,8 Antidiabetic agents were among the top five classes of medications in 2012, accounting for $22 billion in pharmaceutical sales. These agents included eight insulin products (primarily insulin pen delivery devices) and two non-insulin injectable delivery devices (Byetta and Victoza).8,9 A position statement from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD), released in 2012, and a comprehensive diabetes management algorithm from the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) have championed a patient-centered approach to selecting appropriate initial therapy for T2DM.10–12 Both the ADA and the EASD emphasize the use of basal insulin, whereas the AACE consensus statement gives priority to the use of rapid-onset, long-acting insulin analogs and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) because of their Continue reading >>

Patient Assistance Program—diabetes Care

Patient Assistance Program—diabetes Care

The Novo Nordisk Patient Assistance Program (PAP) is based on our commitment to people living with diabetes and on our philosophy, known as the Novo Nordisk Triple Bottom Line The Novo Nordisk PAP provides free diabetes medicine to those who qualify. If you are approved for the PAP, you may qualify to receive free diabetes medicine from Novo Nordisk for up to a year. Do you qualify for PAP? You may be eligible if: You are a US citizen or legal resident Your total household income is at or below 300% of the federal poverty level (FPL). Visit the Families USA website, which lists the current FPL guidelines You are not eligible if you have: Any private prescription coverage, such as an HMO or PPO Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) prescription benefits Any federal, state, or local program such as Medicare or Medicaid. Exceptions include: Medicare Part D patients who have spent $1,000 on prescription medicine in the current calendar year Patients who have applied for and been denied Medicare Extra Help/Low Income Subsidy (LIS) and are Medicare eligible but do not have Medicare Part D coverage. To apply for LIS, please contact the Social Security Administration (SSA) at 800-772-1213 (TTY 800-325-0778) or go to www.socialsecurity.gov/prescriptionhelp Patients who are Medicaid eligible must have applied for and been denied Medicaid to be eligible for the Novo Nordisk PAP Simple steps for a free 120-day supply of medicine If you would like to find out if you qualify for PAP, please follow these steps: 1. Download the Application (in English or Spanish) 2. Complete the "For Patient," "Patient Signature," and "Date" sections on the Application 3. Make copies of your proof of income a. Your most recent federal income tax return (Form 1040) b. Social Security Form SSA-1099 c. Form Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medication Update

Diabetes Medication Update

Diabetes Medication Update In the past 2 years there have been many new medications that have come out to help us treat type 2 diabetes more effectively. For those of you in primary care, but also for those of you who do not specially treat diabetes, but have patients who are diabetic, here is a quick overview of some of the new medications to come on the market. SGLT2 Inhibitors Canagliflozin (Invokana) was the first sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor to be approved in March 2013. Dapagliflozin (Farxiga) and empagliflozin (Jardiance) were approved in early 2014. These SGLT 2 inhibitors work by blocking the kidney’s reabsorption of glucose, so that more glucose is excreted in the urine, thus lowering the patient’s blood sugar. This is the first medication on the market that utilizes the kidney to lower blood sugar and works completely independently of insulin. These medications pose a low risk of hypoglycemia. Unlike a lot of other medications for diabetes that cause weight gain, these medications are associated with modest weight loss caused by the increase in sugar excreted in the urine. They also have a mild diuretic effect and can also help to lower blood pressure which is often a co-morbidity in many patients with type 2 diabetes. Side effects to watch for include lightheadedness or dizziness (from drops in blood pressure) and genital yeast and urinary tract infections. These medications were also found to modestly increase levels of LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, but the potential for increased rates of heart attack, stroke and other cardiac events are still being studied. There is also a concern for dapagliflozin specifically for increase in bladder cancer and liver toxicity. These medications can be used alone, or in combination with any of the Continue reading >>

Victoza Price

Victoza Price

Victoza is an injectable prescription medication that lowers glucose (sugar) levels in adults afflicted with type 2 diabetes. The medication, when taken accordingly and combined with proper diet, can restore blood sugar to normal level quickly. The drug is classified as belonging to the GLP-1 analogs. When you purchase the medicine it will be in a pre-filled injection pen and your doctor will tell you what needle is to be used. There are different parts in your body where you can inject the drug, but do so only if you know the procedure. The injection is usually done once a day, although your doctor may increase the dosage depending on your condition. You can use the medication any time of the day on an empty or full stomach. Victoza Cost Information A carton of the medicine, which comes with three pens, (18mg/3ml) costs $524.02 in Walmart and Sam’s Club, but the price may vary in other stores. Continue reading >>

Mtf Formulary Management For Diabetes Drugs Defense Health Agency Pharmacy Operations Division

Mtf Formulary Management For Diabetes Drugs Defense Health Agency Pharmacy Operations Division

October 2016 Bottom Line • Step therapy exists in most diabetes classes. Patients must first try metformin or a sulfonylurea before use of non-insulin diabetes drugs. • Preferred agents exist within the DPP-4, SGLT2, and GLP1RA subclasses (i.e., sitagliptin, empagliflozin, exenatide once weekly, and albiglutide). • Prior Authorization applies to U-300 insulin, insulin degludec, and inhaled insulin. If A1c target not achieved after ~ 3 months of monotherapy, proceed to two-drug combination (order of medications represents a suggested hierarchy of usage; however, choice of drug is dependent on a variety of patient-specific factors). Efficacy: The Efficacy measure is the extent to which an intervention is helpful in reducing A1C, improving outcomes, of a medical condition. The scale used to measure efficacy is: 5 (Highly effective): Achieves A1C reduction >1.5% 4 (Very effective): Achieves A1C reduction >1.0% 3 (Moderately effective): Achieves A1C reduction >0.5% 2 (Minimally effective): Modest, no, or unknown impact on A1C 1 (Not effective): Provides no benefit Safety: Safety refers to the assessment of the relative likelihood of side effects from an intervention with fewer side effects being scored highly. The scale used to measure safety is: 5 (Usually no meaningful adverse effects): Uncommon or minimal side effects 4 (Infrequent adverse effects): Rare significant side effects or low-grade side effects only 3 (Occasional adverse effects): Mild side effects, such as edema, that interfere with ADLs is common. 2 (Frequent adverse effects): Significant side effects often occur, such as hypoglycemia. Life threatening issues are uncommon. 1 (Severe adverse effects): Usually severe, significant toxicities or life threatening/fatal toxicity often observed. Cos Continue reading >>

How Victoza® Works

How Victoza® Works

Victoza® is different from diabetes pills because it works in 3 ways to lower blood sugar. Victoza® works in 3 ways like the hormone GLP-1 (7-37)a to help control blood sugar levels Victoza® slows food leaving your stomach. GLP-1 is normally released from your small intestine when you eat. This slows down the process of food leaving your stomach, which helps control your blood sugar after meals. Victoza® helps prevent your liver from making too much sugar. Victoza® helps the pancreas produce more insulin when your blood sugar levels are high. Victoza® does this by helping important cells work the way they should. These cells are called beta cells and they help control blood sugar by making and releasing insulin. aGLP-1 (7-37) represents <20% of the total circulating GLP-1 produced by your body. Victoza® is not insulin Victoza® is not insulin. But it can be taken with long-acting insulin. When using Victoza® with insulin, take them as separate injections. You may give both injections in the same body area (for example, your stomach area), but you should not give the injections right next to each other. Never mix insulin and Victoza® together. Victoza® may also be taken alone or in combination with one or more common oral type 2 diabetes medications. These include biguanides (such as metformin), sulfonylureas (SUs), and thiazolidinediones (TZDs). While not a weight-loss product, Victoza® may help you lose some weight In clinical studies ranging from 26 to 52 weeks in length, many people lost some weight. In our largest study, when Victoza® was added to metformin, people lost on average up to 6.2 pounds. While many people in clinical trials lost weight, some did gain weight. The American Diabetes Association recommends weight loss as an important goal for over Continue reading >>

Drug Interactions Between Lantus Solostar And Victoza

Drug Interactions Between Lantus Solostar And Victoza

Interactions between your drugs Moderate insulin glargine ↔ liraglutide Applies to:Lantus Solostar (insulin glargine) and Victoza (liraglutide) Using liraglutide together with insulin glargine can increase the risk of hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. You may need a dose adjustment or more frequent monitoring of your blood sugar to safely use both medications. Let your doctor know if you experience hypoglycemia during treatment. Symptoms of hypoglycemia include headache, dizziness, drowsiness, nervousness, confusion, tremor, nausea, hunger, weakness, perspiration, palpitation, and rapid heartbeat. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor. Drug and food interactions Liraglutide may affect the absorption of other medications that you take by mouth. In some cases, this may affect how well and/or how fast those medications work, or it may make no difference. Talk to a healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns, and contact your doctor if your symptoms worsen or your condition changes. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor. Therapeutic duplication warnings No therapeutic duplications were found for your selected drugs. Compare Pharmacy Prices Compare Local Prescription Prices. Get a Free Coupon & Save up to 80% goodrx.com The classifications below are a guideline only. The relevance of a particular drug interaction to a specific patient is difficult to determine using this tool alone given the large number of variables that may apply. Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the Continue reading >>

Spending On Expensive Specialty Drugs Triples Since 2003

Spending On Expensive Specialty Drugs Triples Since 2003

Specialty drugs are a relatively small part of total prescriptions filled at the pharmacy, but they are a dramatically increasing part of total prescription spending. A new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill reveals that just 1.8 percent of drugs make up 43.2 percent of spending in 2014. The work, led by Stacie Dusetzina, an assistant professor at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and Gillings School of Global Public Health, shows a dramatic increase from 2003, when specialty drugs accounted for just 11 percent of the money spent by commercial health plans on prescription drugs obtained at pharmacies. “There’s a story here of very expensive drugs used by relatively small groups of patients for conditions for which there are few options,” said Dusetzina, who is also a member of the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center. “But we also have commonly used drugs for which there might be acceptable substitutes being prescribed for very large groups of patients.” Dusetzina reviewed prescriptions obtained by patients enrolled in commercial insurance plans from 2003 to 2014 to explore trends in the prescribing of specialty drugs using the Truven Health MarketScan Commercial Database. For this study, a “specialty” drug was defined as a product that costs $600 or more for a 30-day supply which is the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services threshold for allowing a product to be placed on a specialty tier. To account for inflation, all costs were adjusted to represent 2014 dollars. Her findings were published in the journal Health Affairs. Dusetzina’s analysis shows that the use of specialty products tripled between 2003-2014, from 0.6 percent of all prescriptions in 2003 to 1.8 percent in 2014. Spending by commercial health plans on Continue reading >>

Victoza And Lantus Solostar Drug Interactions - From Fda Reports

Victoza And Lantus Solostar Drug Interactions - From Fda Reports

Drug interactions are reported among people who take Victoza and Lantus solostar together. This review analyzes the effectiveness and drug interactions between Victoza and Lantus solostar. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 174 people who take the same drugs from FDA , and is updated regularly. What to expect? If you take Victoza and Lantus solostar, find out what symptoms you could have in 1 year or longer. You are not alone! Join a support group for people who take Victoza and Lantus solostar Personalized health information On eHealthMe you can find out what patients like me (same gender, age) reported their drugs and conditions on FDA since 1977. Our tools are simple to use, anonymous and free. Start now >>> Continue reading >>

Can I Use My Insulin Past Its Expiration Date?

Can I Use My Insulin Past Its Expiration Date?

A certified diabetes educator answers whether older insulin is still safe to use. Integrated Diabetes Services (IDS) provides detailed advice and coaching on diabetes management from certified diabetes educators and dieticians. Insulin Nation hosts a regular Q&A column from IDS that answers questions submitted from the Type 1 diabetes community. Q: Should I really worry about using insulin after its expiration date? What about using it for more than 30 days? I think the insulin companies promote that just to make us throw out good insulin. A: When it comes to insulin, we have to make darned sure that the stuff is at full potency, or blood glucose levels can go dangerously high. The insulin manufacturers are required to test their products rigorously before bringing them to market. They can more or less guarantee that their products will work as indicated if used within the expiration date and for not more than a month after the seal on the vial, cartridge, or pen is broken. This is, of course, assuming that the insulin has been stored properly and not exposed to extreme heat, freezing cold, or direct sunlight. sponsor Does this mean that insulin suddenly goes belly up at the stroke of midnight on the expiration date, or 28 days after being put into use? Hardly. Many people, including clinicians with diabetes, have used insulin beyond the “deadlines” without a hitch. It simply means that the manufacturer has not tested their product beyond the dates indicated, so there is no guarantee — no way of knowing exactly how long the insulin will remain at full strength. Read “Can I Get Insulin Over the Counter?” This is where common sense comes into play. For those with good insurance coverage and plenty of insulin on-hand, it’s best to follow the rules and discard i Continue reading >>

Is Victoza The Same As Lantus Or Humalog?

Is Victoza The Same As Lantus Or Humalog?

A: Victoza (liraglutide) is a medication in the class called GLP-1 agonists. The other medication in this class is Byetta (exenatide). Both medications work by mimicking the effects of a hormone called GLP-1. These medications have been shown to be effective in improving diabetes control, as well as in promoting weight loss. The other medications that you mention are different types of insulin – Lantus and Humalog. Lantus is a long-acting basal insulin that lasts up to 24 hours. The other long-acting insulin is Levemir insulin. Humalog is one of three rapid-acting insulins – the other two being Novolog and Apidra. These rapid-acting insulins are useful to control blood glucose levels after meals. You should discuss with your healthcare provider which of these medications would be indicated in your situation. Continue reading >>

Lantus And Victoza Drug Interactions - From Fda Reports

Lantus And Victoza Drug Interactions - From Fda Reports

Drug interactions are reported among people who take Lantus and Victoza together. This review analyzes the effectiveness and drug interactions between Lantus and Victoza. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 1,916 people who take the same drugs from FDA , and is updated regularly. What to expect? If you take Lantus and Victoza, find out what symptoms you could have in 1 year or longer. You are not alone! Join a support group for people who take Lantus and Victoza Personalized health information On eHealthMe you can find out what patients like me (same gender, age) reported their drugs and conditions on FDA since 1977. Our tools are simple to use, anonymous and free. Start now >>> Number of reports submitted per year: Most common drug interactions by gender *: Most common drug interactions by age *: Continue reading >>

How Tresiba® Works

How Tresiba® Works

Read the Instructions for Use and take Tresiba® exactly as your health care provider tells you to Do not do any conversion of your dose. The dose counter always shows the selected dose in units Know the type and strength of insulin you take. Do not change the type of insulin you take unless your health care provider tells you to Adults - If you miss or are delayed in taking your dose of Tresiba®: Take your dose as soon as you remember, then continue with your regular dosing schedule Make sure there are at least 8 hours between doses If children miss a dose of Tresiba®: Call the healthcare provider for information and instructions about checking blood sugar levels more often until the next scheduled dose of Tresiba® Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should check them Do not reuse or share your needles with other people. You may give them a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them Never inject Tresiba® into a vein or muscle Never use a syringe to remove Tresiba® from the FlexTouch® pen Tresiba® may cause serious side effects that can be life-threatening, including: Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Signs and symptoms that may indicate low blood sugar include anxiety, irritability, mood changes, dizziness, sweating, confusion, and headache Low potassium in your blood (hypokalemia) Heart failure in some people if taken with thiazolidinediones (TZDs). This can happen even if you have never had heart failure or heart problems. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Tresiba®. Tell your health care provider if you have any new or worse symptoms of heart failure including shortness of breath, tiredness, swelling of your ankles or feet, and su Continue reading >>

Compare Victoza Vs. Lantus

Compare Victoza Vs. Lantus

Lowers A1c (average blood sugar over time) up to 1.5%. Helps with weight loss and controls appetite. No limitation for people with kidney problems, but close monitoring is recommended. Medicine is ready to use, without need to mix. Insulin is one of the most effective blood sugar-lowering medication and can lower your A1c (average blood sugar over time) by up to 2-3%. Lantus (insulin glargine) is a long-lasting insulin that provides consistent, all-day sugar control with just once or twice daily dosing. Dose can be easily adjusted to make a customized regimen that's tailored to your body's needs. Lantus (insulin glargine) can be used with liver or kidney problems. 22 reviews so far Have you used Victoza (liraglutide)? Leave a review 584 reviews so far Have you used Lantus (insulin glargine)? Leave a review Low blood sugar - self-treatable27% Continue reading >>

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