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Lantus Pen Vs Vial Cost

How To Inject Lantus® With A Vial And Syringe

How To Inject Lantus® With A Vial And Syringe

Do not take Lantus® during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®. Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes with others. Do NOT reuse needles. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with certain medicines called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®. Your treatment with TZDs and Lantus® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of heart failure, including: Sudden weight gain Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, and supplements, including herbal supplements. Lantus® should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Lantus® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection. While using Lantus®, do not drive or operate heavy machinery until Continue reading >>

Insulin Vials Vs. Insulin Cartridges: Further Cost Considerations

Insulin Vials Vs. Insulin Cartridges: Further Cost Considerations

Go to: 1. Introduction Diabetes is difficult to control and treatment involves several approaches which are associated with different costs. In the Royal Medical Services (RMS), after diagnosis of the disease and by excluding the regular visits to the clinics, the core costs incurred by the RMS in diabetes treatment can be confined to the cost of medications dispensed to patients and hospitalization due to diabetes complications. Many patients need insulin in the regimen of diabetes treatment. For outpatients, insulin can be administered by two main approaches: traditional vials and cartridges. In the RMS, both approaches are available; however, it is believed that adopting one of these approaches could be more cost-effective from the RMS perspective. Both types of insulin packages contain 100 IU/ml of biphasic insulin aspart. The vial contains 10 ml (1000 IU), while the cartridge used to refill the pen contains 3 ml (300 IU). Although, it is assumed that both approaches produce the same pharmacological outcomes, the ease of use and patient adherence have been compared widely in the literature (Baser et al., 2010; Bohannon, 1999; Rakel, 2009). The comparison between these approaches strongly favors the use of cartridges due to many reasons, for example, pens provide more accurate dosing, less pain due to smaller needle gauge, increased social acceptability and better quality of life (Bohannon, 1999); moreover, patient adherence was improved by using pens without significant increase in the cost (Baser et al., 2010). A study conducted in Mayo Clinic found that converting patients to insulin pens provided an overall cost savings (Ward and Aton, 2011). Another study, in the USA, found that overall annual health care costs were significantly decreased by starting or convert Continue reading >>

Lantus Vs Levemir/ Cost, Effectiveness

Lantus Vs Levemir/ Cost, Effectiveness

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Not really sure if I should be posting here, or in the introduction section. I'm kinda upset, as I read many of the posts here.. .. My last A1c was like 10.5 I'm on 60 units of Lantus a night & doc wants me to increase it more. I see so many here are only on like 10-30 units a night & are maintaining well. I know I need to take drastic steps to improve my bs numbers. I hear that losing weight is hard with Lantus. I keep having to increase it more & more. If I lose any weight (can never get past a 10 lb weight loss), but I give up after 3 weeks, and in the 4th week, bam... gain it all back. So, I started to look online for replacement of this Lantus. All I see equivalent is the Levemir... Or going to some sort of a NPH linsulin & always doing 2 shots a day. I guess I won't mind 2 shots a day, but then that's all the more cost regarding insulin needles. So, does anyone know if Levemir is cheaper than Lantus? Some sites say the "replacement factor" is units per units... so, if I'm on 60 units Lantus, then it would be 60 units Levemir? Does levemir work as well? or do I need to split the dosages out? Doc wants me to increase 60 units of Lantus by 1 unit every other or every third day until my morning bs's are consistently under 100. He said occasionally up to 120 okay, but wants the increasing units to the 100 fasting bs mark, so that the higher is only occassional, & not the norm. Does that make sense? He anticipates that I will need to go all the way to 80 units a night.!.. my co-pay on the 60 units (2 vials a month) is already almost too much to bear.. with all the other meds & with hubby's me Continue reading >>

How To Find A Lantus Coupon

How To Find A Lantus Coupon

It looks like this page may be out of date. Please visit NerdWallet’s health hub for our latest content. Diabetics don’t have much of a choice when it comes to taking their insulin, and the costs can be very high, so a Lantus coupon can be invaluable. Paired with diabetic supplies like syringes and blood glucose testing equipment, diabetes is an expensive disease. But with a little bit of information and some resourcefulness, you may be able to save on your monthly prescriptions. Lantus is a long-acting insulin made by Sanofi-Aventis and prescribed to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics. Diabetics are unable to naturally produce or use insulin like most people, so they take injections of synthetic insulin to help regulate their blood sugar. Generic Lantus At this time, there is no generic form of Lantus available. However, that may soon change. The patents protecting Lantus from cheaper generic alternatives expired in February 2015, so less expensive forms of the drug may be coming. When this happens, opting for generic will likely be the best way to save on Lantus, and because of FDA requirements, you don’t have to worry about the generic version being less effective or less safe. Although some people avoid buying generics because they are afraid they won’t work as well as the name brands, those fears are largely unfounded. Lantus coupons from the manufacturer One carton of Lantus can cost close to $400 without insurance, according to GoodRx.com, though Lantus may very well be part of your insurance formulary. Currently, the maker of the drug offers a Lantus Savings Card. According to its website, the card can reduce your prescription cost to no more than $25. However, it also says there is a maximum benefit of $100 off each prescription for the duration of the pr Continue reading >>

The Cost Of Insulin

The Cost Of Insulin

The price of insulin has more than tripled in ten years. Not everybody pays full price, but many find the cost of insulin complicates their life. This week, we’ll cover why insulin prices are so high. Next week, we’ll address what to do about it. According to this story on CBS News, people with diabetes are “cutting back [on their insulin doses] or even going without the drug,” putting them at greater risk for complications. Insulin costs have soared from $100–$200 per month a few years ago to $400–$500 a month now. CBS News quotes a college student saying her bill for insulin has risen from $130 to $495 per month. She has given up her insulin pump and gone back to injections because of expense. One of her friends has cut her dose down to 80% of what’s ordered to save money. This has become common practice for many. A doctor in Montana reported that insulin prices greatly complicate people’s care. “I have patients who tell me that they have to make a decision between food and insulin, and their rent and insulin.” Why is this happening? When insulin was discovered the 1920s, the doctors who found it gave it away. It immediately started saving lives for people with Type 1 diabetes. Now insulin has become a $24-billion-a-year market globally and is predicted to pass $48 billion in only five more years. And people around the world who need it can’t afford it. There are several causes for the price spikes, but many of them come down to America’s pretend “free market” approach to health care. We are seeing these problems now with the controversy over one brand of epinephrine injections, whose manufacturer increased their price by 500% and then paid their CEO a nearly $19 million salary. Here are some ways American economics are making insulin unaff Continue reading >>

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Cost, Dosage, Prescribing Information And Side Effects

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Cost, Dosage, Prescribing Information And Side Effects

Brand Name: Lantus Generic Name: insulin Glargine (rDNA Origin) Injection (vials and SoloStar) Medication Class: Long-Acting Insulin Manufacturer: Sanofi Aventis US FDA Approval Date: April 20, 2000 What is Lantus and its mechanism of action? Lantus (Insulin Glargine) is a long-acting type of insulin used for treating diabetes. Lantus is a biologic drug made by using recombinant DNA (rDNA) technology. Insulin is a hormone produced and released by beta cells in the pancreas. Insulin is released to help the body regulate blood glucose. Insulin release is triggered by an increase in blood glucose from food consumption. Lantus is a basal insulin analogue and it is equivalent to human insulin but it has a slower onset, no pronounced peak, and longer duration of action. Like other types of insulin Lantus regulates the use of glucose by the body. It lowers blood glucose by stimulating glucose uptake by skeletal muscle and adipose tissue, and also reducing glucose production in the liver. Insulin enhances protein production and reduces the breakdown of protein into smaller protein molecules (polypeptides) and breakdown of fats to release fatty acids. What is Lantus used for treating? Lantus is used to lower blood glucose and improve diabetes control in adult and pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. How effective is Lantus? In multiple studies in adults and pediatric patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes the effect of Lantus given once daily at bedtime on reducing glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) was measured and compared against NPH once daily and twice daily. In two of the clinical studies, adult patients with type 1 diabetes were given Lantus or NPH insulin for 28 weeks. Regular insulin was administered before each meal. B Continue reading >>

Pens Versus Vials For Insulin Delivery: A Cost Comparison

Pens Versus Vials For Insulin Delivery: A Cost Comparison

San Francisco—Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the leading cause of kidney failure, nontrauma-related amputation of lower limbs, and new cases of blindness in the United States; it is also one of the most common causes of heart disease, stroke, and death. Type 2 DM (T2DM) is the most common form of the disease, affecting up to 7.9% of the US population. Estimated associated healthcare costs are $159.5 billion each year. Treatment guidelines emphasize the correct type of insulin at the correct time; according to researchers, the method used to deliver the insulin may also have an impact on patient outcomes. Previous studies have shown that patients prefer using an insulin pen rather than the traditional syringe and vial. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ RELATED CONTENT Over-the-Counter Insulin Available for Patients with Diabetes Who Cannot Afford Prescription U.S. FDA approves Medtronic's 'artificial pancreas' for diabetes ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Researchers recently conducted a retrospective analysis to compare total direct healthcare charges and diabetes-related total direct healthcare charges among adults with T2DM who initiate therapy with mealtime insulin disposable pens or vials. They reported results of the analysis at a poster session at the AMCP meeting. The poster was titled The Association Between Use of Mealtime Insulin Pens versus Vials and Healthcare Charges in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes. The analysis compared the insurance claims of a nationwide sample of adults who initiated mealtime analog insulin therapy with a prefilled pen or conventional syringe and vial to assess the impact of th Continue reading >>

Comparative Effectiveness Of Rapid-acting Insulins In Adults With Diabetes

Comparative Effectiveness Of Rapid-acting Insulins In Adults With Diabetes

Comparative Effectiveness of Rapid-Acting Insulins in Adults with Diabetes 1Comprehensive Health Insights, Humana, Louisville, Kentucky. BACKGROUND: Although there are a variety of insulin products and new delivery modalities available, the absence of direct clinical and economic comparisons can make treatment planning and formulary decision making difficult. Direct comparisons between insulin aspart and insulin lispro from a large heterogeneous population are not available. OBJECTIVE: To assess differences in clinical outcomes, medication adherence, utilization, and total health care costs between aspart and lispro and vial versus pen modalities for administering these short-acting insulin analogs. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study used administrative claims data from the Humana Research Database to identify people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes and Medicare or commercial insurance (with medical and pharmacy benefits) who newly initiated rapid-acting insulin between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2013, and were continuously enrolled during the 12-month baseline and 12-month follow-up periods. Generalized linear models were used to assess differences in costs and utilization. Logistic regression models measured the likelihood of having a hypoglycemic event, worsening diabetes complications, or a change in glycated hemoglobin (A1c). RESULTS: 8,189 patients included in the study were grouped by rapid-acting insulin product (aspart, n = 5,364, and lispro, n = 2,566) and modality (vial, n = 6,135, and pen, n = 2,054). There were no significant differences in the percentage of patients with a hypoglycemic event, new or worsening diabetes complications, or change in A1c, and there were no significant differences in adjusted total health care, medical and pharmacy c Continue reading >>

Though Costly, Insulin Pens Facilitate Better Adherence

Though Costly, Insulin Pens Facilitate Better Adherence

Express Scripts, the mega PBM, reports that the 2012 drug trend for traditional medications declined in 7 of the top 10 traditional classes. In part that decline stems from patent expirations for blockbuster medications like Lipitor and a rising generic fill rate. Diabetes medications are a top 10 class and they enjoy a unique position vis a vis the other top 10 drug classes. They didn’t lead costs downward; instead they bucked the trend with a huge expenditure increase. Expenditures for antidiabetic agents increased by 11 percent. Utilization increased by 1.5 percent and prices by 9.5 percent. Antidiabetic agents are a complicated treatment category for health plans and PBMs. There are new combination medications, diabetes is a high priority disease, and there is an intense focus on improving adherence, all of which drive up costs. Adults with diabetes receiving treatment with insulin or other therapies, United States, 2007–2009 Health plans have been unable to control the cost of antidiabetics. Drug manufacturers exploit the importance of these medications with price increases. In most cases, health plans and PBMs are required to provide easy access to the medications and support concerted efforts to improve adherence. Other contributing factors to skyrocketing costs include volume shifts in different subclasses of agents, a trend toward extended release variants, the introduction of new combination agents, and, most significantly, the use of pens for altered insulins. While health plans and PBMs need to focus on controlling costs, poor adherence and glycemic control remain a huge problem. That places them in the difficult position of trying to hold down expenditures while simultaneously improving outcomes. The availability of new medications and new ways of admin Continue reading >>

Comparing Insulin Vials To Pens – Comparison Of Charges, Not Healthcare Benefits

Comparing Insulin Vials To Pens – Comparison Of Charges, Not Healthcare Benefits

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a progressive disease. Insulin resistance is an underlying pathophysiological mechanism in T2DM. However, insulin deficiency also plays a role, especially with disease progression. Insulin therapy forms an important cornerstone for treatment of T2DM1. In their publication ‘The association between use of mealtime insulin pens versus vials and healthcare charges and resource utilization in patients with type 2 diabetes: A retrospective cohort study’2, the authors compare the healthcare charges and utilization of both inpatient and outpatient resources associated with initiating mealtime insulin in the form of a pen as compared to a vial. Several factors need to be considered and discussed while interpreting the results of this study in the clinical context of managing patients with T2DM, especially those on insulin regimen. In addition to the mealtime insulin analogs, mixed insulin preparations were used in the inclusion criteria. The proportion of patients using mixed insulin preparations in the pen vs the vial cohort is not known. With the use of a mixed insulin preparation, patients get part of their basal insulin in addition to the mealtime insulin in the same injection. This results in a decreased number of injections per day, leading to a decreased need for pen needles and syringes, which impacts cost. The outpatient component of the diabetes related charges was $4,659.6 ± $2,299.9 for the pen cohort vs $5,340.3 ± $2,803.3 for the vial cohort; p < 0.0001). The decreased number of injections may also contribute to the decreased charges. Interestingly, the drug charges are lower for the vial cohort as compared to the pen cohort for the outpatient component of the outpatient diabetes related charges ($3,592.6 ± $793.3 vs $2,755 Continue reading >>

Possibly Switching To Vial And Syringe?

Possibly Switching To Vial And Syringe?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. So I was diagnosed with T1 about six weeks ago. I'm on 20 units of Lantus at night and take Humalog with meals. This is recent, since my honeymoon phase only lasted two weeks, so the initial treatment no longer worked. Anyway, I've had very good control of my BG since starting the basal/bolus therapy. I don't really go above 120, but I'm usually around 90. But I'm really careful about carb counting, exercise, the whole thing. Anyway, I'm just saying that I really like being on the Lantus and Humalog. However, I'm a little worried about the cost. I'm using disposable pens for both, so my copay for the five-pen prescription is about 90 each. I'm 20 and newly married, and my husband is still in school. He has a pretty good job, but I don't want to be spending half of what we earn on diabetic supplies. I've been thinking about switching to vial and syringe instead of the pens for cost reasons. I was just wondering about your personal thoughts on vial/syringe versus pens. Is it really all that inconvenient? Because when I was taught both methods in the hospital, it didn't seem that bad. Also, can the opened vials be kept at room temp. like with opened pens? I know that people with vials usually end up wasting a lot. I take 20 units of Lantus and about the same of Humalog a day, so I don't know how much I'd be wasting. I guess I'd just really appreciate any comments you have on the pen versus vial/syringe issue. I don't want something that's going to be terribly inconvenient, but I also don't want to be stressing about whether or not I'll be able to afford my insulin when my current supply starts r Continue reading >>

Patient Satisfaction And Costs Associated With Insulin Administered By Pen Device Or Syringe During Hospitalization

Patient Satisfaction And Costs Associated With Insulin Administered By Pen Device Or Syringe During Hospitalization

Study design. This prospective, randomized, controlled, parallel-group study compared the use of pen devices with conventional vials and syringes for the administration of insulin in hospitalized patients with diabetes mellitus requiring subcutaneous injections. A noninferiority study design was used to evaluate patient satisfaction and cost savings with insulin pens versus vials and syringes. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive their insulin using pen devices or vials and syringes. The study was conducted in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki.[ 16 ] The procedures for the study were followed in accordance with the ethical standards of the investigational review board at Creighton University and Alegent Health System. Written informed consent was obtained from all patients prior to any trial-related activities. Patients were recruited from two general medicalsurgical units from July 2005 to May 2006. Two prefilled, disposable insulin pen devices were used: InnoLet and FlexPen (Novo Nordisk). Because the hospital has one preferred formulary manufacturer for insulin analogues, orders from prescribers for comparable insulin analogues were therapeutically substituted with an analogue of the hospital's preferred manufacturer whenever possible. Patients received InnoLet if they were randomized to the insulin pen group and prescribed insulin human regular, isophane insulin human (NPH insulin), or the combination of 70% NPH insulin and 30% regular insulin. Patients received the FlexPen if they were randomized to the insulin pen group and prescribed any rapid-acting insulin (insulin lispro or insulin aspart) or the combination of 70% insulin aspart protamine with 30% insulin aspart or 75% insulin lispro protamine with 25% insulin lispro. NovoFine Autocover Continue reading >>

Is The Insulin Pen Mightier Than The Syringe?

Is The Insulin Pen Mightier Than The Syringe?

Is the Insulin Pen Mightier Than the Syringe? Is the Insulin Pen Mightier Than the Syringe? Nonadherence to antidiabetic therapies represents a major challenge to clinicians treating patients with diabetes. Adherence rates range from 62% to 64% for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) taking insulin therapy .1 Barriers to adherence include "complicated regimens, fear of injection pain, social embarrassment, lack of confidence about self-injection, perception of injectable therapy as inconvenient, and belief that insulin use is the last resort."2 Additional barriers to adherence are patients' fears about insulin-induced hypoglycemia3 and physicians' delay of initiation of insulin therapy, due to concerns about nonadherence.4 Improving adherence to medication regimens is critical, as nonadherence leads to poorer glycemic control and increased risk of diabetic complications.2 POLL: Which Are Better: Syringes, or Insulin Pens? Vote Now! Moreover, greater medication adherence has been found to be associated not only with improved glycemic control but also with decreased health care utilization.5 Therefore, it is important to examine the most effective means of increasing adherence in patients with T2DM. Insulin pen devices incorporate the insulin and syringe in a single unit and have been found to address some of the barriers to adherence, as compared to conventional vials/syringes.2 Reasons that patients prefer pen devices include that they are easier to use, are more discrete, and elicit less fear in terms of self-injection.2 Additionally, pens may have greater dosing accuracy, compared with vials and syringes.2 Several observational studies have found greater adherence with insulin pens than with vials/syringes.6,7,8,9 Although insulin pens are associated with h Continue reading >>

How Do I Get Lantus Insulin Less Expensively?

How Do I Get Lantus Insulin Less Expensively?

November 2, 2013-- How do I get Lantus Insulin Less Expensively? DCIN receives this question a few times a week from US caregivers of diabetic cats. I am often amazed by the question because of the “good” insulins for diabetic cats, Lantus can be the least expensive per unit. The problem often lies in knowing how to find the insulin inexpensively. (The hints I give also apply to Levemir, another human insulin often used by diabetic cats.) Your vet gave you a prescription that probably read “U100 Glargine/Lantus 10ml vial.” Lantus is the brand name for the generic insulin Glargine. Lantus is an insulin for humans and is only available from a human pharmacy (although some vets do hold some in stock). The company Sanofi makes Lantus, and no other companies currently make a generic Glargine because Sanofi still has an international patent on the insulin. That may change in 2014, and by then Sanofi may have developed a “second-generation” Lantus that is patent protected. Lantus is a U100 insulin, which describes the concentration of the insulin in the liquid suspension. A 10ml vial is the insulin’s containment device. It is a small glass bottle with a rubber stopper at the end that you pierce with a syringe. At a US retail pharmacy, a 10ml vial of Lantus can cost about $180 to $200. WOWZA! That does seem cause for sticker shock. A 10ml vial of U100 insulin holds 1000 units of insulin. At $200/vial, that is a price of $.20/unit. If your cat gets 2 units of insulin twice a day, that is $.80/day for its insulin (if you could completely use a vial of Lantus insulin). It would cost less each day to give your cat its life-saving medicine that to buy a soda from a vending machine. However, the problem with buying Lantus in a 10ml vial is that, properly handled, Lantus Continue reading >>

Is Lantus In A Vial Less Expensive Than A Pen?

Is Lantus In A Vial Less Expensive Than A Pen?

Home Q & A Questions Is lantus in a vial less... Is lantus in a vial less expensive than a pen? It would cost less, but its not cheap. You can go to the lantus web site for assistance. lantus.com Still looking for answers? Try searching for what you seek or ask your own question . What if blood went inside the lantus solostar pen? 21 year old son "thought" he had another lantus pen, he doesn't and it being Saturday night our? The easiest way to lookup drug information, identify pills, check interactions and set up your own personal medication records. Available for Android and iOS devices. Subscribe to receive email notifications whenever new articles are published. Drugs.com provides accurate and independent information on more than 24,000 prescription drugs, over-the-counter medicines and natural products. This material is provided for educational purposes only and is not intended for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Data sources include Micromedex (updated Feb 28th, 2018), Cerner Multum (updated Mar 15th, 2018), Wolters Kluwer (updated Mar 1st, 2018) and others. To view content sources and attributions, please refer to our editorial policy . Continue reading >>

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