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Lantus Needle

Bd Ultrafine Iii Mini-pen Needles

Bd Ultrafine Iii Mini-pen Needles

Writing Prescriptions for Diabetes Supplies in AIM Clinic (with links to charts from DiabetesHealth.com) Each insulin vial holds 1000 units of insulin; specify # U/dose on RX if possible, to calculate # vials needed Syringe size 3/10 cc (holds up to 30 Units) 1/2 cc (holds up to 50 Units) 1 cc** (holds up to 100 Units) **AIM preferred syringes: BD U-100 Insulin Syringes (easy to read, have ultrafine needle, can keep using as dose rises; #100/box) DISPOSABLE PENS Novolog, NovoLog® Mix 70/30, Levemir® Flexpen Dispense: 5x3 mL (box of 5 pens, Total: 1500 units) Humalog®, Humalog® Mix 75/25, NPH (Humulin N®) Pen Dispense: 5x3 mL (box of 5 pens, Total: 1500 units) Lantus SoloStar® Pen (new) Dispense: 5x3 mL (box of 5 pens, Total: 1500 units) Apidra® Pen (coming soon) REFILLABLE PENS Lantus® Refillable Pens Dispense: 5x3 ml (box of 5 pens, Total: 1500 units) Humalog® Humapen® Memoir *Insulin pens DO NOT come with needles. Need separate RX* **AIM preferred BLOOD GLUCOSE MONITORING DISPENSE: *One Touch Ultra 2 Meter Fast; good for frequent testers; in English and Spanish One Touch Ultra Mini Meter Simple; lightweight; portable; no memory - One Touch Ultra Teststrips Test ___ times/day; disp 50 or 100 strips - Microfine lancets Dispense: 100 lancets Ascensia Contour Meter Simple to use; self-coding; good for slow learners, elderly, low tech - Ascensia Contour Teststrips Test ___ times/day; disp 50 or 100 strips - Ascensia Contour lancets Dispense: 100 lancets Continue reading >>

Related Conditions

Related Conditions

Your doctor may have told you that your blood sugar levels are still out of your target range. That your diet, exercise, and other diabetes medicines are no longer enough to keep your levels under control. And that it’s time to work with you on treatment options to help manage your blood sugar. It’s not easy to hear. But the fact is, when you have type 2 Diabetes, your body doesn’t make enough insulin and/or your body does not properly use the insulin it makes. Over time, no matter how much you try to manage your diabetes, you will make less insulin and that’s why your doctor may have also suggested adding insulin to your diabetes treatment plan. Ask your doctor if taking on high blood sugar with Lantus® is right for you. Lantus® Insulin: One Shot a Day, at the Same Time Each Day 1 Lantus® gives you a steady release of insulin overnight and between meals to help control your blood sugar for a full 24 hours. Lantus® is approved for once-a-day use, and comes in the easy to use Lantus® SoloSTAR® pen. 1 Prefilled With Lantus®— The #1 Prescribed Insulin 2 Uses a Small, Thin Needle Easy to see Large Print Dosing Window Easy to use Push-Button Injection You don’t need to refrigerate the pen once it’s in use Once opened, it’s portable and you can travel with it as no refrigeration is needed for 28 days Prescription Lantus® is a long-acting insulin used to treat adults and children (6 years and older) with diabetes for the control of high blood sugar. It should be taken once a day at the same time each day to lower blood glucose.1,3 About Blood Sugar Control By now, you know that many things can impact your blood sugar levels. Simple things, like the foods you eat, your overall activity level, and even your stress levels. That’s why, above all, it’s i Continue reading >>

Novolog® (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml Indications And Usage

Novolog® (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml Indications And Usage

NovoLog® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® or one of its excipients. Never Share a NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill® Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. NovoLog® (insulin aspart injection) 100 U/mL is an insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. NovoLog® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® or one of its excipients. Never Share a NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill® Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse effect of insulin therapy. The timing of hypoglycemia may reflect the time-action profile of the insulin formulation. Glucose monitoring is re Continue reading >>

Choosing A Needle To Inject Insulin: What’s The Difference?

Choosing A Needle To Inject Insulin: What’s The Difference?

For a person with diabetes who is beginning insulin therapy, the range of products can be overwhelming. The options are often limited by the patient’s healthcare plan, however, and the initial selection of a product is frequently influenced by the healthcare provider. With diabetes education tailored to the individual patient, the delivery of insulin through a particular device is achieved by teaching proper injection technique and selecting an appropriate needle. Because people using insulin to manage their diabetes prefer a painless, easy-to-use, and affordable device, manufacturers have worked to improve the injection experience. Over the past 25 years, needle size has evolved from a 16-mm (length), 27-gauge (thickness) needle in 1985, to a 4-mm, 32-gauge needle in 2010. A shorter, thinner needle reduces pain and anxiety during insulin injection. But does this type of needle work as well as a bigger needle, especially in people with more body fat? One concern when using a thin, short needle is whether or not the tip of the needle actually gets through the skin to deliver the full dose of insulin into the fat layer. For a long time, skin thickness has been a factor in product selection. The tendency has been to choose a larger needle for larger patients, using the skin-pinch method of injection to prevent intramuscular administration and subsequent pain and variable glycemic control. Recently, a study was conducted using ultrasound to measure the skin thickness at four injection sites in 338 patients with diabetes. Patients ranged in age from 18 to 85 years, and their BMIs ranged from 19.4 to 64.5 kg/m2. Investigators found minimal variation in skin thickness according to age, gender, race, and body mass. Most patients had a skin thickness of less than 2.8 mm, with Continue reading >>

Pen Needles

Pen Needles

UltiCare® pen needles fit all pens sold in the U.S. Every UltiCare pen needle, regardless of length or gauge, provide universal fit with all diabetes pens and other injection pens listed in the chart below. If you can’t find your pen, please contact us. Safe needle disposal made easy. Safe disposal is important for safety at home and also helps prevent used needles from entering the waste stream, putting individuals handling the trash at risk for accidental needle sticks. The UltiGuard® Safe Pack allows you to easily access our premium quality needles and dispose of them properly. Each UltiGuard safe pack contains 100 premium quality pen needles or syringes. Once a needle has been used you simply pop it in the top, drop and roll it safely out the way. There’s no need to spend more on a separate sharps container. The UltiGuard is the convenient, affordable way to keep your home and community safe. Ask your pharmacist for UltiCare® pen needles with UltiGuard® Safe Pack and help protect your family, environment and community. Learn More » Available in all standard sizes. Available in a 100-count with UltiGuard® Safe Pack or 50-count easy dispense box (Original only available in the 100-count). Continue reading >>

How To Take Insulin And Needles On A Plane

How To Take Insulin And Needles On A Plane

Step 1 Visit your physician four to six weeks before taking your trip. Show your physician your flight itinerary to show time zone changes, arrival and departure times, and flight durations to determine whether you need a change in your pill or insulin regimen. Ask your physician for extra prescriptions in case you lose your medication on the plane or during your trip. Step 2 Tell the TSA security officer that you have diabetes and are carrying needles and insulin in your carry-on bag. If you are wearing an insulin pump, notify the security officer that you have an insulin pump and you will need a visual inspection of your pump and pat-down instead of going through the walk-through metal detector. Explain to the officer that you cannot remove the insulin pump as it is under your skin with a needle. Step 3 Show proof that a physician prescribed your insulin and needles. Provide a professional, preprinted pharmaceutical label identifying the medication. Travel with your original insulin box and glucose meter that shows the pharmaceutical label. Step 4 Protect your medication by packing your diabetes supplies and medication in a carry-on bag to keep you from losing your items. Ask if you can refrigerate your insulin while on the plane or store it in a thermos to keep it at a safe temperature. Keep any pills in a dry place to avoid moisture damage and never freeze the insulin vials. Keep all supplies and medication together for easy access in case you need it. Be sure and pack enough sharps disposal containers for storing used syringes. Pack more than enough insulin in case of an additional layover or unexpected trip extension. Wear a diabetes Medic-Alert bracelet in case of an emergency. Advise flight personnel or security officers if you are in need of medical assistance Continue reading >>

Storing Insulin And Prefilling Syringes - Topic Overview

Storing Insulin And Prefilling Syringes - Topic Overview

Insulin can become damaged and ineffective if it is not stored properly. Unopened insulin that is packaged in small glass bottles (vials) should be stored in the refrigerator. Liquid insulin that is packaged in small cartridges (containing several doses) is more stable. It may be kept unrefrigerated, but it will last longer if it is kept in the refrigerator. These cartridges are used in pen-shaped devices (insulin pens) with attached disposable needles. Powdered insulin cartridges are packaged in blocks of three on cards sealed in foil. Keep unopened foil packages in the refrigerator. After you open a foil package, use the contents within 10 days. And after you tear off and open a block of three, discard any unused insulin after 3 days. Always read the insulin package information that tells the best way to store your insulin. You can keep open bottles with you if you keep them in a dark place. The bottles should not be exposed to temperatures below 36°F (2.2°C) or above 86°F (30°C). Never leave insulin in the sun or in your hot car, because sunlight and heat reduces the strength of the insulin. Avoid shaking insulin bottles and liquid insulin cartridges too much to prevent loss of medicine strength and to prevent clumping, frosting, or particles settling out. Follow the storage information provided by the manufacturer. The first time you use an insulin bottle, write the date on the bottle label. Always store an extra bottle of each type of your insulin in the refrigerator. If you cannot prepare an insulin dose but can give the injection, you may need someone to prepare your insulin dose for you. A family member, friend, or health professional can prefill insulin syringes for you. If you prefill syringes: Store prefilled syringes in the refrigerator with the needle p Continue reading >>

How To Give A Painless Injection

How To Give A Painless Injection

If you have Type 2 diabetes, sooner or later you may require insulin injections, either temporarily (as during infections) or permanently. This is nothing to be afraid of, even though many people with long-standing Type 2 diabetes literally spend years worrying about it. I usually teach all my patients how to inject themselves at our first or second meeting, before there’s any urgency. Once they give themselves a sample injection of sterile saline (salt water), they find out how easy and painless it can be, and they are spared years of anxiety. If you’re anxious about injections, after you read this section, please ask your physician or diabetes educator to allow you to try a self-administered injection. Insulin is usually injected subcutaneously This means Into a layer of fat under the skin The regions of the body that usually contain appropriate deposits of fat are illustrated in Figure 1 Examine your body to see if you have enough fat at the illustrated sites to comfortably grab a big hunk between your thumb and first finger. Fig 1 Potential sites for subcutaneous injections. To show you how painless a shot can be, your teacher should give himself or herself a shot and leave the syringe dangling in place, illustrating that no pain is felt Your teacher should next give you a shot of saline to prove the point. Now it’s time for you to give yourself an injection, using a syringe that’s been partly filled for you with about 5 “units” of saline. 1. With your “nonshooting” hand, grab as big a chunk of skin plus underlying fat as you can hold comfortably. If you have a nice roll of fat around your waist, use this site. If not, select another site from those illustrated in Figure 1 Nearly everyone has enough subcutaneous buttocks fat to inject there without g Continue reading >>

Insulin And Diabetes

Insulin And Diabetes

Insulin injections are required when the body produces little or no insulin, as with type 1 diabetes. They are also required for some people with type 2 diabetes when diabetes tablets, together with healthy eating and regular physical activity, are not enough to control blood glucose levels. What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone made by special cells, called beta cells, in the pancreas. When we eat, insulin is released into the blood stream where it helps to move glucose from the food we have eaten into cells to be used as energy. Insulin also helps store excess glucose in the liver. Why must it be injected? While ways of taking insulin by mouth or as a nasal spray are being developed, they are yet to become readily available. Insulin cannot be given in tablet form as the stomach would digest it, just as it digests food. What if I have to go on to insulin? For people with type 2 diabetes, starting on insulin can be a difficult and frightening decision to make. However, the many injection devices and tiny needles available today make injecting insulin much easier than most people imagine. In fact many say that they can feel the finger prick for monitoring blood glucose more than they can feel the needle used to inject insulin. When starting on insulin, your doctor and diabetes educator will help you adjust to the new routine. You may find that even with their help, it may take a while to find exactly the right dose to reduce your blood glucose to acceptable levels and to suit your particular lifestyle. Are there different types of insulin? There are 5 types of insulin ranging from short to long acting as insulin is classified according to how long it works in the body. Some insulins are clear in appearance, others cloudy. Everyone is different and will respond differentl Continue reading >>

Reference Bd Needles Reference To Bd Ultra-fineâ„¢ Pen Needles

Reference Bd Needles Reference To Bd Ultra-fineâ„¢ Pen Needles

Drug Manufacturer Pen Name Drug Drug NDC Number Place Where Drug Manufacturers Sanofi-Aventis Apidra® SoloStar® Apidra® 0088-2502-05 Package Insert Patient Instructions for use Patient Toll Free Phone Number “SoloStar® is compatible with all pen needles from Becton Dickinson and Company†Lantus® SoloStar® Lantus® 0088-2219-05 Package Insert User Manual, Device Page, Website “ BD Ultra-Fine™ needles to be used in conjunction with SoloStar® and OptiClik® are sold separately and are manufactured by BD.†“ BD Ultra-Fine™ needles are compatible with SoloStar® . These are sold separately and are manufactured by BD.†Amylin Pharmaceuticals & Eli Lilly and Company Byetta® Byetta® 66780-0212-01 66780-0210-07 Amylin Pharmaceuticals SymlinPen® 60 & 120 Symlin® 66780-115-02 66780-121-02 Eli Lilly and Company HumaPen® LUXURA™ HD Humalog® 3mL 0002-7516-59 User Manual, Website “ HumaPen® LUXURA™ HD is suitable for use with Becton, Dickinson and Company pen needles.†Humalog® KwikPen™ Humalog® Humalog® Mix 75/25® Humalog® Mix 50/50 0002-8799-59 0002-8797-59 0002-8798-59 User Manual, Brochures, Prescribing Card “ When prescribing KwikPen™ prefilled with the Humalog brand of insulins you will need to write a separate prescription for BD needles.†Humulin® Pen Humulin® N Humulin® 70/30 0002-8730-59 0002-8770-59 User Manual, Website “ This device is suitable for use with Becton, Dickinson and Company’s insulin pen needles.†Novo Nordisk, Inc. Victoza® Victoza® N/A NovoLog® Mix FlexPen® NovoLog® Mix 70/30 N/A NovoPen® Junior Novo Nordisk PenFill 3ml N/A Novo Pen® 3 Novo Nordisk PenFill 3ml N/A L Continue reading >>

Lantus Solostar

Lantus Solostar

Consumer medicine information (CMI) leaflet Please read this leaflet carefully before you start using Lantus SoloStar. Download CMI (PDF) Download large text CMI (PDF) What is in this leaflet This leaflet answers some common questions about Lantus. It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor, pharmacist or diabetes educator. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you using Lantus against the benefits they expect it will have for you. If you have any concerns about using this medicine, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Keep this leaflet with the medicine. You may need to read it again. What Lantus is used for Lantus is used to reduce high blood sugar (glucose) levels in people with diabetes mellitus. Lantus is a modified insulin that is very similar to human insulin. It is a substitute for the insulin produced by the pancreas. Lantus is a long-acting insulin. Your doctor may tell you to use a rapid-acting human insulin or oral diabetes medication in combination with Lantus. Lantus is not addictive. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why Lantus has been prescribed for you. Before you use Lantus When you must not use Lantus Do not use Lantus: - If you have an allergy to: any medicine containing insulin any of the ingredients contained in Lantus listed at the end of this leaflet Some of the symptoms of an allergic reaction may include: redness, swelling, rash and itching at the injection site rash, itching or hives on the skin shortness of breath wheezing or difficulty breathing swelling of the face, lips, tongue or other parts of the body - If you are experiencing low blood sugar levels (hypoglycaemia - a "hypo"). If you have a lot of hypos discuss appropriate treatme Continue reading >>

Lantus Solostar Pen: How To Inject A Dose

Lantus Solostar Pen: How To Inject A Dose

This is a modal window. This video is restricted from playing on your current domain Let’s take a minute to talk about how to use your Lantus SoloStar insulin pen. You will need clean hands, alcohol swabs, and a compatible needle, like BD Ultra-Fine pen needles. You will also need an approved “sharps container” to dispose of the needles. Before every dose, you should read the SoloStar label to make sure it has the correct insulin for your dose. Do not use a Lantus pen for more than 28 days after the first use. Also, do not use the pen if it is expired. Now, remove the cap and look at the Lantus inside. Lantus should be both clear and colorless. Clean the rubber stopper with an alcohol swab. Attach a new needle by pushing the capped needle straight onto the pen. Twist or push the needle on, depending on which needle you are using. Pull off the outer needle cap and save it. Pull off the inner cap. To make sure the device is ready, dial a dose of 2 units. Hold the pen upright. Tap the pen gently a few times to get air bubbles to collect at the top. Press the push button and check if insulin comes out of the needle tip. If a drop of insulin appears, it is ready to use. If insulin does not appear, repeat these “air shot” steps up to 2 times. If still no insulin, change needles and try again. Make sure that the dose selector is back to zero. Now, select the number of units that you need to inject. Clean the injection site with an alcohol swab and let it dry. Insert the needle into your skin, exactly how and where your doctor has taught you. With your thumb, press the push button all the way down until the display returns to zero. After injecting, leave the needle in the skin for at least 10 seconds to deliver the full dose. Release the button and remove the needle f Continue reading >>

Insulin Pen Needles

Insulin Pen Needles

Tweet Insulin pen needles and disposable syringes come in a variety of lengths and widths to suit all body types. Needles used to be long and sharp, but due to evolutions in technology, needles are now small, thin and quite often pain-free. From 12mm to 4mm, the needle length you choose is likely to be dictated by your size. Children will likely benefit from the shorter 6mm size. Your healthcare team should be able to advise you on which is best your body shape. When it comes to injecting, it is essential to get the right kit and use the right technique to reduce any pain. Hence, be careful not to fall into sloppy habits, such as failing to rotate your insulin injection sites as this might lead to irritation and soreness. Insulin needle guides Read product guides from Sue Marshall with user reviews for insulin needles and accessories. You can buy pens, needles and accessories from the Diabetes Shop. Use needles correctly Make sure that along with rotating injection sites, you follow these rules for using needles correctly. Use new needles either for every injection or at least change them once a day. Do not inject through clothing (or only very rarely). If you’re an ‘old hand’ at injecting, you might benefit from a quick refresher on how to inject to make sure you’re doing it correctly. Needles ranges fit on most insulin pens Most needle ranges fit on most insulin injection pens, including all Novo Nordisk and Eli Lilly pens (Novopens and Humapens) as well as the Autopen range from Owen Mumford. All of these needles are available on prescription. Gauges and needle length The measurements of needles relate to how long the needle is. When a needles measurement is 31G, the G (or g) refers to the gauge of the needle. This donates the thickness, size, or capacity. Th Continue reading >>

Is There A Better Way To Give An Insulin Injection?

Is There A Better Way To Give An Insulin Injection?

M.S., R.D., L.D.N., C.D.E. Manager of Nutritional Education at Joslin Diabetes Center Is there a proper way to give an insulin injection? Yes, according to a report that came out of the Third Injection Technique workshop in Athens (TITAN) in September 2009. Prior to this report there was very little consensus on the proper way to inject insulin and even less research available to back it up. Health practitioners like to use evidenced-based guidelines as the foundation for the recommendations we give to patients. That means that we have the results of controlled research studies at our disposal. But medicine is both an art and a science, and although we would like to have research to back up our decisions sometimes ,we often rely on consensus statements or fall back on prior personal experience. Until recently there was little standardization across the country on how to best teach patients to give an injection. In September of last year, the Journal Diabetes & Metabolism published a special issue devoted to the results from the TITAN workshop on injection recommendations for patients with diabetes. One hundred and twenty-seven injection experts from around the world reviewed 157 articles and the survey results of 4300 insulin-injecting patients with diabetes and came up with a set of new recommendations. These recommendations have not been accepted universally, but we at Joslin Diabetes Center are in the processing of looking at our own procedures in light of them. Why We Need Standards – Results of the Injection Survey Some findings: 21% of patients admitted injecting into the same site for a whole day or even for a few days. 50% of patients had symptoms suggestive of lipohypertrophy (a lump under the skin caused by accumulation of extra fat at the site of many subcu Continue reading >>

Levemir® Flextouch® Is Ready To Use In Just A Few Steps

Levemir® Flextouch® Is Ready To Use In Just A Few Steps

Levemir® FlexTouch®, a prefilled insulin pen with no push-button extension, requires low force to inject at all doses and is ready to use in just a few steps.a In fact, Levemir® FlexTouch® has up to 77% less injection force than Lantus® SoloSTAR®. From the makers of the world’s #1-selling prefilled insulin pen,b Levemir® FlexTouch® is: Accurate—Accurate dosing from 1 to 80 units Prefilled—Each pen is prefilled with 300 units of Levemir® Discreet—Fits in your pocket, purse, or nightstand On the go—Take it with you almost anywherec aPlease see the Patient Information for complete Instructions For Use. cOnce in use, Levemir® FlexTouch® must be kept at room temperature below 86°F for up to 42 days. Injecting with Levemir® FlexTouch® You may have concerns about using an injectable medicine for type 2 diabetes. But it’s important to realize the positive effect it may have on the management of your diabetes. And once you gain a little practice in giving injections on your own, Levemir® injections will become part of your daily routine. If you were given instructions from your health care provider on how to use Levemir® FlexTouch® and you have read the Instructions for Use in the Patient Information, you may be ready for your first injection. Your health care provider will tell you what dose of Levemir® is right for you and how many times to take it each day. Your dose may be adjusted based on your blood sugar. Please consult your health care provider prior to adjusting your dose. No compatible source was found for this video. Levemir® can be injected in the thigh, abdomen, or upper arm. It’s important to change the injection site within your injection area each time you inject and not inject into the exact same spot each time. Rotating where yo Continue reading >>

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