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Lantus Long Or Short Acting

Types Of Insulin | Lantus (insulin Glargine Injection) 100 Units/ml

Types Of Insulin | Lantus (insulin Glargine Injection) 100 Units/ml

Extreme drowsiness, dizziness, or confusion Other possible side effects may include swelling, weight gain, low potassium levels, injection site reactions, including changes in fat tissue at the injection site, and allergic reactions. Lantus SoloStar is a disposable prefilled insulin pen. Please talk to your healthcare provider about proper injection technique and follow instructions in the Instruction Leaflet that accompanies the pen. Click here for Full Prescribing Information for Lantus. Click here for information on Sharps Medical Waste Disposal. Click here to learn more about Sanofi's commitment to fighting counterfeit drugs. If you are a patient experiencing problems with a Sanofi US product, please contact Sanofi US at 1-800-633-1610. The health information contained herein is provided for general education purposes only. Your healthcare professional is the single best source of information regarding your health. Please consult your healthcare professional if you have any questions about your health or treatment. Important Safety Information for Lantus (insulin glargine injection) 100 Units/mL Do not take Lantus during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus. Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes with others. Do NOT reuse needles. Before starting Lantus, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with certain medicines called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse Continue reading >>

Insulin Types: Types Of Insulin

Insulin Types: Types Of Insulin

Usually taken before a meal to cover the blood glucose elevation from eating Used with longer-acting insulin Usually taken about 30 minutes before a meal to cover blood glucose elevation from eating Covers the blood glucoseelevations when rapid-acting insulins stop working Often combined with rapid- or short-acting insulin and usually taken twice a day Long acting: insulin glargine , ultralente insulin, insulin detemir Often combined, when needed, with rapid- or short-acting insulin Lowers blood glucose levels when rapid-acting insulins stop working American Diabetes Association. Insulin Basics. April 7, 2014. American Diabetes Association. Available at . Elizabeth Blair. Insulin A to Z: A Guide on Different Types of Insulin. 2015. [Full Text] . Usually taken before a meal to cover the blood glucose elevation from eating Used with longer-acting insulin Usually taken about 30 minutes before a meal to cover blood glucose elevation from eating Covers the blood glucoseelevations when rapid-acting insulins stop working Often combined with rapid- or short-acting insulin and usually taken twice a day Long acting: insulin glargine , ultralente insulin, insulin detemir Often combined, when needed, with rapid- or short-acting insulin Lowers blood glucose levels when rapid-acting insulins stop working Abimbola Farinde, PharmD, PhDFaculty, Columbia Southern University Francisco Talavera, PharmD, PhDAdjunct Assistant Professor, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Pharmacy; Editor-in-Chief, Medscape Drug Reference Disclosure: Received salary from Medscape for employment. for: Medscape. All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright 1994-2018 by WebMD LLC. This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties. This website uses cookies to deli Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin

Types Of Insulin

Topic Overview Insulin is used to treat people who have diabetes. Each type of insulin acts over a specific amount of time. The amount of time can be affected by exercise, diet, illness, some medicines, stress, the dose, how you take it, or where you inject it. Insulin strength is usually U-100 (or 100 units of insulin in one millilitre of fluid). Short-acting (regular) insulin is also available in U-500. This is five times more concentrated than U-100 regular insulin. Long-acting insulin (glargine) is also available in U-300. This is three times more concentrated than U-100 long-acting insulin. Be sure to check the concentration of your insulin so you take the right amount. Insulin is made by different companies. Make sure you use the same type of insulin consistently. Types of insulinfootnote 1 Type Examples Appearance When it starts to work (onset) The time of greatest effect (peak) How long it lasts (duration) Rapid-acting Apidra (insulin glulisine) Clear 10-15 minutes 1-1.5 hours 3-5 hours Humalog (insulin lispro) Clear 10-15 minutes 1-2 hours 3.5-4.75 hours NovoRapid (insulin aspart) Clear 10-15 minutes 1-1.5 hours 3-5 hours Short-acting Humulin R, Novolin ge Toronto (insulin regular) Clear 30 minutes 2-3 hours 6.5 hours Intermediate-acting Humulin N, Novolin ge NPH(insulin NPH) Cloudy 1-3 hours 5-8 hours Up to 18 hours Long-acting Lantus (insulin glargine) Clear 1.5 hours Does not apply Up to 24 hours Levemir (insulin detemir) Clear 1.5 hours Does not apply 16 to 24 hours Toujeo (insulin glargine U-300) Clear Up to 6 hours Does not apply Up to 30 hours Rapid-acting insulins work over a narrow, more predictable range of time. Because they work quickly, they are used most often at the start of a meal. Rapid-acting insulin acts most like insulin that is produced by Continue reading >>

Long-acting Insulin: How It Works

Long-acting Insulin: How It Works

When you eat, your pancreas releases a hormone called insulin. Insulin moves sugar (glucose) from your blood to your cells for energy or storage. If you take insulin, you may need some at mealtime to help lower your blood sugar after you eat. But even between meals, you need insulin in small amounts to help keep blood sugar stable. This is where long-acting insulin comes in. If you have diabetes, either your pancreas can’t produce enough (or any) insulin, or your cells can’t use it efficiently. To control your blood sugar, you need to replace or supplement the normal function of your pancreas with regular insulin injections. Insulin comes in many types. Each type differs in three ways: onset: how quickly it starts working to lower your blood sugar peak: when its effects on your blood sugar are strongest duration: how long it lowers your blood sugar According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the five types of insulin are: Rapid-acting insulin: This type starts to work just 15 minutes after you take it. It peaks within 30 to 90 minutes, and its effects last for three to five hours. Short-acting insulin: This type takes about 30 to 60 minutes to become active in your bloodstream. It peaks in two to four hours, and its effects can last for five to eight hours. It is sometimes called regular-acting insulin. Intermediate-acting insulin: The intermediate type takes one to three hours to start working. It peaks in eight hours and works for 12 to 16 hours. Long-acting insulin: This type takes the longest amount of time to start working. The insulin can take up to 4 hours to get into your bloodstream. Pre-mixed: This is a combination of two different types of insulin: one that controls blood sugar at meals and another that controls blood sugar between meals. Lo Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin

Types Of Insulin

Insulin analogs are now replacing human insulin in the US. Insulins are categorized by differences in onset, peak, duration, concentration, and route of delivery. Human Insulin and Insulin Analogs are available for insulin replacement therapy. Insulins also are classified by the timing of their action in your body – specifically, how quickly they start to act, when they have a maximal effect and how long they act.Insulin analogs have been developed because human insulins have limitations when injected under the skin. In high concentrations, such as in a vial or cartridge, human (and also animal insulin) clumps together. This clumping causes slow and unpredictable absorption from the subcutaneous tissue and a dose-dependent duration of action (i.e. the larger dose, the longer the effect or duration). In contrast, insulin analogs have a more predictable duration of action. The rapid acting insulin analogs work more quickly, and the long acting insulin analogs last longer and have a more even, “peakless” effect. Background Insulin has been available since 1925. It was initially extracted from beef and pork pancreases. In the early 1980’s, technology became available to produce human insulin synthetically. Synthetic human insulin has replaced beef and pork insulin in the US. And now, insulin analogs are replacing human insulin. Characteristics of Insulin Insulins are categorized by differences in: Onset (how quickly they act) Peak (how long it takes to achieve maximum impact) Duration (how long they last before they wear off) Concentration (Insulins sold in the U.S. have a concentration of 100 units per ml or U100. In other countries, additional concentrations are available. Note: If you purchase insulin abroad, be sure it is U100.) Route of delivery (whether they a Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin

Types Of Insulin

Topic Overview Insulin is used to treat people who have diabetes . Each type of insulin acts over a specific amount of time. The amount of time can be affected by exercise, diet, illness, some medicines, stress, the dose, how you take it, or where you inject it. The table below is a general guide. Your results may be different. Insulin strength is usually U-100 (or 100 units of insulin in one milliliter of fluid). Short-acting (regular) insulin is also available in U-500. This is five times more concentrated than U-100 regular insulin. Long-acting insulin (glargine) is also available in U-300. This is three times more concentrated than U-100 long-acting insulin. Be sure to check the concentration of your insulin so you take the right amount. Insulin is made by different companies. Make sure you use the same type of insulin consistently. Types of insulin Type Examples Appearance When it starts to work (onset) The time of greatest effect (peak) How long it lasts (duration) Rapid-acting insulins work over a narrow, more predictable range of time. Because they work quickly, they are used most often at the start of a meal. Rapid-acting insulin acts most like insulin that is produced by the human pancreas. It quickly drops the blood sugar level and works for a short time. If a rapid-acting insulin is used instead of a short-acting insulin at the start of dinner, it may prevent severe drops in blood sugar level in the middle of the night. Apidra (glulisine), Humalog (lispro), Novolog (aspart) Clear 5-30 minutes 30 minutes-3 hours 3-5 hours Rapid-acting insulin also comes in a form that can be inhaled through the mouth. Afrezza (insulin human, inhaled) Contained in a cartridge 10-15 minutes 30-90 minutes 2½-3 hours Short-acting insulins take effect and wear off more quickly th Continue reading >>

How To Use Long-acting Insulin: Types, Frequency, Peak Times, And Duration

How To Use Long-acting Insulin: Types, Frequency, Peak Times, And Duration

Long-acting insulin can help to stabilize blood sugar levels throughout the day, with only one or two shots. Fast-acting insulin replaces the surge of insulin that a healthy pancreas would release at mealtime. In contrast, long-acting insulin mimics the low-level flow of insulin normally released between meals and overnight. In this way, long-acting insulin works to establish a healthy baseline blood sugar level for the body to work around. Contents of this article: Using long-acting insulin Long-acting insulin cannot be delivered in pill form because it would be broken down in the stomach. Instead, it must be injected into the fatty tissue under the skin. From here, it can be gradually released into the bloodstream. Delivery methods According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, there are a few ways to deliver long-acting insulin. These include: Needle and syringe: a dose of insulin is drawn from a vial into a syringe. Different types of insulin must not be mixed in the same syringe. Pen: this can be loaded with a cartridge containing a premeasured dose, or prefilled with insulin and discarded after use. Injection port: a short tube is inserted into the tissue beneath the skin. Insulin can be delivered using either a syringe or a pen. This only requires the skin to be punctured when the tube needs to be replaced. Injection sites Long-acting insulin can be injected into the abdomen, upper arms, or thighs. Abdomen injections deliver insulin into the blood most quickly. The process takes a little more time from the upper arms, and it is even slower from the thighs. It is important to stay consistent with the general injection area, but the exact injection site should be rotated frequently. Repeat injections at the same spot on the skin Continue reading >>

What Is Long-acting Insulin?

What Is Long-acting Insulin?

Long-acting insulins are insulin analogs that are steadily released and can last in the body for up to 24 hours. It is often used in the morning or at bedtime as a basal insulin to help control your blood sugar throughout the day. Insulin is made inside the beta cells of the pancreas. It helps regulate the glucose (sugar) in the bloodstream by stimulating the cells to absorb the glucose, which is needed by the cells for energy. Insulin also keeps the liver from producing more glucose. In type 2 diabetes, the body can lose the ability to produce insulin and if insulin is produced, the body isn’t able to use it properly (insulin resistance). Different types of insulin therapies, such as long-acting insulin, enables the body to get the insulin that is needed for optimal glycemic control. Some of the long-acting insulins available in the US include: Levemir contains insulin detemir, which is a long-acting, basal insulin that is used to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes. It can help keep your blood sugar levels within a normal range by moving glucose from the bloodstream into the cells, and it prevents the liver from producing more glucose. Levemir is available in a vial and pre-filled pen called Levemir FlexTouch, each containing 100 units/ml (U-100) of insulin detemir. Once the pen is in use, it is good for 42 days and should not be refrigerated but stored at room temperature (below 86°F). The vial is also good for 42 days after first use, and can be stored in the refrigerator or at room temperature. Levemir is injected under the skin (subcutaneously) in the abdomen, thigh or upper arm once daily, or twice daily depending on your personal requirements. Injection sites should be rotated within the same region from one injection to the next to red Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin For Diabetes Treatment

Types Of Insulin For Diabetes Treatment

Many forms of insulin treat diabetes. They're grouped by how fast they start to work and how long their effects last. The types of insulin include: Rapid-acting Short-acting Intermediate-acting Long-acting Pre-mixed What Type of Insulin Is Best for My Diabetes? Your doctor will work with you to prescribe the type of insulin that's best for you and your diabetes. Making that choice will depend on many things, including: How you respond to insulin. (How long it takes the body to absorb it and how long it remains active varies from person to person.) Lifestyle choices. The type of food you eat, how much alcohol you drink, or how much exercise you get will all affect how your body uses insulin. Your willingness to give yourself multiple injections per day Your age Your goals for managing your blood sugar Afrezza, a rapid-acting inhaled insulin, is FDA-approved for use before meals for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The drug peaks in your blood in about 15-20 minutes and it clears your body in 2-3 hours. It must be used along with long-acting insulin in people with type 1 diabetes. The chart below lists the types of injectable insulin with details about onset (the length of time before insulin reaches the bloodstream and begins to lower blood sugar), peak (the time period when it best lowers blood sugar) and duration (how long insulin continues to work). These three things may vary. The final column offers some insight into the "coverage" provided by the different insulin types in relation to mealtime. Type of Insulin & Brand Names Onset Peak Duration Role in Blood Sugar Management Rapid-Acting Lispro (Humalog) 15-30 min. 30-90 min 3-5 hours Rapid-acting insulin covers insulin needs for meals eaten at the same time as the injection. This type of insulin is often used with Continue reading >>

Basal Insulins (intermediate And Long-acting)

Basal Insulins (intermediate And Long-acting)

Who? Intermediate- and long-acting (basal) insulins are recommended for patients with type 1, type 2, or gestational diabetes. They may also be used in other types of diabetes (i.e. steroid-induced). Persons with type 1 diabetes generally use intermediate-acting insulin or long-acting insulin in conjunction with regular or rapid acting insulin. Persons with type 2 diabetes may use intermediate or long-acting insulins in conjunction with regular or rapid acting insulins or with oral medications. What? Injections given under the skin. Not suitable for insulin pumps. These medications can be injected with a traditional syringe and needle, or with a disposable pen that has been prefilled with insulin. Most patients tend to prefer pens though while convenient, they can be more expensive. The most common type of intermediate-acting insulin is: NPH (marketed as Humulin N and the Humulin N Pen) NPH (marketed as Novolin N and the Novolin N FlexPen) Long-acting insulins are marketed as different brands. The common ones are: Glargine (marketed as Lantus and the Solo Star Pen) Detemir (marketed as Levemir and the FlexPen) Degludec (marketed as Tresiba and the FlexTouch Pen) Where? These medicines are injected into the tissue under the skin and are slowly released into the body. These insulins allow glucose from the bloodstream to enter the cells in the body so that glucose can be used as energy. They also reduce glucose release into the bloodstream. When? NPH is usually injected twice a day. It begins working 1-3 hours after injection, and is most effective between 4-10 hours of injection. It generally keeps working for 10-16 hours. Detemir can be used once or twice a day. It begins working a few hours after injection and generally keeps working for anywhere from 20-24 hours. Glarg Continue reading >>

Lantus, Toujeo (insulin Glargine) Dosing, Indications, Interactions, Adverse Effects, And More

Lantus, Toujeo (insulin Glargine) Dosing, Indications, Interactions, Adverse Effects, And More

100 units/mL (Lantus SoloSTAR; Basaglar KwikPen; 3 mL disposable prefilled pens) 300 units/mL (Toujeo; 1.5 mL SoloStar disposable prefilled pen) 300 units/mL (Toujeo Max; 3 mL SoloStar disposable prefilled pen) Note: Recent studies have suggested that glargine-300 extends blood glucose control well beyond 24 hr Long-acting basal insulin indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus Start ~1/3 of total daily insulin dose; use remaining 2/3 of daily insulin dose on short-acting, premeal insulin Usual initial dose range: 0.2-0.4 units/kg; optimal glucose lowering effect may take 5 days to fully manifest and the first insulin glargine dose may be insufficient to cover metabolic needs in the first 24 hr of use Titrate insulin glargine per instructions, and adjust coadministered glucose-lowering therapies per standard of care See Dosing Considerations and Administration Long-acting basal insulin indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus Start 0.2 units/kg qDay; if necessary, adjust dosage of other antidiabetic drugs when starting insulin glargine to minimize the risk of hypoglycemia See Dosing Considerations and Administration Dose must be individualized based on clinical response; blood glucose monitoring is essential in all patients receiving insulin therapy Patients adjusting the amount or timing of dosage should do so only under medical supervision with appropriate glucose monitoring Titrate Toujeo dose no more frequently than every 3-4 days Use with caution in patients with visual impairment who may rely on audible clicks to dial their dose If changing from a treatment regimen with an intermediate- or long-acting insulin to a regimen with insulin glargine, the amount and timing of shorter-acting insulin Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin And How They Work - Health

Types Of Insulin And How They Work - Health

Short-acting insulin covers your insulin needs during meals. It is taken about 30 minutes to an hour before a meal to help control blood sugar levels. This type of insulin takes effect in about 30 minutes to one hour, and peaks after two to four hours. Its effects tend to last about five to eight hours. The biggest advantage of short-acting insulin is that you don't have to take it at each meal. You can take it at breakfast and supper and still have good control because it lasts a little longer, Dr. Chandalia says. What its called: Humulin N (NPH), Novolin N (NPH) Intermediate-acting insulin can control blood sugar levels for about 12 hours or longer, so it can be used overnight. It begins to work within one to four hours, and peaks between four and 12 hours, depending on the brand. Intermediate-acting insulin offer baseline insulin coverage and can be used with short-acting insulin or rapid-acting insulin, says Dr. Chandalia. What its called: Lantus (glargine), Levemir (detemir) Long-acting insulin has an onset of one hour, and lasts for 20 to 26 hours with no peak. This insulin type tends to cover your insulin needs for a full day. It is often taken at bedtime. These long-acting insulin provide 24-hour coverage, and have been helpful at achieving good blood sugar control in type 2 diabetes with just one shot, Dr. Chandalia says. What its called: Humulin 70/30, Novolin 70/30, NovoLog 70/30, Humulin 50/50, Humalog mix 75/25, Humalog mix 50/50 This type of insulin combines intermediate- and short-acting insulin. It is often taken twice a day before meals. It should be taken 10 minutes to 30 minutes before eating. Pre-mixed insulin takes effect in 5 to 60 minutes, and its peak times vary. Its effects last from 10 to 16 hours. Pre-mixed insulin was designed to be more con Continue reading >>

Insulin A To Z: A Guide On Different Types Of Insulin

Insulin A To Z: A Guide On Different Types Of Insulin

Elizabeth Blair, A.N.P., at Joslin Diabetes Center, helps break down the different types of insulin and how they work for people with diabetes. Types of Insulin for People with Diabetes Rapid-acting: Usually taken before a meal to cover the blood glucose elevation from eating. This type of insulin is used with longer-acting insulin. Short-acting: Usually taken about 30 minutes before a meal to cover the blood glucose elevation from eating. This type of insulin is used with longer-acting insulin. Intermediate-acting: Covers the blood glucose elevations when rapid-acting insulins stop working. This type of insulin is often combined with rapid- or short-acting insulin and is usually taken twice a day. Long-acting: This type of insulin is often combined, when needed, with rapid- or short-acting insulin. It lowers blood glucose levels when rapid-acting insulins stop working. It is taken once or twice a day. A Guide on Insulin Types for People with Diabetes Type Brand Name Onset (length of time before insulin reaches bloodstream) Peak (time period when insulin is most effective) Duration (how long insulin works for) Rapid-acting Humalog Novolog Apidra 10 - 30 minutes 30 minutes - 3 hours 3 - 5 hours Short-acting Regular (R) 30 minutes - 1 hour 2 - 5 hours Up to 12 hours Intermediate- acting NPH (N) 1.5 - 4 hours 4 - 12 hours Up to 24 hours Long-acting Lantus Levemir 0.8 - 4 hours Minimal peak Up to 24 hours To make an appointment with a Joslin diabetes nurse educator, please call (617) 732-2400. Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin

Types Of Insulin

For people who need to take external or supplemental insulin (insulin your body did not produce but that was instead made by a pharmaceutical company), there are several different types and kinds of insulin. The insulin you take will depend on your personal needs. Different types of insulin work differently in different people. The University of California, San Francisco explains that insulin “was initially extracted from beef and pork pancreases. In the early 1980’s, technology became available to produce human insulin synthetically. Synthetic human insulin has replaced beef and pork insulin in the US. And now, insulin analogs are replacing human insulin.” Here’s a chart of how the types of insulin work to replicate the normal pancreatic delivery of insulin and how they are typically used. Type of Insulin Brand (Generic) Onset Peak Duration Rapid-Acting Apidra (glulisine), Humalog (lispro), Novolog (aspart) 15 minutes 1 or 2 hours 2 to 4 hours Regular- or Short-Acting Humulin R, Novolin R (human recombinant) 30 minutes 2 to 3 hours 3 to 6 hours Intermediate-Acting Humulin N, Novolin N (insulin isophane)) 2 to 4 hours 4 to 12 hours 12 to 18 hours Long-Acting or Basal Insulin Lantus (glargine), Levemir (detemir), Basaglar (glargine) 2 to 4 hours lower peak 24 hours Ultra Long-Acting Toujeo (glargine), Tresiba (degludec) 6 hours small peak 36 hours Inhaled Insulin Afrezza (insulin human) 15 minutes 30 minutes 3 hours Rapid-acting insulin analogs (Insulin Aspart, insulin Lyspro, Insulin Glulisine): Usually taken as a bolus before a meal to cover the blood glucose elevation from eating or to correct for high blood glucose. This type of insulin is often used with longer-acting insulin, which is used to cover the body’s metabolic need for insulin. Short-acting synth Continue reading >>

5 Types Of Insulin And How They Work

5 Types Of Insulin And How They Work

What you need to know If you have to take insulin to treat diabetes, there’s good news: You have choices. There are five types of insulin. They vary by onset (how soon they start to work), peak (how long they take to kick into full effect) and duration (how long they stay in your body). You may have to take more than one type of insulin, and these needs may change over time (and can vary depending on your type of diabetes). Find out more about the insulin types best for you. Rapid-acting insulin What it’s called: Humalog (lispro), NovoLog (aspart), Apidra (glulisine) Rapid-acting insulin is taken just before or after meals, to control spikes in blood sugar. This type is typically used in addition to a longer-acting insulin. It often works in 15 minutes, peaks between 30 and 90 minutes, and lasts 3 to 5 hours. “You can take it a few minutes before eating or as you sit down to eat, and it starts to work very quickly,” says Manisha Chandalia, MD, director of the Stark Diabetes Center at the University of Texas Medical Branch, in Galveston. Short-acting insulin What it’s called: Humulin R, Novolin R Short-acting insulin covers your insulin needs during meals. It is taken about 30 minutes to an hour before a meal to help control blood sugar levels. This type of insulin takes effect in about 30 minutes to one hour, and peaks after two to four hours. Its effects tend to last about five to eight hours. “The biggest advantage of short-acting insulin is that you don't have to take it at each meal. You can take it at breakfast and supper and still have good control because it lasts a little longer,” Dr. Chandalia says. Intermediate-acting insulin What it’s called: Humulin N (NPH), Novolin N (NPH) Intermediate-acting insulin can control blood sugar levels for about Continue reading >>

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