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Lantus Injection Sites

Lantus Side Effects

Lantus Side Effects

Generic Name: insulin glargine (IN su lin GLAR gine) Brand Names: Basaglar KwikPen, Lantus, Lantus Solostar Pen, Toujeo SoloStar What is Lantus? Lantus (insulin glargine) is a man-made form of a hormone that is produced in the body. Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin glargine is a long-acting insulin that starts to work several hours after injection and keeps working evenly for 24 hours. Lantus is used to improve blood sugar control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. Lantus is used to treat type 1 or type 2 diabetes in adults, and type 1 diabetes children who are at least 6 years old. Some brands of insulin glargine are for use only in adults. Carefully follow all instructions for the brand of insulin glargine you are using. Important information You should not use Lantus if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis. Never share a Lantus injection pen or cartridge with another person. Sharing injection pens or cartridges can allow disease such as hepatitis or HIV to pass from one person to another. Lantus is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, foot care, eye care, dental care, and testing your blood sugar. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely. Changing any of these factors can affect your blood sugar levels. Before taking this medicine You should not use Lantus if you are allergic to insulin, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Lantus is not approved for use by anyone younger than 6 years old, and should not be used to treat type 2 diabetes in a child of any age. To make sure Lantus is safe for you, tell your docto Continue reading >>

Giving Yourself An Insulin Injection With The Lantus Solostar Pen

Giving Yourself An Insulin Injection With The Lantus Solostar Pen

This information describes how to prepare and give yourself an insulin injection (shot) with the Lantus® SoloStar® pen. Your nurse will review these steps with you and help you practice them. Storing Your Lantus® SoloStar® Pen Keep all new, unused insulin pen devices in the refrigerator. Do not freeze them. Never put the pen you are using back in the refrigerator. Keep it at room temperature, away from heat and sunlight. Discard the Lantus® SoloStar® pen 28 days after piercing the rubber stopper. Gather Your Supplies Clear off a clean, flat tabletop to work on and gather the following supplies: Lantus® SoloStar® pen A new single-use pen needle Alcohol swabs A wastebasket A sharps container (a strong, plastic container with a tight cap). Do not store your sharps in glass bottles, soda bottles, milk jugs, aluminum cans, coffee cans, or paper or plastic bags. For more information, please read How to Store and Dispose of Your Home Medical Sharps. Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer. Open an alcohol swab and wipe the rubber tip at the top of the pen (see Figure 1). Remove the tabbed paper from the outer case of a new single-use needle (see Figure 2). Follow the steps below to prime the pen, set your dose, and inject the insulin. You must prime the pen before you set your dose and inject the insulin. You will do this by giving an “air shot.” This removes the air bubbles and ensures the pen and needle are working properly. Dial 2 units (to the number 2) on the dose selector dial by turning it clockwise (see Figure 6). You will hear and feel a faint click for each unit as you turn the dial. The punger button on the pen will also rise. If you dial past 2 units, turn the dose selector counterclockwise to correct it. Po Continue reading >>

Best Insulin Injection Sites: Absorption Time And Rotation

Best Insulin Injection Sites: Absorption Time And Rotation

Insulin is a hormone that helps manage diabetes when it is injected into the body. It can't be taken as a pill or oral medication. This is because the enzymes in the stomach will break down the insulin before it reaches the bloodstream. Insulin injections are one of many ways to treat and manage diabetes. Others include dietary and lifestyle changes, and oral medications. For people who require insulin injections, there are different types of insulin available. It is important to understand and follow the instructions that the doctor provides about how and where to inject insulin. Common injection sites Insulin is injected into the layer of fat directly under this skin, known as subcutaneous tissue. It is injected with a small needle or a device that looks like a pen. There are several different sites where insulin can be injected, including: Abdomen The abdomen is a common site for insulin injection that many people with diabetes choose to use. To give an injection into the abdomen, take a pinch of the fatty tissue from either side between the waist and the hipbones. It should be about 2 inches away from the belly button. This site is easy to access and some people report that it causes less discomfort than other sites. Upper Arms The upper arm is another site where insulin injections can be given. The needle should be placed into the back of the arm (tricep area), about halfway between the elbow and the shoulder. The main disadvantage of this site is that it is very difficult to use for self-administration and may require somebody else to do it. It may be more comfortable to inject into the non-dominant arm. This means injecting into the left arm of a right-handed person or the right arm of a left-handed person. Thighs The thigh is also a very easy area for self-injec Continue reading >>

Lantus - Uses, Side Effects, Interactions - Canoe.com

Lantus - Uses, Side Effects, Interactions - Canoe.com

How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone made by the pancreas that helps our body use or store the glucose (sugar) it gets from food. For people with diabetes, either the pancreas does not make enough insulin to meet the body's requirements, or the body cannot properly use the insulin that is made. As a result, glucose cannot be used or stored properly and accumulates in the bloodstream. Insulin injected under the skin helps to lower blood glucose levels. There are many different types of insulin and they are absorbed at different rates and work for varying periods of time. Insulin glargine is an extended, long-acting insulin. It takes about 90 minutes to begin working after injection, and it stops working after about 24 hours. After injection, insulin glargine is released slowly and constantly into the bloodstream. This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are being given this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop using this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to use this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. What form(s) does this medication come in? EachmL of sterile solution contains 100 units Continue reading >>

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Glargine (lantus, Lantus Opticlik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)?

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Glargine (lantus, Lantus Opticlik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)?

LANTUS® (insulin glargine) Injection DESCRIPTION LANTUS (insulin glargine injection) is a sterile solution of insulin glargine for subcutaneous use. Insulin glargine is a recombinant human insulin analog that is a long-acting, parenteral blood-glucose-lowering agent [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY]. Insulin glargine has low aqueous solubility at neutral pH. At pH 4 insulin glargine is completely soluble. After injection into the subcutaneous tissue, the acidic solution is neutralized, leading to formation of microprecipitates from which small amounts of insulin glargine are slowly released, resulting in a relatively constant concentration/time profile over 24 hours with no pronounced peak. This profile allows oncedaily dosing as a basal insulin. LANTUS is produced by recombinant DNA technology utilizing a non-pathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli (K12) as the production organism. Insulin glargine differs from human insulin in that the amino acid asparagine at position A21 is replaced by glycine and two arginines are added to the C-terminus of the B-chain. Chemically, insulin glargine is 21A-Gly-30Ba-L-Arg-3030b-L-Arg-human insulin and has the empirical formula C267H404N72O78S6 and a molecular weight of 6063. Insulin glargine has the following structural formula: LANTUS consists of insulin glargine dissolved in a clear aqueous fluid. Each milliliter of LANTUS (insulin glargine injection) contains 100 Units (3.6378 mg) insulin glargine. The 10 mL vial presentation contains the following inactive ingredients per mL: 30 mcg zinc, 2.7 mg m-cresol, 20 mg glycerol 85%, 20 mcg polysorbate 20, and water for injection. The 3 mL prefilled pen presentation contains the following inactive ingredients per mL: 30 mcg zinc, 2.7 mg m-cresol, 20 mg glycerol 85%, and water for inje Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection Sites: Where And How To Inject

Insulin Injection Sites: Where And How To Inject

Insulin is a hormone that helps cells use glucose (sugar) for energy. It works as a “key,” allowing the sugar to go from the blood and into the cell. In type 1 diabetes, the body doesn’t make insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the body doesn’t use insulin correctly, which can lead to the pancreas not being able to produce enough — or any, depending on the progression of the disease —insulin to meet your body’s needs. Diabetes is normally managed with diet and exercise, with medications, including insulin, added as needed. If you have type 1 diabetes, insulin is required for life. This may seem difficult at first, but you can learn to successfully administer insulin with the support of your healthcare team, determination, and a little practice. There are different ways to take insulin, including syringes, insulin pens, insulin pumps, and jet injectors. Your doctor will help you decide which technique is best for you. Syringes remain a common method of insulin delivery. They’re the least expensive option, and most insurance companies cover them. Syringes Syringes vary by the amount of insulin they hold and the size of the needle. They’re made of plastic and should be discarded after one use. Traditionally, needles used in insulin therapy were 12.7 millimeters (mm) in length. Recent research shows that smaller 8 mm, 6 mm, and 4 mm needles are just as effective, regardless of body mass. This means insulin injection is less painful than it was in the past. Insulin is injected subcutaneously, which means into the fat layer under the skin. In this type of injection, a short needle is used to inject insulin into the fatty layer between the skin and the muscle. Insulin should be injected into the fatty tissue just below your skin. If you inject the insulin deeper int Continue reading >>

Giving Yourself An Insulin Shot For Diabetes

Giving Yourself An Insulin Shot For Diabetes

For those with diabetes, an insulin shot delivers medicine into the subcutaneous tissue -- the tissue between your skin and muscle. Subcutaneous tissue (also called "sub Q" tissue) is found throughout your body. Please follow these steps when using an insulin syringe. Note: these instructions are not for patients using an insulin pen or a non-needle injection system. Select a clean, dry work area, and gather the following insulin supplies: Bottle of insulin Sterile insulin syringe (needle attached) with wrapper removed Two alcohol wipes (or cotton balls and a bottle of rubbing alcohol) One container for used equipment (such as a hard plastic or metal container with a screw-on or tightly secured lid or a commercial "sharps" container) Wash hands with soap and warm water and dry them with a clean towel. Remove the plastic cap from the insulin bottle. Roll the bottle of insulin between your hands two to three times to mix the insulin. Do not shake the bottle, as air bubbles can form and affect the amount of insulin withdrawn. Wipe off the rubber part on the top of the insulin bottle with an alcohol pad or cotton ball dampened with alcohol. Set the insulin bottle nearby on a flat surface. Remove the cap from the needle. If you've been prescribed two types of insulin to be taken at once (mixed dose), skip to the instructions in the next section. Draw the required number of units of air into the syringe by pulling the plunger back. You need to draw the same amount of air into the syringe as insulin you need to inject. Always measure from the top of the plunger. Insert the needle into the rubber stopper of the insulin bottle. Push the plunger down to inject air into the bottle (this allows the insulin to be drawn more easily). Leave the needle in the bottle. Turn the bottle an Continue reading >>

Is There A Maximum Insulin Glargine (lantus) Dose?

Is There A Maximum Insulin Glargine (lantus) Dose?

Is there a maximum insulin glargine (Lantus) single-injection dose? Anecdotally, I have heard that patients receiving more than 50 units should split the dose from daily dosing to twice-daily. What’s the evidence? The question of a maximum insulin glargine dose is not straightforward because it encompasses several issues: How long does insulin glargine last? Does it ever need to be given twice-daily? Is there a difference in efficacy between daily and twice-daily insulin glargine dosing? Can you administer more than 50 units of insulin glargine as one single injection? Pharmacodynamics and Duration of Insulin Glargine In theory, insulin glargine should last a full 24 hours without a significant peak effect. Glargine forms a depot effect because it is only soluble at an acidic pH.1 In the vial (pH 4), the drug is completely soluble. Once injected, the solution is neutralized to biologic pH (7.4), which causes the insulin molecules to precipitate. These microprecipitates slowly dissolve over a 24-hour period. This slow dissolution results in a slower onset and a lack of a peak effect compared to other insulins, as shown below: Efficacy of Daily versus Twice-Daily Lantus Administration Although insulin glargine should last a full 24 hours, there is some evidence that its duration of action may be reduced to 20-23 hours, particularly following injection due to its delayed onset of activity of about 3-5 hours.2 Currently, the best estimate is that 15-30% of type-I diabetics will have pre-injection hyperglycemia and may benefit from twice-daily dosing. The idea of twice-daily dosing was explored in an 8-week, open-label crossover trial of 20 patients with type-I diabetes.2 Patients received either 100% of a pre-determined dose daily (dinner) or 50% twice-daily (breakfast an Continue reading >>

How To Improve The Insulin Injection Experience

How To Improve The Insulin Injection Experience

How to Improve the Insulin Injection Experience If you have type 1 diabetes, or if you have type 2 and have recently begun injecting insulin, you may have a bit of trouble getting used to the process of preparing and administering your own insulin shots. Andrea Penney, RN, CDE, of the Joslin Diabetes Center, says that injection technique is important to master not only for accurate dosing, but for comfort, too. "With proper practice and good technique, you can avoid pain during an injection," she states. Penney sat down with us recently to answer some common questions about insulin injection. If after reading and practicing insulin injections you still find youre having trouble, Penney suggests seeing a Certified Diabetes Educator for more assistance. A: People often select injection sites based on many factors: accessibility, presence of fatty tissue, and rate of insulin absorption (which will be discussed shortly). As a result, popular sites for injection include the stomach, outer thigh, the back of the arm (between the shoulder and the elbow), or the upper outside "wallet" area of the buttock (but not into the lower buttock area). Q: Once I decide on a location for an injection, how do I pick the right "spot"? -Stomach If youre going to inject into the stomach, stay at least two inches away from the bellybutton and/or any scars you may already have when using the abdomen for injections. For an injection in your thigh, inject at least four inches or about one hands width above the knee and at least four inches down from the top of the leg. Do not inject insulin into your inner thigh because of the large number of blood vessels and nerves in this area. The area between the shoulder and elbow on the outside of the arm is usually fine for injections. Injecting into the Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine (rdna Origin) Injection

Insulin Glargine (rdna Origin) Injection

Insulin glargine is used to treat type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not produce insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood). It is also used to treat people with type 2 diabetes (condition in which the body does not use insulin normally and, therefore, cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) who need insulin to control their diabetes. In people with type 1 diabetes, insulin glargine must be used with another type of insulin (a short-acting insulin). In people with type 2 diabetes, insulin glargine also may be used with another type of insulin or with oral medication(s) for diabetes. Insulin glargine is a long-acting, manmade version of human insulin. Insulin glargine works by replacing the insulin that is normally produced by the body and by helping move sugar from the blood into other body tissues where it is used for energy. It also stops the liver from producing more sugar. Over time, people who have diabetes and high blood sugar can develop serious or life-threatening complications, including heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, nerve damage, and eye problems. Using medication(s), making lifestyle changes (e.g., diet, exercise, quitting smoking), and regularly checking your blood sugar may help to manage your diabetes and improve your health. This therapy may also decrease your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes-related complications such as kidney failure, nerve damage (numb, cold legs or feet; decreased sexual ability in men and women), eye problems, including changes or loss of vision, or gum disease. Your doctor and other healthcare providers will talk to you about the best way to manage your diabetes. Insulin glargine comes as a solution (liquid) to inject subcutaneously (under the Continue reading >>

Lantus® Can Still Be Your Choice For A Once-daily Injection

Lantus® Can Still Be Your Choice For A Once-daily Injection

Lantus® is a long-acting insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Lantus® should be administered once a day at the same time every day. Limitations of Use: Lantus® is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Contraindications Lantus® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or one of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Insulin pens, needles, or syringes must never be shared between patients. Do NOT reuse needles. Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Modify insulin regimen cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment in concomitant oral antidiabetic treatment. Do not dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. If mixed or diluted, the solution may become cloudy, and the onset of action/time to peak effect may be altered in an unpredictable manner. Do not administer Lantus® via an insulin pump or intravenously because severe hypoglycemia can occur. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin therapy, including Lantus®, and may be life-threatening. Medication errors, such as accidental mix-ups between basal insulin products and other insulins, particularly rapid-acting insulins, have been reported. Patients should be instructed to always verify the insulin label before each injection. Severe life-threatening, generalized allergy, including anaphylaxis, can occur. Discontinue Lantus®, treat and monitor until symptoms resolve. A reduction in the Lantus® dose may be re Continue reading >>

So You’re Ready

So You’re Ready

Indication BASAGLAR is a long-acting insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with type 1 diabetes and adults with type 2 diabetes. Limitation of Use Important Safety Information Do not take BASAGLAR during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin glargine or any of the ingredients in BASAGLAR. Do NOT reuse needles or share insulin pens, even if the needle has been changed. Before starting BASAGLAR, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or if you are breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed. BASAGLAR should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. The most common side effect of insulin, including BASAGLAR, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious and life threatening. Signs and symptoms may include dizziness or light-headedness, sweating, confusion, headache, blurred vision, slurred speech, shakiness, fast heartbeat, anxiety, irritability, mood change, or hunger. Do NOT dilute or mix BASAGLAR with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. BASAGLAR must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection. BASAGLAR may cause serious side effects that can lead to death, such as severe allergic reactions. Get emergency help if you have: Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together w Continue reading >>

Insulin

Insulin

Indication BASAGLAR is a long-acting insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with type 1 diabetes and adults with type 2 diabetes. Limitation of Use BASAGLAR is not for treating diabetic ketoacidosis. Important Safety Information Do not take BASAGLAR during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin glargine or any of the ingredients in BASAGLAR. Do NOT reuse needles or share insulin pens, even if the needle has been changed. Before starting BASAGLAR, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or if you are breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed. BASAGLAR should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. The most common side effect of insulin, including BASAGLAR, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious and life threatening. Signs and symptoms may include dizziness or light-headedness, sweating, confusion, headache, blurred vision, slurred speech, shakiness, fast heartbeat, anxiety, irritability, mood change, or hunger. Do NOT dilute or mix BASAGLAR with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. BASAGLAR must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection. BASAGLAR may cause serious side effects that can lead to death, such as severe allergic reactions. Get emergency help if you have: Heart fa Continue reading >>

Lantus Injection Site

Lantus Injection Site

What is your most used injection site? Or Do you vary location each time? Some say, if you inject in your stomach the Lantus may take effect faster, as opposed to the leg, etc. i think in general when injecting insulin in your stomach it works faster (than legs or arms) my most used injection site (for the lantus) is my arms I usually use my leg for the lantus just because my tummy seems to be more sensitive to the burning I usually inject in the leg, but it becomes irritated at the injection site for a few days. I always use my left leg, since lantus and novorapid shouldnt be mixed, I like novorapid to work rapid Yes, I hear you can inject in your abdomen. My doctor told me when injecting the insulin into the stomach it kicks in faster. I have not tried the abdomen area yet. I inject in my stomach area. I use Lantus and Novolog. I change the side every day. So today I injected on my right side with Lantus and Novolog on the left. Ive been doing this since I was Diagnosed in Jan 09. Ive had no issues at all other than the occasional burning feeling. But it really doesnt bother me. My CDE actually told me this is how to do it. Said I could use my legs or arms but that you can burn through the insulin faster in those areas. Books Ive read agree with what she said as well. Yes, I was told Lantus works faster from the stomach. I too have to alternate sites in my legs or else it may become irritated. Upper Leg/Thigh for lantus, usually abdomen for Humalog I try to use a different spot and alternate legs for my morning/night At least i dont have to use my derriere for Lantus/Humalog Trust me when i say the sting from a dose of lantus is MILD compared to some injectables Diabetes is just ONE of my bag of tricks ;( I inject in my stomach mainly on the right as i have no feelin Continue reading >>

Lantus 100 Units/ml Solution For Injection In A Cartridge

Lantus 100 Units/ml Solution For Injection In A Cartridge

Lantus 100 units/ml solution for injection in a cartridge This information is intended for use by health professionals Lantus 100 units/ml solution for injection in a vial Lantus 100 units/ml solution for injection in a cartridge Lantus SoloStar 100 units/ml solution for injection in a pre-filled pen 2. Qualitative and quantitative composition Each ml contains 100 units insulin glargine* (equivalent to 3.64 mg). Each vial contains 5 ml of solution for injection, equivalent to 500 units, or 10 ml of solution for injection, equivalent to 1000 units. Each cartridge or pen contains 3 ml of solution for injection, equivalent to 300 units. *Insulin glargine is produced by recombinant DNA technology in Escherichia coli. For the full list of excipients, see section 6.1. Treatment of diabetes mellitus in adults, adolescents and children aged 2 years and above. 4.2 Posology and method of administration Lantus contains insulin glargine, an insulin analogue, and has a prolonged duration of action. Lantus should be administered once daily at any time but at the same time each day. The dose regimen (dose and timing) should be individually adjusted. In patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, Lantus can also be given together with orally active antidiabetic medicinal products. The potency of this medicinal product is stated in units. These units are exclusive to Lantus and are not the same as IU or the units used to express the potency of other insulin analogues (see section 5.1). In the elderly, progressive deterioration of renal function may lead to a steady decrease in insulin requirements. In patients with renal impairment, insulin requirements may be diminished due to reduced insulin metabolism. In patients with hepatic impairment, insulin requirements may be diminished due to re Continue reading >>

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