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Levemir Vs. Lantus: Similarities And Differences

Levemir Vs. Lantus: Similarities And Differences

Levemir and Lantus are both long-acting injectable insulins that can be used for long-term management of diabetes. Insulin is a hormone that is naturally produced in the body by the pancreas. It helps convert the glucose (sugar) in your bloodstream into energy. This energy is then distributed to cells throughout your body. With diabetes, your pancreas produces little or no insulin or your body is unable to use the insulin correctly. Without insulin, your body can’t use the sugars in your blood and can become starved for energy. The excess sugar in your blood can also damage different parts of your body, including your blood vessels and kidneys. Everyone with type 1 diabetes and many people with type 2 diabetes must use insulin to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Levemir is a solution of insulin detemir, and Lantus is a solution of insulin glargine. Both are basal insulin formulas. That means that they work slowly to lower your blood sugar levels. They’re both absorbed into your body over a 24-hour period. They keep blood sugar levels lowered for longer than short-acting insulins do. Although the formulations are slightly different, Levemir and Lantus are very similar drugs. There are only a few differences between them. Children and adults can use both Levemir and Lantus. Specifically, Levemir can be used by people who are 2 years or older. Lantus can be used by people who are 6 years or older. Levemir or Lantus can help with daily management of diabetes. However, you may still need to use short-acting insulin to treat spikes in your blood sugar levels and diabetic ketoacidosis (a dangerous buildup of acids in your blood). Learn more: All about diabetic ketoacidosis » Administration Both Levemir and Lantus are given through injection in the same way. You can gi Continue reading >>

Selected Important Safety Information

Selected Important Safety Information

Tresiba® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients with hypersensitivity to Tresiba® or one of its excipients Never Share a Tresiba® FlexTouch® Pen Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Changes in insulin may affect glycemic control. These changes should be made cautiously and under medical supervision. Adjustments in concomitant oral anti-diabetic treatment may be needed Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin, including Tresiba®, and may be life-threatening Tresiba® (insulin degludec injection) is indicated to improve glycemic control in patients 1 year of age and older with diabetes mellitus. Tresiba® is not recommended for treating diabetic ketoacidosis or for pediatric patients requiring less than 5 units of Tresiba®. Tresiba® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients with hypersensitivity to Tresiba® or one of its excipients Never Share a Tresiba® FlexTouch® Pen Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Changes in insulin may affect glycemic control. These changes should be made cautiously and under medical supervision. Adjustments in concomitant oral anti-diabetic treatment may be needed Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin, including Tresiba®, and may be life-threatening. Increase monitoring with changes to: insulin dose, co-administered glucose lowering medications, meal pattern, physical activity; and in patients with hypoglycemia unawareness or renal or hepatic impairment Accidental mix-ups betwe Continue reading >>

Lantus, Toujeo (insulin Glargine) Dosing, Indications, Interactions, Adverse Effects, And More

Lantus, Toujeo (insulin Glargine) Dosing, Indications, Interactions, Adverse Effects, And More

100 units/mL (Lantus SoloSTAR; Basaglar KwikPen; 3 mL disposable prefilled pens) 300 units/mL (Toujeo; 1.5 mL SoloStar disposable prefilled pen) 300 units/mL (Toujeo Max; 3 mL SoloStar disposable prefilled pen) Note: Recent studies have suggested that glargine-300 extends blood glucose control well beyond 24 hr Long-acting basal insulin indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus Start ~1/3 of total daily insulin dose; use remaining 2/3 of daily insulin dose on short-acting, premeal insulin Usual initial dose range: 0.2-0.4 units/kg; optimal glucose lowering effect may take 5 days to fully manifest and the first insulin glargine dose may be insufficient to cover metabolic needs in the first 24 hr of use Titrate insulin glargine per instructions, and adjust coadministered glucose-lowering therapies per standard of care See Dosing Considerations and Administration Long-acting basal insulin indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus Start 0.2 units/kg qDay; if necessary, adjust dosage of other antidiabetic drugs when starting insulin glargine to minimize the risk of hypoglycemia See Dosing Considerations and Administration Dose must be individualized based on clinical response; blood glucose monitoring is essential in all patients receiving insulin therapy Patients adjusting the amount or timing of dosage should do so only under medical supervision with appropriate glucose monitoring Titrate Toujeo dose no more frequently than every 3-4 days Use with caution in patients with visual impairment who may rely on audible clicks to dial their dose If changing from a treatment regimen with an intermediate- or long-acting insulin to a regimen with insulin glargine, the amount and timing of shorter-acting insulin Continue reading >>

Lantus 100 Units/ml Solution For Injection In A Cartridge

Lantus 100 Units/ml Solution For Injection In A Cartridge

Lantus 100 units/ml solution for injection in a cartridge This information is intended for use by health professionals Lantus 100 units/ml solution for injection in a vial Lantus 100 units/ml solution for injection in a cartridge Lantus SoloStar 100 units/ml solution for injection in a pre-filled pen 2. Qualitative and quantitative composition Each ml contains 100 units insulin glargine* (equivalent to 3.64 mg). Each vial contains 5 ml of solution for injection, equivalent to 500 units, or 10 ml of solution for injection, equivalent to 1000 units. Each cartridge or pen contains 3 ml of solution for injection, equivalent to 300 units. *Insulin glargine is produced by recombinant DNA technology in Escherichia coli. For the full list of excipients, see section 6.1. Treatment of diabetes mellitus in adults, adolescents and children aged 2 years and above. 4.2 Posology and method of administration Lantus contains insulin glargine, an insulin analogue, and has a prolonged duration of action. Lantus should be administered once daily at any time but at the same time each day. The dose regimen (dose and timing) should be individually adjusted. In patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, Lantus can also be given together with orally active antidiabetic medicinal products. The potency of this medicinal product is stated in units. These units are exclusive to Lantus and are not the same as IU or the units used to express the potency of other insulin analogues (see section 5.1). In the elderly, progressive deterioration of renal function may lead to a steady decrease in insulin requirements. In patients with renal impairment, insulin requirements may be diminished due to reduced insulin metabolism. In patients with hepatic impairment, insulin requirements may be diminished due to re Continue reading >>

Lantus And Levemir: What’s The Difference?

Lantus And Levemir: What’s The Difference?

Lantus and Levemir have a lot in common. Both are basal insulin formulas, which means that they last for a long time in the body and act as background insulin, with a slow feed that mimics the constant low output of insulin produced by a healthy pancreas. Both are insulin analogues, which means that their insulin molecules are analogous to human insulin, but engineered, or recombined, with slight differences that slow their absorption. Lantus is a clear formula made with glargine, a genetically modified form of human insulin, dissolved in a special solution. Levemir is also a clear formula, but it contains dissolved detemir, a different form of genetically modified insulin. Human insulin is made of two amino acid chains, called A and B, that have two disulfide bonds between them. In glargine, one amino acid has been switched out, and two extra amino acids have been added to one end of the B chain. The modifications make glargine soluble at an acidic pH, but much less soluble at the neutral pH that’s found in the body To make Lantus, first the glargine is produced by a vat of E. coli bacteria. Then it’s purified and added to a watery solution containing a little zinc and some glycerol; a dash of hydrochloric acid is also added to make it acidic, bringing its pH down to about 4. At that degree of acidity, glargine completely dissolves into the watery solution, which is why the vial is clear. After you inject it into your subcutaneous tissue, the acidic solution is neutralized by your body to a neutral pH. Because glargine is not soluble at a neutral pH, it precipitates out into a form that’s not soluble in subcutaneous fat, and there forms a relatively insoluble depot. From that pool, or depot, of precipitated glargine in the tissues, small amounts slowly move back Continue reading >>

The Non-diabetic Use Of A 24 Hour Insulin

The Non-diabetic Use Of A 24 Hour Insulin

Welcome to Ellis Toussier-Ades Bigio-Antebi's Using Lantus Introduction: My name is Ellis Toussier. My birth certificate says I was born in Panama, in August, 1945... so my birth certificate is 64 years old. I am a 64 year old person in a 48 year old body. My fight with aging began when my classmates were not yet interested... I was in my early 20's, when I read "Eat Right To Keep Fit" by Adelle Davis... That book didn't have it all right, but it was the early 1960's and it had most of it right... The home glucose meters that we have today didn't exist yet, so it took me 35 years to get it all right, (but it exists today, so I have it all right now...)... A way to make laboratory identical human growth hormone and human insulin had not been discovered yet, either... And I was only 20 years old... I was way ahead of my times reading a book on nutrition... At a time when anti-aging medicine did not exist, I was smart enough to realize that the food I choose to let into my body is the most important anti-aging therapy... Fortunately for me, I live in Mexico. Fortunately for me, too, I studied in the Canal Zone, the American School of Mexico City, and Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana (1963-1967) So I speak and read and write perfect Spanish and English... (Both of my parents were French citizens, born in Egypt... so I also speak French...) That means I am a Panamanian citizen with a Mexican heart, a dash of French culture, an Arab and Mexican stomach, and an American mind. Fortunately for me too, I am not a doctor... so I never learned some of the things that doctors have been taught are impossible... Among those impossible things: I never learned that it is impossible to reverse the aging process... I never knew that it is impossible to prevent diabetes... I nev Continue reading >>

Insulin Actions Times And Peak Times

Insulin Actions Times And Peak Times

A good way to improve your glucose levels is to track the peaks and drops in your glucose , so you can figure out why they happened and how to correct them. Once you identify glucose patterns (they ARE there!), you also want to understand when each of your insulins is active and when they typically stop lowering your glucose. This helps you adjust your doses or food intake to stop unwanted ups and downs in your readings. The table below shows the start, peak, and end times for various insulins with some explanations and typical uses for each. When Does My Insulin Peak and How Long Does It Last? designed to peak, covers meals and lowers high BGs Humalog , Novolog and Apidra insulins currently give the best coverage for meals and help keep the glucose lower afterward. Their glucose lowering activity starts to work about 20 minutes after they are taken, with a gradual rise in activity over the next 1.75 to 2.25 hours. Their activity gradually falls over the next 3 hours with about 5 to 6 hours of activity being common with these insulins.Although insulin action times are often quoted as 3-5 hours, the actual duration of insulin action is typically 5 hours or more. See our article Duration of Insulin Action for more information on this important topic. In general, "rapid" insulins are still too slow for many common meals where the glucose peaks within an hour and digestion is complete within 2-3 hours. The best kept secret on stopping post meal spiking is to eake the injection or bolus earlier before the meal and to eat slower low glycemic carbs. Regular insulin still carries its original name of "fast insulin" but its slower action often works better for people who take Symlin or for those who have gastroparesis (delayed digestion). It is also a great choice for those who Continue reading >>

Insulin Chart

Insulin Chart

List of insulin types available in the U.S. and how they work. By the dLife Editors Each type of insulin has its own unique behavior. One difference among types of insulin is how long they take to start working at lowering blood-glucose levels. The “insulin peak” is the point at which the dose is working at its maximum, and the “duration” is how long the blood-glucose-lowering effect of the injection will last. The following is a list of insulin types available in the United States, along with how soon they start working, their peak, and how long they last. Talk to your healthcare provider about your insulin regimen. Insulin Type Onset of Action Peak Duration of Action Lispro U-100 (Humalog) Approximately 15 minutes 1-2 hours 3-6 hours Lispro U-200 (Humalog 200) Approximately 15 minutes 1-2 hours 3-6 hours Aspart (Novolog) Approximately 15 minutes 1-2 hours 3-6 hours Glulisine (Apidra) Approximately 20 minutes 1-2 hours 3-6 hours Regular U-100 (Novolin R, Humulin R) 30-60 minutes 2-4 hours 6-10 hours Humulin R Regular U-500 30-60 minutes 2-4 hours Up to 24 hours NPH (Novolin N, Humulin N, ReliOn) 2-4 hours 4-8 hours 10-18 hours Glargine U-100 (Lantus) 1-2 hours Minimal Up to 24 hours Glargine U-100 (Basaglar) 1-2 hours Minimal Up to 24 hours Glargine U-300 (Toujeo) 6 hours No significant peak 24-36 hours Detemir (Levemir) 1-2 hours Minimal** Up to 24 hours** Degludec U-100 & U-200 (Tresiba) 1-4 hours No significant peak About 42 hours Afrezza < 15 minutes Approx. 50 minutes 2-3 hours *Information derived from a combination of manufacturer’s prescribing information, online professional literature sources and clinical studies. Individual response to insulin preparations may vary. **Peak and length of action may depend on size of dose and length of time since ini Continue reading >>

Do You See A Peak With Lantus?

Do You See A Peak With Lantus?

This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. I read there isn't supposed to be any noticeable peaks with Lantus but in your experience did you notice any and at what hour? We are having considerable drops in the middle of the night. We stopped the NPH 2 days ago and are on just Novolog + Lantus instead of all three insulins. Adin is still on the same Lantus dose at bedtime while the Novolog has been increased a smidge at meals to cover the carbs. Adin was running high when he woke up in the mornings the week before our appointment. Do you think I was missing drops? The Endo thinks the carb counts are off and a cgm wouldn't help. I disagree the basal have nothing to do with the carb counts. Again is my thinking off? I hate doubting myself like this. I am an adult on Lantus, and I have always had peaks with it, regardless of what they say about it. I have a peak 4 hours after the injection. I had to stop taking it at night because of this, and eventually ended up splitting it into two daily doses so that I could control the peaks better. I'm not talking mild peaks, either. When I took my full dose at night it could easily drop me over 100 points overnight, even with a snack. My endo found this hard to believe, but after much basal testing to be certain I wasn't taking too much, and about a week of me doing some excessive testing to show her what was happening, she saw that I was right. I've never heard of anyone else having this happen, but I thought I would post this to let you know that it can happen. With a child I would suggest talking to your dr about switching to taking it in the morning...if you really are having peaks they are MUCH easier to deal with during the daytime! We see a peak. Although I am n Continue reading >>

Lantus® Can Still Be Your Choice For A Product With Demonstrated Efficacy And Safety

Lantus® Can Still Be Your Choice For A Product With Demonstrated Efficacy And Safety

Lantus® is a long-acting insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Lantus® should be administered once a day at the same time every day. Limitations of Use: Lantus® is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Contraindications Lantus® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or one of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Insulin pens, needles, or syringes must never be shared between patients. Do NOT reuse needles. Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Modify insulin regimen cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment in concomitant oral antidiabetic treatment. Do not dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. If mixed or diluted, the solution may become cloudy, and the onset of action/time to peak effect may be altered in an unpredictable manner. Do not administer Lantus® via an insulin pump or intravenously because severe hypoglycemia can occur. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin therapy, including Lantus®, and may be life-threatening. Medication errors, such as accidental mix-ups between basal insulin products and other insulins, particularly rapid-acting insulins, have been reported. Patients should be instructed to always verify the insulin label before each injection. Severe life-threatening, generalized allergy, including anaphylaxis, can occur. Discontinue Lantus®, treat and monitor until symptoms resolve. A reduction in the Lantus® dose may be re Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin

Types Of Insulin

Insulin analogs are now replacing human insulin in the US. Insulins are categorized by differences in onset, peak, duration, concentration, and route of delivery. Human Insulin and Insulin Analogs are available for insulin replacement therapy. Insulins also are classified by the timing of their action in your body – specifically, how quickly they start to act, when they have a maximal effect and how long they act.Insulin analogs have been developed because human insulins have limitations when injected under the skin. In high concentrations, such as in a vial or cartridge, human (and also animal insulin) clumps together. This clumping causes slow and unpredictable absorption from the subcutaneous tissue and a dose-dependent duration of action (i.e. the larger dose, the longer the effect or duration). In contrast, insulin analogs have a more predictable duration of action. The rapid acting insulin analogs work more quickly, and the long acting insulin analogs last longer and have a more even, “peakless” effect. Background Insulin has been available since 1925. It was initially extracted from beef and pork pancreases. In the early 1980’s, technology became available to produce human insulin synthetically. Synthetic human insulin has replaced beef and pork insulin in the US. And now, insulin analogs are replacing human insulin. Characteristics of Insulin Insulins are categorized by differences in: Onset (how quickly they act) Peak (how long it takes to achieve maximum impact) Duration (how long they last before they wear off) Concentration (Insulins sold in the U.S. have a concentration of 100 units per ml or U100. In other countries, additional concentrations are available. Note: If you purchase insulin abroad, be sure it is U100.) Route of delivery (whether they a Continue reading >>

Clinical Pharmacology/efficacy And Safety | Toujeo (insulin Glargine Injection) 300 Units/ml

Clinical Pharmacology/efficacy And Safety | Toujeo (insulin Glargine Injection) 300 Units/ml

This site is intended for U.S. Healthcare Professionals only. PLEASE NOTE: This reprint includes information that is not contained within the full prescribing information (PI) for Toujeo (insulin glargine injection) 300 Units/mL and is not intended to offer recommendations about Toujeo that are inconsistent with the PI. Please read the full indication, the Important Safety Information and the full Prescribing Information . Sanofi US does not review the information contained in this website and/or database for content, accuracy, or completeness. Use of and access to this information is subject to the terms, limitations, and conditions set by the website and/or database producer. Sanofi US makes no representation as to the accuracy or any other aspect of the information contained on such website and/or database, nor does Sanofi US necessarily endorse such website and/or database. You are about to leave sanofi site for U.S. Sanofi US does not review the informationcontained on this website and/or databasefor content, accuracy or completeness. Useof and access to this information is subject tothe terms, limitations and conditions set by thewebsite and/or database producer. This site might not comply with the regulatory requirements of US You are about to move to an Unbranded site Toujeo is a long-acting human insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with diabetes mellitus. Limitations of Use: Toujeo is not recommended for treating diabetic ketoacidosis. Important Safety Information for Toujeo (insulin glargine injection) 300 Units/mL Toujeo is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or any of its excipients. Toujeo contains the same active ingredient, insulin glargine, as Lantus. The concentra Continue reading >>

Lantus® Is Still Your Choice

Lantus® Is Still Your Choice

Lantus® is a long-acting insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Lantus® should be administered once a day at the same time every day. Limitations of Use: Lantus® is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Contraindications Lantus® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or one of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Insulin pens, needles, or syringes must never be shared between patients. Do NOT reuse needles. Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Modify insulin regimen cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment in concomitant oral antidiabetic treatment. Do not dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. If mixed or diluted, the solution may become cloudy, and the onset of action/time to peak effect may be altered in an unpredictable manner. Do not administer Lantus® via an insulin pump or intravenously because severe hypoglycemia can occur. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin therapy, including Lantus®, and may be life-threatening. Medication errors, such as accidental mix-ups between basal insulin products and other insulins, particularly rapid-acting insulins, have been reported. Patients should be instructed to always verify the insulin label before each injection. Severe life-threatening, generalized allergy, including anaphylaxis, can occur. Discontinue Lantus®, treat and monitor until symptoms resolve. A reduction in the Lantus® dose may be re Continue reading >>

Benefits Of Split Dosing Lantus

Benefits Of Split Dosing Lantus

D.D. Family T1 since 1977 - using Novolog in an Animas pump. Is he a T1? This is posted in the T2 forum & profile says T2??? ... Ooops! I was confusing this with another thread. Lantus acts over 24 hours, but that doesn't mean that it will closely match your basal insulin requirements over a 24 period. The Lantus action profile looks something like this (the line in the middle, insulin glargine). From the graph you can see that the level of action at 10 hours is about 3 times greater than it is at 20 hours. That's fine if it matches your basal action requirements. But for many of us this is not the case. The only way to get smoother action over 24 hours is to split the dose. Having said that, as you are still in the honeymoon (making some of your own insulin), you can probably get away with once-a-day dosing at this stage. When you are fully dependent on injected insulin, you may have to think again. There is something about that graph that confuses me. It shows all the insulins having an effect at zero hours, which would be the moment that it is injected. Yet all of the insulins take time to start working (if they are injected in fat, as they are supposed to be). Any idea why the graph shows that? Bottom line is the reason to split the doseage is one dose compliments the other half during any trail off or reduction near the 24 hour period.....that is, if the 1st half dose tends to drop after 20 + hours, the other 1/2 dose gives you at least a 1/2 dose during that short period. an example for a split 20 unit dose, when the first 10 unit dose trails off, the other 10 unit dose is half way thru its time.......you have a fairly constant 20 unit dose for 24 hours a day. The other chart in the same study shows how a combination of lantus and a quick acting such as nova-log Continue reading >>

Insulin Degludec Versus Insulin Glargine In Insulin-naive Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin Degludec Versus Insulin Glargine In Insulin-naive Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

OBJECTIVE To compare ultra-long-acting insulin degludec with glargine for efficacy and safety in insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In this 1-year, parallel-group, randomized, open-label, treat-to-target trial, adults with type 2 diabetes with A1C of 7−10% taking OADs were randomized 3:1 to receive once daily degludec or glargine, both with metformin. Insulin was titrated to achieve prebreakfast plasma glucose (PG) of 3.9−4.9 mmol/L. The primary end point was confirmation of noninferiority of degludec to glargine in A1C reduction after 52 weeks in an intent-to-treat analysis. RESULTS In all, 1,030 participants (mean age 59 years; baseline A1C 8.2%) were randomized (degludec 773, glargine 257). Reduction in A1C with degludec was similar (noninferior) to that with glargine (1.06 vs. 1.19%), with an estimated treatment difference of degludec to glargine of 0.09% (95% CI −0.04 to 0.22). Overall rates of confirmed hypoglycemia (PG <3.1 mmol/L or severe episodes requiring assistance) were similar, with degludec and glargine at 1.52 versus 1.85 episodes/patient-year of exposure (PYE). There were few episodes of nocturnal confirmed hypoglycemia in the overall population, and these occurred at a lower rate with degludec versus glargine (0.25 vs. 0.39 episodes/PYE; P = 0.038). Similar percentages of patients in both groups achieved A1C levels <7% without hypoglycemia. End-of-trial mean daily insulin doses were 0.59 and 0.60 units/kg for degludec and glargine, respectively. Adverse event rates were similar. CONCLUSIONS Insulins degludec and glargine administered once daily in combination with OADs provided similar long-term glycemic control in insulin-naive patients with type 2 Continue reading >>

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