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Lantus Generic Alternative

Ada: New Insulin As Effective As Lantus

Ada: New Insulin As Effective As Lantus

SAN FRANCISCO -- A new insulin glargine product proved to be noninferior to the top-selling Lantus in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, researchers reported here. The new insulin glargine (LY2963016) being developed by Eli Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim showed similar reductions in HbA1c and hypoglycemia as Lantus in both types of diabetes patients, researchers reported here in three oral presentations of data from the ELEMENT series of trials. The new insulin contains the same amino acid chain as Lantus, which has led to complexity in the way the drug will be regulated in the U.S. Julio Rosenstock, MD, of Dallas Diabetes & Endocrine Center, who presented data on type 2 diabetics, began his presentation with an explanation of the gray area into which the drug falls. Since insulin glargine was approved via a New Drug Application (NDA) with the FDA, the new form of insulin glargine will follow the same pathway in the U.S., even though many consider it to be a "biosimilar" version of insulin. "In my book, it is a biosimilar," Rosenstock said, adding that in other countries it will likely be approved and regulated as a biosimilar. It will not be considered generic. 'Biosimilar' Insulin Holds Up The ELEMENT 2 Study enrolled about 700 patients with type 2 diabetes who were taking other oral antidiabetic drugs to assess whether LY2963016 was noninferior to Lantus. They found over the 24-week study period that both drugs produced similar changes in HbA1c, with a mean reduction of about 1.3% in both groups. About the same proportion of patients in both groups achieved an HbA1c of 7% or less: 53% of those on Lantus and 49% of those on the new insulin glargine. There were similar reductions in fasting plasma glucose and changes in body weight, as well as similar rates of b Continue reading >>

When You Can't Afford The Insulin That You Need To Survive | How To Use The Cheap

When You Can't Afford The Insulin That You Need To Survive | How To Use The Cheap "old-school" Insulin

Note: BootCamp for Betics is not a medical center. Anything you read on this site should not be considered medical advice, and is for educational purposes only. Always consult with a physician or a diabetes nurse educator before starting or changing insulin doses. Did you know that all type 1 diabetics and some type 2 diabetics need injectable insulin in order to live? Put another way, if a diabetic needs insulin in order to live, and the diabetic does not get insulin, the diabetic will die. Diabetic death from Diabetic Ketoacidosis is a grisly process, during which acid starts running through your bloodstream, searing your vessels and organs while your body shrivels up in dehydration as it tries to push the acid out of your body through your urine and lungs, and, left untreated, the condition shuts down your organs one by one until you are dead. If you're lucky, your brain will be the first thing to swell itself into a coma and you'll be unconscious for the remainder of the organ failures. In some cases, this grisly diabetic death can take a few days or weeks to complete its process. Or, if you're one of the luckier less-resistant insulin-dependent type 2 diabetics, you may actually get away with staying alive for quite a few years and suffer only some heart disease, stroke, kidney damage/failure, neuropathy, limb amputations and blindness. (my intent in describing how lack of insulin leads to death is not to cause fear in people with diabetes or their loved ones; rather, my intent is to make clear the reality that injectable insulin is absolutely vital to diabetics who depend on injectable insulin to live) While I'd love to go off on a political rant about how insulin should be a basic human right for all insulin-dependent diabetics (and why the hell isn't it?), that' Continue reading >>

‘generic’ Basaglar Is Cheaper Than Lantus But Does It Work?

‘generic’ Basaglar Is Cheaper Than Lantus But Does It Work?

Basaglar U-100 insulin glargine, which is a follow-on biologic insulin to Lantus is now available by prescription in the US. Basaglar, from Eli Lilly and Company and Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. is not technically a generic to Lantus but it does have an amino acid sequence identical to Lantus and has been FDA approved as a long-acting insulin for patients of all ages with type 1 diabetes and adults with type 2 diabetes. David Kendall, M.D. and the vice president of Global Medical Affairs for Lilly Diabetes said in Lilly’s press release, “Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim are proud to bring another proven effective diabetes treatment choice to people who may need a long-acting insulin to help control their blood sugar,” and that “We know that starting insulin can be a challenging experience for some people with type 2 diabetes. As part of our continuing commitment to the diabetes community, we are expanding our educational resources.” Is it Cheaper? Business Insider reported that Basaglar “is 15% less than the list price of Lantus and Toujeo, two long-acting insulins made by Sanofi Aventis, 21% less than the list price of Levemir, and 28% less than Tresiba, two long-acting insulins made by Novo Nordisk.” An Eli Lilly spokesperson told Business Insider that before discounts or insurance coverage, the list price for a 5-pen pack of Basaglar is $316.85. You will be able to get Basaglar from retail and mail order pharmacies. Basaglar has also been chosen for the formularies of the top three pharmacy benefit managers and is expected to be covered by many commercial insurance plans. The pharmacy benefit manager CVS Health has dropped Lantus and replaced it with Basaglar for their next year’s formulary. In their announcement, CVS Health stated that th Continue reading >>

Eli Lilly Insulin Tops Lantus In Two Tests

Eli Lilly Insulin Tops Lantus In Two Tests

Eli Lilly and Co. reported more successful late-stage trials for a unique insulin it hopes to put on the market in the next 18 months. The Lilly-developed basal, or long-lasting, insulin proved significantly more effective than the best-selling Lantus in lowering blood-sugar levels in patients in two trials, the Indianapolis drugmaker said today. The positive findings are being played up by Lilly in news releases, though the company won’t release statistical details until later. It’s rare for new bio-engineered insulins to show notably better treatment differences in head-to-head tests against the market leader. But in this case the Lilly molecule, called basal insulin peglispro, “demonstrated significantly greater reductions” in blood-sugar compared to Lantus, said Dr. David Kendall, vice president of medical affairs for Lilly Diabetes. “We actually now have seen consistent improvements in glucose control” for the Lilly insulin. “Other insulins have achieved only comparable clinical effects” versus Lantus, Kendall said. If approved for sale, the Lilly insulin would compete with Lantus, the world’s best-selling insulin, made by the French company Sanofi SA. The Lilly-sponsored trials ran for at least 26 and 52 weeks and enrolled patients with type 1 diabetes. One was a blinded trial, meaning patients didn’t know whether they were getting Lantus or the Lilly insulin. The trials showed two other health wins for the Lilly experimental product, according to Lilly. In both trials, patients had significantly lower rates of nighttime hypoglycemia, or abnormally low blood-sugar, when taking the Lilly insulin. And patients taking the Lilly insulin lost weight, while those taking Lantus gained weight. Patients taking the Lilly insulin did see small increases i Continue reading >>

Lantus Patient Information Including Side Effects

Lantus Patient Information Including Side Effects

Brand Names: Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen Generic Name: insulin glargine (Pronunciation: IN su lin AS part, IN su lin AS part PRO ta meen) What is the most important information I should know about insulin glargine (Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)? What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using insulin glargine (Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)? What is insulin glargine (Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)? Insulin glargine is a man-made form of a hormone that is produced in the body. It works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin glargine is a long-acting form of insulin that is slightly different from other forms of insulin that are not man-made. Insulin glargine is used to treat type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Insulin glargine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What are the possible side effects of insulin glargine (Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of insulin allergy: itching skin rash over the entire body, wheezing, trouble breathing, fast heart rate, sweating, or feeling like you might pass out. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is the most common side effect of insulin glargine. Symptoms include headache, hunger, weakness, sweating, tremors, irritability, trouble concentrating, rapid breathing, fast heartbeat, fainting, or seizure (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal). Carry hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar. Tell your doctor if you have itching, swelling, redness, or thickening of the skin where you inject insulin glargine. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call Continue reading >>

How To Get Insulin At A Cheaper Price

How To Get Insulin At A Cheaper Price

Insulin can be expensive. If you’re one of the 6 million Americans with diabetes relying on this main-stay treatment, you could be paying out-of-pocket costs anywhere from $120 to $400 per month, according to a 2015 New England Journal of Medicine commentary. Drugs such as Lantus (insulin glargine) and Levemir (insulin detemir) have seen significant cost increases, according to a recent trend report by pharmacy benefit manager Express Scripts. One reason for the high prices is the lack of generic options for insulin. So for now, you’re stuck having to search around to find affordable options. Where do you shop for more affordable insulin? For some people though, high drug costs can mean making difficult financial choices. Our national polls show people might cut back on groceries and paying bills to pay for their medications. To minimize your costs, consider these options: Prescription Assistance Programs If you don’t have health insurance or are without drug coverage, look into applying for a patient assistance program (PAP). Through the nonprofit NeedyMeds, you can find some programs that offer free or low-cost insulin as long as you meet the eligibility requirements. Those are usually based on your insurance status, income, and diagnosis. You might also qualify for a diagnosis-specific program that can help you save on syringes, pumps, and other diabetes supplies. Pharmacists are also a great resource and can help you find a PAP that meets your financial needs. Switch Drugs Another way to save is by asking your doctor whether there’s a lower-priced insulin that’s right for you. While “long-acting” is a more popular type of insulin, it's also more expensive, but that doesn’t necessarily mean it works better. “It’s mostly a marketing ploy,” says M Continue reading >>

Cvs Drops Sanofi's Diabetes Drugs For Biosimilars

Cvs Drops Sanofi's Diabetes Drugs For Biosimilars

PARIS (Reuters) - U.S. pharmacy benefit manager CVS will drop Sanofi’s main insulin drug Lantus from the list of medicines it reimburses on behalf of health insurers, dealing a blow to the French drugmaker’s key diabetes business. CVS said it would switch instead to Ely Lilly’s cheaper biosimilar drug Basaglar from 2017. Biosimilars are cheaper copies of protein-based biotech drugs such as Lantus, which are no longer protected by patents. They cannot be precisely replicated like conventional chemical drugs but have been shown to be equivalent in terms of efficacy and side effects. U.S. pharmacy benefit managers such as CVS help private-sector medical insurers negotiate better prices from drugmakers and also draw up so-called formularies, which are exclusive lists of drugs they reimburse for the insurers they work for. CVS, which has nearly 80 million plan members, announced on Tuesday a number of changes to its formulary, saying they would lead to significant savings. The company also said it would no longer reimburse Toujeo, Sanofi’s next-generation diabetes drug. Sanofi shares were down 1.4 percent at 1250 GMT. “Sanofi is disappointed by this decision. Healthcare professionals and patients should have a choice regarding their treatment,” a spokesman for the French group said in an emailed statement. “We will continue our ongoing discussions with other insurers,” he said, adding CVS’s announcement did not change the group’s forecasts. The patent on Lantus expired in 2015 in the United States, the world’s largest drugs market, and Sanofi hopes to revive declining diabetes sales with Toujeo, launched in March 2015. Switzerland’s Novartis and Actelion were also dealt blows by CVS’s new formulary. In a research note, Citi analysts said CVS’s new Continue reading >>

Fda Approves New Insulin Glargine Basaglar – The First “biosimilar” Insulin In The Us

Fda Approves New Insulin Glargine Basaglar – The First “biosimilar” Insulin In The Us

Twitter Summary: 1st ever “biosimilar” insulin approved in US – potential to come cheaper than other insulins, with launch in December 2016 Lilly/BI recently announced the FDA approval of its long-awaited biosimilar insulin glargine, Basaglar, for type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Basaglar is biologically similar to Sanofi’s basal insulin Lantus (insulin glargine), including the same protein sequence and a similar glucose-lowering effect. While the FDA does not call it a “biosimilar” drug for regulatory reasons, it can essentially be thought of as an alternative form of Lantus. Pricing for Basaglar is unknown at this time (more on this below), and the drug will not be launching in the US until after December 15, 2016. Why are “biosimilar” insulin options exciting? Most notably, they could potentially be offered at lower costs than brand name insulins. Basaglar has already launched in several international countries (under the brand name Abasaglar) and is typically priced at a 15%-20% discount relative to Lantus in those markets. It’s not clear yet how the discounts for Basaglar will compare in the US, and how much less patients with insurance might pay. “Generic” versions of drugs in the US typically come at a 50-80% discount to the original product. But unlike most generic drugs, biosimilar insulins are much more expensive to manufacture, so it’s unlikely they’ll see that same level of discount in the US. Indeed, Novartis launched the first “biosimilar” drug approved in the US last September (not in diabetes), which came at a 15% discount. Still, we’ve heard great optimism that biosimilar insulin glargine will help patients facing higher insulin costs. At the IDF conference in December, Dr. Matthew Riddle suggested that of all the insulins new Continue reading >>

Diabetes W/out Insurance

Diabetes W/out Insurance

Phoenix Diabetes and Endocrinology has compiled this information to help our patients manage their diabetes in the event they have lost their health insurance or have a very limited budget and cannot afford preferred therapies. Many type II diabetics can maintain good blood sugar control if they focus on diet, weight management and exercise as the primary therapy and use these cheaper medications discussed below when additional therapies are needed. Type I or insulin deficient diabetes patients will have a much harder time controlling their blood sugars with cheaper medications. Several insulin manufacturers have programs for diabetics without any health insurance to provide insulin at no charge. The forms for these programs are found at our needymeds link. For the type II diabetics: Some types of diabetes medications do not have generic alternatives. These include Byetta and Januvia as well as many of the modern insulin. These medications may need to be discontinued. Older insulins such as Novolin N and Regular human insulin work differently and will require more blood sugar monitoring to be used safely. Therefore, understand that these recommendations are based on cost considerations rather than obtaining optimal diabetes control while your financial resources are limited. Additionally, realize ignoring diabetes is not wise either. One ER visit for dehydration or infection due to poorly controlled blood sugars will be very expensive. Therefore, these recommendations are intended to help control costs, not replace needed medical care. Lab work There are many places where discounted lab work is available at less than half the cost of traditional labs. One such place is Lab Express 602-273-9000. A comprehensive metabolic panel cost $45 and hemoglobin A1c costs $65. I bel Continue reading >>

Understanding Insulin Sticker-shock

Understanding Insulin Sticker-shock

Why are some forms of insulin so expensive, and what happens if you can’t afford the price? Mary Clark, a realtor in Cincinnati, has grown accustomed recently to being the center of attention at the pharmacy. An independent contractor, Clark has had trouble finding affordable health insurance that covers the costs of the insulin she needs to control her Type 1 diabetes. Since 2012, she’s noticed the price she must pay out-of-pocket has increased steeply; it’s been a big enough leap that even the pharmacists pause in their work when filling her order. “Everyone was just stunned and they would just stand and stare at me,” Clark says. Read “Can I Use Insulin Past the Expiration Date?” She knows many other people with diabetes that are in the same situation, especially those who use long-acting insulin like Lantus. She says she can’t afford pump therapy and she has cut out all other expenses, including doctor’s visits and dental care, to keep up with the cost of insulin. “We do without everything. There will be diabetics who will go without insulin and they can’t,” Clark says. “You won’t make it.” sponsor She’s not alone in worrying about the costs of insulin, although not everyone would notice the same price spikes as Clark, says David Kliff, who owns the newsletter Diabetes Investor.com. It’s the underinsured and the uninsured who feel the brunt of it. People with good health insurance might not even notice, as health insurance companies often demand lower prices from insulin makers for their customers, Kliff says. That’s why two people with diabetes standing in line at the pharmacy might pay dramatically different prices for insulin; the difference might even be a couple hundred dollars per vial of insulin, he says. Read about a woman Continue reading >>

Lantus And Levemir: What’s The Difference?

Lantus And Levemir: What’s The Difference?

Lantus and Levemir have a lot in common. Both are basal insulin formulas, which means that they last for a long time in the body and act as background insulin, with a slow feed that mimics the constant low output of insulin produced by a healthy pancreas. Both are insulin analogues, which means that their insulin molecules are analogous to human insulin, but engineered, or recombined, with slight differences that slow their absorption. Lantus is a clear formula made with glargine, a genetically modified form of human insulin, dissolved in a special solution. Levemir is also a clear formula, but it contains dissolved detemir, a different form of genetically modified insulin. Human insulin is made of two amino acid chains, called A and B, that have two disulfide bonds between them. In glargine, one amino acid has been switched out, and two extra amino acids have been added to one end of the B chain. The modifications make glargine soluble at an acidic pH, but much less soluble at the neutral pH that’s found in the body To make Lantus, first the glargine is produced by a vat of E. coli bacteria. Then it’s purified and added to a watery solution containing a little zinc and some glycerol; a dash of hydrochloric acid is also added to make it acidic, bringing its pH down to about 4. At that degree of acidity, glargine completely dissolves into the watery solution, which is why the vial is clear. After you inject it into your subcutaneous tissue, the acidic solution is neutralized by your body to a neutral pH. Because glargine is not soluble at a neutral pH, it precipitates out into a form that’s not soluble in subcutaneous fat, and there forms a relatively insoluble depot. From that pool, or depot, of precipitated glargine in the tissues, small amounts slowly move back Continue reading >>

Insurers Heavily Restrict Diabetes Coverage In 2017

Insurers Heavily Restrict Diabetes Coverage In 2017

Dear Betics, ​ Nothing makes me madder than having to arduously fight the insurance bureaucracy to stay alive. And the NPR report I read today has my heart racing with indignant rage on behalf of diabetics everywhere who KNOW what a struggle it is to cry, beg and plead with the insurance company in an effort to coerce them into doing the very thing they’re charged with doing: keeping you alive and well. If you have diabetes, you probably (like me) burst into tears at least three times per year after ending a call with a customer service representative who insists your life-saving diabetes treatment isn’t covered by insurance. Before you continue reading, get your game face on, because this is going to piss you off. In 2017, diabetics who get their meds through CVS Caremark or Express Scripts are in for some blood boiling adjustments to diabetes (and other) drug coverage. NPR’s got the full story, and you can read it here. For my part, I’ll summarize the CVS diabetes drug denial list for 2017 (because it’s bigger than the Express Scripts list), and discuss why denying people the drugs they need to stay alive is so awful. Both companies are choosing to remove brand name drugs from their formulary and instead are choosing to cover generic versions. Fine. We’re all accustomed to that. That isn’t news. Substituting generic for brand name happens ALL the time. I’m not upset about that. Here’s what I AM upset about: the prescription insurers are choosing to replace some of your current meds with biosimilar medications (this happens from time to time with all insurers, but not to this degree). Replacing a drug with a biosimilar is NOT the same thing as replacing a brand name drug with a generic drug that has the exact same ingredients. In this particular con Continue reading >>

Recent Fda Approvals For Diabetes

Recent Fda Approvals For Diabetes

The industry trade and lobbying group Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) said in a recent report that its member companies are developing more than 180 new medicines for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes and their comorbities. But even PhRMA admits that most will never see a pharmacy shelf. It estimates that for every 5,000 to 10,000 compounds in the pipeline, only one is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Still, despite those odds, in the last six years, eight new classes of diabetes medications have joined doctors’ armamentariums to treat people with diabetes. And some of the most recently approved medications could be game-changers for the marketplace and for people’s lives and pocketbooks. Newest FDA approvals for treating diabetes Possibly the biggest potential game-changer in the diabetes medication marketplace in many years was the December 2015 FDA final approval of Eli Lilly’s Basaglar, the pharmaceutical giant’s first-ever long-lasting basal insulin. But Basaglar is hardly new. In fact, there’s a good chance you’ve used it before under another name: Lantus. Basaglar is the first FDA approval of what most consumers would regard as a “generic” insulin. But the FDA does not consider Basaglar a generic because generic medications are by definition identical copies of already approved products, and it’s not possible to make identical copies of complex molecules such as insulin. Instead, when making an insulin knock-off, the best that can be achieved is a medication that is highly similar, not identical, to the original. In most countries, this kind of medication is called a biosimilar. But due to the unique semantics of FDA regulations, the biosimilar label is reserved for copycats of medications licensed u Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine

Insulin Glargine

Insulin glargine, marketed under the names Lantus, among others, is a long-acting basal insulin analogue, given once daily to help control the blood sugar level of those with diabetes. It consists of microcrystals that slowly release insulin, giving a long duration of action of 18 to 26 hours, with a "peakless" profile (according to the insulin glargine package insert). Pharmacokinetically, it resembles basal insulin secretion of non-diabetic pancreatic beta cells. Sometimes, in type 2 diabetes and in combination with a short acting sulfonylurea (drugs which stimulate the pancreas to make more insulin), it can offer moderate control of serum glucose levels. In the absence of endogenous insulin—type 1 diabetes, depleted type 2 (in some cases) or latent autoimmune diabetes of adults in late stage—insulin glargine needs the support of fast acting insulin taken with food to reduce the effect of prandially derived glucose. Medical uses[edit] The long-acting insulin class, which includes insulin glargine, do not appear much better than neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH) insulin but have a significantly greater cost making them, as of 2010, not cost effective.[1] It is unclear if there is a difference in hypoglycemia and not enough data to determine any differences with respect to long term outcomes.[2] Mixing with other insulins[edit] Unlike some other longer-acting insulins, glargine must not be diluted or mixed with other insulin or solution in the same syringe.[3] However, this restriction has been questioned.[4] Adverse effects[edit] Cancer[edit] As of 2012 tentative evidence shows no association between insulin glargine and cancer.[5] Previous studies had raised concerns.[6] Pharmacology[edit] Mechanism of action[edit] Insulin glargine has a substitution of glycine for Continue reading >>

Lantus Vs Tresiba: The Better Long Acting Insulin For Diabetes

Lantus Vs Tresiba: The Better Long Acting Insulin For Diabetes

The judges have declared the winner, and it wasn’t even close! First, some back story in order to understand the importance of this epic fight. Why would Tresiba want to take on Lantus? Lantus has been the champion of long-acting insulin for over fifteen years. That’s right! Lantus was an amazing discovery for diabetes management: the first long-acting basal insulin. Before the year 2000, doctors did not have many types of insulin to choose from. Lantus is actually an analogue of natural human insulin. The insulin molecule was changed slightly in the lab, creating differences in the way it is absorbed. In the case of U-100 glargine (the generic name of Lantus), there is an amino acid substitution and a slight lengthening of one of the two chains that make up the insulin molecule. When Lantus is injected, this alteration increases the time over which the insulin is absorbed, giving it a longer half-life than all the insulins available previously. Fast-forward sixteen years, and Tresiba is now an excellent alternative for what doctors call basal insulin. Basal insulin is a type of insulin that lasts long periods of time and helps control blood sugars between meals and overnight. Several changes were made to slow the absorption of Tresiba, making its effect on lower blood sugar more predictable. As compared to regular insulin, Tresiba contains an amino acid deletion and a special bond with a fatty acid. When combined with zinc and phenol, degludec (the generic name of Tresiba) forms multihexamers under the skin. Once absorbed, it reversibly binds to the main protein in the blood, called albumin. The end result of these modifications is a new class of insulin referred to as “ultra-long-acting basal insulin”. Just recently, in June 2017, the results from the DEVOTE s Continue reading >>

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