diabetestalk.net

Lantus Burning At Injection Site

Buy Cheap Lantus Online | Planetdrugsdirect.com

Buy Cheap Lantus Online | Planetdrugsdirect.com

INSULIN GLARGINE (IN su lin GLAR geen) is a human-made form of insulin. This drug lowers the amount of sugar in your blood. It is a long-acting insulin that is usually given once a day. This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions. What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine? They need to know if you have any of these conditions: -episodes of low blood sugar -kidney disease -liver disease -an unusual or allergic reaction to insulin, metacresol, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives -pregnant or trying to get pregnant -breast-feeding This medicine is for injection under the skin. Use this medicine at the same time each day. Use exactly as directed. This insulin should never be mixed in the same syringe with other insulins before injection. Do not vigorously shake before use. You will be taught how to use this medicine and how to adjust doses for activities and illness. Do not use more insulin than prescribed. Always check the appearance of your insulin before using it. This medicine should be clear and colorless like water. Do not use it if it is cloudy, thickened, colored, or has solid particles in it. It is important that you put your used needles and syringes in a special sharps container. Do not put them in a trash can. If you do not have a sharps container, call your pharmacist or healthcare provider to get one. Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed. Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others. -other medicines for diabetes Many medications may caus Continue reading >>

Compare Prandin Vs Lantus - Iodine.com

Compare Prandin Vs Lantus - Iodine.com

Head-to-head comparisons of medication uses, side effects, ratings, and more. Prandin (repaglinide) works quickly to lower blood sugar, especially during mealtimes. However, it can cause hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) if you are not consistent with your diet and exercise schedule. Lantus (insulin glargine) is an effective, long-acting insulin that provides all-day blood sugar control, but it can cause low blood sugar levels, so be sure to have a source of sugar nearby. 3.7/ 5 average rating with 584 reviewsforLantus Quickly and effectively lowers blood sugar during meal times. Less likely to cause hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) than Starlix (nateglinide). Good first-choice if you cannot tolerate metformin or add-on therapy if your blood sugars are not controlled on metformin alone. Insulin is one of the most effective blood sugar-lowering medication and can lower your A1c (average blood sugar over time) by up to 2-3%. Lantus (insulin glargine) is a long-lasting insulin that provides consistent, all-day sugar control with just once or twice daily dosing. Dose can be easily adjusted to make a customized regimen that's tailored to your body's needs. Lantus (insulin glargine) can be used with liver or kidney problems. May cause hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Can frequently interfere with how other medicines work. Not a good choice if you have poor kidney function, liver problems, or younger than 18 years old. You have to check your blood sugar regularly to assure your medications are working. You may gain some weight, around 4-6 pounds. You have to maintain a consistent schedule to avoid low blood sugar episodes. Dramatic changes in weight or meal patterns will require dose adjustments. Continue reading >>

Lumps And Bumps From Insulin Therapy

Lumps And Bumps From Insulin Therapy

What are these lumps and bumps at my injection sites? Lumps and bumps from insulin are called lipohypertrophy. This is a medical word for a lump under the skin from an accumulation of fat at the site of many insulin injections. Scar tissue may also develop at the sites. Why does this happen? This happens due to the action of insulin on the fat cells. Insulin can actually cause fat cells to increase in size. It is generally seen when one uses the same area for insulin injection or infusion. It happens most often in areas that are easiest to inject insulin or place infusion sets-on both sides of the belly button and on the sides of the thighs. What happens when you have this? You may notice a thickening of this skin and areas of lumps and bumps. This was more evident with the older preparations of insulin where the skin changes were more evident. The changes may be very subtle with the newer insulin analogs so it is important to actually feel the areas that you use to inject or infuse insulin. You want to firmly stroke the areas in a sweeping motion to feel for any lumps. Does it affect your glucose control? Infusing insulin into areas of lipohypertrophy can affect your glucose control. Insulin is not always well-absorbed in these areas. You may find that your glucose control is not what you expect it to be. The more damaged the area is the more likely it is that glucose control will be affected. Sometimes the areas of lipohypertrophy have damaged nerve endings and you don’t feel your infusion set going it at all. This is clearly a sign of a damaged area. How is it prevented? Rotate your infusion sites! It is important to use different sites to prevent lipohypertrophy. You might want to use a calendar or body map to be sure that you are rotating you sites frequently. Av Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine Injection

Insulin Glargine Injection

What is this medicine? INSULIN GLARGINE (IN su lin GLAR geen) is a human-made form of insulin. This drug lowers the amount of sugar in your blood. It is a long-acting insulin that is usually given once a day. This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions. How should I use this medicine? This medicine is for injection under the skin. Use exactly as directed. It is important to follow the directions given to you by your health care professional or doctor. You will be taught how to use this medicine and how to adjust doses for activities and illness. You may take this medicine at any time of the day but you must take it at the same time everyday. Do not use more insulin than prescribed. Do not use more or less often than prescribed. Always check the appearance of your insulin before using it. This medicine should be clear and colorless like water. Do not use it if it is cloudy, thickened, colored, or has solid particles in it. Do not mix this medicine with any other insulin or diluent. It is important that you put your used needles and syringes in a special sharps container. Do not put them in a trash can. If you do not have a sharps container, call your pharmacist or healthcare provider to get one. Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed. Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once. NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others. What if I miss a dose? It is important not to miss a dose. Your health care professional or doctor should discuss a plan for missed doses with you. If you do miss a dose, follow their plan. Do not take double doses Continue reading >>

Using Tresiba® Flextouch®

Using Tresiba® Flextouch®

Do not take Tresiba® if you: are having an episode of low blood sugar are allergic to Tresiba® or any of the ingredients in Tresiba® Before taking Tresiba®, tell your health care provider about all your medical conditions, including if you are: pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding taking new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, or herbal supplements Talk to your health care provider about low blood sugar and how to manage it. Do not take Tresiba® if you: are having an episode of low blood sugar are allergic to Tresiba® or any of the ingredients in Tresiba® Before taking Tresiba®, tell your health care provider about all your medical conditions, including if you are: pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding taking new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, or herbal supplements Talk to your health care provider about low blood sugar and how to manage it. Read the Instructions for Use and take Tresiba® exactly as your health care provider tells you to Do not do any conversion of your dose. The dose counter always shows the selected dose in units Know the type and strength of insulin you take. Do not change the type of insulin you take unless your health care provider tells you to Adults - If you miss or are delayed in taking your dose of Tresiba®: Take your dose as soon as you remember, then continue with your regular dosing schedule Make sure there are at least 8 hours between doses If children miss a dose of Tresiba®: Call the healthcare provider for information and instructions about checking blood sugar levels more often until the next scheduled dose of Tresiba® Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should che Continue reading >>

How To Give A Painless Injection

How To Give A Painless Injection

If you have Type 2 diabetes, sooner or later you may require insulin injections, either temporarily (as during infections) or permanently. This is nothing to be afraid of, even though many people with long-standing Type 2 diabetes literally spend years worrying about it. I usually teach all my patients how to inject themselves at our first or second meeting, before there’s any urgency. Once they give themselves a sample injection of sterile saline (salt water), they find out how easy and painless it can be, and they are spared years of anxiety. If you’re anxious about injections, after you read this section, please ask your physician or diabetes educator to allow you to try a self-administered injection. Insulin is usually injected subcutaneously This means Into a layer of fat under the skin The regions of the body that usually contain appropriate deposits of fat are illustrated in Figure 1 Examine your body to see if you have enough fat at the illustrated sites to comfortably grab a big hunk between your thumb and first finger. Fig 1 Potential sites for subcutaneous injections. To show you how painless a shot can be, your teacher should give himself or herself a shot and leave the syringe dangling in place, illustrating that no pain is felt Your teacher should next give you a shot of saline to prove the point. Now it’s time for you to give yourself an injection, using a syringe that’s been partly filled for you with about 5 “units” of saline. 1. With your “nonshooting” hand, grab as big a chunk of skin plus underlying fat as you can hold comfortably. If you have a nice roll of fat around your waist, use this site. If not, select another site from those illustrated in Figure 1 Nearly everyone has enough subcutaneous buttocks fat to inject there without g Continue reading >>

Help ! Any Thoughts Please.

Help ! Any Thoughts Please.

I have been a diagnosed diabetic on insulin for over 2 years now, however recently i have been finding it extremly difficult to control my Blood Glucose Levels. I have been becoming extremely sensitive to my insulin, having to experiment, and trial and error with doses, ( Quick activing - Novorapid, Humulin S, Humalog. Background - Insulatard, Levemir). The reaction i am getting at the moment is not so much sensitive but a burning feeling under the skin, which has become agonising. I am told this is not common. If anyone should possibly know of a reason for this please let me know, i am at a loss at the moment. Any ideas are welcome, i would try anything. Thank you. I haven't heard of this happening to the levels you have described unfortunately...................however I am aware that the insulin Levemir is slightly acidic and can cause allergic reaction and some time burning quite often in a lot of people..... This wouldn't explain your reaction to the analogue insulin's like Novorapid etc...............as these insulin's have been made in a lab the problem may lie with that fact, maybe some animal insulin may solve your problems............. I hope you find some answers............. James Paget University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust 586 posts I've had a rare touch of this before but more in the form of itchiness after injecting. This was while I was on Lantus... if I remember correctly (I last experienced it years ago). Not had it with Levemir. I believe it was caused by how or where I injected if I'm honest considering it has not been a reoccurring problem for me. How well do you circulate your injection sites? Whatever the cause, I hope this issue is resolved for you soon. I'm guessing whatever is causing it is effecting your insulin absorption rate if your su Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine Recombinant Related Pain In Extremity

Insulin Glargine Recombinant Related Pain In Extremity

lantus solostar related pain in extremity insulin glargine recombinant related pain in extremity toujeo solostar related pain in extremity * Warning: The facts and figures contained in these reports are accurate to the best of our capability; however, our metrics are only meant to augment your medical knowledge, and should never be used as the sole basis for selecting a new medication. As with any medical decision, be sure to work with your doctor to ensure the best choices are made for your condition. * About FAERS: The FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) is used by FDA for activities such as looking for new safety concerns that might be related to a marketed product, evaluating a manufacturer's compliance to reporting regulations and responding to outside requests for information. Reporting of adverse events is a voluntary process, and not every report is sent to FDA and entered into FAERS. The FAERS database may contain duplicate reports, the report quality is variable, and many factors may influence reporting (e.g., media attention, length of time a drug is marketed, market share). For these reasons, FAERS case reports cannot be used to calculate incidence or estimates of risk for a particular product or compare risks between products. Continue reading >>

Getting Up To Speed On New Injection Guidelines (part 2)

Getting Up To Speed On New Injection Guidelines (part 2)

Last week I mentioned that there are new insulin injection guidelines (as of 2010) that came out of a workshop called TITAN. These guidelines are important because they aim to achieve clarity about and consistency in how people with diabetes inject their insulin. Sadly, however, I suspect that not many health-care professionals, let alone people with diabetes, are familiar with these guidelines. As a person with diabetes who injects insulin (or will be injecting insulin in the future), you need to rely on your physician or diabetes educator to use the proper technique for everything diabetes-related: blood glucose monitoring, injecting insulin, counting carbs, etc. But the reality is that this doesn’t always happen, and that means that YOU need to be updated and familiar with the latest and greatest. This week, I’ll share some of the key recommendations to come out of this TITAN workshop. Hopefully none of these are too surprising. If they are, talk to your doctor or educator. You can actually help them get up to speed by mentioning these guidelines. So, here’s what to know: Shorter pen needles are fine. Pen needles come in standard lengths (8 millimeter, or mm, and 12.7 mm). But there’s no real reason to use these length needles specifically. Any adult, regardless of body size can use a shorter needle, meaning a 4-, 5-, or 6-mm needle. If you’re worried that you carry extra weight and that the needle won’t be long enough, don’t. Skin thickness is pretty much the same among all adults, regardless of body fat, body weight, or gender. Remember that the needle injects through the skin layer, and shouldn’t be injecting into muscle. And studies back this up. There’s no evidence that shorter needle use among heavier folks causes insulin leakage, scar tissue Continue reading >>

Lantus Solostar Pen - Medschat

Lantus Solostar Pen - Medschat

Is it possible for lantus to be burning during injection because of A small amount of insulin being left on the tip of the needle after priming the pen? The burn doesn't happen all the, time just sometimes. Lantus has been a great medicine and works wonderfully for me I'm just wondering what causes the burning that I sometimes get during injection? I always use room tempature lantus so that's not an issue. I Know its slightly acidic so maybe that's the cause. What do you think? As far as I know, it's just something that happens with injections, sometimes. My ex-husband is diabetic and he has to occasional sting when using Lantus, as well as other insulin. There really isn't much you can do about it. Insulin prescriptions, of any type, commonly warn about possible injection site reactions or irritation, so it is completely normal. Very glad to hear that it is working so well for you, though. I'm assuming this was also posted by Lynette, whom I answered and already responded on the other post. I get a stinging,& burning feeling when I use my Lantus pen every night. Can you tell me what causes this? For those that feel their Teva brand generic Adderall by Actavis Elizabeth aren't working or making them feel sick, ... 50replies Get notified when a reply is posted here. Discussion Thread Guidelines:Any participation in the discussion threads signifies your agreement with the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy .(1) Act civilized and be respectful towards others. No profanity, vulgarity or lewd / suggestive content is allowed.(2) Posts encouraging, facilitating, or seeking advice about the abuse of medications or other substances are prohibited.(3) Personal contact information (such as telephone numbers, email addresses, etc) is not allowed to appear on our discussion threads.(4 Continue reading >>

Krames Online - Insulin Glargine Injection

Krames Online - Insulin Glargine Injection

INSULIN GLARGINE (IN su lin GLAR geen) is a human-made form of insulin. This drug lowers the amount of sugar in your blood. It is a long-acting insulin that is usually given once a day. This medicine is for injection under the skin. Use this medicine at the same time each day. Use exactly as directed. This insulin should never be mixed in the same syringe with other insulins before injection. Do not vigorously shake before use. You will be taught how to use this medicine and how to adjust doses for activities and illness. Do not use more insulin than prescribed. Always check the appearance of your insulin before using it. This medicine should be clear and colorless like water. Do not use it if it is cloudy, thickened, colored, or has solid particles in it. If you use an insulin pen, be sure to take off the outer needle cover before using the dose. It is important that you put your used needles and syringes in a special sharps container. Do not put them in a trash can. If you do not have a sharps container, call your pharmacist or healthcare provider to get one. Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed. What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine? Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible: allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue signs and symptoms of high blood sugar such as dizziness, dry mouth, dry skin, fruity breath, nausea, stomach pain, increased hunger or thirst, increased urination signs and symptoms of low blood sugar such as feeling anxious, confusion, dizziness, increased hunger, unusually weak or tired, sweating, shakiness, cold, irritable, headache, blurred vision, fast heartb Continue reading >>

Lantus Insulin Side Effects Linked To Risk Of Cancer: Study

Lantus Insulin Side Effects Linked To Risk Of Cancer: Study

New research suggests that side effects of Lantus, an artificial form of insulin manufactured by Sanofi-Aventis for diabetes, may increase the risk of developing cancer. The report, published in the medical journal Diabetologia, found that in studies in Germany and Sweden, there was an increase in the incidence of cancer among diabetics using Lantus insulin. However, editors of the journal and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) caution that the results are inconclusive and that more in-depth studies need to be done about the potential Lantus cancer risk. Lantus (glargine) is an injection taken once per day, which slowly releases insulin into the blood over time. It has the second largest share of the diabetic drug treatment market and brought in $3.45 billion in worldwide sales last year. The drug was approved by FDA for diabetes treatment in 2000. The new report looked at data from an insurance database of 127,000 German insulin-users and found that diabetics taking low doses of Lantus over a year and a half had a 9% higher chance of developing cancer than people taking traditional human insulin treatments. When patients took higher doses of Lantus, the increased risk of being diagnosed with cancer jumped to 31% over those taking other insulin treatments. After getting the results from the German data, researchers looked at databases in the U.K., Sweden and Scotland. The Swedish data showed a doubling of the risk of breast cancer, but the U.K. and Scotland studies showed no statistically significant increase connecting Lantus to cancer, prompting Diabetologia’s editors to urge caution at how the results of the studies are interpreted. Professor Edwin Gale, editor of Diabetologia, and Professor Ulf Smith, president of EASD noted in an editorial Continue reading >>

Bydureon And Injection Site Nodule - Suspected Cause - Reports Of Side Effects

Bydureon And Injection Site Nodule - Suspected Cause - Reports Of Side Effects

Index of reports > Cases with Injection Site Nodule (23) Below is the selection of side effect reports (a.k.a. adverse event reports) related to Bydureon (Exenatide) where reactions include injection site nodule. The selected reports were submitted to the FDA during the sample period of about a year. Reported by a consumer/non-health professional from Germany on 2012-08-14 Reactions: Glycosylated Haemoglobin Increased, Injection Site Inflammation, Injection Site Haemorrhage, Injection Site Abscess, Injection Site Pain, Injection Site Nodule Adverse event resulted in: hospitalization Other drugs received by patient: Loratadine; Atacand; Metformin HCL Reported by a physician from United States on 2012-08-13 Reactions: Injection Site Erythema, Injection Site Urticaria, Injection Site Nodule, Injection Site Pruritus Reported by a consumer/non-health professional from United States on 2012-08-03 Patient: female, weighing 79.4 kg (174.6 pounds) Reactions: Pharyngeal Oedema, Vomiting, Malaise, Nausea, Chills, Asthenia, Injection Site Nodule Other drugs received by patient: Januvia; Januvia; Glimepiride Reported by a consumer/non-health professional from United States on 2012-07-30 Reactions: Injection Site Erythema, Injection Site Haematoma, External Ear Cellulitis, Pyrexia, Injection Site Pruritus, Injection Site Nodule Reported by a consumer/non-health professional from United States on 2012-07-16 Reactions: Weight Decreased, Nausea, Pruritus Generalised, Palpitations, Feeling Jittery, Heart Rate Increased, Feeling Abnormal, Injection Site Nodule, Decreased Appetite Other drugs received by patient: Actos; Actos Reported by a physician from United States on 2012-07-11 Patient: female, weighing 112.9 kg (248.4 pounds) Reactions: LIP Swelling, Swelling Face, Pruritus, Lymphade Continue reading >>

Lantus Solution For Injection Drug Information, Side Effects, Faqs

Lantus Solution For Injection Drug Information, Side Effects, Faqs

-an unusual or allergic reaction to insulin, metacresol, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives This medicine is for injection under the skin. Use this medicine at the same time each day. Use exactly as directed. This insulin should never be mixed in the same syringe with other insulins before injection. Do not vigorously shake before use. You will be taught how to use this medicine and how to adjust doses for activities and illness. Do not use more insulin than prescribed. Always check the appearance of your insulin before using it. This medicine should be clear and colorless like water. Do not use it if it is cloudy, thickened, colored, or has solid particles in it. If you use an insulin pen, be sure to take off the outer needle cover before using the dose. It is important that you put your used needles and syringes in a special sharps container. Do not put them in a trash can. If you do not have a sharps container, call your pharmacist or healthcare provider to get one. Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed. It is important not to miss a dose. Your health care professional or doctor should discuss a plan for missed doses with you. If you do miss a dose, follow their plan. Do not take double doses. Visit your health care professional or doctor for regular checks on your progress. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how this medicine affects you. Alcohol may interfere with the effect of this medicine. Avoid alcoholic drinks. A test called the HbA1C (A1C) will be monitored. This is a simple blood test. It measures your blood sugar control over the last 2 to 3 months. You will receive this test every 3 to 6 months. Learn how to check your blood sugar Continue reading >>

Lantus: Side Effects, Reviews By Patients - Askapatient.com

Lantus: Side Effects, Reviews By Patients - Askapatient.com

Pain everywhere. Hands, fingers, shoulder, neck, knee etc.. Weight gain. I did not realize the effects this injection had on me until I went camping over the 7/4/2018 holiday and forgot my Lantus. My pants were getting looser and I my appetite was less. When I got home after about 5 or 6 days not taking the drug, I was around 10-15 pounds lighter at 212. I say around because I was weighing myself regularly. Today, 4 days later, I was at 205.8 this am, my pain is nearly gone but still a little in the hands. I also seem to have some increased low back pain, Last time, couple weeks ago, I was weighed at the Dr office at 228. occasional fits of excessive hunger - have been prepared for this by doctor and dieticians and have a course of action planned out; have used for about 5 years; have lost about 60 lbs and then have stayed at weight; Frustrated at times with quality control of pens - some jam; others appear not to be at the same solution level - and so make sure I have back up pens ready to warm up. I have worked with dieticians to remove everything from my house that I should not eat - I know when I've comforted myself with food during stress and when not to blame the Lantus. started at 12 units x 3 days went to 13units x3 days. Stopped taking on third 13 unit day(Supposed to increase to 14units) Blood sugar persistently went up. Before taking was in 2 to 300 range when I stopped it was over 600. Sr and team still insist that plants can't increase blood sugar because it is insulin. I will not take any more. Went back to Actos. Sill having spikes over 600. I have stage 4 kidney failure and am having great difficulty finding high protein food not full of salt. Any suggestions on a good drug to use? Easily go hypoglyemic if too active, severe joint pain all over body, it Continue reading >>

More in diabetes