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Lantus A1c Reduction

A1c Reductions

A1c Reductions

In 7 out of 7 trials vs insulin glargine U-100 Tresiba successfully achieved noninferiority in A1C reduction1 Insulin glargine U-100 + metformin DPP-4: Insulin glargine U-100 + metformin DPP-4: Insulin glargine U-100 + metformin DPP-4 Insulin glargine U-100 + metformin DPP-4 At week 52, the difference in A1C reduction from baseline for Tresiba and insulin glargine U-100: At week 26, the difference in A1C reduction from baseline for Tresiba U-200 and insulin glargine U-100: The prespecified noninferiority margin (0.4%) was met in all 7 clinical trials A1C results were similar between Tresiba and insulin glargine U-100 in the other 4 clinical trials Insulin glargine U-100 + metformin DPP-4: Insulin glargine U-100 + metformin DPP-4: Insulin glargine U-100 + metformin DPP-4 Insulin glargine U-100 + metformin DPP-4 No clinically important differences in risk of hypoglycemia between Tresiba and basal insulin comparators were observed in these clinical trials conducted in adult patients. Percent of patients who experienced at least 1 episode of hypoglycemia1 Incidence rates in all type 2 diabetes adult trials (range) 0% to 4.5% for severe hypoglycemiaa and 28.5% to 80.9% for Novo Nordiskdefined hypoglycemiab ( OADs or a basal-bolus regimen) Incidence rates in all type 1 diabetes adult trials (range) 10.4% to 12.7% for severe hypoglycemiaa and 93.0% to 99.4% for Novo Nordiskdefined hypoglycemiab (basal-bolus regimen) aSevere hypoglycemia: an event requiring assistance of another person to actively administer carbohydrate, glucagon, or other resuscitative actions. bNovo Nordiskdefined hypoglycemia: a severe hypoglycemia event or an event where laboratory or self-measured glucose calibrated to plasma was <56 mg/dL or where whole blood glucose was <50 mg/dL (ie, with or without t Continue reading >>

How To Lower Your A1c For Insulin Users | Diabetic Connect

How To Lower Your A1c For Insulin Users | Diabetic Connect

There is no magic formula for achieving a "perfect A1c" or super food that will fix blood sugar levels in a flash. The most important thing to remember is that it takes daily dedication and sometimes several months before you will see any significant improvements in your A1c level. Because your A1c results are a reflection of your blood glucose readings over the past three months, ultimately getting a lower A1c is all about keeping your blood glucose under control daily. Eating a healthy diet and exercising regularly are key to keeping your blood sugar under control, but some of these tips may also help you keep your A1c results on target. Take mealtime insulin before eating. The goal of mealtime insulin is to lower your blood glucose level just as your food is raising it so that your numbers dont spike. A study done by the Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes and Diabetes Technology and Therapeutics found that taking bolus (or rapid-acting) insulin 20 minutes prior to a meal resulted in significantly better glucose control than when insulin was given immediately before a meal or 20 minutes after a meal. It may take a little bit of experimenting to find the exact amount of time before a meal that works best for taking your insulin, but timing bolus insulin correctly may greatly help you increase your blood glucose control. Be careful that while you take your mealtime insulin before you eat not to take insulin too long before eating as this can result in hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Also, if your pre-meal blood sugar test is low, you should not give insulin before beginning your meal as you may experience a dangerously low blood sugar. Fine tune basal (or long-action) insulin. Where bolus insulin is meant to counteract blood glucose rises from meals, basal insulin kee Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine Lixisenatide Can Help Lower A1c | Soliqua 100/33 (insulin Glargine & Lixisenatide Injection) 100 Units/ml & 33 Mcg/ml

Insulin Glargine Lixisenatide Can Help Lower A1c | Soliqua 100/33 (insulin Glargine & Lixisenatide Injection) 100 Units/ml & 33 Mcg/ml

DESIGNED TO EVALUATE THE EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF SOLIQUA 100/33 VS LANTUS A total of 736 patients with T2DM participated in a randomized, 30-week, open-label, multicenter study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of SOLIQUA 100/33 compared to Lantus.1 Adult patients with T2DM, mean age 60 years, uncontrolled on a stable daily basal insulin dose 1 or 2 oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) for 6 months (A1C of 7.5%-10%; fasting plasma glucose [FPG] 180 mg/dL) were screened Eligible patients (n=1018) were enrolled in a 6-week run-in period where they remained on or were switched to Lantus if on another basal insulin and had their dose titrated/stabilized while continuing on metformin (if previously taken). Any other OADs were discontinued Patients inadequately controlled at the end of the run-in period (n=736; A1C between 7% and 10%; FPG 140 mg/dL) and on an insulin glargine dose of 20-50 Units (mean dose of 35 Units) were randomized to SOLIQUA 100/33 (n=367) or Lantus (n=369) for SOLIQUA 100/33 (insulin glargine and lixisenatide injection) 100Units/mL and 33 mcg/mL In patients with known hypersensitivity to the active substance(s) or to any of the product components. Anaphylaxis and Serious Hypersensitivity Reactions: In clinical trials of lixisenatide, there have been cases of anaphylaxis and other serious hypersensitivity reactions including angioedema. Severe, life-threatening, generalized allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis and angioedema, can occur with insulins, including insulin glargine. If hypersensitivity reactions occur, discontinue SOLIQUA100/33. Use caution in patients with a history of anaphylaxis or angioedema with another GLP-1 RA because it is unknown whether such patients will be predisposed to anaphylaxis. Pancreatitis: Acute pancreatitis, including fat Continue reading >>

Experiment With My Lantus

Experiment With My Lantus

I was dxd in April, 2026 as T2 with an A1c of 11.5 and a FBG of 400. Since then, I've reduced my average daily carb load to about 100 g per day and lost 30 pounds. My two A1c readings since my dx have been 6.2 and 6.1. I would like to lose another 30 pounds and get my A1c below 6. When I was dxd, the doctor put me on 38 U Lantus nightly and this dosage has remained unchanged. I'm NOT taking any other diabetes meds. On two occasions since dx, I've forgotten to take my Lantus and my numbers were within range the next day. This leads me and my CDE to believe that I may be able to reduce my Lantus dosage or perhaps go off it altogether. I would like to go off Lantus because of the expense and because I would like to lose more weight. I brought this up with my Dr and he said that we would reassess my Lantus after my next A1c in March. He's already taken me off two meds for cholesterol. I wanted to bring him some more data on which to base a decision, so I deliberately skipped my Lantus for two consecutive nights. Here's my bedtime and waking BG readings for the two days that I skipped my Lantus and a few days before. I don't see a big difference in my FBG on the two days after I didn't take Lantus vs the days after I did take the basal insulin. I'll repeat this experiment next month. Any thoughts? Dx: Type 2 in 04/2016; Diet induced oxalate kidney stones in 12/2016 A1c: 6.9 in 2/2018; 6.1 in 7/2017; 6.0 in 2/2017; 6.1 in 11/2016; 6.2 in 08/2016; 11.5 in 04/2016 D.D. Family Getting much harder to control It is possible it is not doing or lot or maybe it is. How are your two hour pp readings are they about the same as without the Lantus. That would never work for me as I have tried it, truly I have to have insulin each day and meal. Yes, that is an unexpected result. I do not Continue reading >>

Comparable A1c Reduction

Comparable A1c Reduction

BASAGLAR demonstrated noninferiority to Lantus® (insulin glargine injection) products (approved in the US or outside the US) as measured by A1C reduction in adult patients with type 2 diabetes1,4 Type 2 diabetes: change in A1C from baseline at 24 weeks *Three patients randomized to BASAGLAR did not receive study drug and were not included in the full analysis set. Observed A1C data at 24 weeks were available from 331 (88%) and 329 (87%) patients randomized to the BASAGLAR and Lantus products (approved in the US or outside the US) groups, respectively. †Approved in the US or outside the US. CI=confidence interval; OAMs=oral anti-diabetic medications. A comparable percentage of adult patients with type 2 diabetes achieved A1C <7% at 24 weeks1,4* *Secondary endpoint. †Full analysis set; n values reflect maximum sample size. ‡Approved in the US or outside the US. OAMs=oral anti-diabetic medications. Trial design: 24-week phase 3, randomized, double-blind trial of 756 adult patients with type 2 diabetes who were either insulin-naive and failed to achieve adequate glycemic control on at least 2 OAMs, or were already on Lantus products (approved in the US or outside the US) along with 2 or more OAMs with adequate or inadequate glycemic control. The primary endpoint was noninferiority of BASAGLAR to Lantus products (approved in the US or outside the US) as measured by change in A1C from baseline at 24 weeks.1,4 The starting dose for all insulin-naive patients was 10 units/day, while patients entering the study on Lantus products (approved in the US or outside the US) were randomized to either BASAGLAR or Lantus products (approved in the US or outside the US) at a dose equivalent to their prestudy Lantus products (approved in the US or outside the US) dose. BASAGLAR and L Continue reading >>

Insulin Degludec Versus Insulin Glargine In Insulin-naive Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin Degludec Versus Insulin Glargine In Insulin-naive Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

OBJECTIVE To compare ultra-long-acting insulin degludec with glargine for efficacy and safety in insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In this 1-year, parallel-group, randomized, open-label, treat-to-target trial, adults with type 2 diabetes with A1C of 7−10% taking OADs were randomized 3:1 to receive once daily degludec or glargine, both with metformin. Insulin was titrated to achieve prebreakfast plasma glucose (PG) of 3.9−4.9 mmol/L. The primary end point was confirmation of noninferiority of degludec to glargine in A1C reduction after 52 weeks in an intent-to-treat analysis. RESULTS In all, 1,030 participants (mean age 59 years; baseline A1C 8.2%) were randomized (degludec 773, glargine 257). Reduction in A1C with degludec was similar (noninferior) to that with glargine (1.06 vs. 1.19%), with an estimated treatment difference of degludec to glargine of 0.09% (95% CI −0.04 to 0.22). Overall rates of confirmed hypoglycemia (PG <3.1 mmol/L or severe episodes requiring assistance) were similar, with degludec and glargine at 1.52 versus 1.85 episodes/patient-year of exposure (PYE). There were few episodes of nocturnal confirmed hypoglycemia in the overall population, and these occurred at a lower rate with degludec versus glargine (0.25 vs. 0.39 episodes/PYE; P = 0.038). Similar percentages of patients in both groups achieved A1C levels <7% without hypoglycemia. End-of-trial mean daily insulin doses were 0.59 and 0.60 units/kg for degludec and glargine, respectively. Adverse event rates were similar. CONCLUSIONS Insulins degludec and glargine administered once daily in combination with OADs provided similar long-term glycemic control in insulin-naive patients with type 2 Continue reading >>

Interactive Dosing Calculator

Interactive Dosing Calculator

Lantus® is a long-acting insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Lantus® should be administered once a day at the same time every day. Limitations of Use: Lantus® is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Contraindications Lantus® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or one of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Insulin pens, needles, or syringes must never be shared between patients. Do NOT reuse needles. Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Modify insulin regimen cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment in concomitant oral antidiabetic treatment. Do not dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. If mixed or diluted, the solution may become cloudy, and the onset of action/time to peak effect may be altered in an unpredictable manner. Do not administer Lantus® via an insulin pump or intravenously because severe hypoglycemia can occur. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin therapy, including Lantus®, and may be life-threatening. Medication errors, such as accidental mix-ups between basal insulin products and other insulins, particularly rapid-acting insulins, have been reported. Patients should be instructed to always verify the insulin label before each injection. Severe life-threatening, generalized allergy, including anaphylaxis, can occur. Discontinue Lantus®, treat and monitor until symptoms resolve. A reduction in the Lantus® dose may be re Continue reading >>

Adding Lantus To Oral Antidiabetic Drug Therapy Further Reduced Blood Sugar In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes - Sep 20, 2010

Adding Lantus To Oral Antidiabetic Drug Therapy Further Reduced Blood Sugar In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes - Sep 20, 2010

Adding Lantus to Oral Antidiabetic Drug Therapy Further Reduced Blood Sugar in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes - Findings Presented at European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) 46th Annual Meeting - PARIS, Sept. 20 / PRNewswire-FirstCall / -- Sanofi-aventis (EURONEXT: SAN and NYSE: SNY) announced today results of two studies presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) 46th Annual Meeting in Stockholm, Sweden. The first pooled analysis using patient-level data from randomized clinical trials demonstrated that adding Lantus (insulin glargine [rDNA] injection) to patients with type 2 diabetes, uncontrolled on oral antidiabetic drug therapy (OADs), was associated with a greater reduction in A1C levels and lower incidence of any hypoglycemia versus all comparators (OADs, NPH, lispro, premix). In the second pooled analysis of clinical studies, "patients with type 2 diabetes, who used Lantus as monotherapy or added it to one baseline oral antidiabetic agent, demonstrated a greater reduction in A1C with lower risk of hypoglycemia than those taking two OADs, with a most significant reduction when Lantus was added to metformin alone versus other OADs [sulfonylurea alone or sulfonylurea plus metformin]," said Dr. Jack Leahy of the University of Vermont College of Medicine and principal investigator of one of the studies. Better Efficacy and Goal Attainment Demonstrated with Insulin Glargine versus All Comparators(1) "Efficacy and Goal Attainment with Insulin Glargine vs Comparators" [presentation number 976]: This pooled analysis looked at nine clinical studies where insulin-nave patients with type 2 diabetes uncontrolled on OADs were randomized to add Lantus (n=1,462) or comparators (OADs, NPH, lispro or premix; n=1,476) to their treatment re Continue reading >>

Xultophy Beats Out Lantus In Major Clinical Trial

Xultophy Beats Out Lantus In Major Clinical Trial

Twitter Summary: In phase 3 trial for #type 2 #diabetes, Xultophy beats out Lantus with superior A1c reduction, weight benefits, less nocturnal #hypoglycmia One of the biggest drug highlights at the 2015 ADA Scientific Sessions was a compelling presentation by diaTribe scientific Advisory Board member Dr. John Buse on brand new phase 3 clinical trial data comparing Xultophy (a fixed dose combination pen of liraglutide, a GLP-1 agonist, and insulin degludec, a long acting insulin, taken as a single injection) to Lantus (a long acting insulin) for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The results of the 26-week study were very impressive: in the Xultophy arm of the trial, participants reduced their A1c by 1.8% (from 8.4% to 6.6%) from the start of the trial. This is compared to those who remained on Lantus, who experienced an average A1c reduction of 1.1% (from 8.2% to 7.1%). Clearly, in this trial there was a lot of room to improve A1c, and Xultophy was able to achieve a bigger reduction. We are always glad to see trials that have high baseline A1cs – in the “real world,” many patients who need a great deal of help have higher A1cs, and it is important that these trials reflect what will help this group in particular. Excitingly, there was more good news for Xultophy. Those on Xultophy on average lost about three pounds, compared to an average weight gain of four pounds seen with those on Lantus. Xultophy also caused 57% fewer episodes of confirmed hypoglycemia, as well as an 83% reduction in nocturnal hypoglycemic events. So what is the downside? Because it contains a GLP-1 agonist, Xultophy caused more nausea than Lantus did. That said, we were pretty impressed with the relatively low nausea rates – they were, in fact, lower than have been seen with standalone GLP- Continue reading >>

Soliqua Shows Promise Lowering Hemoglobin A1c Levels In Type 2 Diabetes

Soliqua Shows Promise Lowering Hemoglobin A1c Levels In Type 2 Diabetes

Findings presented at ADA conference highlight effiacy of insulin glargine/lixisenatide combination. A new analysis has shown that insulin glargine 100 Units/mL and lixisenatide 33 mcg/mL in combination lowered hemoglobin A1C levels by 1.09% to 2.41% after 30 weeks of treatment in a population of adult patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) who had been previously treated with 15 to 40 units of basal insulin daily. The research was presented yesterday in a poster session at the American Diabetes Association (ADA)’s 77th Scientific Sessions, which are being held in San Diego June 8 to 13. Among the post-hoc analysis of data from the LixiLan-L Phase 3 study were that all subgroups treated with the insulin glargine/lixisenatide combination (Soliqua/Sanofi) achieved a mean A1C below 7% after the 30-week treatment period. The trial grouped the participants by A1C level at screening. “Lowering elevated HbA1c is an important treatment goal in people with diabetes,” Riccardo Perfetti, vice president, head of Global Medical Affairs Diabetes for Sanofi, said in a news release distributed after the presentation. “This analysis demonstrated the substantial blood sugar lowering effect that can be achieved with Soliqua 100/33, and also its potential to help adults reach HbA1c levels below 7%, which is recommended as a treatment goal by bodies such as the American Diabetes Association for many adults with diabetes.” The ADA, in a supplement to its January 2017 issue of Diabetes Care, published recommendations that “A reasonable A1C goal for many nonpregnant adults is <7% (53 mmol/mol).” The LixiLan-L trial compared the effectiveness of the combination of insulin glargine 100 Units/mL and lixisenatide 33 mcg/mL with insulin glargine 100 Units/mL alone in 736 adult patients w Continue reading >>

Benefits Of Timely Basal Insulin Control In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Benefits Of Timely Basal Insulin Control In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

1. Growing burden of diabetes Preventing diabetic complications in the growing population of people with diabetes depends first on improving the rate of diagnosis. Most diabetes agencies in the world recommend similar diagnostic criteria based on the fasting plasma glucose (FPG; ≤ 126 mg/dL) and 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT; ≤ 200 mg/dL), but so far only the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends using the A1C test for diagnosis (Association AD, 2013; Force IDFcGT, 2012). Despite some challenges and controversies (lack of availability and/or standardization of the A1C assay in some areas and reliability of A1C results in patients with hemoglobinopathies and other conditions), the A1C test can be a convenient and useful tool for screening because patients' glucose levels can be tested in a nonfasting state (Association AD, 2013). Regardless of the diagnostic method used (and clinicians should make this choice according to their own preferences), at-risk populations should be screened on a regular basis, because prompt diagnosis and initiation of treatment are essential for preventing diabetic complications. 1.1. Undertreatment Unfortunately, among the diagnosed, undertreatment prevails throughout the world, where as many as one-half to two-thirds of patients do not have an A1C < 7% (Ali et al., 2013). According to data from the 2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), only 52% of patients in the U.S. have A1C levels < 7%, while 13% have A1C levels > 9% (Ali et al., 2013). A 2009 study by the International Diabetes Management Practice Study (IDMPS) found that in Eastern Europe, Latin America, and Asia, only 36% of patients with type 2 diabetes (and even fewer with type 1) had ever had their A1C measured. Of those, only 36% ha Continue reading >>

A1c Reduction

A1c Reduction

Lantus® is a long-acting insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Lantus® should be administered once a day at the same time every day. Limitations of Use: Lantus® is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Contraindications Lantus® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or one of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Insulin pens, needles, or syringes must never be shared between patients. Do NOT reuse needles. Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Modify insulin regimen cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment in concomitant oral antidiabetic treatment. Do not dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. If mixed or diluted, the solution may become cloudy, and the onset of action/time to peak effect may be altered in an unpredictable manner. Do not administer Lantus® via an insulin pump or intravenously because severe hypoglycemia can occur. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin therapy, including Lantus®, and may be life-threatening. Medication errors, such as accidental mix-ups between basal insulin products and other insulins, particularly rapid-acting insulins, have been reported. Patients should be instructed to always verify the insulin label before each injection. Severe life-threatening, generalized allergy, including anaphylaxis, can occur. Discontinue Lantus®, treat and monitor until symptoms resolve. A reduction in the Lantus® dose may be re Continue reading >>

Lantus® Can Still Be Your Choice For A Product With Demonstrated Efficacy And Safety

Lantus® Can Still Be Your Choice For A Product With Demonstrated Efficacy And Safety

Lantus® is a long-acting insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Lantus® should be administered once a day at the same time every day. Limitations of Use: Lantus® is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Contraindications Lantus® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or one of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Insulin pens, needles, or syringes must never be shared between patients. Do NOT reuse needles. Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Modify insulin regimen cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment in concomitant oral antidiabetic treatment. Do not dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. If mixed or diluted, the solution may become cloudy, and the onset of action/time to peak effect may be altered in an unpredictable manner. Do not administer Lantus® via an insulin pump or intravenously because severe hypoglycemia can occur. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin therapy, including Lantus®, and may be life-threatening. Medication errors, such as accidental mix-ups between basal insulin products and other insulins, particularly rapid-acting insulins, have been reported. Patients should be instructed to always verify the insulin label before each injection. Severe life-threatening, generalized allergy, including anaphylaxis, can occur. Discontinue Lantus®, treat and monitor until symptoms resolve. A reduction in the Lantus® dose may be re Continue reading >>

Byetta + Insulin Glargine (lantus®)

Byetta + Insulin Glargine (lantus®)

For many people, trying to maintain their blood sugar (glucose) levels day after day can be frustrating. BYETTA injection may be able to help. BYETTA is a non-insulin injection that may improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes, when used with diet and exercise. BYETTA + Insulin Glargine (Lantus®) BYETTA + Oral Diabetes Medications You may have been prescribed insulin glargine (a long-acting insulin) in addition to any oral diabetes medications you are already taking. To help improve your blood sugar control, your doctor may want to add BYETTA. BYETTA has been proven to help lower A1C when taken with insulin glargine. In a 30-week clinical study, adults with type 2 diabetes using BYETTA with diet and exercise along with insulin glargine with or without oral antidiabetic medicines (metformin and/or thiazolidinedione) who added BYETTA*: Lowered their A1C an average of 1.7% (starting from 8.3%) compared to an average reduction of 1.0% (starting from 8.5%) in those who did not add BYETTA. Also, reduced weight by an average of 4 pounds (starting from 210 pounds) compared with patients who did not add BYETTA, who gained an average of 2.2 pounds (starting from 206 pounds). Most common side effects seen with BYETTA used with insulin glargine in this 30-week study were: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, headache, constipation, acid stomach, and weakness. Additional side effects included: swelling (distention) of the abdomen, decreased appetite, gas (flatulence), and acid reflux. Nausea usually decreases over time. *BYETTA is not a weight loss drug. Individual results may vary. Serious side effects can happen in people taking BYETTA, including inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis). Before taking BYETTA, tell your health care provider if you have had: pancreatiti Continue reading >>

Unbeaten A1c Reduction* With Fewer Injections2,3

Unbeaten A1c Reduction* With Fewer Injections2,3

Trulicity is a glucagon‑like peptide‑1 receptor agonist (GLP‑1 RA) that is indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Not recommended as first‑line therapy for patients inadequately controlled on diet and exercise because of the uncertain relevance of rodent C-cell tumor findings to humans. Prescribe only if potential benefits outweigh potential risks. Has not been studied in patients with a history of pancreatitis; consider another antidiabetic therapy. Not for the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus or diabetic ketoacidosis. Not a substitute for insulin. Has not been studied in patients with severe gastrointestinal disease, including severe gastroparesis. Not for patients with pre-existing severe gastrointestinal disease. WARNING: RISK OF THYROID C-CELL TUMORS In male and female rats, dulaglutide causes a dose‑related and treatment-duration-dependent increase in the incidence of thyroid C‑cell tumors (adenomas and carcinomas) after lifetime exposure. It is unknown whether Trulicity causes thyroid C‑cell tumors, including medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), in humans as human relevance of dulaglutide‑induced rodent thyroid C‑cell tumors has not been determined. Trulicity is contraindicated in patients with a personal or family history of MTC and in patients with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 2 (MEN 2). Counsel patients regarding the potential risk of MTC with use of Trulicity and inform them of symptoms of thyroid tumors (eg, mass in the neck, dysphagia, dyspnea, persistent hoarseness). Routine monitoring of serum calcitonin or using thyroid ultrasound is of uncertain value for early detection of MTC in patients treated with Trulicity. Trulicity is contraindicated in Continue reading >>

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