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Lantus 70 30

Lantus And Novolog Mix 70 / 30 Drug Interactions - Drugs.com

Lantus And Novolog Mix 70 / 30 Drug Interactions - Drugs.com

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider. Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Multum is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. Multum's information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge, and judgement of healthcare practitioners in patient care. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for any given patient. Multum Information Services, Inc. does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. Copyright 2000-2018 Multum Information Services, Inc. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist. Some mixtures of medications can lead to serious and even fatal consequences. Continue reading >>

Does Anyone Uses Novolog Mix 70/30 And Lantus?

Does Anyone Uses Novolog Mix 70/30 And Lantus?

Does anyone uses Novolog mix 70/30 and Lantus? Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Does anyone uses Novolog mix 70/30 and Lantus? hello everyone.. I am type 1 and want to know if anyone is taking Novolog mix 70/30 with lantus. Recently I changed my doctor and he recommended me using Humalog instead of Novolog mix 70/30. I noticed that humalog is not as strong as Novolog mix 70/30. I need some input on this hello everyone.. I am type 1 and want to know if anyone is taking Novolog mix 70/30 with lantus. Recently I changed my doctor and he recommended me using Humalog instead of Novolog mix 70/30. I noticed that humalog is not as strong as Novolog mix 70/30. I need some input on this I've never used any mixed insulins but they generally contain fast acting and intermediate acting insulins. Lantus is a long acting insulin so if you add that to the mix you've got three types going on, which can lead to unpredictable results. How often are you taking the Movolog 70/30 and Lantus? It sounds like your doctor would prefer you to take Lantus for your long acting insulin (some people can get away with one injection a day and others find it works best to split it in two) and cover your meals and corrections for high BGs with Humalog. This is standard and what many people do. Both of these insulins are more predictable than the mixed insulin. You may think Humalog isn't as "strong" because you're used to the lingering effects of the "70" part of the mixed insulin, which lasts much longer in your system than Humalog and the "30" part of the mix! It's very odd to be on a mix with Lantus (or Levemir). Poodlebone and TommyC1 pretty much covered Continue reading >>

Why I Switched From Novolin 70/30 To Novorapid And Lantus

Why I Switched From Novolin 70/30 To Novorapid And Lantus

In the 20 plus years of managing my type 1 diabetes, I have used several types of insulin. When I was first diagnosed I was prescribed Humulin N and Humulin R insulin. I used it for a couple of years until my doctor switched me to Novolin 70/30. At that age I did not understand the rationale behind the switch. Quite frankly it didn’t matter once I could stay healthy and keep my diabetes in check. I used Novolin 70/30 for many years, throughout my teenage years and most of my twenties. One insulin shot in the morning before breakfast and one before dinner. I dabbled in sports as a pre teen and teenager, doing taekwondo, playing hockey and badminton. It wasn’t until my early twenties that I became very cautious of my physique or lack there of. I was inspired to start working out with friends and eventually started following the gym lifestyle. With my busy work schedule and new fitness journey I discovered a couple of issues with 70/30 insulin. 70/30 Premix Insulin is Very Restrictive I am quite a busy person and having a fixed schedule to eat each day isn’t exactly feasible. With numerous meetings, presentations and training sessions, having flexibility with my meals is very important. I would often feel like a slave to 70/30 insulin. It is rather annoying and inconvenient having to excuse yourself from conducting a presentation or training session because you feel a hypoglycemia episode coming on. I’ve been in meetings that were supposed to last 20 minutes but ended up lasting 2 hours. With the unpredictability of 70/30, it could peak at the most inappropriate times. Carb Counting and Flexible Dieting on 70/30 Insulin Premixes is Difficult At the beginning of my fitness journey I tried to follow a meal plan to achieve my goals. I discovered that it is almost impo Continue reading >>

How Long Should Insulin Be Used Once A Vial Is Started?

How Long Should Insulin Be Used Once A Vial Is Started?

Editor’s comment: The commentary by Dr. Grajower has such important clinical relevance that responses were invited from the three pharmaceutical companies that supply insulin in the U.S. and the American Diabetes Association, and all of these combined in this commentary. The commenting letter and individual responses were authored separately and are completely independent of each other. Diabetic patients treated with insulin, whether for type 1 or type 2 diabetes, are prone to often unexplained swings in their blood glucose. These swings can vary from dangerously low to persistently high levels. Most diabetic patients, and most physicians, will adjust insulin regimens so as to avoid hypoglycemia at the expense of hyperglycemia. Among the “textbook” reasons for variable glucose responses to any given insulin regimen are 1) site of administration, 2) exercise, 3) bottles not adequately mixed before drawing the insulin (for NPH, Lente, or Ultralente), and 4) duration of treatment with insulin (1). A new insulin was marketed by Aventis Pharmaceuticals about 1 year ago, insulin glargine (Lantus). The manufacturer seemed to stress that patients not use a started bottle of this insulin for >28 days (2). Two patients of mine highlighted this point. L.K. is a 76-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes, diagnosed at 55 years of age, and treated with insulin since age 56. Her insulin regimen was changed to Lantus at night together with Novolog before meals. She monitors her blood glucose four times a day. She used a bottle of Lantus until it ran out; therefore, a bottle lasted for 2 months. Her recent HbA1c was 7.6%. I retrospectively analyzed her home glucose readings by averaging her fasting blood glucose levels for the first 15 days of a new bottle and the last 15 days of tha Continue reading >>

Ask The Diabetes Team

Ask The Diabetes Team

Question: From Karachi, Pakistan: My 11-year-old son was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes after being in DKA. Can he use Lantus along with his short acting insulin? He weighs 25 kg (55 pounds). Is there is any harm in using Humulin 70/30, which he is using now? Answer: The 70/30 Humulin that has been prescribed is a previously mixed, by the manufacturer, insulin suspension that contains 70% of intermediate-acting NPH insulin and 30% faster-acting Regular insulin. This is a very convenient premixed combination and typically allows an insulin and meal plan that consists of two shots of insulin daily plus three meals and three small snacks that typically are set at specific times of the days with specific doses of insulin and specific calorie intakes. This plan is tried and true. But, the biggest disadvantages is that it assumes the patient's insulin needs are 70%/30% of intermediate and short-acting insulins. An INDIVIDUAL's insulin needs hinge on meal planning, their overall health status, activities, etc. Certainly the capacity that the child and caregivers have for mixing insulins or providing a more sophisticated insulin plan play a role, too. The use of Lantus (as a long-acting insulin) in combination with a short or even rapid-acting insulin is a very good insulin plan. In this plan, the Lantus acts as a "background" or "basal" insulin and the rapid-acting insulin is given with each meal/snack, according to the physicians specific instructions. The advantages of this plan include that it is not so regimented or strict in terms of when and how much calories are consumed at meals and that it better mimics the normal physiology of insulin action. On the other hand, multiple injections of insulin and multiple glucose checks are required daily. Furthermore, Lantus generall Continue reading >>

A Comparison Of Twice-daily Biphasic Insulin Aspart 70/30 And Once-daily Insulin Glargine In Persons With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Inadequately Controlled Onbasal Insulin And Oral Therapy: A Randomized, Open-label Study.

A Comparison Of Twice-daily Biphasic Insulin Aspart 70/30 And Once-daily Insulin Glargine In Persons With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Inadequately Controlled Onbasal Insulin And Oral Therapy: A Randomized, Open-label Study.

1. Endocr Pract. 2011 Jan-Feb;17(1):41-50. doi: 10.4158/EP10079.OR. A comparison of twice-daily biphasic insulin aspart 70/30 and once-daily insulin glargine in persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately controlled onbasal insulin and oral therapy: a randomized, open-label study. Ligthelm RJ(1), Gylvin T, DeLuzio T, Raskin P. (1)EHM Clinic, Hoofddorp, The Netherlands. [email protected] OBJECTIVE: To compare efficacy and safety of biphasic insulin aspart 70/30 (BIAsp30) with insulin (glargine) in type 2 diabetic patients who were not maintaining glycemic control on basal insulin and oral antidiabetic drugs.METHODS: In a 24-week, open-label, parallel-group trial, type 2 diabetic patientswho were not maintaining glycemic control on basal insulin (glargine or neutralprotamine Hagedorn) + oral antidiabetic drugs were randomly assigned totwice-daily BIAsp 30 + metformin or once-daily glargine + metformin +secretagogues (secretagogues were discontinued in the BIAsp 30 arm).RESULTS: One hundred thirty-seven patients were randomly assigned to the BIAsp 30group and 143 patients were randomly assigned to the glargine group. Of 280patients randomized, 229 (81.8%) completed the study. End-of-trial hemoglobin A1creductions were -1.3% (BIAsp 30) vs -1.2% (glargine) (treatment difference: 95%confidence interval, -0.06 [-0.32 to 0.20]; P = .657). Of patients taking BIAsp30, 27.3% reached a hemoglobin A1c level <7.0% compared with 22.0% of patientstaking glargine (treatment difference: P = .388). Glucose increment averaged over3 meals was lower in the BIAsp 30 arm (treatment difference: -17.8 mg/dL, P =.001). Fasting plasma glucose reductions from baseline were -13.8 mg/dL (BIAsp30) vs -42.5 mg/dL (glargine) (P = .0002). Final minor hypoglycemia rate, insulindose, and weight ch Continue reading >>

Information Regarding Insulin Storage And Switching Between Products In An Emergency

Information Regarding Insulin Storage And Switching Between Products In An Emergency

en Español Insulin Storage and Effectiveness Insulin for Injection Insulin from various manufacturers is often made available to patients in an emergency and may be different from a patient's usual insulin. After a disaster, patients in the affected area may not have access to refrigeration. According to the product labels from all three U.S. insulin manufacturers, it is recommended that insulin be stored in a refrigerator at approximately 36°F to 46°F. Unopened and stored in this manner, these products maintain potency until the expiration date on the package. Insulin products contained in vials or cartridges supplied by the manufacturers (opened or unopened) may be left unrefrigerated at a temperature between 59°F and 86°F for up to 28 days and continue to work. However, an insulin product that has been altered for the purpose of dilution or by removal from the manufacturer’s original vial should be discarded within two weeks. Note: Insulin loses some effectiveness when exposed to extreme temperatures. The longer the exposure to extreme temperatures, the less effective the insulin becomes. This can result in loss of blood glucose control over time. Under emergency conditions, you might still need to use insulin that has been stored above 86°F. You should try to keep insulin as cool as possible. If you are using ice, avoid freezing the insulin. Do not use insulin that has been frozen. Keep insulin away from direct heat and out of direct sunlight. When properly stored insulin becomes available again, the insulin vials that have been exposed to these extreme conditions should be discarded and replaced as soon as possible. If patients or healthcare providers have specific questions about the suitability of their insulin, they may call the respective manufacturer a Continue reading >>

Anyone With Experience Transitioning From Lantus To 70/30?

Anyone With Experience Transitioning From Lantus To 70/30?

Anyone with experience transitioning from Lantus to 70/30? I am a 38 yo type 1 and Ive never really used 70/30 in my 20+ years as a diabetic. I need to go a month until I will get more Lantus and my Dr gave me a bottle of 70/30 so that I would have a long acting insulin until I got my Lantus back. She directed me 10 units twice a day before meals but I have had higher than usual sugar readings since then. It is only my second day on 70/30 but I feel like 10 units can't be enough since before I would take between 5-10 units of R before. Can anyone explain to me how 70/30 relates to Lantus and sliding scale R? Thank you- 70/30 insulin is a mixture of 70% log acting and 30% short acting insulins. Using it before meals is like using smaller doses of of Lantus, and very small doses of long lasting insulin. The amount of fast acting insulin in 70/30 is usually too small to completely compensate for the carbs you eat.The R that you were using acts very slowly and that can also give you high BG after meals. The best way to control your BG is to use Lantus and a fast acting insulin like Humalog or Novolog, which will act fast enough to keep the BG much more stable after meals and snacks. Carb counting is much better than a sliding scale. I use 1 unit of Humalog for every 5 carbs in the morning, 1 for every 10 in the afternoon, and 1 for every 12 in the evening. It varies because my levels of sensitivity to the insulin varies throughout the day. The book "Using Insulin" by John Walsh would help you understand carb counting, insulin sensitivity, and many other things. Ask all the questions you want, we are here to help! I have been Type 1 for 70 years. My A1c is 5.9. I pump with the MM 523 (Revel). Continue reading >>

Why Walmart Insulins Aren’t The Answer To High Insulin Prices

Why Walmart Insulins Aren’t The Answer To High Insulin Prices

A diabetes advocate contrasts the performance of generic insulins versus the more popular brands. Commentary Some people don’t understand why people with diabetes get upset at the price of insulin. They see insulin for sale at a relatively reasonable price in Walmart and don’t see the problem. What they don’t know is that these Walmart insulins just don’t perform nearly as well as the more expensive insulins, and that gap in performance can have a very negative effect on the health of people with diabetes. There are three insulins available at Walmart for the price of $25 – NPH, Regular, and 70/30 (a mix of the two). NPH was first approved by the FDA in 1950, Regular was approved in 1982, 70/30 in 1989. That means NPH has been around for 66 years, Regular for 33 years, 70/30 for 27 years. Take a moment and think about what healthcare was like in 1950. Now, I’m sure someone is saying, “Well, they must still work if they are still being sold.” And they do, but they don’t work in the same way. These insulins are not interchangeable. If a person with Type 1 diabetes were to switch from a Humalog/Lantus insulin regimen to Regular and NPH, it would drastically alter their lifestyle, making blood sugar control more irregular and raising A1C scores. The biggest issue is that whereas Lantus is steady, NPH peaks. A person using NPH must keep a very set dietary schedule, making sure to eat meals and snacks at certain times to correspond with peak times of an insulin dose. The strict schedule is difficult for everyone, but especially for children. They are unable to alter their daily schedules and must always be sure to eat at specific times. Even if they’re not hungry, they must eat to avoid low blood sugar. And if they are hungry, they often cannot have more t Continue reading >>

Humulin 70-30

Humulin 70-30

Humulin 70-30 (70% human insulin isophane suspension and 30% human insulin) is a man-made form of a hormone that is produced in the body used to treat diabetes. The most common side effect of Humulin 70-30 is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Symptoms of low blood sugar may include headache, nausea, hunger, confusion, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, blurred vision, fast heartbeat, sweating, tremor, trouble concentrating, confusion, or seizure (convulsions). Other side effects of Humulin 70-30 include: injection site reactions (e.g., pain, redness, irritation), skin thickening or pits at the injection site (lipodystrophy), itching, rash, swelling of your hands and feet. Tell your doctor if you have serious side effects of Humulin 70-30 including signs of low potassium level in the blood (such as muscle cramps, weakness, irregular heartbeat). Each patient's diabetes is different, and the injection schedule and use of Humulin 70-30 is individualized. A doctor determines which insulin to use, how much, and when and how often to inject it. Humulin 70-30 may interact with albuterol, clonidine, reserpine, guanethidine, or beta-blockers. Tell your doctor all medications you are taking. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant before using Humulin 70-30. If you are planning pregnancy, discuss a plan for managing your blood sugars with your doctor before you become pregnant. Your doctor may switch the type of insulin you use during pregnancy. This medication does not pass into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding. Insulin needs may change while breastfeeding. Our Humulin 70-30 (70% human insulin isophane suspension and 30% human insulin) Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this Continue reading >>

Using Lantus & Humulin 70/30

Using Lantus & Humulin 70/30

Currently use Humulin 70/30 35 units 2x day. I average an h1ac of 5.1 to 5.6 throughout a 16 month period. What concerns me is how sporadic my daily blood sugars seem to run. It often seems that stress plays a part. I may eat a Subway six inch sub and see an increase from 95 to 160 one day and 105 to 109 the next. I have had pizza and beer one evening and have a B/S in the morning of 212 one time and 110 the next. Some weeks may see tight control with B/S readings that can seem confusing considering eating high fiber and fruits and vegetables. After consulting a diabetes dietitian we decided that a new meter was warranted. (One Touch Ultra) The results have been the same. I have not been able to follow through with the dietitian due to a lack of insurance coverage. To summarize, I have wondered if I were to add a small dosage of Lantus before each meal and reduce the amount of Humulin 70/30, would I expect to see tighter and more consistent results? Type 1.5 in my opinion - type II in my GP's opinion. In my opinion you seem to be on the wrong type of insulin, the lantus is a basal or long acting insulin and then you are using a 70/30 mix which is 70% long acting and 30% fast or bolus insulin to cover your meals. You should probably be on a basal, bolus regime . But this is something that you will have to discuss with a doctor. D.D. Family Getting much harder to control Taking Lantus 3x a day is really rare. Most take it 1x a day I think like imac you need another basal and bolus insulin. One thing is your carb load seems pretty heavy from what you listed. I would have bs just like yours I am finding the more I lower carb rate the better my bs are getting and less insulin I use much less. D.D. Family type 2 on insulin and metformin In my opinion you seem to be on the wr Continue reading >>

Lantus Vs 70/30 Humulin

Lantus Vs 70/30 Humulin

Guest over a year ago I am a 59 yr old female.. have had diabetes for 35 years. I have just recently changed medications... I was taking 70/30 humulin insulin twice daily 30 units am and 40 units pm w/ 2 500 mg metformin @ night... 3 days ago I stopped this and now am on Lantus 70 units at night with the metformin.. How long will this take to get into my system and start seeing results? This therapy was changed because my glucose testings after meals and before were consistently high but fastings were normal. karel35452 over a year ago Hi there, Having read few things about this, I found out that mixing insulin is not a good thing. Lantus is basal and long acting insulin. It is different from Humilin 70/30. It seems that your first therapy is not working its job any more. Have you had any changes in your diet before going on the Lantus? The results should be seen very soon after switching to new insulin. The only thing that you can look for are possible side effects from the new insulin. Lantus side effects are usually manifested with shaking, sweating, sometimes fast heartbeat and blurred vision. If you notice any of these side effects then a new insulin is not really suitable for you. Regards Continue reading >>

Insulin Chart

Insulin Chart

Onset of action - time period after injection that insulin will begin to work Duration of action - length of time after injection that insulin will have a measurable effect Peak effect - time after injection when insulin will have its greatest activity (effect) NOTE: Pharmacokinetic parameters are affected by age, kidney function, liver function, concomitant medications, medical conditions, and other variables. Because of this, parameters may vary widely among patients. In the U.S., most insulins cost > $150 a vial/pens with one exception; Walmart sells Novolin R, Novolin N, and Novolin 70/30 for $25 a vial * For use in HumaPen Luxura HD and HumaPen Memoir See Inhaled insulin for a complete review of Afrezza Afrezza comes in a sealed foil package with 2 blister cards inside Each blister card has 5 rows of 3 cartridges Before use, cartridge and inhaler should be at room temperature for 10 minutes Inhaler should be thrown away after 15 days Sealed foil package is good until expiration date Sealed blister cards + strips - use within 10 days SoloStar is compatible with all BD pen needles Apidra is a premeal (also called prandial) insulin Inject Apidra within 15 minutes before a meal or within 20 minutes after starting a meal Apidra is compatible with some insulin pumps UNPUNCTURED, REFRIGERATED (Vials and Pens) Inject Fiasp at the start of a meal or within 20 minutes after starting a meal KwikPen is compatible with all BD pen needles Inject Humalog within 15 minutes before a meal or immediately after a meal Humalog is compatible with some insulin pumps HumaPen Luxura HD is a reusable pen that allows dosing in 0.5 unit increments HumaPen Memoir records the time, date, and dose of the last 16 injections UNPUNCTURED, REFRIGERATED (Vials, Pens, Cartridges) UNPUNCTURED, ROOM TE Continue reading >>

Can Insulin Go Back In The Fridge?

Can Insulin Go Back In The Fridge?

After removing insulin glargine (Lantus) from the refrigerator for use, can it be refrigerated over and over again after having warmed to room temperature, or does this degrade it? Continue reading >>

Can I Use 30/70 Insulin With Humalog In Place Of Lantus?

Can I Use 30/70 Insulin With Humalog In Place Of Lantus?

Please see your physician as every individual needs individual care. I routinely will switch my diabetics from Lantus and Humalog to 70/30 insulin or vice versa. The effect is approximate. Studies note reasonably similar blood sugar control with more low blood sugars with 70/30. Pros of 70/30: Less shots: just two per day Cheaper by far if you have no insurance. Pros of Lantus and humalog: More control over your life. You don't have to eat at a strict schedule like on 70/30 or risk low blood sugars. You can carb count and eat what you want, if you are somewhat savvy. You can tune this regimen to you, maybe you need less Lantus and more humalog. It is pretty easy to switch most people. It involves getting your total daily dose of insulin and some simple calculations, then fine tune with your life. Just ask your doc. Continue reading >>

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