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Lancing Device For Diabetes

New Diabetes Products For 2017: Lancing Devices And Diabetes Drugs

New Diabetes Products For 2017: Lancing Devices And Diabetes Drugs

For the last year, Diabetes Self-Management has been following all the new innovations and products aimed at helping to improve the lives of those living with diabetes. From the latest glucometers and monitoring systems to insulin pumps, pens, and treatments, several major advancements made their impact on the diabetes community in 2016. When selecting some of the new products, we first talked to Gary Scheiner, MS, CDE, clinical director of Integrated Diabetes Services of Wynnewood, Pennsylvania. Scheiner, known as the MacGyver of diabetes products, has lived with Type 1 diabetes for more than 30 years. He tries out new products before recommending them to patients. “It’s important to see new products from the user’s point of view, not just from the [health-care practitioner’s] side of things,” said Scheiner. In 2016, the pace of innovation continued to race ahead with unbelievable technology right out of a Star Trek episode. The growing use of smartphone technology and mobile applications has led to better access to blood glucose readings, general health information, and much more. Read on to learn about the newest products. We guarantee you there’s something here for everyone, whether you live with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. In this installment, we look at lancing devices and diabetes drugs that have recently hit the market. Lancing devices Motivated to help a friend with Type 2 diabetes, bioengineer Christopher Jacobs, PhD, developed a new lancing device, called Genteel, to reduce the pain of pricking fingertips. “I was moved by his distress, compelled by our friendship, and undone by the irresistible siren song that lies at the heart of every engineering challenge,” said Jacobs. For 10 years, Jacobs studied the limitations of current devices and the Continue reading >>

Genteel The Best Device For Blood Glucose Testing

Genteel The Best Device For Blood Glucose Testing

Genteel The Best Device for Blood Glucose Testing One of the cool things about being a diabetes coach is that Cyrus and I get to learn from our clients. New products and innovative ideas are coming into our inbox all the time. In this article, I will tell you about a cool blood glucose testing device that I now use every single day and absolutely love! I vividly remember when our client Tim posted in our private Facebook group about a new device that allows for pain free blood glucose testing! This clearly peaked my interest and I started looking into it right away. If you are living with diabetes, then you know the frustrations around pricking your finger to test your blood glucose. It can be a real pain (pun intended) and anything that can improve that process is quite exciting. So I went to the Genteel website and started watching videos. I was quite intrigued by what I saw. In a nutshell, here's how Genteel works. The lancing device first pricks you gently, then applies a suction to your skin to PULL a small drop of blood out of your skin. Just make sure that you apply the suction for about 5 seconds and watch as a drop of blood magically appears with practically zero discomfort. I swear by this device, and I love how it helps me prick myself without any pain. Im an Amazon Prime member so I was quite excited to see that I could order it on Amazon and get it the next day! In addition, I was also happy to hear that I could use all the old lancets that I already have at home. Lets Talk About the Importance of Testing Blood Glucose For those living with insulin-dependent diabetes, it is absolutely essential to test your blood glucose frequently. If you have a CGM, you can test less frequently, but its still essential to test multiple times per day. For those living wit Continue reading >>

How Deep Should I Set The Lancing Device Of My Blood Sugar Meter?

How Deep Should I Set The Lancing Device Of My Blood Sugar Meter?

Once you poke a hole in your finger, a very gentle squeeze should bring the blood to the surface. If you have to milk your finger like a cow you need a deeper or larger diameter hole. Lots of pumping of the finger mixes interstitial fluid (water between cells) into the blood sample and will throw off your results. If it hurts to lance your finger, you probably have your device set too deeply or you put the clear cap on the lance. Yeah, that’s for testing on your forearm. Throw the clear cap away and put the solid one on. For what it is worth, there are some folks out there who really do have hypersensitive fingers. For you folks there are two pretty expensive solutions: a computerized lancing device that lets you micro-control hundreds of different depths; and a laser that burns a painless hole in your skin. The Born-Again Diabetic: The handbook to help you get your diabetes in control (again) Much has been written about the explosion of diabetes on the world stage the 4,000 new cases a day we all know about, the millions of people unaware they have diabetes. But another epidemic is... Continue reading >>

Top 9 Diabetes Lancing Devices

Top 9 Diabetes Lancing Devices

Ensuring you keep your blood glucose levels well within your target range , is one of the most common goals for those with diabetes. You simply cannot monitor your blood glucose levels without using a lancing device that pricks your finger and allows you to measure using a drop of blood. While diabetes management can be challenging and at times overwhelming, determining which types of supplies and products to use should not be. With so many different products on the market you can begin to feel like there is no right answer on which you should be using. In this review, well discuss the available types of lancing devices , their benefits and why they might be the best fit for you. Lets take a look. The Care Touch Adjustable Lancing device is unique when compared to others on the market. It offers 10 adjustable depths to ensure you can get the blood sample you need. An included ejector button pushes out the lancet after it has been used so that you can replace it with a new one. It is compatible with most round types of lancets. Advanced technology offers precise delivery which allows for a less painful testing and a smaller blood sample. Bayers Microlet 2 Adjustable Lancing Device The Bayer Microlet Adjustable device gives you a comfort grip so that you can easily check your blood glucose whenever necessary. With five adjustable setting depths for your fingers. An easy grip gives you a precise and easy aim for smoother lancing. The ergonomic design means you will endure less painful testing with smaller blood samples for much easier testing. The Accu Chek FastClix lancing device is the only lancing device that features 1 click testing. The lancets for the FastClix are conveniently stored in an easy to replace drum. This means you do not have to individually load your la Continue reading >>

Lancets And Lancing Devices

Lancets And Lancing Devices

Testing your blood is vital for good control. Not all lancets and lancing devices are created equal. Some are smaller, which means they hurt less for small children but might not provide an adequate drop for older kids. Some lancing devices are easier to use than others. Here's a list of reviewed products: Lancets Lancing Devices BDTM ULTRA-FINETM II BD GenieTM Soft Touch® ComforTouch Gentle-let 1 Softclix® Tenderlett® Unilet and Unilet GP Unilet Superlite Unistik® 2 ACCU-CHEK Multiclix The best lancing device available today auto-Lancet Adjustable and Mini (Also known as the Soft Touch adjustable) auto-Lancet (non-adjustable) (Also known as the Soft Touch) Penlet® Plus (also called the ONE TOUCH UltraSoft) Softclix® Glucolet Microlet Personal Lasette Laser Lancing Device Penlet II Soft Touch II Vaculance Lancets are where the metal meets the finger (or alternative site for most new meters). Many manufacturers say that their lancet is the "most comfortable." That really means "hurts less." Lancets are not much good without a lancing device to hold the lancet. The reviews evaluate each lancet and lancing device in the following areas: Comfort. Basically, how much does it hurt. Scores range from one (OUCH!) to ten (Whew!). Comfort is more than simply having a small diameter shaft. The quality of the grinding of the lancet makes a big difference, as does the quality and adjustability of the lancing device. Ease of Use. We all want our kids to do their own testing. Some products are easier for little hands to use than others. This mostly applies to the lancing devices, but some lancets are more troublesome than others. Scores range from one (Daddy, help!) to 10 (I can do it myself!). Safety. When you're done with the stick, you've got to dispose of the lancet. Some ha Continue reading >>

How Do I Use The Onetouch Lancing Device? :: Onetouch

How Do I Use The Onetouch Lancing Device? :: Onetouch

How do I use the OneTouch Lancing Device? Before you test your blood sugar, wash your hands and forearm (if applicable) thoroughly with warm, soapy water. Rinse and dry. Remove the blue (or black) cap by snapping it off Insert a sterile OneTouch UltraSoft Lancet into the OneTouch Lancing Device Insert the lancet into the holder and push in firmly. Twist the protective disk until it separates from the lancet and save the disk for later use. Do not twist the lancet. Please fill in a short form to ask a question or provide feedback. The health information on this Web site is for general background purposes and is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for specific conditions. Seek prompt medical attention for healthcare questions you have. Consult your physician before making changes to your medication, diet, fitness program or blood glucose testing schedules. 1 The Meter Remote must not be exposed to water 1 Data on file. "OneTouch Ultra System Accuracy (2001 2009)", LifeScan Inc., 2010 1. Before you begin testing on your forearm or palm, read the User Guide and talk to your healthcare professional. To obtain the OneTouch AST Clear Cap, please call the OneTouch Customer Care line at 1 800 663-5521. 1. Before you begin testing on your forearm or palm, read the user guide and talk to your healthcare professional. To obtain the OneTouch UltraClear Cap, please call the OneTouch Customer Care line at 1 800 663-5521. *Allows for a less painful stick when used with the OneTouch UltraSoft Lancet. LifeScan Canada, 2017. All rights reserved. Trademarks are used under license by LifeScan Canada. The third party trademarks used herein are trademarks of their respective owners. LifeScan Canada, 2017. All rights reserved. Trademarks are used under license by LifeScan Canada. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Lancing Devices

Diabetes Lancing Devices

Tweet Lancing devices are used to obtain samples of blood for glucose testing using a lancet. A variety of lancets are on the market, the most common of which are automatic lancing devices. What are automatic lancing devices? Automatic lancing devices are the most common type of lancing device on the market, and are widely available and offered by a variety of manufacturers. Automatic lancing devices work using a spring-loaded lancet released by a button. The patient using the device can set the lancet to a certain level of skin penetration using a lancet cover. What are laser lancing devices? Laser lancing devices are designed to perforate the skin in order to draw blood, much in the same way as an automatic lancing device. A laser lancing device produces one pulse of laser, which makes a tiny hole in the skin. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar. The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sugar lower by avoiding dietary sugar, likely you will never need long-term medication. Type 2 diabetes was formerly known as non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset dia Continue reading >>

3 Reasons Why This Lancing Device Is The Best

3 Reasons Why This Lancing Device Is The Best

In my 28 years of living with diabetes, I’ve used many different “pokers,” “prickers,” and “lancers.” Even the painful, dreaded “Guillotine” of the 1980’s. A few problems that many of them have is that they are limited to only holding one lancet, the lancets are open to the world when the cap is off, and, when it comes to design, some aren’t the most comfortable to hold and use. These problems are the main reasons why I turn to the Accu-Chek FastClix device as the love of my finger-poking heart. ***For the record, Accu-Chek did not pay us to write this post! We wrote it because we really love this lancing device!*** Multiple-Lancet Drums One of the key features of the FastClix device that I love is the drum. Following the prior design of the MultiClix, the drum carries 6 lancets, which not only reduce the amount of changes that the user will have to complete, but they also reduce the space taken in a travel kit. If the user tests roughly 6 times per day (also barring the scenario of using a new lancet with each test), they’ll only need one lancet drum in their kit per day. Less space, less waste. Closed, Contained Lancets With traditional lancets, whether they’re new or used, there is a risk of being poked by the exposed lancet; especially if one has been used, as there is no way to cap it as securely as they are when they are new. Not with the FastClix drums. No matter if the drum has been used or is brand new, the needles are contained, so the user will never have to see them, and there is virtually no risk at all of being poked. In fact, the only way to tell if the lancet drum has been used is the drum is locked so it can’t be reused, it’s longer, and there is a red mark on the side. Comfortable, Pen-style Design The pen-style design and Continue reading >>

Lancets & Lancing Devices For Diabetes: Read This Before You Buy

Lancets & Lancing Devices For Diabetes: Read This Before You Buy

Lancets are small needles that are used to prick the skin to obtain a blood sample. Many lancets can be used with a lancing device that helps to make it more effective and less painful, however they can be used without one by just sticking the skin with the needle. Once a small blood sample is available, it can easily be put into a machine to run a test. As you can see from the image above, there are many different brands of lancets available. There are a few tests that can be done using a small drop of blood that the lancet provides. For people with diabetes, they can easily check their blood sugar levels. Using a glucometer, which is the machine that tests the blood sugar, they can quickly find out if their sugar is at a good number or not. How do the lancet and the lancing device work together Although the lancet can be used alone to get a sample, it is much easier to use the lancing device along with it. The device provides a quick “punch” of the needle into the skin to make an effective and less painful stick. OneTouch, which is a popular brand of diabetic supplies, has a device that is easy to use. Each brand’s device will be a little different, but the general idea is the same. The following steps demonstrate how to use the OneTouch device. Step 1. Always wash your hands before checking your blood sugar. If there is bacteria on your hands and it enters into your blood, it can cause a major infection! First, take the cap off of the device and insert a new lancet with the safety cap still on. (If it is removed first, you can poke yourself!) When you insert the lancet, do not twist it around. It should easily fit. See the image below for a better description. Step 2. Take the safety guard off of the lancet to expose the needle. This can easily be done by simpl Continue reading >>

Lancing Device Comparison Study

Lancing Device Comparison Study

To evaluate pain responses using the Aurora lancing device and Velvet 33g lancet compared to other common, commercially available lancing systems. Subjects will test the devices at a depth setting sufficient to provide enough blood volume to trigger the OneTouch® Ultra®Mini blood glucose meter using OneTouch® Ultra® blood glucose test strips from either the fingertip or alternate site testing. A low-pain lancing is being developed code name Aurora) for use with a 33g proprietary lancet (code name Velvet). This study evaluates the pain associated with finger lancing using this device and compares that pain to other commercially available lancing devices and associated lancets. All lancets used in the study are currently commercially available except the Facet 33g lancet, which is a prototype version of commercially available lancets. The Roche Multiclix, Roche Softclix, One Touch Comfort and Bayer Microlet 2 lancing devices are all commercially available. The Aurora Lancing Device is effective in obtaining a sufficient blood sample for performing an accurate blood glucose measurement; and the benefits of using the Aurora Lancing Device outweighs any residual risks associated with the product. Literature concerning blood glucose testing was researched by using popular medical databases such as pubmed.gov, diabeteshealth.com, clinicaltrial.gov and search terms lancing device, clinical study, blood volume and pain. Using other popular search engines such as Google was beneficial in helping to support claims concerning safety and efficacy. A commercial database company, NERAC was used as a part of the literature research effort. Our review, together with preliminary in-house bench testing, shows that the Aurora Lancing Device should be able to: Obtain enough blood volume Continue reading >>

Blood Lancet

Blood Lancet

Box of disposable lancets. Blood-sampling device with a lancet at the tip. A blood lancet, or simply lancet, is a small medical implement used for capillary blood sampling. A blood lancet is similar to a small scalpel but with a double-edged blade or needle. Lancets are used to make punctures, such as a fingerstick, to obtain small blood specimens. Blood lancets are generally disposable. Lancets are also used to prick the skin in skin testing for allergies.[1] A blood-sampling device, also known as a lancing device, is an instrument equipped with a lancet. It is also most commonly used by diabetics during blood glucose monitoring. The depth of skin penetration can be adjusted for various skin thicknesses. Long lancing devices are used for fetal scalp blood testing to get a measure of the acid base status of the fetus. Blood sampling[edit] Main article: Capillary blood sampling The small capillary blood samples obtained can be tested for blood glucose, hemoglobin, and many other blood components. [edit] External links[edit] Lancet In Diabetes Self Management Continue reading >>

Genteel Gentle Lancing Device For Diabetes Offers Painless Blood Glucose Testing + Discount Offer

Genteel Gentle Lancing Device For Diabetes Offers Painless Blood Glucose Testing + Discount Offer

This is Diabetes Awareness Month and as Ive mentioned, its been tough since my oldest son was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes. My job as a parent is to make things as smooth as possible and when I heard about Genteels Gentle Lancing Device , which is billed as a no-pain way to draw blood with vacuum and depth control, I was intrigued. Would it really work? Multiple finger pricks and taking insulin 4x a day hasnt been fun for my son. Even though we recently got a Dexcom Monitor, I was shocked at how many times a day we still need to draw blood. Plus, if his Dexcom Monitor tells us hes really low or really high, I have to double check with a blood draw, besides calibrating the Dexcom 2x a day). With Genteel, could we make that painless? For the answer, read on.G enteel Gentle Lancing Device Review for Kids and Adults with Diabetes This is the description on how the Genteel Gentle Lancing Device works: With its patented Butterfly Touch Technology, the Genteel Lancing Device gets test blood from anywhere on the body without pain. Using vacuum, vibration, and depth control, the perfect drop of blood can be drawn, even from the shallowest test site. The lancet only reaches blood capillaries and avoids hitting pain nerves altogether. Finger pricking has been painful with the lancing device that came with our monitor. Plus I had to constantly had to squeeze his poor fingers to draw blood. Sometimes there wasnt enough blood to go on the test strip, so I would have to prick his finger again. Frankly, it was almost worse than taking the insulin injections and my sons poor fingers were taking a beating. We had thought the Dexcom monitor would eliminate all the blood draws, but it doesnt. You have to calibrate the monitor at least two times a day to see if its right. Also, if his De Continue reading >>

How To Determine Which Gauge To Use For Your Diabetic Lancing Device

How To Determine Which Gauge To Use For Your Diabetic Lancing Device

According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), approximately 1.7 million Americans are diagnosed with Diabetes and if current trends remain the same, 1 in 3 Americans will have diabetes by the year 2050. Broken down further, there are approximately 4,657 new diabetic patients diagnosed every day that are having to experience the process of pricking their fingers for the first time in order to read their blood sugar. If you fall under this category, undoubtedly, your doctor has given you instructions on the process and the different products you will become accustomed to such as a blood glucose meter, test strips, lancet pins, control solutions, insulin pumps, and lancets. Yet, many times a Doctor will just give an overview and send a patient on their way with many questions unanswered. Finding tips and tricks to make the process of checking your blood sugar in a quick and accurate manner are important to diabetic patients. Yet, finding ways to reduce the discomfort of pricking the fingers for blood samples is usually on the top of every diabetics patient list. Lancing Devices and Lancets A lancing device is a spring loaded mechanism that, when loaded with a lancet, pricks a finger quickly in order to provide a small sample of blood for the test strip. Most of the lancing devices today are equipped with 2 - 3 depth settings. The higher settings will penetrate deeper while the lower settings are for individuals with thin, sensitive skin such as senior citizens patients and children. The higher settings are for patients who have thick callouses on their skin which will allow the lancet to push through the callouses. The lancet is a sterile grade steel needle encased in a plastic cylinder used to prick the finger. There are 3 common gauges that the needle comes in wh Continue reading >>

Comparison Of Lancing Devices For Self-monitoring Of Blood Glucose Regarding Lancing Pain

Comparison Of Lancing Devices For Self-monitoring Of Blood Glucose Regarding Lancing Pain

Go to: Abstract Self-monitoring of blood glucose empowers diabetes patients to effectively control their blood glucose (BG) levels. A potential barrier to frequent BG controls is lancing pain, intrinsically linked to pricking the finger several times a day. In this study, we compared different state-of-the-art lancing devices from leading manufacturers regarding lancing pain, and we intended to identify lancing devices that are less painful. First, 165 subjects compared 6 different BG monitoring systems—consisting of a lancing device and a BG meter—at home for 36 days and at least 3 BG tests per day. Second, the subjects directly compared 6 different lancing devices—independent from a BG meter—in a laboratory setting. The test results were collected in questionnaires, and lancing pain was rated on a numerical rating scale. One hundred fifty-seven subjects were included in the analysis. Accu-Chek BG monitoring systems were significantly (p ≤ .006) preferred to competitor BG monitoring systems and were rated by >50% of the subjects as “less painful” than competitor BG monitoring systems. Accu-Chek lancing devices were significantly (p < .001) preferred to competitor lancing devices and were rated by >60% of the subjects as “less painful” than competitor lancing devices. We found significant differences in lancing pain between lancing devices. Diabetes patients clearly preferred lancing devices that cause less lancing pain. In order to improve patient compliance with respect to an adequate glycemic control, the medical staff should preferentially prescribe lancing devices that cause less lancing pain. Keywords: lancing device, lancing pain, pain rating, self-monitoring of blood glucose Continue reading >>

Lancing Device Love: Multiclix Vs. Delica

Lancing Device Love: Multiclix Vs. Delica

Pricking our fingers multiple times a day isn't exactly something most of us get excited about, but I've discovered that some folks out there do get excited about the lancing device they use. While most of us use the lancer that came for free with our meter (i.e. we don't give it much thought), there are a couple of brand-name models that really seem to get people talking. They are the ACCU-CHEK Mutliclix from Roche — which I see all the time at diabetes conferences — and the new OneTouch Delica, which Lifescan just released this past June. To have a closer look at these, I thought it would be fun to recruit a couple of "fans" to share their thoughts on why they like their respective device... who knows, maybe we'll get a couple of converts? Photo: Christopher of "Don't Fear Diabetes" Team Multiclix "The Multiclix truly is the best lancing device ever created. First of all, the lancing devices that came with my other meters (e.g. the UltraSoft) used 28 gauge lancets. The MultiClix comes with 30 gauge lancets. Higher number means smaller lancet, which means less pain. There are 11 depth settings on the Multiclix compared to the 5 depths on the other devices I was using. My Multiclix is currently set at .5 — the lowest setting possible, and I have no trouble getting an adequate size sample. I think, by far, the best part of the Multiclix technology and what sets it apart from the rest of the lancing devices is the use of a drum of preloaded lancets. With the other models (although the Delica offers some improvements in this area) there is nothing holding the lancet in place after you hit the trigger. The spring that triggers the lancet wobbles side-to-side as it moves toward your finger. Obviously, any movement as it enters your skin causes unnecessary pain. The dru Continue reading >>

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