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Lada Diabetes Causes

Emotional Exhaustion-induced Latent Autoimmune Diabetes In Adults In A Young Lady

Emotional Exhaustion-induced Latent Autoimmune Diabetes In Adults In A Young Lady

Go to: Abstract Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) refers to an autoimmune disorder characterized with detectable islets antibodies in the early diagnosis and increased autoimmune beta-cell failure progression. Notably, this kind of diabetes seems to be confused with other phenotypic diabetes. A young woman suffered an emotional exhaustion-induced LADA, showing asthenia, polydipsia, polyuria, and visible weight loss. The patient emotionally ended a 14-year romantic relationship, leading to the emotional flooding. The data from physical examination and laboratory tests exhibited as follows: glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody (GADA) = 63.83 U/mL, the fasting blood glucose (FBG) = 13.3 mmol/L, and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) = 10.9%. According to levels of GADA, the patient was diagnosed as LADA. Interventions: The patient was clinically treated with insulin for 3-month. Then, running, diet-control, and emotional treatment were combined, such as the patient started a new relationship. An emotional recovery initiated from a new romantic relationship and a baby, showing normal levels of GAD65 (27.007 IU/mL) and FBG (5.46) mmol/L. The emotional exhaustion might play a significant role in induction of LADA. It is important that individuals should maintain optimism, cheer, and a positive attitude. Keywords: emotional exhaustion, GADA, latent autoimmune diabetes in adults Continue reading >>

Can The Flu Cause Lada?

Can The Flu Cause Lada?

Do any other LADAs share my suspicion that their diabetes was caused by influenza? There's not much research to support a flu-diabetes connection, but here's a link to a recent study: My own experience offers no more than speculation. I was diagnosed at age 60 with type 2 diabetes in summer 2007. After developing what seemed to be a sudden onset of symptoms that I recognized as indicating high blood sugar (thirst, frequent urination, rapid weight loss, really blurry vision, inability to exercise, etc.), I went to a small-town family doctor. My BG was 425 and my A1c was 11.2. The doctor put me on metformin, but my BG remained high, and, a week later, after I had a chance to read about diabetes and its complications, I asked to be put on insulin. Because I am thin, a 30-mile-a-week runner with no family history of diabetes, I began to suspect that I wasn't really type 2, but the Lantus insulin was working (A1c stayed 6.0 or under), so I didn't change doctors. However, after a couple of years, on my own, I got a c-peptide test: .2, and then .3 for two subsequent annual tests, all purchased online (I went to a LabCorp office for the test). My doctor didn't change his mind about his type 2 diagnosis, not even last May when I showed him my latest c-peptide test: less than .1 ng/mL (reference range 1.1-4.4). My A1c was 6.1, but my daily readings had a big spread between lows below 70 and highs above 180. Finally, last August, again, on my own, I ordered the GAD-65 test: 81.6 U/mL (I had antibodies galore), and this November, after some delay in getting an appointment, I saw an endocrinologist, who added Humalog to my daily regimen and, of course, changed my diagnosis to autoimmune diabetes. But, as I've indicated, almost from the outset, I suspected my doctor was wrong: my li Continue reading >>

Latent Autoimmune Diabetes In Adults

Latent Autoimmune Diabetes In Adults

Reviewed by endocrinologist Stanley S. Schwartz, MD, emeritus Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and George Grunberger, MD, FACP, FACE, Chairman of the Grunberger Diabetes Institute, Clinical Professor of Internal Medicine and Molecular Medicine & Genetics at Wayne State University School of Medicine and President of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists Call it diabetes type 1.5. Double diabetes. Or “slim type 2.” By any name, LADA—latent autoimmune diabetes in adults—plays by its own rules. Similar to type 1 diabetes, in LADA the immune system attacks and destroys insulin-making beta cells in the pancreas. But it progresses more slowly than type 1. Like type 2, it tends to happen after age 30. That’s just one reason LADA is usually misdiagnosed as type 2. Like typical type 2s, people with LADA may be insulin resistant; their bodies don’t respond readily to insulin’s signals to absorb blood sugar. And LADA can usually be controlled for months or years with pills and other non-insulin blood-sugar medications used by type 2s. But eventually, people with LADA need daily insulin shots or a pump to control their blood sugar.1 Researchers are still delving into LADA’s true nature. Some experts think it’s simply slow-motion type 1. Others have a hunch LADA’s got its own unique genetic signature.2 Up to 10% of people with type 2 may have LADA. “Knowing you have LADA could help your doctor choose early medications that can preserve beta cells longer. And it could help you and your doctor move you to insulin therapy sooner when blood sugar levels rise,” explains endocrinologist Stanley S. Schwartz, MD, an emeritus Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Is it LADA? Blood glucose tes Continue reading >>

Diabetes Lada

Diabetes Lada

Latent Autoimmune Diabetes of Adulthood (LADA) is adult onset type 1 diabetes that progresses more slowly than type 1 diabetes diagnosed in younger years. People with LADA are usually able to produce a significant amount of insulin for a number of years after diagnosis and so insulin therapy may be withheld until it is strictly necessary. However, research indicates that earlier insulin treatment can help to prolong the body’s ability to keep producing insulin. LADA is defined by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) as autoimmune diabetes, characterised by the presence of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibodies in the blood, diagnosed in adults between 30 and 50 years old. It is otherwise referred to as type 1.5 diabetes, or late-onset type 1 diabetes. LADA symptoms The symptoms of diabetes mellitus are often found in patients with LADA, but a delay in these symptoms developing can be expected if allowed to progress. It could between several months and a few years for more noticeable symptoms to appear, but early signs of LADA can be spotted following meals when blood sugar levels are higher, such as: Tiredness Hunger Irritability Brain fog – difficulty thinking clearly With high blood sugars a common early symptom of LADA, fatigue may be likely as the body struggles to move glucose from the blood into cells. Some may also experience vomiting and nausea due to a collection of built-up ketones in the blood, especially if LADA is misdiagnosed as type 2 diabetes. Infections and wounds will also generally take much longer to heal. LADA diagnosis The first step in diagnosing LADA is to initially test for the presence of hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) through one of the following methods: Oral glucose tolerance test A1c test Fasting plasma glucose t Continue reading >>

Latent Autoimmune Diabetes Of The Adult: Current Knowledge And Uncertainty

Latent Autoimmune Diabetes Of The Adult: Current Knowledge And Uncertainty

Go to: Patients with adult-onset autoimmune diabetes have less Human Leucocyte Antigen (HLA)-associated genetic risk and fewer diabetes-associated autoantibodies compared with patients with childhood-onset Type 1 diabetes. Metabolic changes at diagnosis reflect a broad clinical phenotype ranging from diabetic ketoacidosis to mild non-insulin-requiring diabetes, also known as latent autoimmune diabetes of the adult (LADA). This latter phenotype is the most prevalent form of adult-onset autoimmune diabetes and probably the most prevalent form of autoimmune diabetes in general. Although LADA is associated with the same genetic and immunological features as childhood-onset Type 1 diabetes, it also shares some genetic features with Type 2 diabetes, which raises the question of genetic heterogeneity predisposing to this form of the disease. The potential value of screening patients with adult-onset diabetes for diabetes-associated autoantibodies to identify those with LADA is emphasized by their lack of clinically distinct features, their different natural history compared with Type 2 diabetes and their potential need for a dedicated management strategy. The fact that, in some studies, patients with LADA show worse glucose control than patients with Type 2 diabetes, highlights the need for further therapeutic studies. Challenges regarding classification, epidemiology, genetics, metabolism, immunology, clinical presentation and treatment of LADA were discussed at a 2014 workshop arranged by the Danish Diabetes Academy. The presentations and discussions are summarized in this review, which sets out the current ideas and controversies surrounding this form of diabetes. What’s new? Latent autoimmune diabetes of the adult (LADA) is an autoimmune diabetes defined by adult-onset, Continue reading >>

What Causes Type 1 Diabetes?...state Your Theory

What Causes Type 1 Diabetes?...state Your Theory

What causes Type 1 Diabetes?...state your theory Dr. J. Bart Classen, a Maryland immunologist has proven that certain vaccines are the largest cause of type 1 diabetes in children, yet for whatever reason, this finding has received very little public media attention, while parents of autistic kids continue to argue that their childrens developmental disorder is due to vaccinations even though no fewer than 3 major studies have proven this not to be the case. Specifically, Dr. Classens data shows that vaccines cause approximately 80% of cases of type 1 diabetes in children who have received multiple vaccines starting after 2 month of life. Specifically, his data included vaccines for pertussis, mumps, rubella (mumps and rubella vaccines are among those found to be given too frequently in the U.S.), as well as hepatitis B, hemophilus influenza and others. However, the data indicates people with vaccine-induced type 1 diabetes may not develop the disease until 4 or more years after receiving a vaccine. As for the other theories, I was diagnosed in July 1976 as a 7-year old, and I can honestly say that I never had so much as a cold as a child, so there was no trauma or illness to attribute my diagnosis to. But, I was vaccinated and I believe that the scheduling of vaccinations has more to do with getting them per se. Why must a child have so many within such a short timeframe? It seems like we could be confusing the immune system with these different signals, and consequently, autoimmune diseases arise. I was diagnosed at age 14 we have attributed it to my body going through puberty. Who knows!!! Ive been dealing with it for almost 25 years. I was diagnosed in January just before I turned 20. I had been sick on and off all Fall semester, and I really never get sick. Then I Continue reading >>

The Lada Epidemic. What's Going On Here?

The Lada Epidemic. What's Going On Here?

A surprising number of people who are joining the online diabetes community after recent diagnoses are people who have been diagnosed with a new form of diabetes which is called LADA, which stands for Latent Autoimmune Diabetes of Adults. It is neither Type 1 or Type 2, but is often called "Type 1.5." Typically, a person with LADA goes to the doctor sometime after the age of 35 and is told they have type 2 diabetes. They are put on oral drugs like metformin or Avandia and almost nothing happens. If they read up online and cut their carbs their blood sugars do improve, but even so, over time they continue to rise. Within an average of four years, they have no insulin production left at all. At this point they must go on insulin. But the Lantus-only regimens most doctors prescribe--the ones that work well for many people with Type 2 diabetes--do not stop the inexorable rise in their blood sugars, and eventually they end up needing the full basal/bolus treatment that Type 1s use. That's because LADA is really a slow-developing form of Type 1. The body mounts an immune attack on the pancreas and wipes out the insulin producing cells. The difference between LADA and classic Type 1 is the speed with which this happens. In young Type 1s a person can go from normal to completely whacked in a week. People with LADA may take up to a decade to lose all their insulin-secreting capacity. People with LADA are often thin, so if you are thin and are told you have Type 2 diabetes, you should demand the antibody tests that are used to diagnose LADA. The antibodies tested for are: GAD antibodies, Islet cell antibodies, and more rarely, tyrosine phosphatase antibodies. But not all people with LADA are slim. People with defective autoimmune genes are also prone to get thyroid disease and rh Continue reading >>

Forms Of Diabetes

Forms Of Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes accounts for roughly 10% of the diabetes cases in the world with the majority being Type 2. An estimated 1-5% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes are rare types, such as latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA), maturity onset diabetes in the young (MODY), cystic fibrosis related diabetes (CFRD), Cushing’s syndrome and others. Explore these various forms of diabetes and what makes them distinct in the diabetes family. Learn how to test for diabetes type. What is Type 1 Diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is a chronic, autoimmune condition that occurs when the body’s own immune system attacks the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. This attack leaves the pancreas with little or no ability to produce insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar. Without insulin, sugar stays in the blood and can cause serious damage to organ systems, causing people to experience Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA).READ MORE What is Type 2 Diabetes? Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body cannot properly use insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar. This is also known as insulin resistance. In Type 2, the pancreas initially produces extra insulin, but eventually cannot keep up with production in order to keep blood sugar levels in check. Of the 415 million diabetes cases globally, 90% are estimated to be Type 2.READ MORE Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a form of diabetes that affects pregnant women, and occurs in 1 in 25 pregnancies worldwide. It is caused by the malfunctioning of insulin receptors, due to the presence of hormones from the placenta. It develops usually around the 24th week of pregnancy and will continue to affect both the mother and unborn child throughout the pregnancy.READ MORE LADA, (Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults) diabetes is rare and known Continue reading >>

Type I Diabetes — A Viral Thing?

Type I Diabetes — A Viral Thing?

Here's something I've been curious about for a long time. For a while I've been corresponding with a number of adult "late-onset" Type 1 (LADA) diabetics like myself who were told their disease manifested itself due to a virus. Strange, but a leading theory... I looked into this and discovered that the medical profession is pretty much still baffled about why people get Type 1 diabetes as adults. If we have the "genetic propensity," then why doesn't it manifest itself sooner? Adult-onset does appear to be more and more frequent, but why should this be if Type 1 is not brought on by poor diet or lifestyle? Here's one excellent link about What Causes Type 1 Diabetes from the University of Maryland Medical Center. Essentially this site tells us that "some researchers believe one or more viral infections may trigger the disease in genetically susceptible individuals." These researchers suggest: * An infection introduces a viral protein that resembles a beta-cell protein * T cells and antibodies are tricked by this resemblance into attacking the beta protein as well as the virus * Two people may be infected with the same virus and only one of them who is genetically prone will go on to develop diabetes * Among the viruses under scrutiny (suspected of triggering the Big D) are enteric viruses, which attack the intestinal tract. Coxsackieviruses are an enteric virus of particular interest. * BUT: One study has suggested that respiratory infection during a child's first year may actually be protective against diabetes, perhaps priming the immune response so that it is better able to respond to alien organisms later on. Gotcha. As usual, the theory sounds quite reasonable, but there is also intriguing evidence to suggest the opposite. What have we learned? It does seem pretty cl Continue reading >>

Diabetes Lada

Diabetes Lada

Tweet LADA stands for Latent Autoimmune Diabetes of Adulthood. LADA is a form of type 1 diabetes that develops later into adulthood. LADA tends to develop more slowly than type 1 diabetes in childhood and, because LADA can sometimes appear similar to type 2 diabetes, doctors may mistakenly diagnose LADA as type 2 diabetes. The definition provided by Prof. David Leslie, Principle Investigator of Action LADA, is that in Europe: LADA is defined as initially non-insulin requiring diabetes diagnosed in people aged 30-50 years with antibodies to GAD - glutamic acid decarboxylase. How does LADA compare with other diabetes types? LADA is sometimes referred to as type 1.5 diabetes. This is not an official term but it does illustrate the fact that LADA is a form of type 1 diabetes that shares some characteristics with type 2 diabetes. As a form of type 1 diabetes, LADA is an autoimmune disease in which the body’s immune system attacks and kills off insulin producing cells. The reasons why LADA can often be mistaken for type 2 diabetes is it develops over a longer period of time than type 1 diabetes in children or younger adults. Whereas type 1 diabetes in children tends to develop quickly, sometimes within the space of days, LADA develops more slowly, sometimes over a period of years. The slower onset of diabetes symptoms being presented in people over 35 years may lead a GP to initially diagnose a case of LADA as type 2 diabetes. Symptoms of LADA The first symptoms of LADA include: Feeling tired all the time or regularly tired after meals Foggy headedness Experiencing hunger soon after meals As LADA develops, a person’s ability to produce insulin will gradually decrease and this may lead to symptoms such as: It is important to catch the symptoms at the earliest stage because Continue reading >>

Lada Diabetes Symptoms And Treatment

Lada Diabetes Symptoms And Treatment

If you have been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes or prediabetes but standard diets and treatments aren’t helping much, you may have LADA (latent autoimmune diabetes in adults). What causes LADA? What are the symptoms and treatment? What is LADA? We usually hear that there are two types of diabetes. Type 2 is caused primarily by insulin resistance. The insulin isn’t effectively used by the body’s cells, so too much glucose stays in the blood and causes complications. Type 2 comes on slowly and used to be called “adult-onset diabetes.” Type 1 is caused by the body’s immune system destroying the beta cells in the pancreas, which produce insulin. Without insulin, our bodies can’t use glucose, and eventually people with Type 1 will die without injected insulin. Type 1 usually comes on rapidly in childhood or adolescence. LADA is a mixed type. It comes on slowly during adulthood like Type 2, but is caused mostly by an immune system reaction like Type 1. The diabetes website diabetes.co.uk defines LADA as “initially non-insulin requiring diabetes diagnosed in people aged 30–50 years.” It’s a common and serious problem. According to a study in the journal Diabetes, “Among patients [who appear to have] Type 2 diabetes, LADA occurs in 10% of individuals older than 35 years and in 25% below that age.” LADA is often misdiagnosed as Type 2. People with LADA may be denied needed insulin and given advice that doesn’t work. Symptoms of LADA According to diabetes.co.uk, early LADA symptoms may be vague. They include: • Foggy headedness • Feeling tired all the time or feeling tired after meals • Feeling hungry again soon after meals As LADA develops, a person’s ability to produce insulin will gradually decrease, and this may lead to more typical diabete Continue reading >>

I've Been Diagnosed With Lada — Latent Autoimmune Diabetes In Adults. What's The Difference Between It And Other Forms Of Diabetes?

I've Been Diagnosed With Lada — Latent Autoimmune Diabetes In Adults. What's The Difference Between It And Other Forms Of Diabetes?

Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is a slow progressing form of autoimmune diabetes. Like the autoimmune disease type 1 diabetes, LADA occurs because your pancreas stops producing adequate insulin, most likely from some "insult" that slowly damages the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. But unlike type 1 diabetes, with LADA, you often won't need insulin for several months up to years after you've been diagnosed. Many researchers believe LADA, sometimes called type 1.5 diabetes, is a subtype of type 1 diabetes. Other researchers believe diabetes occurs on a continuum, with LADA falling between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. People who have LADA are usually over age 30. Because they're older when symptoms develop than is typical for someone with type 1 diabetes and because initially their pancreases still produce some insulin, people with LADA are often misdiagnosed with type 2 diabetes. If you've been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and you're lean and physically active or you've recently lost weight without effort, talk with your doctor about whether your current treatment is still the best one for you. At first, LADA can be managed by controlling your blood sugar with diet, weight reduction if appropriate, exercise and, possibly, oral medications. But as your body gradually loses its ability to produce insulin, insulin shots will eventually be needed. More research is needed before the best way to treat LADA is established. Talk with your doctor about the best LADA treatment options for you. As with any type of diabetes, you'll need close follow-up to minimize progression of your diabetes and potential complications. Continue reading >>

Type 1.5 Diabetes: An Overview

Type 1.5 Diabetes: An Overview

Type 1.5 Diabetes (T1.5D) is also known as Latent Autoimmune Diabetes of Adults (LADA). LADA is considered by some experts to be a slowly progressive form of Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) while other experts in the field consider it a separate form of Diabetes. LADA or T1.5D is sometimes thought of as T1D that is diagnosed in adults over the age of 30—T1D is commonly diagnosed in children and younger adults. T1.5D is often found along with Type 2 Diabetes (T2D): up to 25% of individuals with T1.5D also have characteristics of T2D.1 This is sometimes called “double diabetes”. Individuals with T1.5D are all eventually dependent on insulin for treatment, and have a very high risk of requiring insulin within months or years (up to six years) after the initial diagnosis. This is in contrast to people with T1D—these people tend to need insulin within days or weeks of diagnosis.2 Individuals diagnosed with T2D relatively rarely require insulin treatment. Current recommendations are to treat individuals with T1.5D immediately with insulin, though this is not universally accepted (see below). The Causes of T1.5D Just as with other forms of diabetes, we don’t truly understand the underlying cause(s) of T1.5D. There are autoimmune components in Types 1, 1.5 and 2 diabetes with some overlap in the types of antibodies formed, so it is clear that as in T1D, the immune system has become “confused” and begins to act against the beta cells of the pancreas—the source of the insulin needed to control blood sugars. Both T1D and T1.5D have antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase or anti-GAD antibodies. As with T1D, individuals with T1.5D tend not to be obese, whereas in T2D, most individuals are overweight or obese. Genetics and Environmental Susceptibility Individuals with T1.5D Continue reading >>

Latent Autoimmune Diabetes Of Adults

Latent Autoimmune Diabetes Of Adults

Latent autoimmune diabetes of adults (LADA) is a form of diabetes mellitus type 1 that occurs in adulthood, often with a slower course of onset than type 1 diabetes diagnosed in juveniles.[3] Adults with LADA may initially be diagnosed incorrectly as having type 2 diabetes based on their age, particularly if they have risk factors for type 2 diabetes such as a strong family history or obesity. The diagnosis is typically based on the finding of hyperglycemia together with the clinical impression that islet failure rather than insulin resistance is the main cause; detection of a low C-peptide and raised antibodies against the islets of Langerhans support the diagnosis. It can only be treated with the usual oral treatments for type 2 diabetes for a certain period of time,[4][5] after which insulin treatment is usually necessary, as well as long-term monitoring for complications. The concept of LADA was first introduced in 1993,[6] though The Expert Committee on the Diagnosis and Classification of Diabetes Mellitus does not recognize the term, instead including it under the standard definition of diabetes mellitus type 1.[7] Signs and symptoms[edit] The symptoms of latent autoimmune diabetes of adults are similar to those of other forms of diabetes: polydipsia (excessive thirst and drinking), polyuria (excessive urination), and often blurred vision.[8] Compared to juvenile type 1 diabetes, the symptoms develop comparatively slowly, over a period of at least six months.[9] Diagnosis[edit] It is estimated that more than 50% of persons diagnosed as having non-obesity-related type 2 diabetes may actually have LADA. Glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody (GADA), islet cell autoantibody (ICA), insulinoma-associated (IA-2) autoantibody, and zinc transporter autoantibody (ZnT8) t Continue reading >>

5 Facts About Lada Diabetes That You Probably Didn’t Know

5 Facts About Lada Diabetes That You Probably Didn’t Know

2 0 LADA or Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults has been a pretty big topic of discussion over the last year, with an estimated 10% of Type 2 diabetes diagnoses being labeled as LADA. Most of the talk has been about the misdiagnosis of LADA as Type 2 diabetes, because its symptoms show up later in life. LADA, however, shares a lot of similarities with Type 1 diabetes as well. Here’s what you should know about LADA diabetes, which is also being called Type 1.5 diabetes, because of the commonalities it shares with both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. 1. Signs and symptoms of LADA usually become obvious after age 30. This is a common reason for misdiagnosis, since Type 1 diabetes is largely diagnosed during youth. Because of this, many people undergo treatment for Type 2 diabetes, which isn’t corrected until the medicine they’ve been prescribed fails to get their blood glucose levels under control. 2. LADA is more closely related with Type 1 diabetes than Type 2 diabetes. People with LADA test positively for GAD autoantibodies, which are a type of antibody that destroy the body’s own GAD (or Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase) cells and are also prevalent in people diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. 3. Absolute insulin deficiency progresses much slower with LADA. People diagnosed with LADA can sometimes still create insulin after their initial diagnosis. However, it usually progresses slowly to complete insulin deficiency over the course of 2-6 years, as opposed to Type 1 diabetes which sees the onset of total insulin deficiency much more quickly – usually within a twelve month period. 4. LADA usually requires insulin therapy. In the beginning stages of LADA, the body may still be producing insulin, and if a misdiagnosis of Type 2 diabetes has occurred, meal planning and bloo Continue reading >>

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