diabetestalk.net

Kombucha Insulin

Kombucha Tea: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Dosage, And Warning

Kombucha Tea: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Dosage, And Warning

Algue de Th, Champagne of Life, Champignon de la Charit, Champignon des Hros, Champignon de Longue Vie, Champignon Miracle, Combucha Tea, Dr. Sklenar's Kombucha Mushroom Infusion, Kombucha Th, Laminaire de Th, Mushroom Infusion, Fungus Japonicus, Kargasok Tea, Kombucha, Kombucha Mushroom Tea, Kwassan, Manchurian Fungus, Manchurian Mushroom Tea, Petite Mère Japonaise, Spumonto, T'Chai from the Sea, T de Kombucha, Th de Combucha, Th de Kombucha, Tschambucco. Kombucha is a type of yeast, although it is sometimes described incorrectly as a mushroom. Kombucha tea is made by fermenting kombucha and bacteria with black tea, sugar, and other ingredients. People use kombucha tea as medicine, but there is no scientific evidence that it is an effective treatment for any condition. Kombucha tea is used for memory loss , premenstrual syndrome ( PMS ), joint pain (rheumatism), aging, loss of appetite, AIDS, cancer , high blood pressure , constipation , arthritis , and hair regrowth. It is also used for increasing white cell (T-cell) counts, boosting the immune system, and strengthening the metabolism . Some people apply kombucha tea directly to the skin for pain. Kombucha tea contains alcohol, vinegar, B vitamins, caffeine, sugar, and other substances. However, there isn't enough evidence to know how kombucha tea might work for medicinal uses. Strengthening the immune system and metabolism . Kombucha tea is POSSIBLY UNSAFE for most adults when taken by mouth. It can cause side effects including stomach problems , yeast infections , allergic reactions, yellow skin (jaundice), nausea, vomiting, head and neck pain, and death. Kombucha tea, especially batches made at home where its hard to maintain a germ-free environment, can become contaminated with fungus (Aspergillus) and bac Continue reading >>

18 Kombucha Benefits That Will Change Your Life For Good

18 Kombucha Benefits That Will Change Your Life For Good

18 Kombucha Benefits That Will Change Your Life for Good Kombucha is a fermented tea that has a tangy, sweet, full-bodied flavor and is packed with health benefits. Many people are discovering the benefits of probiotics which are a source of good bacteria. The body needs beneficial bacteria for optimum functioning, including digestion and are turning to fermented foods. Kombucha can be made at home with simple ingredients such as black tea, vinegar, sugar and water and is allowed to sit and ferment for a week to a month. From this culture, Kombucha drinks are made, some with the classic, natural Kombucha flavor and others with additional flavoring such as spices or fruit juice. This beverage has numerous health benefits, which partly accounts for its popularity. Since it is fermented, it contains a small amount of alcohol, but the drink can be safely consumed by pregnant women and children, given certain precautions. Although Kombucha contains sugar, much of it is oxidized and the resulting mixture is low in sugar. It is also fizzy, which makes it a great alternative to sugary sodas. Kombucha can fight microbes because it contains acetic acid, which accounts for its tangy flavor. Acetic acid can destroy harmful bacteria while allowing good bacteria to thrive. Kombucha can prevent and fight infections and can work against candida yeasts that can be responsible for a number of health issues. Some alternative farmers have considered using Kombucha as an alternative to commercial antibiotics used for chickens. Regular antibiotics used in agriculture can be harmful to animal and humans, and Kombucha can provide the protective benefits of antiobiotics without killing good bacteria in the body. Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemic And Antilipidemic Properties Of Kombucha Tea In Alloxan-induced Diabetic Rats

Hypoglycemic And Antilipidemic Properties Of Kombucha Tea In Alloxan-induced Diabetic Rats

Go to: Background Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic metabolic disorder that constitutes a major public health problem throughout the world. Current estimates indicate that approximately 4% of the global population suffer from DM, a percentage which is expected to reach 5.4% in 2025 [1]. This disease is a multifactor disorder associated with chronic hyperglycemia and troublesome disruptions in carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolisms emanating from deficiencies or disruptions in insulin secretion [2], defects in reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes [3], and high oxidative stress impairing pancreatic beta cells [4,5]. Hyperglycemia leads to long-term tissue damages and complications, such as liver-kidney dysfunctions, often associated with serious diseases [6,7]. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus is increasing worldwide at alarming rates. Several therapeutic strategies are currently available for the treatment of this chronic metabolic disorder, including the stimulation of endogenous insulin secretion, enhancement of insulin action at the target tissues, inhibition of dietary starch and lipid degradation, and treatment with oral hypoglycemic agents [8]. The limitations associated with those therapeutic strategies have led to a determined search for more efficient and cost-effective alternatives. This trend has been further intensified by increasing doubts surrounding current dietary and other lifestyle behaviors together with growing interests in functional foods and nutraceuticals [9]. Complementary and alternative medicine applications have attracted special attention in recent research for they offer new promising opportunities for the development of efficient, side effect-free, and lower cost alternatives to existing synthetic hypoglycemic agents [ Continue reading >>

How Kombucha Helps Diabetics

How Kombucha Helps Diabetics

When yeast and bacteria are placed in sugared tea they form Kombucha. It regulates blood sugar levels and is a source of vitamins and minerals. Relieves diabetic complications like high blood pressure. Can cure baldness, insomnia, intestinal disorders, arthritis, etc. In a sugared tea, yeast and bacteria are placed and they form kombucha. Proponents believe it to be a good range of vitamins, minerals and acids, helpful in the regulation of blood sugar levels, cholesterol level and control of blood pressure. It is usually mistaken as mushroom because the mix of bacteria and yeast results in the formation of flat structure that mimics a mushroom cap. For several days, this bacteria-yeast mix is left in a cup of sugar-sweetened tea. After a few days, fermentation process starts and results in kombucha tea, which contains B vitamins and vinegar. During fermentation, the bacteria and yeast absorb the sugar present in the tea and small nub-like growths are formed. This can be used later for preparing kombucha tea. The non-sterile fermentation and unhygienic growing practices are the main reasons behind concerns related to kombucha. Health Benefits of Kombucha for Diabetics Kombucha, which is sour in taste, is beneficial for moderating the blood sugar level and keeps it within normal range. It works to relieve some diabetic complications, such as high blood pressure and improves cholesterol levels. Kombucha improves metabolism, energy levels and works to make digestion process better. However, there is little scientific evidence to support this. In an article published in the "Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology", it was stated that Kombucha is helpful in preventing and curing periodontal disease, of which diabetics are at an increased risk compared to non-diabetics. Continue reading >>

Health Benefits Of Kombucha Tea & Magnesium

Health Benefits Of Kombucha Tea & Magnesium

Health Benefits of Kombucha Tea & Magnesium Kombucha is a fermented tea that has been consumed for thousands of years. Not only does it have the same health benefits as tea, but its also rich in beneficial probiotics . Kombucha also contains antioxidants , can kill harmful bacteria and may help fight several diseases. Here are the top 8 health benefits of kombucha, based on scientific evidence. 1. Kombucha is a Rich Source of Probiotics Kombucha is thought to originate in China or Japan. Its made by adding specific strains of bacteria, yeast and sugar to black or green tea, and then allowing it to ferment for a week or more. During this process, the bacteria and yeast form a mushroom-like blob on the surface, which is why kombucha is also known as mushroom tea. This blob is actually a living symbiotic colony of bacteria and yeast , or a SCOBY, and can be used to ferment new kombucha. The fermentation process produces vinegar and several other acidic compounds, trace levels of alcohol and gases that make it carbonated. A large amount of probiotic bacteria is also produced during fermentation. Probiotics provide your gut with healthy bacteria. These bacteria can improve many aspects of health, including digestion, inflammation and even weight loss . For this reason, adding probiotics foods like kombucha to your diet can improve your health in many ways. Bottom Line: Kombucha is a type of tea that has been fermented. This makes it a good source of probiotics, which have many health benefits. 2. Kombucha Contains the Benefits of Green Tea Green tea is one of the healthiest beverages on the planet. This is because green tea contains many bioactive compounds, such as polyphenols , which function as powerful antioxidants in the body. Kombucha made from green tea has many of t Continue reading >>

Kombucha And Diabetes

Kombucha And Diabetes

Kombucha is a mix of bacteria and yeasts that is placed in tea to create a health tonic of sorts. It's said to help regulate blood sugar and possibly help with high blood pressure and high cholesterol, making it a drink of interest to diabetics. The question remains, however, of whether it works. The jury is still out. Video of the Day Kombucha is a "scoby," or symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeasts. Physically, it is a gelatinous colony that may remind you of a mushroom. Used for centuries in China, Japan, Korea and Russia, kombucha is steeped in tea and sugar for several days. The result is a drink that tastes something like sparkling apple cider, depending on the type of tea you use. The mixture produces a range of vitamins, minerals and acids that proponents say are healthful for a range of conditions, including diabetes. Kombucha tea is said to have a number of effects that make it of interest to diabetics. For example, if you use a more sour tea, kombucha may help by moderating fluctuations in blood sugar. In addition, it reportedly helps with diabetic complications such as high blood pressure and improving your cholesterol profile. It's also said to increase energy and improve digestion. Unfortunately, little modern scientific evidence exists to support any of these claims. The NYU Langone Medical Center reports the earliest investigations of kombucha took place in Germany in the 1930s, but more recent studies have been examining kombucha as a probiotic. For example, a January-March 2011 article in the "Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology" studied the promise of kombucha and other healthful bacteria in fighting periodontal disease, of which diabetics are at greater risk than nondiabetics. Scientists also suspect that changes in the bacteria in the gut c Continue reading >>

Kombucha Tea | American Nutrition Association

Kombucha Tea | American Nutrition Association

Neurasthenic stomach-liver-kidney disorders Only a few of the health claims made for Kombucha tea have a scientific basis, even though some existing studies do suggest potential health benefits. There is a considerable amount of mis-information available about Kombucha tea. For example, it is often called a mushroom that grows on sweetened tea. Actually, it is a colony of yeast and bacteria, a complex symbiosis of yeasts (simple fungi) and bacteria embedded in a pure cellulose "pancake." When this "pancake" is grown on a blend of black tea and sugar, it transforms the resulting liquid into a refreshingly sweet and sour, lightly sparkling beverage with a fruity fragrance. Many articles claim that Kombucha tea contains usnic acid, a compound found in certain lichens with strong antibiotic activity. There is no available evidence that Kombucha contains usnic acid! It is often claimed that Kombucha contains glucuronic acid, a potent detoxifying compound that the liver produces. In actuality, no credible laboratory analysis of Kombucha tea has found glucuronic acid. It does contain gluconic acid, a common food ingredient that is not used by the liver for detoxification. The microbiology of Kombucha tea is confusing, because most books and articles on Kombucha report names that are considerably outdated. In addition, the exact species of microorganisms may vary slightly depending on the starting culture. For those interested in this aspect, the best place to begin is the paperback book: KOMBUCHA TEA MUSHROOM: MANCHURIAN TEA MUSHROOM: THE ESSENTIAL GUIDE by Christopher Hobbs. Is it really a fountain of youth capable of all the miraculous claims? Can there be any justification for these recurring reports from around the world that have gone on for centuries? Any physician who Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pre-diabetic

Diabetes And Pre-diabetic

Diet & Life-style may strain your body's proper control of blood sugar levels and often leads to insulin insufficiency and erratic secretion of insulin - precursors to diabetes Research shows that when the body has optimal nutrition available that is specific to pancreatic and Immune System support, plus the electromagnetic directives to act on that nutritional input, it can manage insulin production, output and use more efficiently, and can rebuild pancreatic tissues and beta cell formations damaged by a diet disproportionately high in sugars. Sometimes we tend to eat too many simple carbohydrates (sugar, ice cream, crackers and cookies etc.) which tends to put a strain on the body's ongoing ability to deal with such overly refined foods. Our body, although miraculous, can wear out when asked to live off of a long- term compromised, overly processed diet. And when our diets have become compromised, we usually have various problems including suffering from the "sugar blues," those deep pockets of low energy reserves that we may feel after a meal (insufficiently balanced with protein and long chain carbohydrates) when we tend to get sleepy and look for the nearest couch. Unfortunately, such strain over time can lead to serious problems of Insulin insufficiency and erratic secretion, pancreatic disease, hormonal imbalance and Insulin receptor abnormalities, all of which may culminate into diabetes mellitus, unless the body can be rebalanced and restored through the proper diet. Whether hypo- or hyperglycemic (pre-diabetic), or diabetic, as well as to help the body maintain appropriate Insulin sensitivity. The inclusion of a safe chromium source in one's diet has been proven to assist the body in controlling Insulin production and use, are particular and specific for the Continue reading >>

A Comparison Between The Effect Of Black Tea And Kombucha Tea On Blood Glucose Level In Diabetic Rat

A Comparison Between The Effect Of Black Tea And Kombucha Tea On Blood Glucose Level In Diabetic Rat

A Comparison between The Effect of Black Tea and Kombucha Tea on Blood Glucose Level in Diabetic Rat Department of Physiology, Shahid Sadoughi Medical University, Yazd, Iran. Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder characterized by insufficient insulin secretion and/or insensitive target tissues to metabolic actions of insulin. Despite progressive efforts in production of synthetic drugs for treating diabetic patients there is a widespread propensity of patients to herbal medicine. Among these herbal remedies consumption of Kombucha tea (a solution of Kombucha mushroom cultivated in sweeted black tea) is relatively popular in some societies as an antidiabetic drink. On the other hand black tea (camellia sinensise) is a normal drink approximately in all societies. A casecontrol clinical trial study was conducted to evaluate the effect of black tea and Kombucha tea on blood glucose level in diabetic rats. In this study Wistar male rats with a free access to normal diet and lightdark cycle were used in room temperature of 22-25C. Diabetes mellitus was induced on 15 rats by intraperitoneal injection of 60 mg/kg BW Streptozotocin. The diabetic animals (with blood glucose level equal or more than 300 mg/dl) divided equally into two groups. The animals in group 1 consumed black tea and in group 2 Kombucha tea instead of fresh water while animals in group 3 consumed fresh water. The blood samples were obtained from each animal in 3, 7 and 15 days after diabetic induction and blood glucose level in these stages relative to that in the onset of diabetes induction and were compared with each other. Our data showed that blood sugar level of both the black tea and Kombucha tea consuming diabetic rats declined significantly (p<0.01). The blood sugar of the control group however re Continue reading >>

8 Evidence-based Health Benefits Of Kombucha Tea

8 Evidence-based Health Benefits Of Kombucha Tea

Kombucha is a fermented tea that has been consumed for thousands of years. Not only does it have the same health benefits as tea, but it's also rich in beneficial probiotics. Kombucha also contains antioxidants, can kill harmful bacteria and may help fight several diseases. Here are the top 8 health benefits of kombucha, based on scientific evidence. Kombucha is thought to originate in China or Japan. It's made by adding specific strains of bacteria, yeast and sugar to black or green tea, and then allowing it to ferment for a week or more (1). During this process, the bacteria and yeast form a mushroom-like blob on the surface, which is why kombucha is also known as "mushroom tea." This blob is actually a living symbiotic colony of bacteria and yeast, or a SCOBY, and can be used to ferment new kombucha. The fermentation process produces vinegar and several other acidic compounds, trace levels of alcohol and gases that make it carbonated (2). A large amount of probiotic bacteria is also produced during fermentation (3). Probiotics provide your gut with healthy bacteria. These bacteria can improve many aspects of health, including digestion, inflammation and even weight loss. For this reason, adding probiotics foods like kombucha to your diet can improve your health in many ways. Kombucha is a type of tea that has been fermented. This makes it a good source of probiotics, which have many health benefits. Green tea is one of the healthiest beverages on the planet. This is because green tea contains many bioactive compounds, such as polyphenols, which function as powerful antioxidants in the body (4). Kombucha made from green tea has many of the same chemical properties and therefore many of the same benefits. Studies show that drinking green tea regularly can increase the Continue reading >>

Diabetic? Kombucha Can Help!

Diabetic? Kombucha Can Help!

One of my patients recently asked for my advice on a meal plan that she should stick to in order to help manage her diabetes. I recommended healthy foods rich in fiber, vitamins, and minerals, as well as a variety of vegetables, fruits, and lean meats. When it came to beverages, I suggested she try kombucha tea. “Kombucha?” she asked confused. “Sounds like a board game.”Not quite! Kombucha has been around for centuries and provides essential vitamins, minerals, and acids that are crucial for several health conditions, including diabetes. Ad Did you know that there is an ancient Chinese technique that is clinically proven to significantly reduce blood pressure without drugs? In this special report, you’ll get all the details on how you can use this technique yourself to lower your blood pressure and get many other health benefits as well. Click here to see now. What Is Kombucha? Kombucha is a mixture of good bacteria and yeast; kombucha tea is made by fermenting a mixture of kombucha cultures, sugar, and tea for a few days to a few weeks. It is brewed with a SCOBY (symbiotic colony of yeast and bacteria), which results in an acidic probiotic drink. During the fermentation process, most of the sugar gets absorbed by the bacteria and yeast, so it has minimal effect on the body’s blood sugar levels. Kombucha Benefits for Diabetics Did you know that diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S.? The disease affects nearly 26 million Americans, so patients are always looking for new ways to manage their diabetes effectively. Kombucha has become especially popular as research shows it relieves diabetic complications: Keeps your blood sugar levels within a normal range Normalizes high blood pressure and improves cholesterol levels Improves your metaboli Continue reading >>

Top 10 Questions About Sugar & Kombucha

Top 10 Questions About Sugar & Kombucha

Sugar is truly a wondrous, misunderstood building block of life. It is nature’s gasoline: real, honest and pure energy, and when delivered in an easily digestible form, incredibly efficient! And yet, is there a necessary-for-life substance in our society with which we have a more tortured relationship than sugar? How did we end up in such a BATTLE with something we desperately need to survive? I have some ideas, but as always, the answers to “how” are not as important as the answers to “what now?” Pounding candy bars and soda pop is a rite of childhood that is born directly from the needs of the body. Kids are growing and they need energy. That’s how horrible/wonderful products of my youth like FunDip or Pixy Sticks became my favorites. As I grew up, I started taking my alcohol with lots of sugar. Dessert was my favorite meal. Snacks took their toll. But then something funny happened on the way to the Kombucha Forum. As my Kombucha consumption became more regular, I noticed that my sugar cravings were decreasing. At the same time, the “sour” taste of the Booch dissipated and became more natural to my palate. As Kombucha slowly alkalized my blood, my body kicked those cravings completely. These days, my sugar cravings are entirely mental. Once I have dessert in front of me, I rarely eat more than a few bites. The spirit is willing, but the flesh is *strong* and doesn’t want anything to do with that insulin spike. This is one of the greatest Kombucha benefits I have experienced. That is why misgivings about Kombucha & Sugar are mostly misguided. Without the sugar, there is no fermentation, and without fermentation, there’s no good stuff to feed your body. So let’s ask Wiki before we get started. Hey Wiki, what’s sugar? Sugar is a term for a class o Continue reading >>

Reasons To Drink Kombucha Everyday

Reasons To Drink Kombucha Everyday

Known as the “Tea of Immortality”, by the Chinese, kombucha was thought to have first been used in China in about 221BC, although the name is more likely to originate from Japan, where legend has it, a Korean physician named Kombu treated the Emporer, with the tea or “cha”, hence the name kombucha. A lot of mystery shrouds the details around kombucha, it was thought to have travelled through Asia to Russia and the rest of Europe where it was revived after World War Two when a doctor in Germany used it as part of his treatment for various ailments such as cancer, metabolic disorders, high blood pressure and diabetes. Kombucha isn’t a miracle cure, but what it does do, with its special combination of bacteria and yeast, acids and enzymes, is help restore balance to the body so that it has a better chance of healing itself naturally. What is kombucha? Kombucha is made from a mixture of black or green tea and sugar, which is then fermented for a period of between 7 to 30 days, by a colony of bacteria and yeast called a scoby (symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast). The scoby, which is also called a mushroom, has similar properties to the “mother” found in apple cider vinegar. The scoby breaks down the sugar and transforms it into acids, vitamins, minerals, enzymes, and carbon dioxide, which is what makes it fizzy. Kombucha, along with many other fermented foods, is back in popularity for its gut health benefits. Poor gut health is linked to a number of health issues including IBS, diabetes, obesity, rheumatoid, arthritis and depression. Replenishing the gut with a variety of fermented food sources can help to restore the good-bad bacteria balance in the gut and help us to become much healthier in the process. They can help with digestion, reducing inflammati Continue reading >>

15 Proven Health Benefits Of Kombucha Tea

15 Proven Health Benefits Of Kombucha Tea

15 Proven Health Benefits of Kombucha Tea 15 Proven Health Benefits of Kombucha Tea Over 2,000 years ago the Chinese dubbed kombucha tea as the Immortal Health Elixir or the Tea of Immortality because of its many health benefits. The first mentioned use of the tea was during Chinas Tsin Dynasty in 221 BC. The age-old fermented beverage is brimming with a variety of minerals, vitamins, enzymes, and antioxidants. A Korean doctor used the beneficial tea to treat Japans Emperor Inyko in 415 AD. The physicians name was Kombu and the Japanese word for tea is cha. The two words were quickly combined and the name kombucha was created. The teas popularity quickly spread to Russia where it was frequently called Tea Kvass made from the Japanese Mushroom. Although the drink contained no mushrooms, many people felt that the fermenting cultures that were floated on top of the liquid during its creation resembled a large, whitish mushroom. From Russia, the drinks reputation as curative drink reached Poland, Prussia, Germany, and Denmark where it was readily embraced as not only a tasty refreshment but also a medicinal cure all. During World War I and II, the fermented beverages popularity waned. However, shortly after World War II, a German doctor started using Kombucha tea as a treatment for cancer patients, diabetes, metabolic disorders, and high blood pressure. His research spurred renewed interest in the bevy of possible health benefits that the tea provides. Nowadays, it has been widely commercialized and is available throughout the United States, Europe, Russia, and many other parts of the world. In the United States, it has been widely embraced by the booming health and naturopathic industry. Virtually all health food stores sell a wide assortment of brands and varieties to fi Continue reading >>

Kombucha: Is It A Healthy Drink For People With Diabetes?

Kombucha: Is It A Healthy Drink For People With Diabetes?

Kombucha is a fermented tea drink that contains gut-friendly bacteria or probiotics that may aid in digestion and boost the immune system. Kombucha hasn't been extensively studied in humans but lab tests indicate that it may have a positive impact on blood sugar. Kombucha is a fizzy, fermented tea drink with a flavor that is just slightly sweet and at the same time, slightly acidic and sometimes a little bitter, not unlike sparkling apple cider or nonalcoholic beer. With its low-cal, low-sugar nutritional profile, sparkling kombucha is a great soda substitute for people with diabetes. And unlike artificially sweetened diet drinks, kombucha is a natural product with built-in health and nutrition benefits. Those benefits start with kombucha’s probiotic effects, which come from the bacteria and yeast that form during the fermentation process. Like the live cultures in yogurt, kefir, aged cheese, fresh sauerkraut, kimchi and other fermented foods, the microorganisms in kombucha that are responsible for its tangy flavor also help keep the natural population of bacteria in your digestive tract balanced and healthy. And that, in turn, helps keep the rest of you healthy! The bacterial culture in kombucha—known as a tea fungus or SCOBY (which stands for symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast)—forms a slippery, mushroom-like organism that, when added to a slightly sweetened tea mixture and brewed properly at controlled temperatures, results in a sparkling beverage that’s more fun to drink than plain water or plain seltzer, but equally refreshing. You can buy kombucha in the refrigerated section of most supermarkets and health food stores or you can learn to brew your own at home which is a fairly easy process and a less expensive way to enjoy it. (A 16 oz. commercially-b Continue reading >>

More in diabetes