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Key Statistics On Diabetes Uk

Paediatric Diabetes Key Fact Sheet References

Paediatric Diabetes Key Fact Sheet References

Department of Health (2007) Making every young person with diabetes matter. Report of the children and young people with diabetes working group. London: Department of Health. Diabetes UK (2012) Diabetes in the UK 2012; key statistics on diabetes [online] Available at: www.diabetes.org.uk/diabetes-in-the-uk-2012 [Accessed 6 May 2014] Diabetes UK (2012) The United Kingdom Insulin Pump Audit- service level data [online] Available at: www.diabetes.org.uk/Documents/News/The_United_Kingdom_Insulin_Pump_Audit_May_2013.pdf [Accessed 6 May 2014] Diabetes UK (2013) Best practice for commissioning diabetes services: An integrated care framework [online] Available at: www.diabetes.org.uk/About_us/What-we-say/Improving-services--standards/Best-practice-for-commissioning-diabetes-services-An-integrated-care-framework/ Franz, M.J., Bantle, J.P., Beebe, C.A., Brunzell, J.D., Chiasson, J., Garg, A., Holzmeister, L., Hoogwerf, B., Mayer-Davis, E., Mooradian, A.D., Purnell, J.Q. and Wheeler, M. (2002) Evidence based nutrition principles and recommendations for the treatment and prevention of diabetes and related complications. Diabetes Care:25: pp48-198. Franz, M.J., Boucher, J.L. and Evert, A.B. (2014) Evidence-based diabetes nutrition therapy recommendations are effective: the key is individualization Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy 2014:7 65–72 Garon, M.I., Ball, G.D.C. and Cruz M. L. (2003) Obesity and risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in children and adolescents. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism: 88 (4): pp. 1417-1427. Hex, N., Bartlett, C., Wright, D., Taylor, M. and Varley, D. (2012), Estimating the current and future costs of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes in the UK, including direct health costs and indirect societal Continue reading >>

Diabetes Now Affects More Than 4 Million People In Uk, Charity Says

Diabetes Now Affects More Than 4 Million People In Uk, Charity Says

The number of people living with diabetes in the UK has topped 4 million for the first time, a charity says. Based on 2014-15 GP patient data, Diabetes UK says there are 4.05 million people with the condition, including 3.5 million adults who have been diagnosed, an increase of 65% over the past decade and around 120,000 more than the previous year. There are thought to be 549,000 with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. Melanie Davies, professor of diabetes medicine at the University of Leicester and University Hospitals of Leicester NHS trust, who was made a CBE in the New Year’s honours list, said that numbers with the condition were growing across the world, often outstripping estimates. As such, she said, the 4 million figure is “not surprising but quite alarming. There are also lots of people at very high risk of developing diabetes over the next five to 10 years. The large driver is the increase in the number of people with type 2 diabetes, associated with obesity in the population. “We know that we have an ageing population so of course there are lots of ageing people with diabetes, but we’re seeing in the [Leicester] clinic, teenagers and even children with type 2 diabetes and we wouldn’t have seen that 10 years ago. Even under the age of 30 there are many more people developing it than before and having it for a longer time, so there are more complications.” The National Audit Office recently criticised the poor standard of diabetes care, and Diabetes UK says that unless this is remedied more people will end up experiencing potentially preventable diabetes-related complications such as blindness, kidney failure and amputation. The charity says more than 24,000 people a year with diabetes die before their time. Diabetes UK’s chief executive, Chris Askew, Continue reading >>

Facts About Diabetes

Facts About Diabetes

You can be a diabetes expert with our diabetes facts. Don't forget to share them with your friends and family so they know about diabetes too! General diabetes facts The full medical name for diabetes is Diabetes Mellitus There are 3 main types of diabetes: type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes Type 1 diabetes is sometimes called juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes Type 1 diabetes is managed using insulin injections or an insulin pump 90% of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes used to be called non-insulin dependent diabetes Type 2 diabetes is managed by diet, exercise and sometimes medication and insulin Diabetes in the UK More than 3 million people in the UK are diagnosed with diabetes - of these about 270,000 have type 2 diabetes and around 300,000 have from type 1 diabetes Approximately 850,000 people in the UK have undiagnosed type 2 diabetes In the UK, most diabetes patients receive treatment on the National Health Service (NHS) Diabetes worldwide Diabetes affects around 370 million adults worldwide The global diabetes rate is expected to grow to 552 million by 2030, or 9.9% of the adult population Diabetes is rapidly increasing in low- and middle-income countries China has the largest diabetes population, with 90 million diabetes sufferers, followed by India (61.3m) and the USA (23.7m) Africa is projected to see the largest growth in diabetes prevalence between now and 2030, with rates forecast to rise from 14.7 million to 28 million (90% increase) Diabetes history World Diabetes Day is on November 14th every year Diabetes was given its name by the Greek Physician Aretaeus (30-90CE), but the history of the disease can be dated back to ancient Egypt! There is a lot to learn about diabetes, but don’t get put off! Random diabete Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Facts And Stats

Diabetes: Facts And Stats

CONTENTS PART 1: PREVALENCE OF DIABETES 03 Globally UK Diagnosed Undiagnosed Prevalence 04 Type 1 and Type 2 Children with diabetes PART 2: WHO IS AT RISK OF DIABETES? 06 Genes Ethnicity 07 Obesity Deprivation Gestational diabetes PART 3: THE IMPACT OF DIABETES 10 Cardiovascular disease 11 Kidney disease Eye disease 12 Amputation Depression Neuropathy 13 Sexual dysfunction Complications in pregnancy Dementia 14 Life expectancy and mortality Financial costs PART 4: DIABETES CARE 16 Diabetes care PART 5: REFERENCES 18 References DIABETES: FACTS AND STATS 01 CONTENTS FURTHER HELP If you need any more help with your communications or have a question about anything in this document, contact the Clinical team. OF DIABETES PREVALENCE PART ONE DIABETES: FACTS AND STATS 03 PART ONE: HOW COMMON IS DIABETES? GLOBALLY The estimated diabetes prevalence for adults between the ages of 20 and 79 worldwide for 2014 was 387 million and it is expected to affect 592 million people by 2035. It is estimated that 179 million people have undiagnosed Type 2 diabetes. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) estimated that in 2013 five countries had more than 10 million people with diabetes: China, India, the United States of America, Brazil, the Russian Federation. The IDF also reported that in 2013 the ten countries with the highest diabetes prevalence in the adult population were Tokelau (37.5%), Micronesia, Marshall Islands, Kiribati, Cook Islands, Vanuatu, Saudi Arabia, Nauru, Kuwait and Qatar (22.9%). Diabetes affects people in both urban and rural settings worldwide, with 64% of cases in urban areas and 36% in rural1. UK It is estimated that more than one in 16 people in the UK has diabetes (diagnosed or undiagnosed)2. There are 3.9 million people living with diabetes in the UK. DIAG Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevalence

Diabetes Prevalence

Tweet Since 1996, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK has risen from 1.4 million to 3.5 million. Taking into account the number of people likely to be living with undiagnosed diabetes, the number of people living with diabetes in the UK is over 4 million. Diabetes prevalence in the UK is estimated to rise to 5 million by 2025. Type 2 diabetes in particular has been growing at the particularly high rate and is now one of the world’s most common long term health conditions. UK diabetes prevalence Currently, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK is estimated to be 3.5 million. [16] It is predicted that up to 549,000 people in the UK have diabetes that is yet to be diagnosed. This means that, including the number of undiagnosed people, there is estimated to be over 4 million people living with diabetes in the UK at present. This represents 6% of the UK population or 1 in every 16 people having diabetes (diagnosed and undiagnosed). The prevalence of diabetes in the UK (for adults) is broken down as follows: How many people have diabetes in the UK Country Number of People England 2,913,538 Northern Ireland 84,836 Scotland 271,312 Wales 183,348 The majority of these cases are of type 2 diabetes, which has been linked to increasing cases of obesity. Statistics suggest that a slightly higher proportion of adult men have diabetes. Men account for 56 per cent of UK adults with diabetes and women account for 44 per cent. World diabetes prevalence It is estimated that 415 million people are living with diabetes in the world, which is estimated to be 1 in 11 of the world’s adult population. 46% of people with diabetes are undiagnosed. The figure is expected to rise to 642 million people living with diabetes worldwide by 2040. Prevalence across Continue reading >>

Diabetes Life Expectancy

Diabetes Life Expectancy

Tweet After diabetes diagnosis, many type 1 and type 2 diabetics worry about their life expectancy. Death is never a pleasant subject but it's human nature to want to know 'how long can I expect to live'. There is no hard and fast answer to the question of ‘how long can I expect to live’ as a number of factors influence one’s life expectancy. How soon diabetes was diagnosed, the progress of diabetic complications and whether one has other existing conditions will all contribute to one’s life expectancy - regardless of whether the person in question has type 1 or type 2 diabetes. How long can people with diabetes expect to live? Diabetes UK estimates in its report, Diabetes in the UK 2010: Key Statistics on Diabetes[5], that the life expectancy of someone with type 2 diabetes is likely to be reduced, as a result of the condition, by up to 10 years. People with type 1 diabetes have traditionally lived shorter lives, with life expectancy having been quoted as being reduced by over 20 years. However, improvement in diabetes care in recent decades indicates that people with type 1 diabetes are now living significantly longer. Results of a 30 year study by the University of Pittsburgh, published in 2012, noted that people with type 1 diabetes born after 1965 had a life expectancy of 69 years.[76] How does diabetic life expectancy compare with people in general? The Office for National Statistics estimates life expectancy amongst new births to be: 77 years for males 81 years for females. Amongst those who are currently 65 years old, the average man can expect to live until 83 years old and the average woman to live until 85 years old. What causes a shorter life expectancy in diabetics? Higher blood sugars over a period of time allow diabetic complications to set in, su Continue reading >>

Save Time And Improve Your Marks With Cite This For Me

Save Time And Improve Your Marks With Cite This For Me

10,587 students joined last month! ✔ Save your bibliographies for longer ✔ Super fast and accurate citation program ✔ Save time when referencing ✔ Make your student life easy and fun ✔ Pay only once with our Forever plan ✔ Use our extensive Premium features (Plagiarism checks, Word Add On...) ✔ Create and edit multiple bibliographies Continue reading >>

Are Both Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes Patients At The Risk Of Death?

Are Both Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes Patients At The Risk Of Death?

Are both type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients at the risk of death? Yes, absolutely. Every single person on the planet with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes will die. But don’t worry, so will everyone else - it is all just a matter of time. The real question should be are they at risk of a premature death due to their conditions, and unfortunately the answer to that is also yes for various reasons. The first reason is the impact of long-term high blood glucose levels, including damage to large and small blood vessels, which can lead to heart attack and stroke, and problems with the kidneys, eyes, feet and nerves. Another risk often overlooked is overdosing on insulin. Insulin is a highly dangerous hormone, taking too much will cause a person to slip into a hypoglycemic coma which can lead to death. Alternatively, it is possible to die from not getting enough (or any insulin), due to Diabetic ketoacidosis Continue reading >>

Diabetic Eye Disease: A Uk Incidence And Prevalence Study

Diabetic Eye Disease: A Uk Incidence And Prevalence Study

Title: Diabetic eye disease: A UK Incidence and Prevalence Study, Author: Rohini Mathur et al. (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine), Publisher: RNIB, Year of Publication: 2017 This research report investigates trends in prevalence and incidence of diabetic retinopathy in the UK. Background Diabetic retinopathy is one of the leading causes of visual impairment and blindness in the UK, particularly among working age people. In the UK, within 20 years of diagnosis, nearly all people with Type 1 and almost two thirds of people with Type 2 diabetes have some degree of retinopathy. Prior to this research, there were no UK-wide population-based measures of incidence and prevalence. To enhance our understanding of diabetic retinopathy in the UK, RNIB commissioned the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine to estimate the incidence and prevalence of diabetic retinopathy. Aims The aims of the research were to analyse a large patient database with millions of records and ascertain: The prevalence and incidence of diabetic retinopathy in the UK by sub group Whether diabetic retinopathy is more or less common in specific groups of people; specifically whether incidence and prevalence varies with age, sex, geographical location, ethnicity and socio-economic status An estimated time it takes to develop visual impairment following onset of diabetic retinopathy Key Findings In 2014, the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was 54.6% in people with Type 1 diabets and 30.0% in people with Type 2 diabetes The overall prevelance of diabetic retinopathy has been increasing steadily over the last 10 years. The increase is likely to be related to increasing prevalence of Type 2 diabetes and potentially increased ascertainment through nationwide screening programs. Higher rate Continue reading >>

Blender At Work In A Care Environment For Diabetes Uk

Blender At Work In A Care Environment For Diabetes Uk

Blender provides the basis for a fast and effective solution that addresses issues Diabetes UK had with incoming data streams. It replaced an increasingly time-consuming and costly in-house project, and was built and installed in a very short time-span, proving itself flexible, customisable, scalable and extremely well suited to the CARE environment (though it is equally effective working in conjunction with other database types). Wood for Trees had already established a working relationship with Diabetes UK, having carried out a range of analysis projects and a successful FastStats database build and installation. We introduced them to our data integration software tool, Blender, and collaborated to develop and install a solution that resulted in significant improvements, savings and efficiencies in the charity’s key data flows. Read more and download the case study here. Like Tweet Pin it Continue reading >>

Sugars And Type 2 Diabetes

Sugars And Type 2 Diabetes

What is type 2 diabetes? Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person’s blood sugar to be too high. There are two forms of diabetes: type 1 and type 2 [1]. Insulin is a hormone that is key in regulating blood glucose levels. Type 2 diabetes can occur either as a result of insulin receptors becoming desensitised and as a result no longer responding to insulin; or, due to the beta cells of the pancreas no longer producing insulin. Often it is a combination of these two factors that leads to this condition known as type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is by far the most common type – of all the adults who have diabetes, 90% of them have type 2. Diabetes is an increasing health problem in the UK with 3.2million people diagnosed with diabetes and a further 850,000 estimated to be undiagnosed [1]. Diabetes is a growing health burden and it is estimated that by 2025, 5 million people will have been diagnosed in the UK [2]. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in the UK and the disease’s complications cause more than 100 amputations to take place each week. Each year, 24 000 people die early from diabetes-associated complications [3]. Its total cost is estimated at £13.8billion each year [4]. It is predicted that the annual NHS cost of the direct treatment of diabetes in the UK will increase to £16.9 billion over the next 25 years, which is 17 per cent of the NHS budget [5], believed to potentially bankrupt the NHS What are the causes of Type 2 diabetes? There is a complex combination of genetic and environmental risk factors that play a part in the development of diabetes – it tends to cluster in families, but there is also a strong link to environmental risk factors. Ethnicity also plays a major role in its development, with people of South Asian descent Continue reading >>

Non-communicable Diseases

Non-communicable Diseases

Advances in diagnosis and treatment have led to reductions in premature deaths from major causes such as heart disease, strokes, respiratory disease and infectious disease, as clearly seen in the trend graphs below. Male age-standardised mortality rates by major cause, England and Wales 1951-2010 Female age-standardised mortality rates by major cause, England and Wales 1951-2010 It is estimated that there are 2 million people in the UK with a major neurological condition (1) – including about 600,000 with epilepsy (2) and 127,000 with Parkinson's disease (3). The burden on health and social care is high: 1 million people are disabled by their neurological condition and 350,000 require help with daily activities (4) – and as many as 1 in 10 emergency medical admissions are for neurological problems (5). Some neuro-developmental disorders such as epilepsy and Parkinson's disease are more common in old age – the number of people in the UK with Parkinson's disease is estimated to rise by 27 per cent between 2009 and 2020 (3). Prevalence rates for Parkinson's disease in the UK, 2009 Musculoskeletal disease is one of the most prevalent long-term conditions, affecting 137 people per 1,000 reporting a long-term condition (6). Osteoarthritis (a degenerative disease of joints, causing pain and stiffness, and leading to a decline in physical function) is the most common reason for hip or knee replacement (7). Back pain affects 4 out of 5 people at some time in their life; 2 out of 5 have had back pain for more than a day during the past year (8). Osteoporosis (a reduction in bone mineral density which increases the risk of bone fractures especially after falls) is estimated to cause one in two women and one in five men over the age of 50 to break a bone (9). In the future co Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes – where the body's immune system attacks and destroys the cells that produce insulin type 2 diabetes – where the body doesn't produce enough insulin, or the body's cells don't react to insulin Type 2 diabetes is far more common than type 1. In the UK, around 90% of all adults with diabetes have type 2. During pregnancy, some women have such high levels of blood glucose that their body is unable to produce enough insulin to absorb it all. This is known as gestational diabetes. Pre-diabetes Many more people have blood sugar levels above the normal range, but not high enough to be diagnosed as having diabetes. This is sometimes known as pre-diabetes. If your blood sugar level is above the normal range, your risk of developing full-blown diabetes is increased. It's very important for diabetes to be diagnosed as early as possible because it will get progressively worse if left untreated. When to see a doctor Visit your GP as soon as possible if you experience the main symptoms of diabetes, which include: urinating more frequently than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk cuts or wounds that heal slowly blurred vision Type 1 diabetes can develop quickly over weeks or even days. Many people have type 2 diabetes for years without realising because the early symptoms tend to be general. Causes of diabetes The amount of sugar in the blood is controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is produced by the pancreas (a gland behind the stomach). When food is digested and enters your bloodstream, insulin moves glucose out of the blood and into cells, where it's broken down to produce ene Continue reading >>

Diabetes Fact Sheet

Diabetes Fact Sheet

The Big D: defeating diabetes through diet By Veronika Powell (formerly Charvatova) MSc, Viva!Health Campaigner As diabetes continues to spread all over the world, it is essential that an effective approach to its prevention and treatment is adopted. Current mainstream recommendations are not powerful enough and medication does not treat the condition. Diabetes mellitus is a health condition characterised by high levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood, which the body cannot use properly and eventually excretes in the urine (together with a lot of water). It is caused either by the pancreas not producing hormone insulin (or not enough of it) or by the body cells’ inability to react to insulin. Insulin is produced by the pancreas and acts as a key that lets glucose into the body’s cells. Glucose is a vital source of energy for the cells and thus the main fuel for the body’s processes. It comes from digesting carbohydrate and it’s also partially produced by the liver. Carbohydrates are the main nutrient in healthy foods such as wholegrain or rye bread, pasta, oats, brown rice, pulses (beans, peas, and lentils), sweet potatoes, and in not so healthy foods such as white bread, cakes, sweets and other sugary foods. If the body cannot use glucose as a source of energy, it uses fat instead but this inevitably disturbs biochemical balance of the body and leads to further health complications. Symptoms of diabetes include tiredness, irritability, nausea, hunger, weight loss, blurred vision, tingling sensations in the hands and feet and dry, itchy skin. Numbers skyrocketing In 1985 an estimated 30 million people worldwide had diabetes; a decade later this figure had increased to 135 million and by 2000 an estimated 171 million people had diabetes. It is predicted that at l Continue reading >>

Nhs Statistics, Facts And Figures

Nhs Statistics, Facts And Figures

NHS Confederation / Resources / NHS statistics, facts and figures Get the facts behind the headlines with our compilation of key NHS statistics. The NHS facts and figures apply to England, unless otherwise stated. This data was last updated in July 2017. NHS funding NHS net expenditure (resource plus capital, minus depreciation) has increased from £78.881 billion in 2006/071 to £120.512 billion in 2016/17.2 Planned expenditure for 2017/18 is £123.817bn and for 2018/19 is £126.269bn.3 In real terms the budget is expected to increase from £120.512bn in 2016/17 to £123.202bn by 2019/20.4 Health expenditure (medical services, health research, central and other health services) per capita in England has risen from £1,879 in 2011/12 to £2,106 in 2015/16.5 The NHS net deficit for the 2015/16 financial year was £1.851 billion (£599m underspend by commissioners and a £2.45bn deficit for trusts and foundation trusts).6 The provider deficit for the 2016/17 financial year has been confirmed at £791m.7 The most recently published national surveys of investment for mental health found there had been real terms reductions of 1 per cent for working age adults and 3.1 per cent for older people in 2011/12.8 CCG investment in mental health was £9.148bn in 2015/16 and a planned £9.500bn in 2016/17.9 Providers and commissioners of NHS services There are in England: 207 clinical commissioning groups10 135 acute non-specialist trusts (including 84 foundation trusts) 17 acute specialist trusts (including 16 foundation trusts) 54 mental health trusts (including 42 foundation trusts) 35 community providers (11 NHS trusts, 6 foundation trusts, 17 social enterprises and 1 limited company) 10 ambulance trusts (including 5 foundation trusts)11 7,454 GP practices12 853 for-profit and no Continue reading >>

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