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Key Statistics On Diabetes Uk

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Paediatric Diabetes Key Fact Sheet References

Paediatric Diabetes Key Fact Sheet References

Department of Health (2007) Making every young person with diabetes matter. Report of the children and young people with diabetes working group. London: Department of Health. Diabetes UK (2012) Diabetes in the UK 2012; key statistics on diabetes [online] Available at: www.diabetes.org.uk/diabetes-in-the-uk-2012 [Accessed 6 May 2014] Diabetes UK (2012) The United Kingdom Insulin Pump Audit- service level data [online] Available at: www.diabetes.org.uk/Documents/News/The_United_Kingdom_Insulin_Pump_Audit_May_2013.pdf [Accessed 6 May 2014] Diabetes UK (2013) Best practice for commissioning diabetes services: An integrated care framework [online] Available at: www.diabetes.org.uk/About_us/What-we-say/Improving-services--standards/Best-practice-for-commissioning-diabetes-services-An-integrated-care-framework/ Franz, M.J., Bantle, J.P., Beebe, C.A., Brunzell, J.D., Chiasson, J., Garg, A., Holzmeister, L., Hoogwerf, B., Mayer-Davis, E., Mooradian, A.D., Purnell, J.Q. and Wheeler, M. (2002) Evidence based nutrition principles and recommendations for the treatment and prevention of diabetes and related complications. Diabetes Care:25: pp48-198. Franz, M.J., Boucher, J.L. and Evert, A.B. (2014) Evidence-based diabetes nutrition therapy recommendations are effective: the key is individualization Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy 2014:7 65–72 Garon, M.I., Ball, G.D.C. and Cruz M. L. (2003) Obesity and risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in children and adolescents. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism: 88 (4): pp. 1417-1427. Hex, N., Bartlett, C., Wright, D., Taylor, M. and Varley, D. (2012), Estimating the current and future costs of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes in the UK, including direct health costs and indirect societal Continue reading >>

Diabetes Fact Sheet

Diabetes Fact Sheet

The Big D: defeating diabetes through diet By Veronika Powell (formerly Charvatova) MSc, Viva!Health Campaigner As diabetes continues to spread all over the world, it is essential that an effective approach to its prevention and treatment is adopted. Current mainstream recommendations are not powerful enough and medication does not treat the condition. Diabetes mellitus is a health condition characterised by high levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood, which the body cannot use properly and eventually excretes in the urine (together with a lot of water). It is caused either by the pancreas not producing hormone insulin (or not enough of it) or by the body cells’ inability to react to insulin. Insulin is produced by the pancreas and acts as a key that lets glucose into the body’s cells. Glucose is a vital source of energy for the cells and thus the main fuel for the body’s processes. It comes from digesting carbohydrate and it’s also partially produced by the liver. Carbohydrates are the main nutrient in healthy foods such as wholegrain or rye bread, pasta, oats, brown rice, pulses (beans, peas, and lentils), sweet potatoes, and in not so healthy foods such as white bread, cakes, sweets and other sugary foods. If the body cannot use glucose as a source of energy, it uses fat instead but this inevitably disturbs biochemical balance of the body and leads to further health complications. Symptoms of diabetes include tiredness, irritability, nausea, hunger, weight loss, blurred vision, tingling sensations in the hands and feet and dry, itchy skin. Numbers skyrocketing In 1985 an estimated 30 million people worldwide had diabetes; a decade later this figure had increased to 135 million and by 2000 an estimated 171 million people had diabetes. It is predicted that at l Continue reading >>

Facts About Diabetes

Facts About Diabetes

You can be a diabetes expert with our diabetes facts. Don't forget to share them with your friends and family so they know about diabetes too! General diabetes facts The full medical name for diabetes is Diabetes Mellitus There are 3 main types of diabetes: type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes Type 1 diabetes is sometimes called juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes Type 1 diabetes is managed using insulin injections or an insulin pump 90% of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes used to be called non-insulin dependent diabetes Type 2 diabetes is managed by diet, exercise and sometimes medication and insulin Diabetes in the UK More than 3 million people in the UK are diagnosed with diabetes - of these about 270,000 have type 2 diabetes and around 300,000 have from type 1 diabetes Approximately 850,000 people in the UK have undiagnosed type 2 diabetes In the UK, most diabetes patients receive treatment on the National Health Service (NHS) Diabetes worldwide Diabetes affects around 370 million adults worldwide The global diabetes rate is expected to grow to 552 million by 2030, or 9.9% of the adult population Diabetes is rapidly increasing in low- and middle-income countries China has the largest diabetes population, with 90 million diabetes sufferers, followed by India (61.3m) and the USA (23.7m) Africa is projected to see the largest growth in diabetes prevalence between now and 2030, with rates forecast to rise from 14.7 million to 28 million (90% increase) Diabetes history World Diabetes Day is on November 14th every year Diabetes was given its name by the Greek Physician Aretaeus (30-90CE), but the history of the disease can be dated back to ancient Egypt! There is a lot to learn about diabetes, but don’t get put off! Random diabete Continue reading >>

Key Data: Diet, Weight And Diabetes

Key Data: Diet, Weight And Diabetes

Men generally eat a poorer diet than women and are less knowledgeable about healthy foods. 24% of men and 29% of women consumed the recommended five or more portions of fruit and vegetables daily in England in 2011 (Reference: Information Centre). Consumption varied with age among both sexes, being lowest among those aged 16-24 (15% of men and 20% of women this age ate five or more portions) (Reference: Information Centre). Higher consumption was also associated with higher income: 32% of men and 37% of women in the highest income quintile consumed five or more portions in 2009, but only 18% of men and 19% of women in the lowest quintile had done so (Reference: Information Centre). A higher proportion of women (78%) than men (62%) were aware that five portions of fruit and vegetables should be consumed per day (Reference: Information Centre). In England in 2014, 81% of men and 53% of women were estimated to exceed the recommended maximum salt consumption of no more than 6g per day Mean estimated salt intake for adults aged 19 to 64 years was 8.0g/day (33% higher than the SACN recommended maximum); 9.1g/day for men and 6.8g/day for women. Median estimated salt intake was 7.6g/day (27% above the SACN recommended maximum); 8.6g/day for men, 6.2g/day for women. (Reference: Public Health England). According to the World Cancer Research Fund, men in the UK are less aware than women that eating processed meat such as bacon and ham increases the risk of cancer and they eat twice as much as women (Reference: WCRF). WCRF has found that 36 per cent of men know about the link between processed meat and bowel cancer, while for women the figure is 41 per cent. Men eat an average of nearly 50g of processed meat a day compared to 24g for women. Weight Men are more likely than women to Continue reading >>

Diabetic Eye Disease: A Uk Incidence And Prevalence Study

Diabetic Eye Disease: A Uk Incidence And Prevalence Study

Title: Diabetic eye disease: A UK Incidence and Prevalence Study, Author: Rohini Mathur et al. (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine), Publisher: RNIB, Year of Publication: 2017 This research report investigates trends in prevalence and incidence of diabetic retinopathy in the UK. Background Diabetic retinopathy is one of the leading causes of visual impairment and blindness in the UK, particularly among working age people. In the UK, within 20 years of diagnosis, nearly all people with Type 1 and almost two thirds of people with Type 2 diabetes have some degree of retinopathy. Prior to this research, there were no UK-wide population-based measures of incidence and prevalence. To enhance our understanding of diabetic retinopathy in the UK, RNIB commissioned the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine to estimate the incidence and prevalence of diabetic retinopathy. Aims The aims of the research were to analyse a large patient database with millions of records and ascertain: The prevalence and incidence of diabetic retinopathy in the UK by sub group Whether diabetic retinopathy is more or less common in specific groups of people; specifically whether incidence and prevalence varies with age, sex, geographical location, ethnicity and socio-economic status An estimated time it takes to develop visual impairment following onset of diabetic retinopathy Key Findings In 2014, the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was 54.6% in people with Type 1 diabets and 30.0% in people with Type 2 diabetes The overall prevelance of diabetic retinopathy has been increasing steadily over the last 10 years. The increase is likely to be related to increasing prevalence of Type 2 diabetes and potentially increased ascertainment through nationwide screening programs. Higher rate Continue reading >>

Population Trends In The 10-year Incidence And Prevalence Of Diabetic Retinopathy In The Uk: A Cohort Study In The Clinical Practice Research Datalink 2004–2014

Population Trends In The 10-year Incidence And Prevalence Of Diabetic Retinopathy In The Uk: A Cohort Study In The Clinical Practice Research Datalink 2004–2014

Go to: To describe trends in the incidence and prevalence of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in the UK by diabetes type, age, sex, ethnicity, deprivation, region and calendar year. Primary and secondary outcome measures Age-standardised prevalence and incidence of diabetes, DR and severe DR (requiring photocoagulation) by calendar year and population subgroup. Relative risk of developing DR and severe DR by population subgroup. Results The prevalence of DR was 48.4% in the population type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) (14 846/30 657) and 28.3% (95 807/338 390) in the population with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Prevalence of DR remained stable in people with T2DM and decreased in people with T1DM. Screening for DR increased over time for patients with T2DM and remained static for patients with T1DM Incidence of DR increased in parallel with the incidence of T2DM in both diabetic populations. Among patients with T2DM, relative risk of DR varied significantly by region, was increased for older age groups and in men compared with women, with risk of severe DR increased in South Asian groups and more deprived groups. Relative risk of DR for patients with T1DM varied by age and region, but not by gender, ethnic group or deprivation. This is the largest study to date examining the burden of DR in the UK. Regional disparities in incidence may relate to differences in screening delivery and disease ascertainment. Evidence that deprivation and ethnicity are associated with a higher risk of severe DR highlights a significant potential health inequality. Findings from this study will have implications for professionals working in the diabetes and sight loss sectors, particularly to inform approaches for diagnosis of retinopathy and campaigning to better tackle the disease for at risk g Continue reading >>

Clinical Commissioning Group (ccg) / Local Health Board (lhb) Report

Clinical Commissioning Group (ccg) / Local Health Board (lhb) Report

Key findings about the outcomes for people with diabetes in NHS Blackpool CCG National Diabetes Audit 2012-2013 Report 1: Care Processes and Treatment Targets Summary for NHS Blackpool CCG (00R) Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) / Local Health Board (LHB) Report The National Diabetes Audit is commissioned by The National Diabetes Audit is delivered by The National Diabetes Audit is supported by The national cardiovascular intelligence network (NCVIN) is a partnership of leading national cardiovascular organisations which analyses information and data and turns it into meaningful timely health intelligence for commissioners, policy makers, clinicians and health professionals to improve services and outcomes. Diabetes UK is the largest organisation in the UK working for people with diabetes, funding research, campaigning and helping people live with the condition. The Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC) is England’s central, authoritative source of essential data and statistical information for frontline decision makers in health and social care. The HSCIC managed the publication of the 2012-2013 reports. The Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership (HQIP) The National Diabetes Audit is commissioned by the Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership (HQIP) as part of the National Clinical Audit Programme (NCA). HQIP is led by a consortium of the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges, the Royal College of Nursing and National Voices. Its aim is to promote quality improvement, and in particular to increase the impact that clinical audit has on healthcare quality in England and Wales. HQIP holds the contract to manage and develop the NCA Programme, comprising more than 30 clinical audits that cover care provided to people with a wide range of medical, surg Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes – where the body's immune system attacks and destroys the cells that produce insulin type 2 diabetes – where the body doesn't produce enough insulin, or the body's cells don't react to insulin Type 2 diabetes is far more common than type 1. In the UK, around 90% of all adults with diabetes have type 2. During pregnancy, some women have such high levels of blood glucose that their body is unable to produce enough insulin to absorb it all. This is known as gestational diabetes. Pre-diabetes Many more people have blood sugar levels above the normal range, but not high enough to be diagnosed as having diabetes. This is sometimes known as pre-diabetes. If your blood sugar level is above the normal range, your risk of developing full-blown diabetes is increased. It's very important for diabetes to be diagnosed as early as possible because it will get progressively worse if left untreated. When to see a doctor Visit your GP as soon as possible if you experience the main symptoms of diabetes, which include: urinating more frequently than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk cuts or wounds that heal slowly blurred vision Type 1 diabetes can develop quickly over weeks or even days. Many people have type 2 diabetes for years without realising because the early symptoms tend to be general. Causes of diabetes The amount of sugar in the blood is controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is produced by the pancreas (a gland behind the stomach). When food is digested and enters your bloodstream, insulin moves glucose out of the blood and into cells, where it's broken down to produce ene Continue reading >>

Are Both Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes Patients At The Risk Of Death?

Are Both Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes Patients At The Risk Of Death?

Are both type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients at the risk of death? Yes, absolutely. Every single person on the planet with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes will die. But don’t worry, so will everyone else - it is all just a matter of time. The real question should be are they at risk of a premature death due to their conditions, and unfortunately the answer to that is also yes for various reasons. The first reason is the impact of long-term high blood glucose levels, including damage to large and small blood vessels, which can lead to heart attack and stroke, and problems with the kidneys, eyes, feet and nerves. Another risk often overlooked is overdosing on insulin. Insulin is a highly dangerous hormone, taking too much will cause a person to slip into a hypoglycemic coma which can lead to death. Alternatively, it is possible to die from not getting enough (or any insulin), due to Diabetic ketoacidosis Continue reading >>

Nhs Statistics, Facts And Figures

Nhs Statistics, Facts And Figures

NHS Confederation / Resources / NHS statistics, facts and figures Get the facts behind the headlines with our compilation of key NHS statistics. The NHS facts and figures apply to England, unless otherwise stated. This data was last updated in July 2017. NHS funding NHS net expenditure (resource plus capital, minus depreciation) has increased from £78.881 billion in 2006/071 to £120.512 billion in 2016/17.2 Planned expenditure for 2017/18 is £123.817bn and for 2018/19 is £126.269bn.3 In real terms the budget is expected to increase from £120.512bn in 2016/17 to £123.202bn by 2019/20.4 Health expenditure (medical services, health research, central and other health services) per capita in England has risen from £1,879 in 2011/12 to £2,106 in 2015/16.5 The NHS net deficit for the 2015/16 financial year was £1.851 billion (£599m underspend by commissioners and a £2.45bn deficit for trusts and foundation trusts).6 The provider deficit for the 2016/17 financial year has been confirmed at £791m.7 The most recently published national surveys of investment for mental health found there had been real terms reductions of 1 per cent for working age adults and 3.1 per cent for older people in 2011/12.8 CCG investment in mental health was £9.148bn in 2015/16 and a planned £9.500bn in 2016/17.9 Providers and commissioners of NHS services There are in England: 207 clinical commissioning groups10 135 acute non-specialist trusts (including 84 foundation trusts) 17 acute specialist trusts (including 16 foundation trusts) 54 mental health trusts (including 42 foundation trusts) 35 community providers (11 NHS trusts, 6 foundation trusts, 17 social enterprises and 1 limited company) 10 ambulance trusts (including 5 foundation trusts)11 7,454 GP practices12 853 for-profit and no Continue reading >>

Blender At Work In A Care Environment For Diabetes Uk

Blender At Work In A Care Environment For Diabetes Uk

Blender provides the basis for a fast and effective solution that addresses issues Diabetes UK had with incoming data streams. It replaced an increasingly time-consuming and costly in-house project, and was built and installed in a very short time-span, proving itself flexible, customisable, scalable and extremely well suited to the CARE environment (though it is equally effective working in conjunction with other database types). Wood for Trees had already established a working relationship with Diabetes UK, having carried out a range of analysis projects and a successful FastStats database build and installation. We introduced them to our data integration software tool, Blender, and collaborated to develop and install a solution that resulted in significant improvements, savings and efficiencies in the charity’s key data flows. Read more and download the case study here. Like Tweet Pin it Continue reading >>

3.8 Million People In England Now Have Diabetes

3.8 Million People In England Now Have Diabetes

The new Diabetes Prevalence Model, produced by the Public Health England (PHE) National Cardiovascular Intelligence Network (NCVIN) and launched today at the PHE Conference at Warwick University, estimates the total number of adults with both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes in England. Whilst 3.8 million people are estimated to have both types of diabetes, approximately 90% of diabetes cases are Type 2; this is largely preventable or manageable by lifestyle changes and also provides additional benefits for health and wellbeing. The likelihood of developing Type 2 diabetes is increased by being overweight (although family history, ethnicity and age can also increase risk). The figures reiterate that diabetes is an increasing burden of ill health, underlining the need for urgent action to lessen the impact on individuals, as well as the health and social care system supporting them. The model suggests that 1 in 4 people with diabetes, an estimated 940,000, are unaware of their condition. The disease can lead to serious complications including foot amputation and kidney disease, and is associated with an increased risk of stroke and heart attack. John Newton, Chief Knowledge Officer at PHE, said: The number of people with diabetes has been steadily increasing and tackling it is fundamental to the sustainable future of the NHS. Diabetes can be an extremely serious disease for those that have it and treating it and its complications costs the NHS almost £10 billion a year. Developing Type 2 diabetes is not an inevitable part of aging, we have an opportunity through public health to reverse this trend and safeguard the health of the nation and the future of the NHS. The proportion of people who have diabetes increases with age: 9% of people aged 45 to 54 have diabetes, but for ov Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Read on to learn some of the key facts and statistics about the people who have it and how to manage it. Risk factors Many risk factors for type 2 diabetes include lifestyle decisions that can be reduced or even cut out entirely with time and effort. Men are also at slightly higher risk of developing diabetes than women. This may be more associated with lifestyle factors, body weight, and where the weight is located (abdominally versus in the hip area) than with innate gender differences. Significant risk factors include: older age excess weight, particularly around the waist family history certain ethnicities physical inactivity poor diet Prevalence Type 2 diabetes is increasingly prevalent but also largely preventable. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes in adults. The CDC also gives us the following information: In general Research suggests that 1 out of 3 adults has prediabetes. Of this group, 9 out of 10 don't know they have it. 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes, but 8.1 million may be undiagnosed and unaware of their condition. About 1.4 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in United States every year. More than one in every 10 adults who are 20 years or older has diabetes. For seniors (65 years and older), that figure rises to more than one in four. Cases of diagnosed diabetes cost the United States an estimated $245 billion in 2012. This cost is expected to rise with the increasing diagnoses. In pregnancy and parentingAccording to the CDC, 4.6 to 9.2 percent of pregnancies may be affected by gestational diabetes. In up to 10 percent of them, the mother is diagnosed w Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Facts And Stats

Diabetes: Facts And Stats

CONTENTS PART 1: PREVALENCE OF DIABETES 03 Globally UK Diagnosed Undiagnosed Prevalence 04 Type 1 and Type 2 Children with diabetes PART 2: WHO IS AT RISK OF DIABETES? 06 Genes Ethnicity 07 Obesity Deprivation Gestational diabetes PART 3: THE IMPACT OF DIABETES 10 Cardiovascular disease 11 Kidney disease Eye disease 12 Amputation Depression Neuropathy 13 Sexual dysfunction Complications in pregnancy Dementia 14 Life expectancy and mortality Financial costs PART 4: DIABETES CARE 16 Diabetes care PART 5: REFERENCES 18 References DIABETES: FACTS AND STATS 01 CONTENTS FURTHER HELP If you need any more help with your communications or have a question about anything in this document, contact the Clinical team. OF DIABETES PREVALENCE PART ONE DIABETES: FACTS AND STATS 03 PART ONE: HOW COMMON IS DIABETES? GLOBALLY The estimated diabetes prevalence for adults between the ages of 20 and 79 worldwide for 2014 was 387 million and it is expected to affect 592 million people by 2035. It is estimated that 179 million people have undiagnosed Type 2 diabetes. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) estimated that in 2013 five countries had more than 10 million people with diabetes: China, India, the United States of America, Brazil, the Russian Federation. The IDF also reported that in 2013 the ten countries with the highest diabetes prevalence in the adult population were Tokelau (37.5%), Micronesia, Marshall Islands, Kiribati, Cook Islands, Vanuatu, Saudi Arabia, Nauru, Kuwait and Qatar (22.9%). Diabetes affects people in both urban and rural settings worldwide, with 64% of cases in urban areas and 36% in rural1. UK It is estimated that more than one in 16 people in the UK has diabetes (diagnosed or undiagnosed)2. There are 3.9 million people living with diabetes in the UK. DIAG Continue reading >>

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