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Keto Reverses Diabetes

Reversing Type 2 Diabetes With Nutritional Ketosis

Reversing Type 2 Diabetes With Nutritional Ketosis

Virta is a science-based online specialty medical clinic using continuous remote monitoring and intensive coaching to help our patients reverse type 2 diabetes and prediabetes. A unique contributor to our success in this is harnessing and sustaining the metabolic benefits of nutritional ketosis. Admittedly, reversing diabetes is a rather bold goal. By way of contrast, the American Diabetes Association defines type 2 diabetes as a progressive disease whose course at best can be slowed by lifestyle change and medication. Based upon solid sciencesome old and some newwe beg to differ. Perhaps its time for a paradigm change. There are few times in the lives of medical scientists where we have the opportunity to change the course of a major medical disease; and even fewer cases where we actually succeed in doing so. In 1920, Bantings discovery that injected insulin could control type 1 diabetes (T1D) was such an event. As a result, over the last century, millions of people with T1D have achieved long and productive lives; whereas before 1920 most of them would have succumbed to this insulin-deficiency disease within less than a year. Young insulin patient circa 1920s, before insulin, and 4 months after beginning treatment. Type 2 diabetes (T2D), on the other hand, is a very different disease that affects hundreds of millions of people. It responds very poorly to injected insulin. Whereas T1D patients cannot make insulin, people with T2D typically make lots of insulin but are resistant to insulins effects across a variety of cellular functions. Despite these facts having been known for 5 decades, we are taught that the core components of T2D management are to force the body to make even more insulin or to inject more insulin to overcome the insulin resistance that characteriz Continue reading >>

Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe For People With Diabetes?

Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe For People With Diabetes?

Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe for People with Diabetes? If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, chances are you’re looking for simple yet effective ways to control your blood sugar. And, if at all possible, without the use of daily shots or medications. As I’ve mentioned in earlier blog posts, exercise is one of the best natural ways to manage blood glucose. But perhaps the most obvious way to keep blood sugar at a safe and consistent level without insulin is to pay special attention to what you eat. And, in the case of diabetes, limiting your carbohydrate intake may be the key. What Is the Keto Diet? At first glance the ketogenic (keto) diet may seem like a crazy idea for type 2 diabetics. After all, many patients are put on diets to help them lose weight. The keto diet is high in fat, but it is very low in carbs, and this combination can help change the way your body stores and uses energy. With this diet your body converts fat instead of sugar into energy, which can improve blood glucose levels while reducing the need for insulin. Ketosis VS Ketoacidosis Ketosis and ketoacidosis are two very different things, which are often confused. But it’s very important you understand the difference. What is ketoacidosis? Ketoacidosis (KA) is a life-threatening condition in which your body doesn’t make enough insulin. This causes you to have dangerously high levels of ketones (substances occurring when the body uses fat stores for energy) and blood sugar. The combination of both makes your blood incredibly acidic, and this can, in turn, change the normal functioning of your internal organs such as your liver and kidneys. Patients suffering from ketoacidosis must get treatment immediately or they could slip into a coma and even die. Ketoacidosis can develop in less than 24 Continue reading >>

Is “keto” The Key To Reversing Diabetes?

Is “keto” The Key To Reversing Diabetes?

SEATTLE -- A wave of recent studies show that in many cases, type 2 diabetes is partly or wholly reversible with high fat, very low carb ketogenic diets. Speakers at the Personalized Lifestyle Medicine Institute 5th annual Thought Leaders Consortium urged the clinical community to radically re-think the received wisdom about this common disorder, and start applying diet and lifestyle programs that actually address the root causes of the condition. Fresh data from an ongoing study of 232 overweight or obese women and men with type 2 diabetes (average age 54 years, average BMI of 41), provide evidence that after 10 weeks on a carefully-formulated low-carb ketogenic diet, 36% were able to stop insulin therapy completely, while an additional 51% were able to significantly lower their doses. Mean hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measures dropped from 7.5% to 6.5%, with 56% of the participants reaching A1c levels below the diagnostic threshold for diabetes. This was accompanied by clinically significant weight loss in 71% of cases (McKenzie A, et al. JMIR Diabetes. 2017 2 (1): e5). Though many clinicians and researchers have long predicted the possibility, this is the first large-scale study to show that major biomarkers of type 2 diabetes can be consistently shifted in the right direction via dietary interventions. “We are very pleased with what we are seeing,” said Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD, Chief Medical Officer and co-founder of Virta Health, a San Francisco based clinic specializing in lifestyle-based treatment of diabetes and related metabolic diseases. “And all of this is based on eating to satiety. There are no additional medications, no calorie counting, no anxiety.” Dr. Phinney told PLMI attendees that while he hesitates to say ketogenic diets can “cure” diabetes, Continue reading >>

Experts Weigh In On Ketogenic Diet For Diabetes Type 2

Experts Weigh In On Ketogenic Diet For Diabetes Type 2

Ketogenic diet has taken us by the wind in the recent years. There are numerous resources available online for people who are considering going on one. A ketogenic diet, in very simple terms, is a very low-carb diet. It has been claimed that going on a ketogenic diet is beneficial for people seeking to lose weight and to improve their health. This probably sounds very charming to a person with diabetes who is looking to lose excess weight and to improve their overall general health to avoid or prevent any diabetes related complications. But, is it really worth all the hype it has generated? For someone who has diabetes, a healthy and nutritional lifestyle is extremely important. Though lowering the consumption of carbs from your diet can aid you, is it actually recommended to restrict yourself to a very low carb diet if you have diabetes? We can’t claim to know but we reached out to respected experts who have shared their thoughts on the diet and whether they recommend it to their patients. Read on to find out whether or not you could benefit from going on a Ketogenic diet. 1. Gina Keatley, CDN I would not recommend the ketogenic diet to any patients other than those suffering with epilepsy. The proper ratio of fat to protein to carbohydrate calories (80-15-5) is extremely difficult to maintain over any period of time. In many research studies over half of the participants drop out of studies before they have completed due to this difficulty and in other studies the researchers do not get institutional approval for such a strict limit of carbohydrates and use one with far more protein and carbohydrate (usually a 60-30-10 ratio). That being said what has been shown to lower blood sugar levels over the long term is losing weight–a diet that is calorie controlled and f Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet

Ketogenic Diet

Tweet Ketogenic diets are very effective at achieving two common aims of diabetes control, lowering blood glucose levels and reducing weight What is the ketogenic diet? A ketogenic diet is a very low-carb diet, considered to be when you eat a level of carbohydrate of around 30g of carbohydrates per day or below. This encourages the body to get its energy from burning body fat which produces an energy source known as ketones. The diet helps to lower the body's demand for insulin which has benefits for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Note that it is important that you speak to your doctor if you are considering following the diet as precautions may need to be taken before starting. How a ketogenic diet works On a ketogenic diet, blood glucose levels are kept at a low but healthy level which encourages the body to break down fat into a fuel source known as ketones. The process of breaking down or ‘burning’ body fat is known as ketosis. People on insulin will typically require smaller doses of insulin which leads to less risk of large dosing errors. The diet helps burn body fat and therefore has particular advantages for those looking to lose weight, including people with prediabetes or those otherwise at risk of type 2 diabetes. How to follow a ketogenic diet Based on the understanding that carbohydrate is the macronutrient that raises blood glucose the most, the primary goal of a ketogenic diet is to keep consumption lower than that of a traditional low carbohydrate diet with moderate protein and a very high fat content. This will determine the nutrient density of the ketogenic diet as well as how to follow it, as different foods will have different effects on insulin and blood sugar levels. Which foods to eat on a ketogenic diet There are a number of differen Continue reading >>

Study Shows Ketogenic Diet May Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Study Shows Ketogenic Diet May Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

If you’ve ever read about health on the internet, you’ve probably seen stories and ads claiming to reverse diabetes. Maybe you saw the article about juicing bitter gourds, or the one that suggests boiling cinnamon powder in water. And isn’t there one out there that suggests rubbing your pancreas with aloe vera twice a day? Maybe you’ve tried one of the above, but hopefully every time you’ve seen the words reverse diabetes, you quickly closed your browser’s tab. However, while there is definitely no way to reverse type 1 diabetes yet, a new study suggests type 2 diabetes really can be reversed (but not by pancreatic massage). Recently, a trial conducted by Stephen Phinney and Jeff Volek, of The Art and Science of Low Carb, showed the positive effects of a low-carbohydrate diet. Phinney and Volek have been low-carb advocates for some time, and you can see their other research here. This particular trial provides evidence that a low-carb diet can improve blood sugar levels and facilitate weight loss in adults with type 2 diabetes. In almost 60% of participants, medication was decreased or stopped altogether. The study, conducted in Indiana in partnership with Indiana University Health, and published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research publications, looked at 262 people with type 2 diabetes who were also overweight. Each participant restricted their carbohydrate intake to 30 grams or less per day, and they increased fat and protein intake. This practice induces what is known as “nutritional ketosis” and is considered a ketogenic diet, forcing the body to burn fat for energy rather than carbohydrates. According to Diabetes.co.uk, “Previous studies have shown that such ketogenic diets can improve insulin sensitivity and bring many other benefits. How Continue reading >>

The Type 2 Diabetes Cure, The Fix, The Program For Reversing Type 2 Diabetes

The Type 2 Diabetes Cure, The Fix, The Program For Reversing Type 2 Diabetes

The Golden Rule Diabetes Progresses when your spot sugar is above 6.6 mmol/L (120 mg/dl) Diabetes Regresses when your spot sugar is below 5.6 mmol/L (100 mg/dl) The Guiding Principles Carbs are Poison. Exercise is the Antidote. Going Calorie Negative fixes Obesity. Going Carb Negative fixes Diabetes. Medium Intensity Exercise (brisk walking) fixes Blood Sugar To fix insulin resistance we must eat more poly fat and less sat fat and mono fat. Go Low Carb High Poly NOT Low Carb High Fat. Still not sure about High Intensity Exercise. It burns carbs but can increase adrenalin (until you get used to it). The History of My Cure Here is the process I went through with this disease to reach my present understanding of how to fix it. Firstly I read the Newcastle Diabetes Reversal paper and imagined that simply by losing a lot of weight I could reverse my condition. I believed Prof Taylor's assertion that diabetes is caused by insulin resistance which is caused by a fat build up in the liver. So I went from a BMI of 26.4 (weight of 176 lbs) to a BMI of 21.0 (140 lbs) in 12 weeks. That improved my condition in that I could almost pass a 50% OGTT but I was still very much diabetic. I then wasted 3 months getting even thinner to no avail. In fact during this period I lost muscle mass which is very damaging to a diabetic since we all store sugar in our muscles as glycogen. So I no longer recommend ultra low calorie fasting unless you are obese (BMI in excess of 30). Then I read that insulin resistance is caused by having the wrong type of fat in one's diet. Too much Omega6 and not enough Omega3. So I went on a Paleo diet for 3 months. I ate boat loads of Omega3 and as little as possible Omega6 in order to restore my muscle cell membranes to a non insulin resistant condition. That had Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Diabetes

The Ketogenic Diet And Diabetes

The ketogenic diet was originally developed almost 100 years ago to treat epilepsy. Nowadays, it is used as a nutrition plan by health-conscious men and women to optimize body composition and athletic performance. Recent research suggests that high fat, very-low carb diets have another benefit: They may help control glucose, triglycerides, insulin, and body weight in people with diabetes. The research below shows the ketogenic diet may be an effective tool you can use to manage symptoms of Diabetes, alongside exercise and medication. Cutting through the Fat: What is Diabetes? Before we get to research, we need to review some basic medical terminology. Diabetes is a group of metabolic diseases in which the body has elevated blood levels its main energy source: a sugar called glucose. There are two reasons why this occurs. In some people, there is insufficient production of a chemical called insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas that lower levels of glucose in the blood. People who suffer from low insulin levels have type I diabetes and they comprise approximately 5 to 10% of all diabetics. [1] Type I diabetes is usually inherited and type I diabetics usually have to inject insulin to maintain proper levels of blood glucose. The other 90% to 95% of people with diabetes are type II diabetics. [1] In this version, the body doesn’t produce enough insulin for proper function or cells in the body do not react to insulin and take in sugar from the blood. Type 2 diabetes is not inherited. However, lifestyle factors such as high body weight, poor exercise and eating habits all increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. [2] It can be managed by improving dietary and lifestyle habits and also using proper medication. [2] Diabetes results in a higher concentration of s Continue reading >>

A Low-carbohydrate, Ketogenic Diet To Treat Type 2 Diabetes

A Low-carbohydrate, Ketogenic Diet To Treat Type 2 Diabetes

A low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet to treat type 2 diabetes 1Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Department of Veterans' Affairs Medical Center (152), 508 Fulton Street, Durham, NC, USA 27705 2Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA 3Private Bariatric and Family Practice, and Clinical Faculty, University of Kansas School of Medicine, Lawrence, KS, USA William S Yancy, Jr: [email protected] ; Marjorie Foy: [email protected] ; Allison M Chalecki: [email protected] ; Mary C Vernon: [email protected] ; Eric C Westman: [email protected] Received 2005 Aug 10; Accepted 2005 Dec 1. Copyright © 2005 Yancy et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( ), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. The low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet (LCKD) may be effective for improving glycemia and reducing medications in patients with type 2 diabetes. From an outpatient clinic, we recruited 28 overweight participants with type 2 diabetes for a 16-week single-arm pilot diet intervention trial. We provided LCKD counseling, with an initial goal of <20 g carbohydrate/day, while reducing diabetes medication dosages at diet initiation. Participants returned every other week for measurements, counseling, and further medication adjustment. The primary outcome was hemoglobin A1c. Twenty-one of the 28 participants who were enrolled completed the study. Twenty participants were men; 13 were White, 8 were African-American. The mean [± SD] age was 56.0 ± 7.9 years and BMI was 42.2 ± 5.8 kg/m2. Hemoglobin A1c decr Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And The Ketogenic Diet

Type 1 Diabetes And The Ketogenic Diet

For thousands of years, something has been sneaking up on children and robbing them of their ability to control their blood sugar levels. The culprit is an autoimmune condition called Type 1 Diabetes, and its incidence has been increasing in both the United States and in other western countries. But there is no need to worry. This sneaky disease has left us with enough clues to diagnose it, manage it, and potentially reverse it. How to Know If It Is Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes is most commonly diagnosed in children between the ages of 10 and 14, although many children can present with symptoms at ages as young as two years old. The incidence is approximately 1.5 times higher in American non-Hispanic white people compared with African American or Hispanic individuals. Risk Factors for Type 1 Diabetes The three most well-researched risk factors for type 1 diabetes include: Family history. Anyone with a parent or sibling with type 1 diabetes has a slightly increased risk of developing the condition. Genetics. Specific genes can increase the risk of developing type 1 diabetes. Age. Although type 1 diabetes can appear at any age, it is diagnosed in two prominent peaks. The first peak occurs in children between 4 and 7 years old, and the second is in children between 10 and 14 years old. However, these aren’t the only three risk factors. Recent research has found that type 1 diabetics tend to have a different balance of bacteria in their microbiome then non-susceptible individuals. Vitamin D deficiency, gut health issues, and dairy intolerance are also linked to a greater risk of type 1 diabetes as well. Having all of these risk factors, however, does not mean that you will have type 1 diabetes. Its symptoms will provide us with a clearer picture. Symptoms of Type 1 Dia Continue reading >>

Mobile Health, Ketogenic Diet Reverse Type 2 Diabetes After One Year

Mobile Health, Ketogenic Diet Reverse Type 2 Diabetes After One Year

Mobile health, ketogenic diet reverse type 2 diabetes after one year Researchers from Purdue University, IU Health Arnett and Virta Health have found the combination of nutritional ketosis with a mobile health application could safely reverse type 2 diabetes. Findings were published in Diabetes Therapy . As Americans continuefacing the obesity epidemic, rates of type 2 diabetes are on the rise. In this study, researchers examined the effects of remote mobile health patient monitoring paired with a high-fat, low-carb, moderate protein diet in preventing or reversing type 2 diabetes. We feel that it is really important to support a patient in many different ways, said the studys principal investigator, Dr. Sarah Hallberg. Due to the unique structure of the trial and use of telemedicine, we helped prevent any significant hypoglycemic events. Instead of patients scheduling an office visit, they could log their blood sugar and ketone levels in the app. Then, both the patient and I could track their levels and make adjustments accordingly. A total of 349 patients were enrolled in the five-year study87 of whomwere put in the control group and received usual care while 262 followed the ketogenic diet and were provided connection to a health coach and physician through a mobile app. In the first year of the study, 83 percent of the original enrollees remained in the study. First-year outcomes showed an average decrease of 1.3 percent in three-month hemoglobin levels and a 12 percent weight loss in the intervention group. Additionally, 94 percent of patients using insulin decreased or eliminated their need for the medication and 60 percent showed three-month hemoglobin levels below the diabetes threshold without the need for medication. Our results push against the accepted norm Continue reading >>

Reversing Type 2 Diabetes In Only 2.5 Months With Keto And Fasting

Reversing Type 2 Diabetes In Only 2.5 Months With Keto And Fasting

With a combination of keto, fasting and exercise, Osvaldo has been able to reverse his type 2 diabetes in only 2.5 months! It’s very impressive. Here’s exactly how he did it: The email Hello Andreas, I want to thank you for the advice at Diet Doctor, as it helped me reverse my type 2 diabetes in only one and a half months. On the 1st of June 2017, I went to a scheduled appointment at my doctor’s office and he stated that my blood sugar had risen to an HbA1c of 73 mmol/mol (8.8%), and he thought that I should start taking insulin. I had, since I was diagnosed in 2012, taken Metformin (850 mg) three times daily and Glimeperid 4 mg in the morning. I told him that I didn’t want to take insulin and so he prescribed Januvia instead, with the intention of strengthening the blood-sugar lowering power of the medication, but he said that we needed to book another appointment within three months to see whether the blood sugar (as measured by HbA1c) had been lowered to approximately 52 mmol/mol (6.9%) which is what they recommend for people with the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes and if that didn’t happen he would have to prescribe insulin. When I went home I felt both disappointed and angry as I hadn’t worked out during the last couple of months and it hadn’t affected the result in any significant way, but at the same time I refused to accept that type 2 diabetes is a chronic and incurable disease which worsens no matter what. My older brother died from the disease in the beginning of May and my father in law passed away from it three years ago. I refused to see a dark future in front of me. I started to search for alternative treatments and found a YouTube clip by Dr. Jason Fung about reversing type 2 diabetes and I started to collect information by looking on other p Continue reading >>

Is Keto The Cure For Type Ii Diabetes?

Is Keto The Cure For Type Ii Diabetes?

A keto-compliant salad featuring collard greens and bacon crumbles. Photo courtesy of Brian Ambrozy/FlickrType II diabetes is one of America's most ubiquitousand expensivechronic diseases. Patients often require a suite of pharmaceutical products to manage high blood glucose levels, and the complications that arise over the long term, ranging from loss of vision and limbs to kidney failure and coronary artery disease, strain the resources of patients, their families, and the health care system. The financial strain on insurance companies, employers, and Medicaid and Medicare is even more enormous. A 2013 study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine put the lifetime direct medical costs for type II diabetes treatment at $124,000 for patients diagnosed in middle age. With nearly 30 million Americans affected by the disease, the American Diabetes Association estimates the national cost of direct diabetes care to be roughly $176 billion per year. But unlike type I diabetes, which is an autoimmune disorder that destroys insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, type II diabetes is a lifestyle disease, and thus reversible. Over time, people with type-II diabetes can be made more receptive to their own insulin, which in turn allows their bodies to effectively clear glucose from the blood without insulin medication. The trick for the vast majority of type II patients is as simple as losing weight. ("The relationship between obesity and diabetes is of such interdependence that the term 'diabesity' has been coined," two diabetes researchers wrote in 2005.) But that "trick" is actually pretty hard. Permanent weight loss without bariatric surgery is practically impossible at the population level. A 2014 study by Kaiser Permanente that looked at incidents of non-surgical dia Continue reading >>

The Low-carb Diet That Can Reverse Diabetes And Make Medication A Thing Of The Past

The Low-carb Diet That Can Reverse Diabetes And Make Medication A Thing Of The Past

This fantastic article was written by Galen Chay, founder of Fit and Healthy Beyond 50! We encourage you to check out his website here! I decided to write this article on the best diet to control and even reverse type 2 diabetes because of a personal reason. You see I’m at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes; it’s not because of my lifestyle or my dietary habits: I’m in danger because both my parents are Type 2 diabetics. If both your parents have type 2 diabetes, then your risk factor is 1 in 2. If only 1 parent has diabetes and the diagnosis was made before age 50, then your chances are 1 in 7; if the diagnosis was made after age 50, then your chances are 1 in 13. Luckily, you can significantly reduce your risk of Type 2 diabetes through lifestyle changes, including diet changes, weight loss, and regular exercise. However, for those who already have Type 2 diabetes, this is not enough; they can only control their diabetes because once diagnosed with the condition little that can be done to reverse the condition, so says most doctors. This means that people with diabetes will always need to take medication to get their blood sugar levels down to normal. But this in itself comes with a host of issues because all drugs have side effects, some of which can be severe. Take Metformin, for instance, and it’s one of the most common drugs prescribed for Type 2 diabetes patients. The side effects range from having a metallic taste in the mouth to lactic acidosis, which is primarily lactic acid building up in the bloodstream faster than it can be removed. 1 This is just 1 medication; depending on how serious the diabetes is, more medications may be added – which translates to more adverse effects. And diabetes medications do not cure or reverse the condition. So, what a Continue reading >>

How The Ketogenic Diet Works For Type 2 Diabetes

How The Ketogenic Diet Works For Type 2 Diabetes

Special diets for type 2 diabetes often focus on weight loss, so it might seem crazy that a high-fat diet is an option. But the ketogenic (keto) diet, high in fat and low in carbs, can potentially change the way your body stores and uses energy, easing diabetes symptoms. With the keto diet, your body converts fat, instead of sugar, into energy. The diet was created in 1924 as a treatment for epilepsy, but the effects of this eating pattern are also being studied for type 2 diabetes. The ketogenic diet may improve blood glucose (sugar) levels while also reducing the need for insulin. However, the diet does come with risks, so make sure to discuss it with your doctor before making drastic dietary changes. Many people with type 2 diabetes are overweight, so a high-fat diet can seem unhelpful. The goal of the ketogenic diet is to have the body use fat for energy instead of carbohydrates or glucose. A person on the keto diet gets most of their energy from fat, with very little of the diet coming from carbohydrates. The ketogenic diet doesn’t mean you should load up on saturated fats, though. Heart-healthy fats are the key to sustaining overall health. Some healthy foods that are commonly eaten in the ketogenic diet include: eggs fish such as salmon cottage cheese avocado olives and olive oil nuts and nut butters seeds The ketogenic diet has the potential to decrease blood glucose levels. Managing carbohydrate intake is often recommended for people with type 2 diabetes because carbohydrates turn to sugar and, in large quantities, can cause blood sugar spikes. If you already have high blood glucose, then eating too many carbs can be dangerous. By switching the focus to fat, some people experience reduced blood sugar. The Atkins diet is one of the most famous low-carb, high-p Continue reading >>

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