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Keto Metformin Weight Loss

I Took Metformin For A Week And Here's What Happened

I Took Metformin For A Week And Here's What Happened

Craig Cooper Men's Health Leave a comment 0 I admit it: I took metformin for a week, the leading prescribed drug for treatment of type 2 diabetes ( 59.2 million units prescribed ) in the United States alone and taken by 80 million people around the world. This medication has been around for more than half a century and is often touted as a wonder drug for individuals with type 2 diabetes as well as for those living with other health challenges. My reasons for taking metformin were highly personal: I have a genetic predisposition for both prostate cancer and type 2 diabetes (Im not diabetic but I swing in and out of pre-diabetes based on my daily blood sugar readings), and Im getting older (who isnt!). I did copious amounts of research and it seemed on all three counts ( prostate cancer prevention , managing type 2 diabetes (increasing insulin sensitivity), and anti-aging), it truly was a wonder drug. Oh, and I had also read that pretty much every billionaire in Silicon Valley was on it mainly for its purported life extension benefits (as it can mimic the effect of calorie restriction see more below). Before I went on it I wanted to get some key blood indicators taken, specifically: Testosterone (total, free, and bioavailable). The plan was to have these indicators measured before taking metformin and then again, one month later. I really wasnt looking at metformin as a drug I was looking at it more as a superfood. Could it really have all these purported benefits with no real side effects? Why wouldnt I take it? After all, I dont take any other drugs so I had no real risk of the cocktail effect whereby it could have possibly interacted with other medications. However I quickly changed my mind for the reasons set out below, but I wanted to first share with you some of t Continue reading >>

3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin

3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin

September 30, 2015 by Dr. Brooke in Be Better , Eat Better , pcos 3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin Metformin is recommended by doctors for women with PCOS that want to loose weight or otherwise manage their PCOS and insulin resistance. But there are 3 very important things that you need to know about it including the fact that it's not the only option! Let me first say, I dont hate Metformin for women with PCOS . For some women it really does help spur ovulation, control blood sugar and help with some weight management but.its not without its share of issues. And its definitely not the magic bullet for weight loss although its usually presented that way. How Metformin (or its generic form: Glucophage) Works Metformin is typically given with meals throughout the day, or more commonly now the extended release version is given once with dinner or at bedtime. While only having to pop a pill one time per day is always appealing, this once a day dosing (especially at bedtime) is where I see the most problems with my patients. It lowers both fasting and post meal glucose levels by decreasing the glucose absorption in your intestines after a meal; as well as decreasing the amount of glucose your liver makes for later use. It also does help improve insulin sensitivity by increasing glucose movement into a cell. All sounds good so far right? Not so fast, here are the most common issues I see in women using Metformin: Metformin is notorious for causing sometimes severe digestive issues including stomach pain or upset, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and even a sense of body weakness or metallic taste in the mouth in some. And it is touted as not causing low blood sugar as many older blood sugar lowering drugs did, however I see it every day in my practice that Metformin can m Continue reading >>

Question About Keto And Metformin?

Question About Keto And Metformin?

Raynne413 Posts: 1,524Member, Premium Member Posts: 1,524Member, Premium Member I'm on metformin as well, and I would be curious as to what your doctor tells you, if you wouldn't mind reporting back, because I was wondering the same thing. I take my metformin first thing in the morning, after my lunch around 3, and then at bedtime, and I've noticed that by the time I get home from work in the afternoon, around 5, I'm usually feeling sick to my stomach, tired, and shaky, so now I'm wondering if it is from my afternoon dose. KnitOrMiss Posts: 9,918Member Member Posts: 9,918Member Member My doctor recommended staying on Met as it helped with my insulin resistance, but as I added more dairy, it wasn't worth the dumping complication for me personally. Not everyone has that. Since I am doing well staying with my diet plan, and my IR is minimal, I'm able to manage it to 90-95% of the Metformin levels through my Keto diet. I don't believe there is much risk of low blood sugar with it (there was some research a while back), but after adjusting dietarily, you may be able to reduce or stop your dosages eventually. But you may not. Some people's insulin resistance don't get better using diet or it may take a long LONG time to restore your metabolism's "health." So this is very much and individual situation, based on how your body responds. However, if you struggle to stay on plan, it is unlikely that you would ever be able to stop this medication, because low carb eating requires patience and persistence for success. It's not a quick fix... Metformin only works, as I understand it, by making your body see the insulin it has already created instead of making more and continuing the raging hunger cycle that is IR. So since Metformin doesn't create or increase insulin, there should n Continue reading >>

How To Heal Pcos (polycystic Ovarian Syndrome)

How To Heal Pcos (polycystic Ovarian Syndrome)

TESTIMONIES OF THE DAY Just a few testimonies on how Keto Healed PCOS!!! How to Heal PCOS 1. “My PCOS is gone! after a month and a half eating grain free and sugar free (in addition to gluten and mostly dairy) my blood work came back with 0 markers of PCOS! :)” – Elise 2. “Hi Maria, I’ve been a follower of your blog for awhile now, and have been following a ketogenic diet for 1.5 years now (because of your valuable books and blog), which has helped me recover from significant adrenal fatigue problems, and also manage my PCOS and thyroid disease, allowing me to get pregnant at age 35. I had a healthy ketogenic pregnancy and found your blog and cookbooks a staple in my new diet and health journey. Thanks for your input and for all the work you do!”- Leah 3. “I am so thankful to have found this site. I was diagnosed with PCOS when I was 21. At the time I had only the absence of menses as a symptom. I was 120lbs. No extra hair. Thyroid was fine. GTT was great. It was a sonogram for pelvic pain that spurred the blood work and diagnosis.Fast forward 11 years, my husband and I had been trying for over a year to conceive. He got checked out and came back normal. When I went to see my GYN she mentioned I might want to “cut back on carbs” which at the time I thought that was nuts. (Calorie is a calorie school of thought) I had recently gained up to 196lbs, really quickly and the calorie counting wasn’t working. So I decided to do some research about low carb and fertility. After finding some studies on the national institute of health I thought I would give it a go. I have now had 4 consecutive cycles under 40 days. (That has NEVER happened to me before) I have lost 22lbs. And I tell everyone about these recipes!!! I could never do it without this site. I have Continue reading >>

Metformin In Combination With A Ketogenic Diet As An Effective Cancer Protocol

Metformin In Combination With A Ketogenic Diet As An Effective Cancer Protocol

Metformin in Combination with a Ketogenic Diet as an effective Cancer Protocol Metformin originates from the French lilac or goats rue (Galega officinalis, see picture below), a plant used in folk medicine for several centuries including for diabetes and other ailments. Today, the use of Metformin has been shown to decrease the risk of cancer. (1) Metformin has exhibited a strong and consistent antiproliferative action on several cancer cell lines, including breast, colon, ovarian, pancreatic, lung, and prostate cancer cells. (See Exhibits A & B below). These in vitro studies were generally completed by preclinical studies showing a reliable antitumoral effect in various mouse models. In addition, the first clinical trials demonstrated a beneficial effect in breast and colon cancer. (2) Metformin has also shown to increase radiotherapys efficiency. (3) COMBINING A LOW GLUCOSE KETOGENIC DIET WITH METFORMIN Would it be possible to potentiate metformins anti cancer impact within a low glucose environment ? It has been shown that different cancer cells exhibit altered sensitivity to metformin treatment. (CF Exhibit B) One reason for this discrepancy is the common cell culture practice of utilizing high glucose. However, when glucose is lowered, metformin becomes increasingly cytotoxic to cancer cells. In low glucose conditions ranging from 0 to 5 mM, metformin was cytotoxic to breast cancer cell lines MCF7, MDAMB231 and SKBR3, and ovarian cancer cell lines OVCAR3, and PA-1. (4) Recent findings suggest that lowering glucose potentiates metformin induced cell death by reducing metformin stimulated glycolysis. Additionally, under low glucose conditions metformin significantly decreased phosphorylation of AKT and various targets of mTOR, while phospho-AMPK was not significantl Continue reading >>

The Keto Diet, Explained

The Keto Diet, Explained

Its why people are putting grass-fed butter in their coffee, downing ketone drinks , and replacing their cereal and pasta with eggs and avocados. The ketogenic diet has become a Silicon Valley obsession and the diet du jour that supposedly keeps celebrities like Kim Kardashian and Halle Berry trim and strong. Keto devotees believe that if you banish most carbs (including fruit!) and embrace fat, you can lose weight without feeling hungry. #FitnessFriday ! I think the most important part of being healthy and in great shape depends on what and when you eat. Being diabetic most of my life, I have always had to take food very seriously. Today I encourage you to say yes to the keto diet, give it a try... pic.twitter.com/9Fa1NeVVPo Halle Berry (@halleberry) January 26, 2018 The diets long history in science also lends it credibility. Doctors have been prescribing ketogenic diets to treat epilepsy for nearly a century , and increasingly believe it may hold promise for people with Type 2 diabetes. But whats lost in the many trend articles and books about going keto for weight loss today is that this diet is the same one the now-late Dr. Robert Atkins and other low-carb evangelists have been selling since the 1960s. (Diet peddlers have an incredible knack for rebranding old ideas over and over, and in our eternal confusion about what to eat, we keep falling for it all.) Those older keto diets didnt work for most people hoping to slim down, and theres no evidence the newly popular keto diet will be any different. Heres why. To understand the ketogenic diet, you need a quick primer on how the human body gets energy. We are fueled primarily by glucose, or blood sugar, much of which we derive from carbohydrates in foods like bread, fruit, potatoes, and sweets. If glucose levels in Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet For Type 2 Diabetes: Does It Work?

Ketogenic Diet For Type 2 Diabetes: Does It Work?

Type 2 diabetes is a condition affecting blood sugar levels that can be managed by following a healthful diet and maintaining a healthy weight. People who are obese can reduce their risk of developing diabetes by eating a balanced, nutritious diet. Following a diet that is full of vitamins and minerals and low in added sugars and unhealthful fats can help people to lose some of the extra weight. People who lose 5-10 percent of their body weight can lower their risk of developing diabetes by 58 percent. For people with diabetes or people with pre-diabetes, losing the same amount of body weight can help provide a noticeable improvement in blood sugar. For some people, the ketogenic diet is an effective way to control their diabetes. It has been shown to lower blood glucose levels as well as reduce weight. Contents of this article: What is the ketogenic diet? Foods containing carbohydrates, such as bread, pasta, and fruit, are the body's main fuel source. The body breaks the food down and uses the resulting sugar (glucose) for energy. A ketogenic diet is a high-fat, very low carbohydrate diet. It was initially developed and recommended for children with epilepsy. The diet recommends that people eat 30 grams (g) of carbohydrates or below per day. The goal is to eat 3 to 4 g of fat for every 1 g of carbohydrate and protein. Impact on blood sugar levels Because the ketogenic diet restricts carbohydrates, there is not enough sugar available for the body to use as fuel, so it resorts to using fat. The process of breaking down fat is called "ketosis," and it produces a fuel source called ketones. A ketogenic diet helps some people with type 2 diabetes because it allows the body to maintain glucose levels at a low but healthy level. The reduced amount of carbohydrates in the diet Continue reading >>

Metformin, Weight Loss & Pcos – Does It Actually Work?

Metformin, Weight Loss & Pcos – Does It Actually Work?

Did you know that one of the main reasons you can't lose weight with PCOS is because of your hormones? It's true, and that's why many women (and physicians) turn to using Metformin to try and help with weight loss. But just because it works for some people doesn't mean it will necessarily work for YOU. Find out why metformin helps with weight loss, but more important what works better and how to finally lose weight if you have PCOS. ​ Insulin & PCOS: Why It's so Important One of the most common medications prescribed for PCOS is metformin. But, PCOS is a hormonal condition which results in weight gain, hair growth on the face, infertility, acne and estrogen/progesterone imbalances. So why is metformin, a medication used to lower blood sugar and treat insulin resistance, used to treat estrogen/progesterone imbalances in women? The logic is quite simple: Most of the symptoms of PCOS (all those listed above) stem from insulin resistanc e! In fact many physicians recommend that ALL women with PCOS should be treated for insulin resistance regardless of what their fasting insulin and fasting blood sugar levels are. This means that the root cause of PCOS (at least the majority of it) is insulin resistance, and this is why metformin is so commonly used to treat. Insulin resistance causes a block of glucose uptake in your skeletal muscles which results in a lower metabolism (and weight gain), insulin also directly acts on your ovaries and adrenals increasing androgens like testosterone and DHEA. It's also the action of insulin on your pituitary that results in increased LH production which over stimulates your ovaries resulting in the characteristic "cysts" of PCOS. ​ High levels of DHEA and testosterone lead to acne and hair growth (hirsutism). ​ But one simple question r Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate Restricted Diet In Conjunction With Metformin And Liraglutide Is An Effective Treatment In Patients With Deteriorated Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Proof-of-concept Study

Carbohydrate Restricted Diet In Conjunction With Metformin And Liraglutide Is An Effective Treatment In Patients With Deteriorated Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Proof-of-concept Study

Go to: Abstract Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chronic progressive disease. During the course of the disease intensive treatment is often necessary resulting in multiple interventions including administration of insulin. Although dietary intervention is highly recommended, the clinical results of the widely prescribed diets with low fat content and high carbohydrates are disappointing. In this proof-of-concept study, we tested the effect of dietary carbohydrate-restriction in conjunction with metformin and liraglutide on metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Forty patients with type 2 diabetes already being treated with two oral anti-diabetic drugs or insulin treatment and who showed deterioration of their glucose metabolism (i.e. HbA1c >7.5), were treated. A carbohydrate-restricted diet and a combination of metformin and liraglutide were instituted, after stopping either insulin or oral anti-diabetic drugs (excluding metformin). After enrollment, the study patients were scheduled for follow-up visits at one, two, three and six months. Primary outcome was glycemic control, measured by HbA1c at six months. Secondary outcomes were body weight, lipid-profile and treatment satisfaction. Thirty-five (88%) participants completed the study. Nearly all participating patients experienced a drop in HbA1c and body weight during the first three months, an effect which was maintained until the end of the study at six months. Seventy-one percent of the patients reached HbA1c values below 7.0%. The range of body weight at enrollment was extreme, reaching 165 kg as the highest initial value. The average weight loss after 6 months was 10%. Most patients were satisfied with this treatment. During the intervention no significant change of lipids was observed. Most patients wh Continue reading >>

Does Metformin Cause Weight Loss? What To Know Before You Take It

Does Metformin Cause Weight Loss? What To Know Before You Take It

If you’re managing type 2 diabetes with metformin (Glucophage), you might be well acquainted with unwanted side effects of this drug — namely, upset stomach, diarrhea, muscle aches, and sleepiness. These can be a figurative and literal pain, but you might welcome one side effect of metformin with open arms, particularly if you’ve struggled to lose weight. Metformin isn’t a weight loss drug, but researchers have found a link between the drug and weight loss. In fact, a long-term study published in April 2012 in the journal Diabetes Care that was conducted by the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) concluded that the drug could serve as a treatment for excess body weight, although more studies are needed. What Is Metformin and How Does It Work? “[Metformin] has been considered a first-line medication in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, and it mainly acts by lowering the amount of glucose released by the liver,” says Minisha Sood, MD, an endocrinologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. “It also helps a hormone called insulin to work better by helping muscles use glucose in a more efficient manner. When insulin works better (and insulin sensitivity improves), a person’s insulin levels are lower than they would be otherwise.” There’s no cure for type 2 diabetes, but the right combination of medication and healthy lifestyle can stabilize blood sugar levels, which, of course, is the end goal of any diabetes treatment. As the medication helps your body properly metabolize food and restores your ability to respond to insulin, you’ll not only feel better, you can potentially avoid complications of high blood sugar, such as heart disease, kidney damage, nerve damage (diabetic neuropathy), and eye damage (retinopathy). Why Does Metformin Cause Weight Lo Continue reading >>

Is Keto The Cure For Type Ii Diabetes?

Is Keto The Cure For Type Ii Diabetes?

A keto-compliant salad featuring collard greens and bacon crumbles. Photo courtesy of Brian Ambrozy/FlickrType II diabetes is one of America's most ubiquitousand expensivechronic diseases. Patients often require a suite of pharmaceutical products to manage high blood glucose levels, and the complications that arise over the long term, ranging from loss of vision and limbs to kidney failure and coronary artery disease, strain the resources of patients, their families, and the health care system. The financial strain on insurance companies, employers, and Medicaid and Medicare is even more enormous. A 2013 study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine put the lifetime direct medical costs for type II diabetes treatment at $124,000 for patients diagnosed in middle age. With nearly 30 million Americans affected by the disease, the American Diabetes Association estimates the national cost of direct diabetes care to be roughly $176 billion per year. But unlike type I diabetes, which is an autoimmune disorder that destroys insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, type II diabetes is a lifestyle disease, and thus reversible. Over time, people with type-II diabetes can be made more receptive to their own insulin, which in turn allows their bodies to effectively clear glucose from the blood without insulin medication. The trick for the vast majority of type II patients is as simple as losing weight. ("The relationship between obesity and diabetes is of such interdependence that the term 'diabesity' has been coined," two diabetes researchers wrote in 2005.) But that "trick" is actually pretty hard. Permanent weight loss without bariatric surgery is practically impossible at the population level. A 2014 study by Kaiser Permanente that looked at incidents of non-surgical dia Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance (metformin) And Keto

Insulin Resistance (metformin) And Keto

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Can someone give me advices and opinion about the Keto Diet + treatment of insulin resistance (my mother is with D. type 1) (mine results 1. 19 - 23 / 2. 19 - 140 / 3. 19 - 90, have it from 4-5 years, blood sugar - around 7 in the mornings, and 8-13 after something eated) with Metformin(3x850). 185 cm, 23 years old (today haha), 95 kg (I was 75 kgs but those 20 kilos I got because of **** IR) - I want to be 75 but it feels so impossible thing to do, that's way I hope the Keto diet will help. Also I had tooths that was in very healthy conditions .... now it's getting worse, really worse, blood pressure is very low or very high but not normal, pulse is always high in calm condition (95-105), also sometimes I can't feel my whole hands. Just really want to take an advantage over the IR and hope that the Keto (High Fat Diet) will help, actually that is my last chance of a diet (Low Fat doesn't help, even I had several hypogl. when the worst was with sugar 2.1; Rotation of Carbs also doens't help) :\\ So what do you think? Is it safe to start the KD, any risks, side effects? It will help to control the weight and loose some kilos? for insulin resistance, I found metformin and cutting carbs got my bloods back to normal and a 13kg weight loss Hey,Can someone give me advices and opinion about the Keto Diet + treatment of insulin resistance (my mother is with D. type 1) (mine results 1. 19 - 23 / 2. 19 - 140 / 3. 19 - 90, have it from 4-5 years, blood sugar - around 7 in the mornings, and 8-13 after something eated) with Metformin(3x850). 185 cm, 23 years old (today haha), 95 kg (I was 75 kgs but those 20 kilos I got because of **** IR) - I want to be 75 but it Continue reading >>

Starting Low Carb With Diabetes Medications

Starting Low Carb With Diabetes Medications

So you have diabetes and you want to try a low-carb diet? Congratulations! It may be the single best thing you could ever do for your health. It can start to reverse your type 2 diabetes, and dramatically increase your blood sugar control with type 1 diabetes. However, you need to know what you are doing. Once you start eating low carb you may instantly have to lower any insulin doses, a lot. Avoiding the carbohydrates that raise your blood sugar decreases your need for medication to lower it. Taking the same dose of insulin as you did prior to adopting a low-carb diet might result in hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). You need to test your blood sugar frequently when starting this diet and adapt (lower) your medication. This should ideally be done with the assistance of a knowledgeable physician. No drugs If you have diabetes and you’re treated either by diet alone or just with Metformin there is no risk of low blood sugar on low carb. You can get started right away. Insulin As a general guide you may need to lower your doses by 30-50% or more when starting a strict low-carb diet. Unfortunately there’s no way to know the doses required in advance. You’ll have to test your blood sugar frequently and adapt (lower) insulin doses. This should ideally be done with the assistance of a knowledgeable physician. Note that as a general rule it’s easier to err on the low side, and take more insulin later if needed. That’s fine. If instead you overdose and get low sugar you’ll have to quickly eat or drink more carbohydrates, and that obviously reduces the effect of the low-carb diet. Insulin in type 1 diabetes The advice on insulin above generally applies to type 1 diabetes too. A low-carb, high-fat diet can be fantastic for empowering people with type 1 diabetes to get s Continue reading >>

Metformin And Ketosis

Metformin And Ketosis

Another twist in my never-ending saga. I started Metformin about 11 days ago and worked my way up to 1500mg so far. I haven't noticed any difference in BG (yet), but I have a lower level of urine ketones. If anything I'm eating LESS carbs and less food in general (Metformin is suppressing my appetite); I used to eat 30gram of carb or less, now I make sure I eat my protein first and often don't feel like eating anything else, so I'm probably down to 15-20 grams of carbs/day. Yet ketones have dropped to a 'trace' level (they've been consistently 'small' to 'moderate' levels since I started testing last summer). Any idea why? Sometimes metformin can take up to 3-4 weeks to build up in your system. I'm not sure about the ketones, since I never test mine. I had to raise my metformin over 2 years to 2550 before I saw significant bg dropping. I have found though that my appetite is much smaller at meals, so I tend to eat more mini meals througout the day. 115 pounds, Breast Cancer dx'd 6/16, 6 months of chemo and 6 weeks of radiation 2000 metformin ER, 100 mg Januvia,Glimperide, Prolia, Gabapentin, Meloxicam, Probiotic with a Prebiotic, , Lisinopril, B-12, B-6, Tumeric, Magnesium, Calcium, Vit D, and Occuvite mostly vegan diet, low fat and around 125 carbs a day, walk 5-6 miles every other day and 1 hour of yoga and light weights. Sometimes metformin can take up to 3-4 weeks to build up in your system. I'm not sure about the ketones, since I never test mine. I had to raise my metformin over 2 years to 2550 before I saw significant bg dropping. I have found though that my appetite is much smaller at meals, so I tend to eat more mini meals througout the day. I did find some posts on low carb forums saying that people couldn't get in to ketosis on Metformin until they went to th Continue reading >>

Approach Keto (very Low Carb) Diet With Caution

Approach Keto (very Low Carb) Diet With Caution

In a second study,2 a Harvard-led research team evaluated the benefit of a ketogenic diet in both children and adults with type 1 diabetes despite concerns about a possible negative effect on growth and development in children following such a restricted diet.These researchers report "exceptional" glucose controlwith little adverse effects. However, the participants were recruited from a closed Facebook group, TypeOneGrit, for people who follow a diet and diabetes program based on the recommendations in the Diabetes Solution,3a book by Richard K Bernstein, MD, who devised this program tomanage his own type 1 diabetes. The ketogenic diet focuses on lean meat and lots of vegetables to promote weight loss. Too good to be true? Many experts are pushing back and raising questions about whether the keto diet itself is responsible for the improvement in weight and blood sugar or maybe the dieters' successes are due to other components of the research methods, such as lifestyle differences or physiological changes. "First, the studies are too small to make sense of the differences between the groups," says Michael J Gonzalez-Campoy, MD, PhD, medical director and CEO of the Minnesota Center for Obesity, Metabolism, and Endocrinology, in Eagan, Minnesota. And, it's important to recognize that both study teams acknowledge that as exciting as their findings seem,a large,randomized controlled trial is still needed to more closely assess a variety of components that may be contributing to the successes found in both studies before the findings can be recommended to anyone outside the study groups1,2he says. "We recommend against 'dieting',which is invariably a short-termsolution," Dr. Gonzalez-Campoy, tells EndocrineWeb, "and since weight loss may be accomplished by a reduction in c Continue reading >>

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