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Just Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes

A Father’s Letter To His Son, Newly Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes

A Father’s Letter To His Son, Newly Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes

Dear Son, It seems strange how one day in time can change everything about your life. September 4, 2014 was such a day, when we received the news that you have Type 1 diabetes. Mom and I already suspected the diagnosis due to your constant thirst, hunger, and urination. You didn’t do anything to cause this, and neither did we. I hate that diabetes is part of your life and I hate that we have to tell you that you can’t eat something before we check your blood sugar and count the carbohydrates. We hate having to give you shots every day. It’s not fair to you. I feel like you can’t be a normal 5 year old because when you want to do something there is always that delay. We will always look out for you, but I hate that we have to watch you like a hawk. I hate that you have to wear a medical alert bracelet. I hate not knowing how you are going to react to the insulin. I hate that there isn’t a clear, cut answer to how much you need. Every time you have a low, I feel like I am doing wrong by you. I hate the extreme fluctuations in your blood sugar. I hate that we have to wake you in the middle of the night to give you sugar. I hate seeing how this affects you. I hate diabetes. The most frustrating thing about this is that when I go to work, my job as a firefighter/paramedic is to fix people’s problems. I get paid to do that, and sometimes, I even get thanked for it. I should be able to fix you and it absolutely kills me that I can’t. I should be able to give you the right answers. I hate knowing that sometimes when I think I am right, I couldn’t be more wrong. I hate the feeling of using you as a science experiment because I constantly have to juggle your numbers. If I could trade places with you, I would. I hate that this is not an option. Though I am grateful Continue reading >>

Top 10 Tips For People Newly Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes

Top 10 Tips For People Newly Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes

twitter summary: Ten tips for newly diagnosed T2 #diabetes: act NOW for long-term benefits, use healthy eating, exercise, meds + structured blood glucose testing short summary: This article offers ten tips for people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes: 1) Know that developing type 2 diabetes does not represent a personal failing; 2) Start to take care of your diabetes as soon as you’re diagnosed (and even better, before, if you know you have prediabetes); 3) Recognize that type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease; 4) Keep in mind that food has a major impact on blood glucose; work to optimize your mealtime choices; 5) Exercise is a powerful and underutilized tool which can increase insulin sensitivity and improve health – use it as much as possible; 6) Use blood glucose testing to identify patterns; 7) Don’t forget that needing to take insulin doesn’t mean you failed; 8) Keep learning and find support; 9) Seek out the services of a Diabetes Educator; and 10) Review our Patient's Guide to Individualizing Therapy at www.diaTribe.org/patientguide. Know that developing type 2 diabetes does not represent a personal failing. It develops through a combination of factors that are still being uncovered and better understood. Lifestyle (food, exercise, stress, sleep) certainly plays a major role, but genetics play a significant role as well. Type 2 diabetes is often described in the media as a result of being overweight, but the relationship is not that simple. Many overweight individuals never get type 2, and some people with type 2 were never overweight. At its core, type 2 involves two physiological issues: resistance to the insulin made by the person’s beta cells and too little insulin production relative to the amount one needs. These problems can lead to high bl Continue reading >>

Depression In Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes

Depression In Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes

Go to: Abstract Objective: To investigate the incidence of depression in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes. Materials and One hundred newly diagnosed (4 – 12 weeks) T2DM participants were evaluated for depressive symptoms by using the Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS). Blood glucose (HBA1C), urinary albumin, BMI, and blood pressure were measured. Sexual function was evaluated by a self-score on IIEF-5 Questionnaires in male participants below 60 years of age. Twenty-eight (28%) of these had depressive scores, 18 (18%) had mild scores, six (6%) had moderate scores, and four had (4%) severe ones. In those who took oral medication, the percentage of depression was 18.5% (10/54) and in those who were treated by insulin the percentage was 39.1% (18/46). The levels of fasting blood glucose (FBG), HBA1c, and urinary albumin were higher in those with depression. The SDS score was negatively correlated with age and annual household income (r = 0.151,0.139, P < 0.05); 17% of the (8/48) males below 60 years of age was diagnosed with erectile dysfunction (ED) by II EF-5score < 20 and the severity of depressive symptoms was negatively correlated with II EF-5score (r = 0.131, P < 0.05). Conclusion: These findings indicated that depressive symptoms are common in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics. A variety of factors could be influencing the severity of depressive symptoms. Keywords: Diabetes, depression, erectile dysfunction Continue reading >>

Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes? Tips To Help You Out

Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes? Tips To Help You Out

I was involved in a discussion over in a Facebook group recently and someone posted: What one tip would you give someone who is newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes? So I thought it would make a perfect post right here, sharing many of their tips. So that means these tips I've compiled for you are from people who have experienced this themselves and here's what some of them had to say. 20 Tips To Help You Out Your life depends on you checking your blood sugars. The numbers don't lie so you cannot claim denial. Love yourself enough to take care of yourself and report you true numbers to your doctor often. Check your blood sugars often, take your medications when you're supposed to, exercise, eat right, and NEVER GIVE UP!! You have diabetes, it doesn't have you. It's not a death sentence when a few life choices are changed. Never ignore your symptoms. Educate yourself and educate the people around you that will be with you daily. Don't panic, it's not the end of the world. Drink lots of water. Eat right, no pasta, no sweets, take your medication and exercise. You can live a normal life while maintaining blood sugars. Limit carbs and eat the right carbs. Don't give up. Cut way back on carbs. Check your sugar often, take it one day at a time. It isn't going to be easy but before you know it, it will become second nature to you. Keep your head up and remember what you do now affects you later on in life. Don't get scared it won't accomplish anything. Educate yourself and exercise. Get rid of diet soda Life will be normal again, just a new normal. Be sure to weight and portion everything and keep a food log until you know portions and have your blood sugar and eating routine under control. Join a support group and know that you aren't the only one and some days are better than oth Continue reading >>

Newly Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes And Scared

Newly Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes And Scared

HealthBoards > Immune & Autoimmune > Diabetes > Newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and scared Newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and scared Newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and scared Hello all. I am not new to Health Boards, but new to the diabetes site. I was recently hospitalized with a blood glucose of 1,275...no that is not a misprint. I have had some suspicians that I was diabetic due to increased thirst, frequent urination,etc.., and even made an appt with my PCP to have this checked out. The day of my appt., my daughter called me to babysit and well the rest is history. That weekend my husband had to call 911 because my behavior changed drastically and I was drinking water by the gallon and asked him to get me some pop which I don't drink. Well, I started acting like a "drunk," and I even fell at one point. My husband was petrified and I don't remember anything after that except waking up in ICU 3 days later. Please forgive my long post, but I tend to be a detail person??? I was in the hospital for almost 2 weeks and on insulin, Metformin, and Amaryl. When discharged, I was only on the meds and still wonder why they gave me insulin in the hospital right up until the moment I was discharged??? My BG is somewhat eratic still and have had some pretty heavy blurred vision, but the vision appears to improve daily. I was told that with consistent BG the vision would improve, but my numbers still are not that great...I mean inconsistent. I am on an 1800 calorie diet with 45-60 carbs per meal, and am actually losing weight...slowly, but it's definitely coming off. I'm also supposed to take in 15 carbs with snacks in between each meal!! I feel like all I do is eat and monitor my BG!!! Why all the food? I really have little appetite and was also diagnosed with a Continue reading >>

Tom Hanks On What Led To Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis: 'i Was A Total Idiot'

Tom Hanks On What Led To Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis: 'i Was A Total Idiot'

He's funny, charming and talented, but Tom Hanks is also "a total idiot" — according to the star himself. That's because, despite being clever in many ways, he ignored medical advice and chose to live a lifestyle that he now believes led to his type 2 diabetes diagnosis. We apologize, this video has expired. Radio Times. “I was heavy. You've seen me in movies, you know what I looked like," he continued. "I was a total idiot." Back in 2013, Hanks first revealed his ailment, telling then-"Late Show" host David Letterman, "I went to the doctor, and he said, 'You know those high blood sugar numbers you've been dealing with since you were 36? Well, you've graduated! You've got type 2 diabetes, young man,'" It seems the 59-year-old's previous attempts to bring those elevated blood sugar numbers down by dieting just weren't working. "I thought I could avoid it by removing the buns from my cheeseburgers," he told RadioTimes. "Well, it takes a little bit more than that." But it's not too late to turn things around. "My doctor says if I can hit a target weight, I will not have type 2 diabetes anymore," he adeed. But in 2013, he explained to Letterman that his teen-like target weight was one he might not be able to hit. "Well, I'm going to have type 2 diabetes then, because there is no way I can weigh [what I weighed] in high school," he said with a laugh. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Is Not Your Fault

Diabetes Is Not Your Fault

It’s hard enough to deal with a new diabetes diagnosis without blaming yourself on top of it. In this edited excerpt from The First Year: Type 2 Diabetes – An Essential Guide for the Newly Diagnosed, Gretchen Becker unpacks the emotional minefield that comes with a diabetes diagnosis. You’ve just been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. If you’re like most people, you’re probably in a state of shock. When you got your diagnosis, your doctor probably told you a lot of things about diets and drugs and insulin and glucose and carbohydrates and blood tests and avoiding this and doing that, and you probably came out of the office with your head spinning, not remembering much of what the doctor said. Don’t worry, you’re not alone. Most people feel that way. If no one in your family ever had diabetes, and especially if you’re thin and thought diabetes only happened to fat people, you’re probably especially puzzled. “What did I do wrong? Why is this happening to me?” Sometimes a diagnosis comes like a thunderbolt on a sunny day. Sophie C. consulted a doctor about a toenail fungus, and he drew some blood for routine tests. “Next day the phone rang, and my doctor informed me quite bluntly that I was diabetic,” she said. “Talk about a slap in the face! I was scared out of my mind. There must be some mistake here. I wasn’t blind; my feet weren’t gangrenous. No family history of the disease, no warning signs (that I knew of at the time), not a clue.” Or maybe you were expecting a diagnosis someday. You’ve got relatives with diabetes: your grandmother had diabetes and died from gangrene in her foot. Your father got it when he was 65 and died from a heart attack a few years later. If you’re also overweight, maybe you figured someday you’d get diabet Continue reading >>

Newly Diagnosed With Type 2

Newly Diagnosed With Type 2

Tweet The diagnosis experience of people with type 2 diabetes can vary quite significantly. Some people are given a good introduction to what type 2 diabetes is and access to well run diabetes education courses. However, we’re aware that some people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes have been given a prescription for tablets and been told to get on with it! Our guide here provides important information as to what type 2 diabetes is and how you can get on top of the condition and start controlling it at an early stage. What is type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes is a condition which develops if your body can no longer respond effectively enough to its own insulin to prevent your blood glucose levels from going too high. The good news is that you can fight back against this and get your body to respond better to insulin. Our Low Carb Program shows you how you can achieve this and, since we launched it in 2015, many thousands of people have improved their ability to control their diabetes. Coming to terms with type 2 diabetes Diabetes can be a tough condition to accept but the good news is that it is a condition which, with a bit of dedication, can be well controlled. It’s fair to say that there are a good number of people with type 2 diabetes that have actually been pleased to have got a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes because it has explained why they were feeling less than well and has given them the chance to take achievable steps to feel better than they have in a long time. The Diabetes Forum has thousands of posts from people with type 2 diabetes and there is no better place to find support and share your experiences. If you are finding the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes to be a shock, or are struggling to come to with your diagnosis, read our guide on accepting a di Continue reading >>

Newly Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes

Newly Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes

Being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes does change your life. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that causes the pancreas to stop producing insulin, a hormone that is necessary to convert food into energy. Suddenly, you're exposed to a whole new world—one that likely includes changing your diet (you may never look at carbs the same way again), taking new medications and learning about insulin and how to administer it to your body. Monitoring your blood glucose levels will eventually become second nature but the idea may seem scary at first. It may help to remember that you are not alone. According to the Joslin Diabetes Foundation, 1.25 million Americans are living with type 1 diabetes--including about 200,000 youth (less than 20 years old) and over a million adults (20 years old and older). With support from your family, friends and healthcare team, you can learn how to cope with diabetes in your everyday life. We're here to help, too. We'll show you simple ways to manage your diabetes, including common treatments and the information you need to stay up-to-date on your condition. We also have the resources, expert advice, delicious recipes and personal stories of inspiration to cheer you on. Unfortunately, there is no cure for type 1 diabetes. You should know that your diabetes will be largely managed by you and that can feel lonely. But your diabetes treatment team, which may include a primary care physician, endocrinologist, dietitian, and certified diabetes educator, will be there to support you every step of the way Add a few key tools, such as educating yourself about your condition and adopting a can-do attitude, and you'll be well prepared to handle whatever comes your way. So be kind to yourself. It's a lot to absorb at first but it will get easier. Deali Continue reading >>

Cope With The Emotional Rollercoaster Of Diabetes Diabetes Newly Diagnosed Health Monitor

Cope With The Emotional Rollercoaster Of Diabetes Diabetes Newly Diagnosed Health Monitor

If you just learned you have type 2 diabetes , youre probably upset, confused and fearful, thanks in no small part to all those unanswered questions swimming in your head: Will I ever be able to eat the foods I love? How can I possibly give myself an insulin shot? You may be stressed about the effects of uncontrolled diabetes, scared of long-term complications and even feel guiltylike you caused it. As you come to terms with your diabetes diagnosis, its normal to experience the gamut of emotions: depression, stress, anxiety, denial, anger, shame and even grief. The trick is to figure out how to prevent your feelings from interfering with proper care. Follow these steps to help stay upbeat in the face of a type 2 diabetes diagnosis: Become an expert. A lot of the fear and anxiety over a type 2 diabetes diagnosis comes from not understanding the condition. True, there is no cure, yet you can control your condition through treatment and lifestyle changes. Studies suggest that many people with type 2 diabetes can drop their blood sugar numbers back to a normal range just by exercising and modifying their diets. Talk to your healthcare provider, read up and equip yourself with the know-how to best manage your diabetes. A certified diabetes educator and registered dietitian can also provide practical guidance. Learn to relax.Meditation,yoga and massage can help reduce stress and get your mind off the diagnosis. Besides easing anxiety, some studies suggest that massage at insulin injection points can help promote insulin absorption, contributing to lower blood sugar levels. It can also help relieve pain associated with diabetic neuropathy. Consult your healthcare team before booking a massage. Take actionany action. Throw out the junk food from just one shelf in your pantry. Continue reading >>

Newly Diagnosed

Newly Diagnosed

A diagnosis of diabetes can give rise to many emotions and questions. With so much information available, particularly through searching the internet, it can be overwhelming and confusing. It’s important to seek information from trusted sources. Your diabetes healthcare team can signpost to reputable sources of support. There is a wealth of information on our site to give a clear understanding of what type 1 and type 2 diabetes is all about, and the support that we offer. There are many "myths" that have been voiced regarding diabetes over the years. It’s good to know the fact and fiction, so here are just a few of the most common ones - Declassifying diabetes and dispelling myths By Dr Mayank Patel, Consultant in Diabetes and Acute Medicine at University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust. There are many recognised definitions for diabetes. Put very simply, they all amount to the same thing; there is too much glucose (sugar) in the body. So where does all this surplus glucose come from? Think of glucose as petrol and the body as an engine. The natural tendency is to ensure that there is enough glucose available for the engine to run and keeps the "chemistry of life" ticking over. This essential glucose comes largely from the food we eat. Normally, if blood glucose levels exceed a safe threshold, to prevent the engine from being flooded, the pancreas will produce insulin, which acts as a key to promote glucose uptake, use and storage. Conversely, if glucose levels fall too low, less insulin is produced and more glucose is then freely available for use. Without diabetes, glucose and insulin levels are nicely balanced. With diabetes, the tendency is towards raised glucose levels, which can cause problems in both the short and long term. The reason why diabetes Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a progressive, chronic disease related to your body's challenges with regulating blood sugar. It is often associated with generalized inflammation. Your pancreas produces the hormone insulin to convert sugar (glucose) to energy that you either use immediately or store. With type 2 diabetes, you are unable to use that insulin efficiently. Although your body produces the hormone, either there isn't enough of it to keep up with the amount of glucose in your system, or the insulin being produced isn't being used as well as it should be, both of which result in high blood sugar levels. While this can produce different types of complications, good blood sugar control efforts can help to prevent them. This relies heavily on lifestyle modifications such as weight loss, dietary changes, exercise and, in some cases, medication. But, depending on your age, weight, blood sugar level, and how long you've had diabetes, you may not need a prescription right away. Treatment must be tailored to you and, though finding the perfect combination may take a little time, it can help you live a healthy, normal life with diabetes. What Causes Type 2 Diabetes? Type 2 diabetes is most common is those who are genetically predisposed and who are overweight, lead a sedentary lifestyle, have high blood pressure, and/or have insulin resistance due to excess weight. People of certain ethnicities are more likely to develop diabetes, too. These include: African Americans, Mexican Americans, American Indians, Native Hawaiians, Pacific Islanders, and Asian Americans. These populations are more likely to be overweight and have high blood pressure, which increases the risk of developing diabetes. As you age, you are also at increased risk of developing diabetes. A poor diet and smoking can Continue reading >>

Newly Diagnosed - Diabetes Ireland : Diabetes Ireland

Newly Diagnosed - Diabetes Ireland : Diabetes Ireland

When newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes it can be overwhelming. Understanding what is happening in the body when a person has diabetes can help make sense of the advice your diabetes care team will provide you with. Diabetes is a long term condition where the amount of glucose in the blood is too high because the body cannot use it efficiently for energy. To use glucose for energy, your body needs insulin. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the pancreas completely stops producing insulin. This occurs most frequently in children and young people. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body is making some insulin but not enough to meet the bodys needs or when the insulin produced does not work efficiently (insulin resistance). When insulin is not present or does not work efficiently, glucose cannot get in to the cells and builds up in the bloodstream. There is no cure for diabetes, but it can be managed. Balancing the carbohydrate foods (sugars and starches) you eat with physical activity and medicine (if prescribed) can keep your blood glucose in a healthy range. As you get older, your pancreas which produces insulin may not be working as efficiently as it did when you were younger Type 2 diabetes may be more common in your family Your may have had diabetes during a pregnancy or a baby that weighed over 10lbs Continue reading >>

Toddler May Be Youngest Ever Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes

Toddler May Be Youngest Ever Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes

Toddler May Be Youngest Ever Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes STOCKHOLM A Texas toddler is believed to be the youngest person ever diagnosed with type 2 diabetes . The case report was presented September 16 in a poster discussion session here at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) 2015 Meeting by Michael Yafi, MD, director of pediatric endocrinology at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. But during the question-and-answer period, session moderator Tiinamaija Tuomi, MD, PhD, head of the department of endocrinology at the University of Helsinki, Finland, raised the possibility of an alternative diagnosis: maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY). The child, a 3-year-old Hispanic girl weighing 35 kg (77 pounds; > 95th percentile for age) presented at Dr Yafi's pediatric endocrinology clinic for evaluation of obesity . Dr. Yafi noted that while she didn't seem ill, she had polyuria and polydipsia, so he screened her and found she had a fasting plasma glucose of 230 mg/dL (12.6 mmol/L)and an HbA1c of 7.2%. Her C-peptide was positive (6.9 ng/mL) and she was negative for antiglutamic acid decarboxylase or islet-cell antibodies, so he diagnosed her with type 2 diabetes. The parents who initially had very poor nutritional habits were educated about lifestyle modification, and the girl started on a liquid form of metformin. She lost 25% of her body weight and eventually was taken off metformin. At 6 months' postdiagnosis, she continued to have normal blood glucose levels, with an HbA1c of 5.3%. Although 40% of children in Texas who are newly diagnosed with diabetes have type 2, this case is believed to be the youngest. And there are probably others like her, Dr Yafi told Medscape Medical News. "It's scary. I think the problem is pedia Continue reading >>

The Patient With Newly Diagnosed Diabetes

The Patient With Newly Diagnosed Diabetes

Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find the Diabetes (Diabetes Mellitus) article more useful, or one of our other health articles. The initial management of someone who has just been diagnosed as having diabetes mellitus can have a big effect on the course of the illness. It is essential to establish a clear understanding of the disease, the benefits of all aspects of management and to allay unnecessary fears and myths quickly. See also the separate Management of Type 1 Diabetes and Management of Type 2 Diabetes articles. Assessment Indications for hospital referral at initial presentation include: Children and young people presenting with suspected diabetes should always be referred urgently, on the same day, for admission to hospital for initiation of insulin therapy. Adults who are clearly unwell, or who have ketones in their urine, or who have a blood glucose level greater than 25.0 mmol/L, should also be referred urgently for admission to hospital on the same day. Those who present with diabetic ketoacidosis or hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state will require immediate treatment in hospital. Young adults (aged under 30 years) should also be referred to a specialist diabetes team. Clinical examination and investigations Measure height and weight, and calculate body mass index (BMI). Urinalysis: ketones and proteinuria. Arrange midstream specimen of urine (MSU) if protein is present. Identify any long-term complications of diabetes already present: Cardiovascular assessment, including smoking status, blood pressure, lipids and ECG. Examine feet for diabetic complications, including cardiovascular disease, diabetic neuropathy Continue reading >>

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