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Jock Itch And Diabetes

Diabetes: Foot & Skin Related Complications

Diabetes: Foot & Skin Related Complications

How can diabetes affect feet and skin? For people with diabetes, having too much glucose (sugar) in their blood for a long time can cause some serious complications, including foot and skin problems, as well as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, eye damage, and other problems. How can diabetes affect my feet? Diabetes can cause two problems that can affect your feet: Diabetic neuropathy — Uncontrolled diabetes can damage your nerves. If you have damaged nerves in your legs and feet, you might not feel heat, cold or pain. This lack of feeling is called diabetic neuropathy. If you do not feel a cut or sore on your foot because of neuropathy, the cut could get worse and become infected. Peripheral vascular disease — Diabetes also affects the flow of blood. Without good blood flow, it takes longer for a sore or cut to heal. Poor blood flow in the arms and legs is called peripheral vascular disease. (The word "peripheral" means "located away from a central point," and the word "vascular" refers to the blood vessels. Peripheral vascular disease is a circulation disorder that affects blood vessels away from the heart.) If you have an infection that will not heal because of poor blood flow, you are at risk for developing gangrene, which is the death of tissue due to a lack of blood. To keep gangrene from spreading, the doctor may have to remove a toe, foot, or part of a leg. This procedure is called amputation. Diabetes is the most common, non-traumatic cause of leg amputations. Each year, more than 56,000 people with diabetes have amputations. However, research suggests that more than half of these amputations can be prevented through proper foot care. What are some common foot problems of people with diabetes? Anyone can get the foot problems listed below. For people Continue reading >>

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes can affect many parts of your body, including your skin. When diabetes affects the skin, it’s often a sign that your blood sugar (glucose) levels are too high. This could mean that: You have undiagnosed diabetes, or pre-diabetes Your treatment for diabetes needs to be adjusted If you notice any of the following warning signs on your skin, it’s time to talk with your doctor. This skin condition often begins as small raised solid bumps that look like pimples. As it progresses, these bumps turn into patches of swollen and hard skin. The patches can be yellow, reddish, or brown. You may also notice: The surrounding skin has a shiny porcelain-like appearance You can see blood vessels The skin is itchy and painful The skin disease goes through cycles where it is active, inactive, and then active again The medical name for this condition is necrobiosis lipodica (neck-row-by-oh-sis lee-poi-dee-ka). TAKE ACTION Get tested for diabetes if you have not been diagnosed. Work with your doctor to better control your diabetes. See a dermatologist about your skin. Necorbiosis lipodica is harmless, but it can lead to complications. A dark patch (or band) of velvety skin on the back of your neck, armpit, groin, or elsewhere could mean that you have too much insulin in your blood. AN is often a sign of prediabetes. The medical name for this skin condition is acanthosis nigricans (ay-can-THOE-sis NIE-gri-cans). TAKE ACTION: Get tested for diabetes. 3. Hard, thickening skin When this develops on the fingers, toes, or both, the medical name for this condition is digital sclerosis (sclear-row-sis). On the hands, you’ll notice tight, waxy skin on the backs of your hands. The fingers can become stiff and difficult to move. If diabetes has been poorly controlled for years, it can f Continue reading >>

Below Is More Detail On How Diabetes Affects The Skin, Common Conditions And Pointers To Protect The Skin You’re In.

Below Is More Detail On How Diabetes Affects The Skin, Common Conditions And Pointers To Protect The Skin You’re In.

Diabetes can affect every part of the body, including your skin. In fact, according to the American Diabetes Association, about one-third of people with type 2 diabetes will develop a skin problem caused or affected by diabetes at some point in their lives. The statistics aren’t surprising considering that people with diabetes often suffer from nerve damage (diabetic neuropathy) that can lead to numb, injuryprone hands and feet, while poor circulation and high blood sugar slows down healing. There are some conditions that most anyone can have, such as bacterial and fungal infections and itching. However, people with diabetes are more prone to these and others including diabetic blisters, diabetic dermopathy [der-mop’ă-thē], small, round, brown atrophic skin lesions that occur on the shins of patients with diabetes, and eruptive xanthomatosis [zan’thō-mă-tō’sis], firm, yellow, pea-like skin growths. Most of these skin conditions can be treated with due diligence and a simple daily skin care routine, while others need treatment right away to prevent serious problems. Below is more detail on how diabetes affects the skin, common conditions and pointers to protect the skin you’re in. The Basics If you have diabetes, there are several basic steps you can take to prevent skin problems: Keep your diabetes well managed. When blood sugar levels run high, it causes the body to lose fluids and the skin to become dry, causing skin that may crack, itch and lead to infections. Moisturize your skin to prevent cracking and chapping, especially in windy or cold weather. Neuropathy can also lead to dry skin, as the nerves in the legs and the feet may not get the message to sweat, which is necessary to keep the skin soft and moist. So, the main message is moisturize, moistu Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Skin

Diabetes And Your Skin

Proper care, awareness crucial to maintaining healthy skin Skin is the largest organ in your body. Many people with diabetes are more likely to develop skin problems. While some are minor and mainly cosmetic, others can be fatal. “Diabetes tends to dry out the skin as part of the disease process,” said Jeffrey Meffert, MD, program director, dermatology at University Health System’s Diabetes Institute in San Antonio, Texas. “Some of the medications used can make the problem worse.” When blood sugar is high the body loses fluid, causing the skin to become dry. Dry skin in diabetes is related to damage to the nerves that cause sweating, the body’s main lubricating system. Dry skin and infections Dry skin can lead to many major concerns in diabetes. Cracking and peeling results in openings in the skin, allowing bacteria or fungi to enter the body. High levels of sugar in the body are great breeding grounds and reduce your body’s ability to heal itself, increasing the chances an infection may spread. Several different kinds of bacterial infections occur more often in people with diabetes. Among these are: • styes in the glands of the eyelids; • boils; • folliculitis of the hair follicles; • carbuncles — very deep infections of the skin and underlying tissue; and • infections around the nails. “With bacterial infections, you most often first see a redness around the area of the cut or crack,” said Matthew G. Garoufalis, DPM, a podiatrist in private practice in Chicago. “People with diabetes are at a disadvantage because they often will not feel pain, which can be an early warning that an infection is occurring. As it progresses, you may also see drainage from the wound, and it may become warm to the touch.” Fungal infections also are a concer Continue reading >>

10 Diabetic Skin Problems

10 Diabetic Skin Problems

1 / 11 Are You Suffering From a Diabetes-Related Skin Complication? About a third of people with diabetes will develop skin problems at some point. In fact, some skin issues can be warning signs of diabetes. The good news is that most skin conditions can be treated easily if they’re caught early. Keeping proper control of your blood sugar (glucose) can prevent skin problems and many other diabetes symptoms from happening in the first place. “For the most part, control of diabetes can help with related skin issues,” says Justin Ko, MD, the medical director and service chief of medical dermatology at Stanford Health Care, in Redwood City, California. “I’m always adamant that my diabetic patients take aggressive care of their skin and health in general. For the skin, moisturization, checking feet and legs daily for any blisters, sores, and skin breaks (especially between the toes), and nail care is extremely important. Nail and foot fungus can lead to skin cracks and breaks, allowing bacteria to enter and cause infection.” Continue reading >>

4 Common Summer Skin Conditions With Diabetes

4 Common Summer Skin Conditions With Diabetes

4 Common Summer Skin Conditions With Diabetes 4 Common Summer Skin Conditions With Diabetes Proper foot care is important when you have diabetes. Wash your feet daily with gentle soap and warmwater. Dry them completely and apply foot cream, staying away from the areas between your toes. Alwayswear closed shoes that fit properly. Wear well fitting white socks to help with perspiration. Avoid wearingflip-flops, sandals, and other open shoes. People with diabetes tend to suffer more bacterial infections than anyone else. Bacteria thrive in thewarm, humid weather of spring and summer. Bacterial infections are often caused by staph, formallyknown as Staphylococcus. If you think you have a bacterial infection, consult with your doctor right away.Often they are treated with antibiotics in the form of a topical cream or a pill. The blood sugar highs and lows associated with diabetes can create a perfect environment for fungalinfections to grow. The biggest culprit is a yeast-like fungus called Candida albicans. It is responsible formany of the fungal infections people with diabetes get. Yeast infections may develop in the moist, warmfolds of your skin. Common yeast infections include ringworm, athletes foot and jock itch. Itchy skin is common for people with diabetes, especially during the spring and summer months. Alwayswear sunscreen with an SPF 30+ when you go outdoors. Minimize sun exposure to sensitive areas of yourskin by wearing a hat, sunglasses and socks with shoes. This iframe contains the logic required to handle Ajax powered Gravity Forms. Disclaimer: By signing up for Diabetes Education and Supply Center of the Midlands materials, you consent to receiving our regular education and communication information, which may include paid advertising. We do not pass on or Continue reading >>

Dr. David B. Samadi Health Blog: Six Surprising Ways Diabetes May Affect Your Skin | Blog Dr. David B. Samadi | El Pas

Dr. David B. Samadi Health Blog: Six Surprising Ways Diabetes May Affect Your Skin | Blog Dr. David B. Samadi | El Pas

Six surprising ways diabetes may affect your skin To avoid serious consequences and complications, those with the disease need to be aware of certain conditions that could be associated with it A diabetes test is administered. Up to one-third of people with diabetes can experience skin problems related to the disease. REUTERS Diabetes tends to be an equal-opportunity troublemaker when it comes to the body, as it can affect multiple systems. Whether its the heart, kidneys, eyes or limbs, diabetes can overtake and disrupt overall health. One other body system the disease can affect is the skin. It is not uncommon for up to one-third of people with diabetes to experience skin problems related to the disease. Thankfully,if caught early most of these issues can be treated. But to avoid serious consequences and complications, those with this disease need to be aware of certain skin conditions that could be associated with it. Up to one third of people with diabetes experience skin problems related to the disease One way to keep skin conditions from arising is to keep diabetes in control. Following a healthy diet plan, regular exercise, reducing stress, and taking any medications prescribed can all do their part for maintaining good blood-glucose levels. Also simply practicing taking good care of skin to begin with and noticing anything out or the ordinary, bringing it to a doctors attention, can be an excellent method for keeping skin conditions under control. Here are some common skin problems those with diabetes may experience and should be aware of. Acanthosis nigricans is a condition related to insulin resistance . This skin disorder is characterized by velvety dark patches appearing in body folds such as the neck, groin, armpits, knees, elbows and hands. People with thi Continue reading >>

Skin Problems In Diabetes

Skin Problems In Diabetes

If you have diabetes, it’s important to be aware of potentially serious skin problems related to the disease and see your doctor before the problem gets out of control. In most cases, skin problems in diabetes can be managed with early diagnosis and treatment. you might like Scleroderma diabeticorum: While rare, this skin problem affects people with type 2 diabetes, causing a thickening of the skin on the back of the neck and upper back. The treatment is to bring your blood sugar level under control. Lotions and moisturizers may help soften skin. Vitiligo: Vitiligo, a skin problem more commonly associated with type 1 diabetes than type 2 diabetes, affects skin coloration. With vitiligo, the special cells that make pigment (the substance that controls skin color) are destroyed, resulting in patches of discolored skin. Vitiligo often affects the chest and abdomen, but may be found on the face around the mouth, nostrils, and eyes. Current treatment options for vitiligo include topical steroids and micropigmentation (tattooing). If you have vitiligo, you should use sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher to prevent sunburn on the discolored skin. Acanthosis nigricans. This is a skin problem that results in the darkening and thickening of certain areas of the skin especially in the skin folds. The skin becomes tan or brown and is sometimes slightly raised and described as velvety. Most often the condition, which typically looks like small warts, appears on the sides or back of the neck, the armpits, under the breast, and groin. Occasionally the top of the knuckles will have a particularly unusual appearance. Acanthosis nigricans usually strikes people who are very overweight. While there is no cure for acanthosis nigricans, losing weight may improve the skin condition. Acant Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Causing Your Skin Problems?

Is Diabetes Causing Your Skin Problems?

Diabetes can affect all body systems, but often the connection between diabetes and skin problems is missed. Up to one third of people with diabetes will experience skin problems related to the disease. If caught early, most conditions can be treated and resolved. Skin problems should be addressed and promptly treated to avoid serious consequences and complications. Here is a summary of common skin problems that occur more frequently in people with diabetes, along with some skin problems that are specifically related to the disease. If you have diabetes, and skin problems are a concern, the best way to prevent problems is to keep your diabetes in good control, keep blood sugar within recommended levels and practice good skin care. Bacterial infections produce painful and swollen, inflamed skin that is often hot to the touch. These infections can usually be treated with antibiotics and improve with good blood sugar control. Bacteria can thrive in the presence of excess glucose. Examples of bacterial infections are boils, eyelid styes, carbuncles, nail infections and hair follicle infections. Staphylococcus is a common bacterium responsible for bacterial infections in people with diabetes. Fungal infections produce itchy rashes in moist areas of the body, such as skin folds. These rashes can be red, surrounded by scales or blisters and have a yeasty white film in the folds of the skin. Prescription medicines and good diabetes control help in treatment. As with bacterial infections, excess glucose is beneficial to fungus. Examples of fungal infections are: yeast infections , jock itch , ringworm and athlete's foot. Candida albicans is a common fungus responsible for fungal infections in people with diabetes. Dry Skin is more common in people with diabetes. Skin becomes fl Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Skin

Diabetes And Your Skin

Protecting Your Outermost Layer The phrase “feeling comfortable in your own skin” is usually used figuratively to describe a level of self-confidence or self-acceptance. But when your skin itches, hurts, flakes, breaks out, changes color, or just doesn’t look or feel the way you’d like it to, the phrase can take on a new, very literal meaning. Diabetes can affect the skin in a number of ways that can make a person feel less than comfortable. In fact, as many as a third of people with diabetes will have a skin condition at some point in their lifetime. While some conditions may appear uniquely in people with diabetes, others are simply more common in people with diabetes. The good news is that a fair number of these conditions are treatable or can be prevented by maintaining blood glucose control and taking good daily care of your skin. Dry, itchy skin Dry skin can occur as a result of high blood glucose. When the blood glucose level is high, the body attempts to remove excess glucose from the blood by increasing urination. This loss of fluid from the body causes the skin to become dry. Dry skin can also be caused by neuropathy (damage to the nerves) by affecting the nerves that control the sweat glands. In these cases, neuropathy causes a decrease or absence of sweating that may lead to dry, cracked skin. Cold, dry air and bathing in hot water can aggravate dry skin. Dryness commonly leads to other skin problems such as itching (and often scratching), cracking, and peeling. Any small breaks in the skin leave it more exposed to injury and infection. It is therefore important to keep skin well moisturized. The best way to moisturize is to apply lotion or cream right after showering and patting the skin dry. This will seal in droplets of water that are present on t Continue reading >>

Skin Conditions And Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Skin Conditions And Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Everyone knows about the major long- and short-term complications of diabetes. But what many newly-diagnosed patients might not realize, is that skin conditions often come with having diabetes. My first exposure to skin conditions was a fungal infection. I can remember saying to the trainer that I could not have a fungal infection because my A1c was 6%. A specific over-the-counter anti-fungal ointment stopped the fungal infection process, and now I travel with this small tube just in case. I use it in the summer when I'm in the water and I develop itchy skin on my upper shoulder always in the same place. It's gone, and I'm happy. First, we want you to know that people who do not have diabetes get these skin conditions also, but as with many other complications, we tend to get them more often. About one-third of people with diabetes will have a skin disorder caused or affected by diabetes at some time. In fact, doctors report noting the presence of skin disorders before they diagnose diabetes. Second, if you think you have one of the skin conditions outlined in this article, please see your physician right away. Don't wait. Finally, we end this article with some easy ways to protect your skin when you have diabetes (either type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes). Skin Conditions that Can Affect People with Diabetes Bacterial Infections: People with diabetes appear to suffer more bacterial infections than the general population. There are several kinds of infections that can affect those of us with diabetes. One is a sty, which is an infection of the glands of the eyelids. A second type is a boil, which are infections of the hair follicles. Carbuncles are deep infections of the skin and the tissue underneath. Infections can also occur around the nails. We all know bacterial i Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Skin Health

Type 2 Diabetes And Skin Health

What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Skin problems are often the first visible signs of diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. Type 2 diabetes can make existing skin problems worse, and also cause new ones. Type 2 diabetes is a chronic metabolic condition that affects how your body absorbs glucose (sugar). This happens when the body either rejects insulin or doesn’t produce enough insulin to maintain a normal blood sugar level. While it’s most common in adults, some children and adolescents can be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. According to the Mayo Clinic, risk factors include being overweight, having a family history of diabetes, and inactivity. While there is no cure, patients can manage their type 2 diabetes by eating well, exercising, and (in some cases) taking medications recommended by your doctor. Monitoring your blood sugar is also important. Sometimes even maintaining a healthy weight isn’t enough to manage this condition. In some cases, your doctor will determine that medication intervention is needed. Common treatments for type 2 diabetes include: insulin therapy (insulin “shots,” usually reserved for those who don’t do well with oral medications) sulfonylureas (medications that stimulate your pancreas to secrete more insulin) metformin (widely prescribed drug which increases the body’s sensitivity to insulin) DPP-4 inhibitors (medications which reduce blood sugar levels) Causes of Diabetes-Related Skin Problems Long-term type 2 diabetes with hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) tends to reduce blood flow to the skin. It can also cause damage to blood vessels and nerves. Decreased blood circulation can lead to changes in the skin’s collagen. This changes the skin’s texture, appearance, and ability to heal. Damage to the skin cells can Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Skin

Diabetes And Your Skin

Want another reason to get your blood sugar levels under control and keep them that way? Doing so can help you avoid many diabetes skin problems. Still, skin conditions related to this disease are common. As many as 1 out of 3 people with diabetes will have one. Fortunately, most can be or successfully treated before they turn into a serious problem. The key is to catch them early. Common Skin Conditions Linked to Diabetes Itching skin, also called pruritus, can have many causes, such as dry skin, poor blood flow, or a yeast infection. When itching is caused by poor blood flow, you’ll likely feel it in your lower legs and feet. Lotion can help to keep your skin soft and moist, and prevent itching due to dry skin. Bacterial infections: Staphylococcus skin infections are more common and more serious in people with poorly controlled diabetes. When hair follicles are irritated, these bacteria can cause boils or an inflamed bump. Other infections include: Styes, which are infections of the eyelid glands Nail infections Most bacterial infections need to be treated with antibiotic pills. Talk with your doctor. Fungal infections: Warm, moist folds of the skin are the perfect breeding ground for these infections. Three common fungal infections are: Jock itch (red, itchy area on the genitals and the inside of the thighs) Athlete's foot (affects the skin between the toes) Ringworm (ring-shaped, scaly patches that can itch or blister and appear on the feet, groin, chest, stomach, scalp, or nails). A yeast-like fungus called "Candida albicans" causes many of the fungal infections that happen to people with diabetes. Women are likely to get this in their vaginas. People also tend to get this infection on the corners of their mouth. It feels like small cuts and is called "angular ch Continue reading >>

Why Does The Groin Itch Because Of Diabetes?

Why Does The Groin Itch Because Of Diabetes?

Groin or Genital itching and burning can indicate a yeast infection in both males and females. Regular yeast infections are signs of type 2 diabetes. In diabetes, blood glucose levels can go abnormally high, which can therefore provide ideal conditions for naturally present yeast to grow and also diminishes the body’s ability to fight infection. Diabetes can also cause a higher glucose content in the urine – another extremely suitable place for yeast to thrive. Recognizing genital itching Genital itching is the term used to describe itching, burning or redness/soreness in and around the vagina or penis. When to see your doctor If you have genital itching that does not disappear after a couple days or more, or causes you concern, talk to your doctor or another healthcare professional. Failure to seek professional medical advice could lead to further problems, such as spread of infectious disease through close body contact (usually sexual contact) or a secondary skin infection. Download the Beat Diabetes app to learn over 70+ tips to control Diabetes through food and diet. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Skin Complications

Diabetes And Skin Complications

Copyright © 2005 American Diabetes Association From Reprinted with permission from The American Diabetes Association Diabetes can affect every part of the body, including the skin. As many as one third of people with diabetes will have a skin disorder caused or affected by diabetes at some time in their lives. In fact, such problems are sometimes the first sign that a person has diabetes. Luckily, most skin conditions can be prevented or easily treated if caught early. Some of these problems are skin conditions anyone can have, but people with diabetes get them more easily. These include bacterial infections, fungal infections, and itching. Other skin problems happen mostly or only to people with diabetes. These include diabetic dermopathy, necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum, diabetic blisters, and eruptive xanthomatosis. Bacterial Infections Several kinds of bacterial infections occur in people with diabetes. One common type is styes. These are infections of the glands of the eyelid. Another kind of infection is boils, or infections of the hair follicles. Carbuncles are deep infections of the skin and the tissue underneath. Infections can also occur around the nails. Inflamed tissues are usually hot, swollen, red, and painful. Several different organisms can cause infections. The most common ones are the Staphylococcus bacteria, also called staph. Once, bacterial infections were life threatening, especially for people with diabetes. Today, death is rare, thanks to antibiotics and better methods of blood sugar control. But even today, people with diabetes have more bacterial infections than other people do. Doctors believe people with diabetes can reduce their chances of these infections in several ways (see “Good Skin Care” on page 15). If you think you have a bac Continue reading >>

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