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Januvia Pancreatic Cancer

Januvia And Janumet

Januvia And Janumet

Januvia (sitagliptin) is an oral Type 2 diabetes medication manufactured by Merck & Co. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the drug in 2006, and it is one of the most popular Type 2 diabetes drugs on the market. In 2007, the FDA approved a variation of Januvia called Janumet, which is a combination of sitagliptin and metformin. Janumet also comes in an extended-release formula called Janumet XR. Januvia and Janumet are known as dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors that work by helping the body produce more insulin. Both Januvia and Janumet belong to a class of drugs called dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors that work by helping the body produce more insulin. Januvia was the first DPP-4 approved by the FDA and is the top-selling brand in its class. Two million prescriptions were written for Januvia in 2011. Januvia brought in about $6 billion in 2014. Merck stands to benefit from the patent on the drug until 2022. In clinical trials, Januvia proved effective in controlling blood-sugar levels. However, some studies reported rare and serious side effects, including acute pancreatitis, severe joint pain, pancreatic cancer and thyroid cancer. How Do Januvia and Janumet Work? Januvia is designed to work with other Type 2 diabetes medications, like Byetta, to increase their effectiveness. It helps lower blood sugar in two ways. It helps the body increase insulin to stabilize blood sugar and decrease sugars that are made in the liver. It is a part of the class of diabetes medications called DPP-4 inhibitors. DPP-4 is a protein made by the body that plays a role in glucose metabolism. The process works like this: After a person eats and blood sugar rises, intestinal cells release hormones called incretin hormones. Incretin stimulates pancreatic cell Continue reading >>

Januvia And Pancreatic Cancer

Januvia And Pancreatic Cancer

Januvia is a prescription medication used by diabetic patients to help stabilize their blood sugar levels. The drug became available for public use in 2006. However, the drug did not come without a cost, including serious side effects and an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. Have you or someone you love suffered serious side effects or an injury after taking Januvia? If so, the experienced class action attorneys at Gordon & Doner are currently investigating potential Januvia lawsuits on behalf of patients who were the victims of these serious, and sometimes fatal, side effects. Our lawyers have more than 200 years of combined legal experience and have helped victims just like you receive millions in verdicts and settlements. Contact us today to see if you are entitled to file a Januvia lawsuit and obtain compensation for medical bills, lost wages and pain and suffering. To schedule a FREE legal consultation regarding your Januvia lawsuit, call 1 (855) 722-2552 . Januvia belongs to a class of medications known as dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-IV). It is in the same drug class as Byetta, which is also a diabetes drug that allegedly increase the risk of cancer. According to the FDA, 88 cases of acute pancreatitis among Januvia patients were reported in 2009. By 2011, this number had increased to almost two-hundred. Some of these cases resulted in death of the patient. Pancreatitis occurs when an individuals pancreas becomes inflamed. In severe cases, pancreatitis can cause permanent scarring of the pancreas, infections, cysts and internal bleeding. If left untreated, inflammation from the disease can spread to other organs, such as the heart, kidneys or lungs. Additional analysis of the FDA reports revealed that 19 of the pancreatitis cases occurred within 30 Continue reading >>

Januvia Pancreatic Cancer

Januvia Pancreatic Cancer

Since its release in 2006, the diabetes drug Januvia has been used by millions of patients to control high blood sugar associated with type 2 diabetes. With sales of more than $4 billion last year and prescriptions in over 80 countries, Januvia is the best-selling drug for pharmaceutical giant Merck. Unfortunately, health experts with the FDA, American Medical Association and UCLA have now warned that diabetes medications like Januvia may be linked to pancreatitis, kidney failure and Januvia pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic cancer attacks the lining of the pancreas, an organ that aids in digestion and the metabolism of sugars. Because the disease is seldom detected early and can spread quickly, it often has a poor prognosis. As a result, it is a leading cause of cancer death. Some of the common symptoms of Januvia pancreatic cancer include: Jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes) If you have experienced any of these symptoms, it is important to speak with your doctor immediately. If you were diagnosed after taking Januvia, it is also important to learn about the substantial compensation that may be available from a defective drug injury claim. Lawyers are currently helping those affected file claims against Merck due to the companys failure to properly warn patients about the risks of Januvia pancreatic cancer. If you or a loved one have been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer after taking Januvia, it is important to speak with a lawyer about your legal rights as soon as possible. Contact us today. The FDA first warned that Januvia was associated with pancreatitis in 2009. However, records show that Merck had reason to know of these risks years before, and also delayed important testing ordered by the FDA in 2011 that may have uncovered the risks of Januvia pancreatic can Continue reading >>

Januvia Pancreatic Cancer Lawsuits | Janumet Attorney

Januvia Pancreatic Cancer Lawsuits | Janumet Attorney

Januvia & Janumet Pancreatic Cancer Lawsuits We are investigating potential lawsuits throughout the United States for claims on behalf of victims who took the drugs and have suffered from pancreatic cancer. These lawsuits will allege product liability, negligence, and failure to warn claims against Merck & Co., Inc., the manufacturer. These drugs used to treat specific types of diabetes. Januvia is a prescribed pill taken once-daily to help manage blood sugar in adults with type-2 diabetes. Janumet is a prescription used to manage blood sugar in adults with type-2 diabetes mellitus. Type-2 diabetes (also known as adult-onset diabetes and non-insulin dependent diabetes) affects the bodys metabolization of sugar. With type-2 diabetes, the body is either resistant to the effects of insulin or does not manufacture enough insulin. The effect is that the body cannot maintain a normal glucose level. Januvia and Janumet are new classes of drugs known as sitagliptin which are dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors or blockers. These DPP-4 blockers help the body to manage blood sugar levels. They increase the amount of insulin manufactured by the pancreas when blood sugars are their highest (usually after eating). They also lower the amount of sugar manufactured by the liver after eating, when the body does not need it. What are the Warning Signs and Dangers of Januvia and Janumet? Januvia and Janumet may cause acute pancreatitis and, as you will see below, pancreatic cancer. On September 25, 2009, the FDA issued a warning to healthcare professionals that the drugs have been associated with 88 cases of acute pancreatitis (including hemorrhagic and necrotizing pancreatitis) by patients using sitagliptin. These 88 cases were found using the FDAs post-market surveillance and occ Continue reading >>

Januvia Side Effects

Januvia Side Effects

Januvia and the similar drug Janumet are two medications made by Merck to treat type 2 diabetes along with diet and exercise changes. Merck got these two drugs approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2006 and 2007 and since then has made a huge amount of money. Drugs like these have been so popular because more and more people in the U.S. are struggling with Type 2 diabetes. Medications may be helpful for lowering blood sugar in patients with this chronic condition, but they come with risks. Januvia side effects range from infections to acute pancreatitis and even pancreatic cancer. As the risks and how serious they are become clearer, more people are blaming Merck for not warning them of the side effects that were possible with their drugs. These people are also suing the company seeking compensation for the damage they have suffered to their health. How Januvia and Janumet Work Januvia is the generic drug sitagliptin, while Janumet is a combination of sitagliptin and metformin. Merck developed sitagliptin to control high blood sugar in people with Type 2 diabetes. This is a chronic condition, typically caused by a poor diet and obesity. It is characterized by chronically high blood sugar levels. This happens when the body becomes less sensitive to insulin, the hormone that is supposed to lower blood sugar levels. Someone with Type 2 diabetes may also be producing less insulin from the pancreas. Having blood sugar levels that are too high for a long period of time leads to serious health consequences, and ultimately to death. This is why it is so crucial for people with Type 2 diabetes to get their blood sugar under control. Drug companies have produced a number of drugs to do this in recent years as cases of the condition rise in the population. Lik Continue reading >>

Study Sees No Evidence Linking Diabetes Drugs With Pancreatic Cancer Webmd

Study Sees No Evidence Linking Diabetes Drugs With Pancreatic Cancer Webmd

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 26, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- There's no firm evidence that the type 2 diabetes medications known as incretin-based drugs cause pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer , U.S. and European health officials say. But it's too early to say there's definitely no link between the injectable drugs and pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer , according to the safety assessment by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and its counterpart overseas, the European Medicines Agency (EMA). "Both agencies agree that assertions concerning a causal association between incretin-based drugs and pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer , as expressed recently in the scientific literature and in the media, are inconsistent with the current data," states the report in the Feb. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. "The FDA and the EMA have not reached a final conclusion at this time regarding such a causal relationship." Incretin-based drugs are among the newest medications available to treat type 2 diabetes , a chronic condition characterized by high levels of sugar in the blood . Nearly 26 million people in the United States and 33 million in the European Union have diabetes , and type 2 is by far the most common type. There are two types of incretin-based medications: GLP-1 agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors. Examples of GLP-1 agonists include exenatide ( Byetta ) and liraglutide (Victoza). Exenatide , the first incretin-based drug approved by the FDA, was approved in 2005. Examples of DPP-4 inhibitors include sitagliptin ( Januvia ) and saxagliptin (Onglyza). Sitagliptin was the first DPP-4 inhibitor approved by the FDA, receiving consent in 2006. GLP-1 agonists slow stomach emptying and increase insulin secretion, which help keep blood sugar lower. They also suppress secretion Continue reading >>

Do Januvia Side Effects Include Cancer Of The Pancreas?

Do Januvia Side Effects Include Cancer Of The Pancreas?

Q. My wife is taking Januvia to control her blood sugar. Without Januvia her sugar level is 130 or more. With Januvia it is in the range of 110, which is close to normal. I heard an interview on the radio that three medications to reduce blood sugar levels may have negative side effects, including cancer of the pancreas. Now I am wondering what is worse, pancreatic cancer or the effect of excessive sugar level in the blood. Our “medicine man” told my wife not to worry about side effects with Januvia. I have my doubts now and would welcome your thoughts. A. The story is quite complicated. Januvia (sitagliptin) belongs to a class of diabetes drugs called incretin mimetics. Incretin is a natural hormone produced by the body. It helps stimulate the pancreas to release insulin after a meal which leads to lower blood sugar levels. This category of medications mimics incretin. They include DPP-4 (dipeptidyl peptidase 4) inhibitors and GLP-1 agonists. That’s short hand for glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists. Sorry for the hard-to-pronounce alphabet soup. But wait, it gets worse! The generic names for such drugs are also difficult to pronounce: Alogliptin (Nesina, Oseni) Exenatide (Byetta) Linagliptin (Tradjenta) Liraglutide (Victoza) Saxagliptin (Onglyza) Sitagliptin (Januvia, Janumet) Vildagliptin (Galvus) They have been extremely popular with diabetes doctors because they generally produce good numbers. That is to say they control blood glucose levels quite well and are often considered “well tolerated.” In other words, the medical community considers them as having few side effects. What About the Pancreas? Remember that these incretin mimetics work by stimulating the pancreas to make more insulin. A study published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine (Apr Continue reading >>

Fda Drug Safety Communication: Fda Investigating Reports Of Possible Increased Risk Of Pancreatitis And Pre-cancerous Findings Of The Pancreas From Incretin Mimetic Drugs For Type 2 Diabetes

Fda Drug Safety Communication: Fda Investigating Reports Of Possible Increased Risk Of Pancreatitis And Pre-cancerous Findings Of The Pancreas From Incretin Mimetic Drugs For Type 2 Diabetes

FDA Drug Safety Communication: FDA investigating reports of possible increased risk of pancreatitis and pre-cancerous findings of the pancreas from incretin mimetic drugs for type 2 diabetes [3-14-2013] The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is evaluating unpublished new findings by a group of academic researchers that suggest an increased risk of pancreatitis, or inflammation of the pancreas, and pre-cancerous cellular changes called pancreatic duct metaplasia in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with a class of drugs called incretin mimetics. These findings were based on examination of a small number of pancreatic tissue specimens taken from patients after they died from unspecified causes. FDA has asked the researchers to provide the methodology used to collect and study these specimens and to provide the tissue samples so the Agency can further investigate potential pancreatic toxicity associated with the incretin mimetics. Drugs in the incretin mimetic class include exenatide (Byetta, Bydureon), liraglutide (Victoza), sitagliptin (Januvia, Janumet, Janumet XR, Juvisync), saxagliptin (Onglyza, Kombiglyze XR), alogliptin (Nesina, Kazano, Oseni), and linagliptin (Tradjenta, Jentadueto). These drugs work by mimicking the incretin hormones that the body usually produces naturally to stimulate the release of insulin in response to a meal. They are used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. FDA has not reached any new conclusions about safety risks with incretin mimetic drugs. This early communication is intended only to inform the public and health care professionals that the Agency intends to obtain and evaluate this new information. FDA will communicate its final conclusions and recommendations when its review is co Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Cancer Linked To Drugs Byetta And Januvia

Pancreatic Cancer Linked To Drugs Byetta And Januvia

Pancreatic Cancer Linked to Drugs Byetta and Januvia There is a class of drugs used to treat diabetes called incretin mimetics. Research has shown that those drugs may be responsible for increased risks to patients for pancreatic cancer and pancreatitis. Some drugs that are included in that classification are Byetta and Januvia. Byetta and Januvia are drugs that are considered incretin mimetics, which means drugs that mimic incretin hormones. They are designed to help diabetics with type 2 diabetes regulate their blood sugar by increasing incretin hormones that the body normally produces once a meal is eaten, in order to stimulate the production of insulin. Research has shown that these drugs may increase the risk up to six times of pancreas issues in patients that use them in their treatment. Byetta was approved by the FDA in 2005. By 2007, the FDA already had concerns with high numbers of patients taking the drug who developed pancreatitis and issued an alert. In 2009, the FDA also issued an alert for Januvia. In 2013, the FDA went further and issued another alert warning about the link between the drugs and pancreatic cancer and thyroid cancer. Pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer are both serious conditions. Pancreatitis involves inflammation of the pancreas and can cause painful conditions. Chronic pancreatitis can reduce life expectancy by about 10 to 15 years, and greatly increases the odds of contracting pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive and deadly forms of cancer. Even if caught early, the prognosis is usually poor. Because of the very serious nature of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, there is a serious concern among patients who are taking Byetta or Januvia. Many lawsuits have already been filed for victims of the drugs who Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Cancer Reports Increase With 2 Diabetes Drugs

Pancreatic Cancer Reports Increase With 2 Diabetes Drugs

Pancreatic Cancer Reports Increase With 2 Diabetes Drugs September 23, 2011 Patients who are using the type 2 diabetes medications sitagliptin and exenatide appear more likely to report pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, a new study has found. The retrospective study, which analyzed a US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reporting system, also found a possible association of thyroid cancer with the use of exenatide. These results were presented September 14 at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) 47th Annual Meeting. The study, by Michael Elashoff, from the Larry L. Hillblom Islet Research Center, University of California, Los Angeles, and colleagues, was published in the July issue of Gastroenterology. "[Our analysis] suggests that the [glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1)] class of drugs being widely promoted for treatment of type 2 diabetes could have serious unintended and unpredicted side effects," the authors write. However, Peter Butler, MD, a study coauthor and director of the Larry L. Hillblom Islet Research Center, recently injected a cautionary note after reportedly receiving questions from concerned patients using these drugs. "Our study does not prove an association between GLP-1-based therapy and pancreatitis and pancreatic and thyroid cancer," Dr. Butler told Medscape Medical News. "It shows that there is a concern of a possible association, and that appropriate prospective studies are required to rule out an association." In their study, the researchers examined the FDA adverse events reporting system (AERS) between 2004 and 2009 for events of pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer, thyroid cancer, and other cancers reported in association with prescription of sitagliptin (Januvia, Merck) or exenatide (Byetta, Amylin Pharmaceuticals). They co Continue reading >>

Diabetes Update: The Latest Study

Diabetes Update: The Latest Study "proving" That Januvia Does Not Cause Pancreatic Cancer And Pancreatitis Does Not Prove This

The Latest Study "Proving" that Januvia Does Not Cause Pancreatic Cancer and Pancreatitis Does Not Prove This As many of you know, a very disturbing study was published in 2013 that documented the pancreatic changes associated with Januvia. It is found here: Marked Expansion of Exocrine and Endocrine Pancreas with Incretin Therapy in Humans with increased Exocrine Pancreas Dysplasia and the potential for Glucagon-producing Neuroendocrine Tumors. Alexandra E Butler et al. Published online before print March 22, 2013, doi: 10.2337/db12-1686. Diabetes March 22, 2013 You can read another discussion of what this study found HERE . As soon as Dr. Butler's study came out, there was a rush to publish studies that supposedly refute it, funded, not so surprisingly by the companies who are earning billions of dollars from these highly profitable drugs. UPDATE 2-Doctors get good and bad safety news on diabetes drugs This study claimed to find no sign of pancreatic disease with Onglyza. This week, a larger, much more high profile study of Januvia was published in the New England Journal of Medicine in June of 2015. It was presented at the 2015 ADA conference which took place this past weekend and is being treated as if it removes all barriers to prescribing Januvia as it has supposedly dismissed all safety concerns about the drug. This latest study is: Effect of Sitagliptin on Cardiovascular Outcomes in Type 2 Diabetes. Jennifer B. Green, et al. NEJM, June 8, 2015DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1501352 Though the focus of the study was on cardiovascular outcomes, it was also reported as stating that there was no sign of more pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer in the group that took Januvia. This, apparently, is being interpreted as proving that these drugs do not cause these two conditions. But Continue reading >>

Sitagliptin And Pancreatic Cancer Risk In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes.

Sitagliptin And Pancreatic Cancer Risk In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes.

Sitagliptin and pancreatic cancer risk in patients with type 2 diabetes. Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan. Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine of the National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Taiwan. Eur J Clin Invest. 2016 Jan;46(1):70-9. doi: 10.1111/eci.12570. Epub 2015 Dec 17. BACKGROUND: The risk of pancreatic cancer associated with incretin-based therapies is controversial. METHODS: This study retrospectively analysed the National Health Insurance database including patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus at an age 25 years between 1999 and 2010. A total of 71 137 ever users of sitagliptin and 933 046 never users were followed for pancreatic cancer until 31 December 2011. A time-dependent approach was used to calculate incidence and estimate hazard ratios adjusted for propensity score using Cox regression. RESULTS: During follow-up, 83 ever users and 3658 never users developed pancreatic cancer, representing an incidence of 736 and 550 per 100 000 person-years, respectively. The adjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence intervals) for ever versus never users was 140 (113-175). The respective adjusted hazard ratio for the first, second and third tertile of cumulative dose < 14 700, 14 700-33 700 and > 33 700 mg was 183 (128-262), 197 (141-276) and 072 (045-115). For average daily dose of < 50, 50-999 and 100 mg, the respective hazard ratio was 310 (117-826), 101 (063-161) and 153 (118-197). CONCLUSIONS: Sitagliptin is significantly associated with a higher risk of pancreatic cancer, especially when the cumulative dose is < 33 700 mg. The ri Continue reading >>

Januvia, Janumet May Cause Pancreatic Cancer

Januvia, Janumet May Cause Pancreatic Cancer

Januvia, Janumet May Cause Pancreatic Cancer Drug recall lawyers at Pintas & Mullins Law Firm report of recent developments linking popular diabetes medications Januvia, Byetta and Janumet to pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. These are the brand-names for the generic drug Sitagliptin. The medications are a new class of drugs that use DPP-4 inhibitors, or gliptins, to control glucose levels in the blood for those suffering from type II diabetes. They were approved by the FDA in October 2006, and for the next three years the FDA reviewed 88 cases of acute pancreatitis related to the medication. Two of these cases involved hemorrhagic or necrotizing pancreatitis, which is far more severe and potentially fatal. Approximately 58 of the 88 patients (66%) were hospitalized and at least four were admitted to the ICU. Based on these cases, the FDA is currently working with the drug manufacturers to change the prescription labeling. The new information will include reports of acute pancreatitis, recommendations for healthcare professionals to carefully monitor patients, and an alert noting that the drug has not been studied in patients with a history of pancreatitis. Patients should pay close attention to signs and symptoms of pancreatitis, such as nausea, severe persistent abdominal pain, vomiting, and anorexia. Nearly 20 of the 88 cases of pancreatitis reported to the FDA occurred within 30 days of starting the medication, and 47 patients fully recovered after they discontinued the medication. Additionally, 45 patients had at least one other risk factor for pancreatitis development, such as obesity, high cholesterol, and high triglycerides. Two lawsuits in San Diego are placing blame on six different drug manufacturers for failing to warn physicians and patients of the assoc Continue reading >>

Byetta And Januvia Pancreatic Cancer

Byetta And Januvia Pancreatic Cancer

Patients with Type 2 diabetes may be prescribed Byetta (exenatide) or Januvia (sitagliptin) to help improve their blood sugar levels in combination with diet and exercise. While both of these popular diabetes drugs work in different ways to achieve their intended results, they share a common link to serious pancreatic problems in certain patients: pancreatic cancer. At Ferrer, Poirot & Wansbrough, we are currently reviewing cases of pancreatic cancer linked to Byetta and Januvia. If you or a loved one were diagnosed with pancreatic cancer after taking either of these Type 2 diabetes drugs, you may be entitled to compensation. Contact our drug injury lawyers 24/7 for a free, no-obligation case reviewjust dial (800) 210-8503 or complete our free online form to get started now. Byetta and Januvia May Increase Pancreatic Cancer Risk The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a drug safety communication stating that they intend to evaluate potential links between pancreatic cancer and drugs like Byetta and Januvia. Prior to this communication, the FDA warned of a link between Byetta and Januvia and potentially fatal cases of pancreatitis, and the agency has cited that both of these drugs may double the risk of acute pancreatitis. While the drug warning labels for Byetta and Januvia contain warnings about pancreatitis, they fail to warn patients of potential pancreatic cancer risks. Now Investigating Byetta and Januvia Pancreatic Cancer Lawsuits If you or a loved one took Byetta or Januvia and were diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, contact Ferrer, Poirot & Wansbrough. Our lawyers have more than 35 years of experience fighting for injury victims, and we are currently reviewing Byetta and Januvia cases nationwide. Contact us today for a free, no-obligation case rev Continue reading >>

Januvia Lawsuit | Januvia Pancreatic Cancer | Morgan & Morgan

Januvia Lawsuit | Januvia Pancreatic Cancer | Morgan & Morgan

The attorneys at Morgan and Morgan are investigating claims on behalf of Januvia users that have been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Various academic and post-marketing studies have established a possible link between Januvia (sitagliptin) and pancreatic cancer. This link is particularly troubling because pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignant diseases, due to the high rate of advanced stage disease at the time of diagnosis and the lack of effective medical therapies. If you or a loved one was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer aftertaking Januvia, do not hesitate to contact our attorneys today, free of charge, to learn more about your legal rights. You may be able to file a lawsuit against the manufacturer to recover compensation for medical bills, lost wages, pain and suffering, and other damages. To contact us today, please fill out our free, no obligation case review form . Merck is facing a number of lawsuits claiming that Januvia is a flawed and defective product , and increases the risk of pancreatic cancer in users. These suits allege that: Merck knew Janvuia could pose a risk of pancreatic cancer and keptthis information from patients and doctors The warnings on Januvia are inadequate and do not even mentionpancreatic cancer Merck failed to tell doctors to monitor Januvia users for signs ofchanges within the pancreas Januvia poses an extreme risk and its benefits do not outweigh thisrisk Rather than pull the drug from the market or issue stronger warnings,Merck continues to promote Januvia as a safe and effective treatment Merck did not perform adequate safety tests Merck over-promoted Januvia and under-warned about its risks These suits are seeking a number of damages, including but not limited to lost income, diminishment of earning capacity, Continue reading >>

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