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Januvia Not Working

Januvia Has Stopped Working?

Januvia Has Stopped Working?

HealingWell.com Forum > Diseases & Conditions > Diabetes > Januvia has stopped working? Hi: I have been on Januvia for about 4 years; my bs in the am has always been under 100. about 3 months ago, it went over 100 and has never broken 100 since. Usually it is between 108 and 126, which is too high. Does anyone know what happens when 100 mg of Januvia is not enough. My diet, etc. has been stable. I weigh about 120 lbs.; 5'6" tall-- weight was never an issue in the diagnosis. Welcome to HealingWell, Irish Eyes. Gosh, I'm sorryabout this problem. I'm sure you're frustrated. I cannot answer your question but I hope someone who's familiar with Januvia will come along and help you with this. HI: Thank you for the warm welcome. I, too, hope there is a simple answer-- like, increase the dose slightly. You need to start a food/exercise diary that you can fax to your doctor's office along with daily blood glucose readings. I suspect that you may have become lax in your portion control on carbs or you may not have been as active lately. Regardless of the changes or no changes your doctor needs to be aware of this. Call the office and speak with the nurse or doctor. A medication change may be in order to bring the numbers back down. Januvia is supposed to increase your production of insulin while it blocks the liver's release of glucogon (a concentrated form of sugar). Something is kattywampus if you're doing everything the same and still getting higher readings. Your pancreas may be giving out, your food intake may be off, something isn't working right. You are the prime example of why we need to test, so we can see when something is off kilter. Let us know what the doc says. ~ Jeannie, Forum Moderator/Diabetes & Fibromyalgia I know God will not give me anything I can't handle. I Continue reading >>

About Type 2 Diabetes

About Type 2 Diabetes

JANUVIA (jah-NEW-vee-ah) is a once-daily prescription pill that, along with diet and exercise, helps lower blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUVIA should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUVIA. IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION Serious side effects can happen in people who take JANUVIA, including pancreatitis, which may be severe and lead to death. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you've ever had pancreatitis. Stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right away if you have pain in your stomach area (abdomen) that is severe and will not go away. The pain may be felt going from your abdomen through to your back. The pain may happen with or without vomiting. These may be symptoms of pancreatitis. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you have ever had heart failure (your heart does not pump blood well enough) or have problems with your kidneys. Contact your doctor right away if you have increasing shortness of breath or trouble breathing (especially when you lie down); swelling or fluid retention (especially in the feet, ankles, or legs); an unusually fast increase in weight; or unusual tiredness. These may be symptoms of heart failure. Do not take JANUVIA if you are allergic to any of its ingredients, including sitagliptin. Symptoms of serious allergic reactions to JANUVIA, including rash, hives, and swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty breathing or swallowing, can occur. If you have any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right Continue reading >>

Some Disturbing News About Januvia

Some Disturbing News About Januvia

UPDATE (April 2, 2013): Before you take Byetta, Victoza, Onglyza, or Januvia please read about the new research that shows that they, and probably all incretin drugs, cause severely abnormal cell growth in the pancreas and precancerous tumors. You'll find that information HERE. NEW Dec 19, 2008: If you want to better understand the health issues associated with Januvia, read the Dec 8, 2008 blog post citing the research that makes it clear that a "side effect" of how Januvia lowers blood sugar is that it turns off a tumor suppressor gene making it "a trigger for prostate cancer". This same mechanism has been linked with promoting melanoma, ovarian cancer and lung cancer. None of the approval testing for Januvia investigated this problem and there is evidence it is real and affecting people taking this drug. You can read about this important issue here: More Research Shows Januvia and Glinides Inhibit Tumor Suppressor Gene DPP-4 Here is the original post "Some Disturbing News About Januvia": Diabetes in Control reports last week that "According to a survey, prescriptions for the diabetes drug Januvia have grown nearly threefold between the first week of 2007 and the week ending July 20. ... It was reported that patients were switched from metformin 21%, Avandia 17% and Actos 13%." Once again we are being treated to the spectacle of doctors who do not understand a new drug's mode of action prescribing that new drug in a way that is guaranteed to damage the health of many of those patients. Januvia does NOT affect Insulin Resistance Januvia stimulates insulin production after meals and may inhibit the production of glucagon after meals. That's what it does folks, and that is ALL it does. The problem here is that for at least 21% of the Type 2s in this study, doctors were t Continue reading >>

Wait Times: How Long Until Your Med Begins Working

Wait Times: How Long Until Your Med Begins Working

Photography by Mike Watson Images/Thinkstock There are many type 2 medications, and each drug class works in the body in a different way. Here’s a quick guide to help you understand how long each drug will generally take to work: These short-acting oral medications, taken with meals, block the breakdown of complex sugars into simple sugars in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. “Simple sugars are more easily absorbed and cause the blood sugar to ultimately go up,” Sam Ellis, PharmD, BCPS, CDE, associate professor in the Department of Clinical Pharmacy at the University of Colorado says. These drugs are minimally absorbed into the blood, so a certain blood level concentration is not necessary for them to work. You will see the effect immediately with the first dose. “You take it before a meal, and with that meal you see the effect,” says George Grunberger, MD, FACP, FACE, President of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. While researchers aren’t exactly sure how these oral medications work, it’s likely that the meds block some absorption of glucose in the GI tract. “You’ll see most of the effect in the first week with these drugs,” says Ellis. alogliptin, linagliptin, saxagliptin, sitagliptin These drugs work to block the enzyme responsible for the breakdown of a specific gut hormone that helps the body produce more insulin when blood glucose is high and reduces the amount of glucose produced by the liver. Take a DPP-4 inhibitor (they come in pill form) and it’ll work pretty fast—you’ll see the full effect in about a week. “It’s blocking that enzyme after the first dose a little bit, but by the time you get out to dose five, you’re blocking the majority of that enzyme,” Ellis says. albiglutide, dulaglutide, exenatide, exe Continue reading >>

Sitagliptin

Sitagliptin

Sitagliptin is used along with diet and exercise and sometimes with other medications to lower blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes (condition in which blood sugar is too high because the body does not produce or use insulin normally). Sitagliptin is in a class of medications called dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. It works by increasing the amounts of certain natural substances that lower blood sugar when it is high. Over time, people who have diabetes and high blood sugar can develop serious or life-threatening complications, including heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, nerve damage, and eye problems. Taking medication(s), making lifestyle changes (e.g., diet, exercise, quitting smoking), and regularly checking your blood sugar may help to manage your diabetes and improve your health. This therapy may also decrease your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes-related complications such as kidney failure, nerve damage (numb, cold legs or feet; decreased sexual ability in men and women), eye problems, including changes or loss of vision, or gum disease. Your doctor and other healthcare providers will talk to you about the best way to manage your diabetes. Sitagliptin comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken once a day with or without food. Take sitagliptin at around the same time every day. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take sitagliptin exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor. Sitagliptin helps to control high blood sugar but does not cure diabetes. Continue to take sitagliptin even if you feel well. Do not stop taking sitagliptin withou Continue reading >>

Important Safety Information

Important Safety Information

WHAT IS JANUVIA®? JANUVIA (jah-NEW-vee-ah) is a once-daily prescription pill that, along with diet and exercise, helps lower blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUVIA should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUVIA. Serious side effects can happen in people who take JANUVIA, including pancreatitis, which may be severe and lead to death. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you've ever had pancreatitis. Stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right away if you have pain in your stomach area (abdomen) that is severe and will not go away. The pain may be felt going from your abdomen through to your back. The pain may happen with or without vomiting. These may be symptoms of pancreatitis. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you have ever had heart failure (your heart does not pump blood well enough) or have problems with your kidneys. Contact your doctor right away if you have increasing shortness of breath or trouble breathing (especially when you lie down); swelling or fluid retention (especially in the feet, ankles, or legs); an unusually fast increase in weight; or unusual tiredness. These may be symptoms of heart failure. Do not take JANUVIA if you are allergic to any of its ingredients, including sitagliptin. Symptoms of serious allergic reactions to JANUVIA, including rash, hives, and swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty breathing or swallowing, can occur. If you have any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right away. Kid Continue reading >>

Januvia Smackdown

Januvia Smackdown

Get your ringside seats, Folks! A while back I posted about the Merck's new Type 2 oral drug Januvia (What It Doesn't Do), explaining how it apparently trumps competitors in terms of patient "tolerability." No other post has ever generated such ongoing reader energy, both positive and negative. Nearly every day, several new commentors weigh in, duking it out over the relative merits of Januvia. Most everyone seems to agree that Januvia reduces appetite, which is a good thing. But then again, Byetta is known for that effect as well. The key is question whether Januvia fulfills its core function of lowering blood glucose (BG) levels, and lives up to its no-side-effects promise. As of today, the score stands pretty much tied, as such: Total comments = 50 Positive = 10 Negative = 13 Mixed = 16 (liked some aspects of the drug but not others) Neutral = 11 (those asking or responding to questions only) Among the most vocal of the Pro Team: "I take Januvia and have for 6 months. I have no side effects. I have experienced a decrease in appetite. I have had no headaches or respiratory problems. My BG has gone down. It is a great drug." -- Mike "Januvia has been a positive thing for me. My sugar levels dropped from 240+ to 110 +/- 10 after fasting. I have taken 100 mg once per day for a month... I am not as hungry as before usage." -- Jim K. L. "I've been on Januvia for a little over three months and have lost over 15 pounds which I had put on with Actos. I've experienced no side effects, other than I am not hungry all of the time. For me it has been very effective..." -- Bill "I am substantially less hungry then I have felt in years ... and my BG hovers around 100 - 120 between meals/fasting, and 120 - 160 for a few hours after a heavy carb meal. The usual BG spikes of 180 - 200+ Continue reading >>

New Combination Treatments In The Management Of Diabetes: Focus On Sitagliptin Metformin

New Combination Treatments In The Management Of Diabetes: Focus On Sitagliptin Metformin

New combination treatments in the management of diabetes: focus on sitagliptin metformin Duke University Medical Center, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Durham, North Carolina, USA Correspondence: Jennifer B Green Duke University Medical Center, Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Nutrition, DUMC Box 3222, Baker House Room 280, Durham, NC 27710, USA, Tel +1 919 684 5568, Fax +1 919 681 7796 Email [email protected] Copyright 2008 Dove Medical Press Limited. All rights reserved This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is an increasingly prevalent condition worldwide. The complications of this disease are known to significantly increase the morbidity and mortality of those affected, resulting in substantial direct and indirect costs. Although good glycemic control has been shown to reduce the incidence and progression of diabetes-related microvascular complications, blood glucose levels are not adequately controlled in most individuals with diabetes. The reasons for this are many, and include issues such as poor adherence to complex medication regimes; costs of prescribed therapies; and the failure of traditionally prescribed medications to preserve beta cell function over time. However, our armamentarium of glucose-lowering drugs has expanded recently with the development of medications that act via the incretin pathway. Sitagliptin, the first commercially available dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, inhibits the metabolism and inactivation of the incretin hormones GLP-1 and GIP. The subsequent elevation in levels of these hormones and associated prolongation of their actions has been shown to increase insulin secretion and suppress glucagon secretion in a glucose-appropriate fashion. Sitagliptin therapy i Continue reading >>

Why Don't Docs Prescribe Lantus Instead Of Januvia Etc.?

Why Don't Docs Prescribe Lantus Instead Of Januvia Etc.?

I have been diagnosed as a Type 2 for over 9 years. I initially was put on metformin and then after a couple of years my doctor put me on Januvia. I too initially had no effects, either bad or good! Then after a few months on it I started getting upper chest infections. At first I did not connect the dots, as these things would start out as a bit of congestion, but then within 24 hours they would turn into a full fledged upper respiratory infection that would only respond to heavy antibiotics. During the first two year of taking Januvia I had 4-5 of these episodes and prior to Januvia it was unusual for me to be sick like this. I did more research on side effects of Januvia, and then for the first time I found out that it was known to cause upper respiratory problems among many other problems....I stopped taking it that day, and never went back. I have not had any respiratory infections since that day! Problem solved.... The problem with all new drugs is that they have not been in use for years with proven track records amongst the general population. Many of the problems and side effects will not show up right away. Some side effects can become permanent problems....so when you find out about them it is to late! Therefore I take my metformin and Lantus injections and will not take anything else period! Since I started following Low Carb High Fat I have been able to reduce my Lantus from 126u daily to 25u! My A1c is now at 5.8% LCHF has solved my medication problems.....I hope to be completely off of Lantus by the end of this year.... By the way you mention dropping your carb intake, but if you do, you must increase your fat intake or the LCHF model will not work and actually could be dangerous....hope you read Blood Sugar 101 website....knowledge is the key here! Than Continue reading >>

How Does Januvia Work In Your Body?

How Does Januvia Work In Your Body?

JANUVIA (jah-NEW-vee-ah) is a once-daily prescription pill that, along with diet and exercise, helps lower blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUVIA should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUVIA. Serious side effects can happen in people who take JANUVIA, including pancreatitis, which may be severe and lead to death. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you've ever had pancreatitis. Stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right away if you have pain in your stomach area (abdomen) that is severe and will not go away. The pain may be felt going from your abdomen through to your back. The pain may happen with or without vomiting. These may be symptoms of pancreatitis. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you have ever had heart failure (your heart does not pump blood well enough) or have problems with your kidneys. Contact your doctor right away if you have increasing shortness of breath or trouble breathing (especially when you lie down); swelling or fluid retention (especially in the feet, ankles, or legs); an unusually fast increase in weight; or unusual tiredness. These may be symptoms of heart failure. Do not take JANUVIA if you are allergic to any of its ingredients, including sitagliptin. Symptoms of serious allergic reactions to JANUVIA, including rash, hives, and swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty breathing or swallowing, can occur. If you have any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right away. Kidney problems, somet Continue reading >>

Raised Blood Sugars And Januvia

Raised Blood Sugars And Januvia

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I'm new to this forum, but can anyone help me? I have been taking Januvia for nearly 2 months now. Everything seemed to be working fine as my readings were coming down, but just last week, I had diarrhoea for 5 days, and now my readings are high again, as high as 17mmol in the mornings, and sometimes before my evening meal. I have seen my GP, who said I must have caught a bug, but my blood sugars aren't coming down. I'm following a low GI diet, haven't touched alchohol since starting Januvia. Infact, I've been really behaving myself! So as you can imagine, I'm feeling stressed because it seems to have stopped working. Also, I've been feeling really depressed too. Has anyone had the same problem and if so, how did you manage to sort it out? There are just a few members on here who have taken/are taking Januvia and hopefully will see your post and help you with their experience. There may be a bit of a wait as the forum is quiet on this holiday weekend. I don't know how long ago you were diagnosed but the Forum Monitors have written some basic information for new members which I hope will be useful to you. Ask as many questions as you like and someone will know the answer. Here is the advice that Ken and I, as Forum Monitors, usually give to newly diagnosed Diabetics. We hope that these few ideas gained through experience help you to gain control and give you some understanding of Diabetes. This forum doesn't always follow the recommended dietary advice, you have to work out what works for you as we are all different. It's not just 'sugars' you need to avoid, diabetes is an inability to process glucose properly. Carbohydrate converts, in the body, to gl Continue reading >>

Januvia And Janumet

Januvia And Janumet

Januvia (sitagliptin) is an oral Type 2 diabetes medication manufactured by Merck & Co. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the drug in 2006, and it is one of the most popular Type 2 diabetes drugs on the market. In 2007, the FDA approved a variation of Januvia called Janumet, which is a combination of sitagliptin and metformin. Janumet also comes in an extended-release formula called Janumet XR. Januvia and Janumet are known as dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors that work by helping the body produce more insulin. Both Januvia and Janumet belong to a class of drugs called dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors that work by helping the body produce more insulin. Januvia was the first DPP-4 approved by the FDA and is the top-selling brand in its class. Two million prescriptions were written for Januvia in 2011. Januvia brought in about $6 billion in 2014. Merck stands to benefit from the patent on the drug until 2022. In clinical trials, Januvia proved effective in controlling blood-sugar levels. However, some studies reported rare and serious side effects, including acute pancreatitis, severe joint pain, pancreatic cancer and thyroid cancer. How Do Januvia and Janumet Work? Januvia is designed to work with other Type 2 diabetes medications, like Byetta, to increase their effectiveness. It helps lower blood sugar in two ways. It helps the body increase insulin to stabilize blood sugar and decrease sugars that are made in the liver. It is a part of the class of diabetes medications called DPP-4 inhibitors. DPP-4 is a protein made by the body that plays a role in glucose metabolism. The process works like this: After a person eats and blood sugar rises, intestinal cells release hormones called incretin hormones. Incretin stimulates pancreatic cell Continue reading >>

I've Added Januvia

I've Added Januvia

I'm on 2000mg Metformin and 30mg Actos, and it isn't working well anymore. This morning I told my PCP at the VA I wanted to add a DPP-4 inhibitor. She said we had to have several other things fail before we went there. I asked if this was procedure, or if you just don't carry that drug in the VA pharmacy. Since I don't use their pharmacy, no problem. I'm now on 25mg of Januvia for a few weeks to see what happens. It is nice to have a doctor who is willing to listen and work with me. The doc did say that if the Januvia didn't work, we would work with the pharmacist to find another option......I guess the VA doesn't have Endocrinologists??? Good for you, Kyle. Sounds like you did your research and that your doctor recognized that. I suspect that there are a lot of drugs that are not part of the VA forumulary and/or that the VA will not allow their doctors to prescribe unless and until all cheaper medications been tried first. So good for you for giving your doctor the option of working with an outside pharmacy. I assume you know that Januvia (DPP-4 inhibitor) is the weakest of the incretin family of drugs. I hope it works well for you. But if not, do consider one of the other GLP-1 agonists. I have found that they work really well for me. "My fitness trajectory in my senior years does not have to be a continuous downward slope-- I do have some control over that." --Chrysalis Dx T2; 2005-2014: A1c 6.5-7.0% (ave 6.7) with 2000 mg/day metformin + 40 U/day Lantus. Jan 2015: A1c 7.8%. Reduce carbs, begin exercise, stop Lantus, stop metformin and start Victoza. A1c 6.2%-6.4% since Nov 2015. D.D. Family Getting much harder to control Well partner really good luck with that one. Unless the VA has changed they only carry insulin and glimerpride and glipizide and metformin. Now it Continue reading >>

Questions To Ask Your Doctor

Questions To Ask Your Doctor

JANUVIA (jah-NEW-vee-ah) is a once-daily prescription pill that, along with diet and exercise, helps lower blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUVIA should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUVIA. Serious side effects can happen in people who take JANUVIA, including pancreatitis, which may be severe and lead to death. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you've ever had pancreatitis. Stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right away if you have pain in your stomach area (abdomen) that is severe and will not go away. The pain may be felt going from your abdomen through to your back. The pain may happen with or without vomiting. These may be symptoms of pancreatitis. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you have ever had heart failure (your heart does not pump blood well enough) or have problems with your kidneys. Contact your doctor right away if you have increasing shortness of breath or trouble breathing (especially when you lie down); swelling or fluid retention (especially in the feet, ankles, or legs); an unusually fast increase in weight; or unusual tiredness. These may be symptoms of heart failure. Do not take JANUVIA if you are allergic to any of its ingredients, including sitagliptin. Symptoms of serious allergic reactions to JANUVIA, including rash, hives, and swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty breathing or swallowing, can occur. If you have any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right away. Kidney problems, some Continue reading >>

Yet Another Problem With Januvia

Yet Another Problem With Januvia

UPDATE (April 2, 2013): Before you take Byetta, Victoza, Onglyza, or Januvia please read about the new research that shows that they, and probably all incretin drugs, cause severely abnormal cell growth in the pancreas and precancerous tumors. You'll find that information HERE. Update (January, 2009) : A much more important problem with Januvia--that it promotes cancer by inhibiting a tumor suppressor gene researchers have called "the trigger for prostate cancer"--is discussed in this more recent blog post: More Research Shows Januvia and Glinides Inhibit Tumor Suppressor Gene DPP-4. Posted Dec 8, 2008. Original Post: If you have had or might get melanoma, ovarian cancer, lung cancer or prostate cancer, please read the above post before making your decision about whether Januvia is for you. Here is the original post that was posted 9/12/08: I have been hearing from people about a new, and, to me, very troubling problem with Januvia. The problem is this: now that doctors have decided that all people recently diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes should be put on Januvia, prescriptions for the combination drug Janumet, which is made up of both Januvia and Metformin, are becoming much more frequent as a first prescription for diabetes. Metformin is a very safe drug that has been used safely for decades. The most recent follow up to the UKPDS study, the 20 year follow-up, which was just presented at the annual EASD conference found that at 20 years after the start of the study, "Patients treated with metformin had a 21% reduction in risk of any diabetes endpoint (P=0.01), a 30% reduction in risk of diabetes-related death (P=0.01), a 33% reduction in risk of MI (P=0.005), and a 27% reduction in risk of all cause mortality (P=0.002)." Metformin is a very good drug for people with Ty Continue reading >>

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