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Januvia Not Lowering Blood Sugar

Some Disturbing News About Januvia

Some Disturbing News About Januvia

UPDATE (April 2, 2013): Before you take Byetta, Victoza, Onglyza, or Januvia please read about the new research that shows that they, and probably all incretin drugs, cause severely abnormal cell growth in the pancreas and precancerous tumors. You'll find that information HERE. NEW Dec 19, 2008: If you want to better understand the health issues associated with Januvia, read the Dec 8, 2008 blog post citing the research that makes it clear that a "side effect" of how Januvia lowers blood sugar is that it turns off a tumor suppressor gene making it "a trigger for prostate cancer". This same mechanism has been linked with promoting melanoma, ovarian cancer and lung cancer. None of the approval testing for Januvia investigated this problem and there is evidence it is real and affecting people taking this drug. You can read about this important issue here: More Research Shows Januvia and Glinides Inhibit Tumor Suppressor Gene DPP-4 Here is the original post "Some Disturbing News About Januvia": Diabetes in Control reports last week that "According to a survey, prescriptions for the diabetes drug Januvia have grown nearly threefold between the first week of 2007 and the week ending July 20. ... It was reported that patients were switched from metformin 21%, Avandia 17% and Actos 13%." Once again we are being treated to the spectacle of doctors who do not understand a new drug's mode of action prescribing that new drug in a way that is guaranteed to damage the health of many of those patients. Januvia does NOT affect Insulin Resistance Januvia stimulates insulin production after meals and may inhibit the production of glucagon after meals. That's what it does folks, and that is ALL it does. The problem here is that for at least 21% of the Type 2s in this study, doctors were t Continue reading >>

Januvia (sitabliptin) Faq Information On Medicinenet.com

Januvia (sitabliptin) Faq Information On Medicinenet.com

Januvia may occasionally cause stomach discomfort and diarrhea . Tell your healthcare professional if you have any side effects that bothers you or that does not go away. Other side effects may occur when using Januvia. For more information, ask your healthcare professional. What Should I Tell My Healthcare Professional? Before you start taking Januvia, tell your healthcare professional if you: are pregnant or plan to become pregnant, because Januvia may not be right for you. It is not known if Januvia will harm your unborn baby. If you are pregnant, talk with your healthcare professional about the best way to control your blood sugar while you are pregnant. If you use Januvia during pregnancy , talk with your healthcare professional about how you can be on the Januvia registry. The toll-free telephone number for the pregnancy registry is: 1-800-986-8999. are breast-feeding or plan to breast-feed. Januvia may be passed in your milk to your baby. Talk with your healthcare professional about the best way to feed your baby if you are taking Januvia. During periods of stress on the body, such as fever, trauma, infection or surgery, your medication needs may change; contact your doctor right away. Can Other Medicines Or Food Affect Januvia? Tell your healthcare professional about all the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Know the medicines you take. Keep a list of them with you to show your healthcare professional. Take Januvia exactly as your healthcare professional tells you to take it. If you have kidney problems, your doctor may prescribe lower doses of Januvia. Your healthcare professional may perform blood tests on you from time to time to measure how well your kidneys are working. Your healthca Continue reading >>

Januvia Side Effects

Januvia Side Effects

Januvia and the similar drug Janumet are two medications made by Merck to treat type 2 diabetes along with diet and exercise changes. Merck got these two drugs approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2006 and 2007 and since then has made a huge amount of money. Drugs like these have been so popular because more and more people in the U.S. are struggling with Type 2 diabetes. Medications may be helpful for lowering blood sugar in patients with this chronic condition, but they come with risks. Januvia side effects range from infections to acute pancreatitis and even pancreatic cancer. As the risks and how serious they are become clearer, more people are blaming Merck for not warning them of the side effects that were possible with their drugs. These people are also suing the company seeking compensation for the damage they have suffered to their health. How Januvia and Janumet Work Januvia is the generic drug sitagliptin, while Janumet is a combination of sitagliptin and metformin. Merck developed sitagliptin to control high blood sugar in people with Type 2 diabetes. This is a chronic condition, typically caused by a poor diet and obesity. It is characterized by chronically high blood sugar levels. This happens when the body becomes less sensitive to insulin, the hormone that is supposed to lower blood sugar levels. Someone with Type 2 diabetes may also be producing less insulin from the pancreas. Having blood sugar levels that are too high for a long period of time leads to serious health consequences, and ultimately to death. This is why it is so crucial for people with Type 2 diabetes to get their blood sugar under control. Drug companies have produced a number of drugs to do this in recent years as cases of the condition rise in the population. Lik Continue reading >>

How Does Januvia Work In Your Body?

How Does Januvia Work In Your Body?

JANUVIA (jah-NEW-vee-ah) is a once-daily prescription pill that, along with diet and exercise, helps lower blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUVIA should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUVIA. Serious side effects can happen in people who take JANUVIA, including pancreatitis, which may be severe and lead to death. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you've ever had pancreatitis. Stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right away if you have pain in your stomach area (abdomen) that is severe and will not go away. The pain may be felt going from your abdomen through to your back. The pain may happen with or without vomiting. These may be symptoms of pancreatitis. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you have ever had heart failure (your heart does not pump blood well enough) or have problems with your kidneys. Contact your doctor right away if you have increasing shortness of breath or trouble breathing (especially when you lie down); swelling or fluid retention (especially in the feet, ankles, or legs); an unusually fast increase in weight; or unusual tiredness. These may be symptoms of heart failure. Do not take JANUVIA if you are allergic to any of its ingredients, including sitagliptin. Symptoms of serious allergic reactions to JANUVIA, including rash, hives, and swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty breathing or swallowing, can occur. If you have any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right away. Kidney problems, somet Continue reading >>

Januvia

Januvia

How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Sitagliptin belongs to the group of diabetes medications called DPP-4 inhibitors. It works by increasing the amount of incretin released by the intestine. Incretin is a hormone that raises insulin levels when blood sugar is high and decreases the amount of sugar made by the body. Sitagliptin is used alone or in combination with other medications to improve blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. This medication should be used as part of an overall diabetes management plan that includes a diet and exercise program. This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. What form(s) does this medication come in? 25 mg Each pink, round, film-coated tablet, with "221" on one side, contains 25 mg sitagliptin. Nonmedicinal ingredients: microcrystalline cellulose, anhydrous dibasic calcium phosphate (calcium hydrogen phosphate, anhydrous), croscarmellose sodium, magnesium stearate, and sodium stearyl fumarate; film coating: polyvinyl alcohol, polyethylene gl Continue reading >>

Januvia Side Effects Center

Januvia Side Effects Center

Januvia (sitagliptin) is an oral diabetes medicine for people with type 2 diabetes (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes. Januvia is sometimes used in combination with other diabetes medications, but is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Many people using Januvia do not have serious side effects. Side effects that may occur with Januvia include: headache, joint or muscle pain, nausea, stomach pain, diarrhea, or constipation. Although Januvia by itself usually does not cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), low blood sugar may occur if Januvia is prescribed with other anti-diabetic medications. Symptoms of low blood sugar include sudden sweating, shaking, fast heartbeat, hunger, blurred vision, dizziness, or tingling hands/feet. Tell your doctor if you have serious side effects of Januvia including pancreatitis (severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite, fast heart rate), urinating less than usual or not at all, swelling, weight gain, shortness of breath, or severe skin reaction (fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads [especially in the face or upper body] and causes blistering and peeling). The recommended dose of Januvia is 100 mg once daily. Januvia may interact with digoxin, probenecid, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin or other salicylates, sulfa drugs, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), or beta-blockers. Tell your doctor all prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. During pregnancy Januvia should be used only when prescribed. Pregnancy may cause or worsen diabetes. Your doctor may change your diabetes treatment during pregnancy. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. Cons Continue reading >>

How Januvia Helps Control Blood Sugar Levels In Type 2 Diabetespatients

How Januvia Helps Control Blood Sugar Levels In Type 2 Diabetespatients

How Januvia Helps Control Blood Sugar Levels In Type 2 DiabetesPatients Diabetes is a disease that occurs when the levels of insulin in a persons body are not normal. There are two types of diabetes diabetes type 1 and diabetes type 2. Type 2 diabetes patients, (those that are not on insulin), can be controlled by the drug Januvia, but this drug cannot be used for type 1 diabetes patients. Januvia is also called Sitagliptin, and it is an oral form of medication that helps to control the levels of insulin in the body, especially after eating, in people that have type 2 diabetes. In some cases, it is used in combination with other medications. It is important that people taking Januvia also keep up with their exercise routines, watch their weight, practice a diet that is good for diabetics, and they should continue to take their other medications. Januvia should only be taken under a doctors care. The drug Januvia may be taken with meals or not. It all depends on what the doctor prescribes for the person. Anyone who is taking the drug should follow the doctors instructions completely. It is an oral form of medication that can be taken with or without a meal. For most people, the daily dosage of Januvia is 100 mg. It is important that the doctor know any of the other medications that a person is taking because Januvia may interfere with some of them. In controlled studies, only 5 % of the people taking it had adverse side effects from taking Januvia. You can buy Januvia online at; www.planetdrugsdirect.com/drugs/januvia Important Things To Remember When Taking Januvia It is important that people do not let their blood sugar levels dip when they are taking Januvia. They should not skip meals because this will cause them to feel tired, they may sweat, have tremors, feel hun Continue reading >>

Sitagliptin For Diabetes Januvia

Sitagliptin For Diabetes Januvia

Take sitagliptin tablets once a day. Remember to follow any advice you have been given about your diet. The most common side-effects are feeling sick (nausea), headache, and nose or throat infections. About sitagliptin Type of medicine An antidiabetic medicine Used for Adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus Also called Januvia®; Janumet® (a combination tablet containing sitagliptin with metformin) Available as Tablets Insulin is a hormone which is made naturally in your body, in the pancreas. It helps to control the levels of sugar in your blood. If your body does not make enough insulin, or if it does not use the insulin it makes effectively, this results in the condition called sugar diabetes (diabetes mellitus). People with diabetes need treatment to control the amount of sugar (glucose) in their blood. This is because good control of blood glucose levels reduces the risk of complications later on. Some people can control the sugar in their blood by making changes to the food they eat but, for other people, medicines like sitagliptin are given alongside the changes in diet. Sitagliptin works in part by increasing the amount of insulin produced by your body. It also reduces the amount of a substance called glucagon being produced by your pancreas. Glucagon causes your liver to produce more sugar, so by reducing the amount of glucagon in your body, this also helps to reduce the levels of glucose in your blood. Before taking sitagliptin Some medicines are not suitable for people with certain conditions, and sometimes a medicine may only be used if extra care is taken. For these reasons, before you start taking sitagliptin it is important that your doctor knows: If you are pregnant, trying for a baby or breast-feeding. If you have any problems with the way your kidneys w Continue reading >>

Compare Januvia Vs. Metformin

Compare Januvia Vs. Metformin

Oral blood sugar-lowering medicine. Januvia (sitagliptin) is not linked to worsening heart failure like other medicines in its class. It is less likely to cause weight gain and low blood sugar compared to other diabetes medicines. One of the few diabetes medicines that lowers the risk of death from diabetes-related complications. Rarely causes low blood sugar. 143 reviews so far Have you used Januvia (sitagliptin)? Leave a review 938 reviews so far Have you used Glucophage (metformin)? Leave a review Continue reading >>

Understanding Low Blood Sugar

Understanding Low Blood Sugar

JANUVIA (jah-NEW-vee-ah) is a once-daily prescription pill that, along with diet and exercise, helps lower blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUVIA should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUVIA. IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION Serious side effects can happen in people who take JANUVIA, including pancreatitis, which may be severe and lead to death. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you've ever had pancreatitis. Stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right away if you have pain in your stomach area (abdomen) that is severe and will not go away. The pain may be felt going from your abdomen through to your back. The pain may happen with or without vomiting. These may be symptoms of pancreatitis. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you have ever had heart failure (your heart does not pump blood well enough) or have problems with your kidneys. Contact your doctor right away if you have increasing shortness of breath or trouble breathing (especially when you lie down); swelling or fluid retention (especially in the feet, ankles, or legs); an unusually fast increase in weight; or unusual tiredness. These may be symptoms of heart failure. Do not take JANUVIA if you are allergic to any of its ingredients, including sitagliptin. Symptoms of serious allergic reactions to JANUVIA, including rash, hives, and swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty breathing or swallowing, can occur. If you have any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right Continue reading >>

Raised Blood Sugars And Januvia

Raised Blood Sugars And Januvia

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I'm new to this forum, but can anyone help me? I have been taking Januvia for nearly 2 months now. Everything seemed to be working fine as my readings were coming down, but just last week, I had diarrhoea for 5 days, and now my readings are high again, as high as 17mmol in the mornings, and sometimes before my evening meal. I have seen my GP, who said I must have caught a bug, but my blood sugars aren't coming down. I'm following a low GI diet, haven't touched alchohol since starting Januvia. Infact, I've been really behaving myself! So as you can imagine, I'm feeling stressed because it seems to have stopped working. Also, I've been feeling really depressed too. Has anyone had the same problem and if so, how did you manage to sort it out? There are just a few members on here who have taken/are taking Januvia and hopefully will see your post and help you with their experience. There may be a bit of a wait as the forum is quiet on this holiday weekend. I don't know how long ago you were diagnosed but the Forum Monitors have written some basic information for new members which I hope will be useful to you. Ask as many questions as you like and someone will know the answer. Here is the advice that Ken and I, as Forum Monitors, usually give to newly diagnosed Diabetics. We hope that these few ideas gained through experience help you to gain control and give you some understanding of Diabetes. This forum doesn't always follow the recommended dietary advice, you have to work out what works for you as we are all different. It's not just 'sugars' you need to avoid, diabetes is an inability to process glucose properly. Carbohydrate converts, in the body, to gl Continue reading >>

Januvia Side Effects

Januvia Side Effects

Januvia diabetes treatment to lower blood sugar levels, side effects by Merck company Ray Sahelian, M.D. Januvia (sitagliptin phosphate) tablets are the first diabetes treatment approved in a new class of drugs known as DPP-4 inhibitors that enhances the body's own ability to lower elevated blood sugar. Januvia is used daily to improve blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes, alone or in combination with two other commonly prescribed oral diabetes medications, metformin or a PPAR (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma) agonist, when either of these drugs alone, along with diet and exercise, don't provide adequate blood sugar control. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of the disease, accounting for about 90 percent to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes (21 million in 2005). In type 2 diabetes, the body does not produce enough insulin or the cells ignore the insulin. Insulin is necessary to take sugar, the basic fuel for cells, from the blood into the cells. Over time, high blood sugar levels can increase the risk for serious complications, including heart disease, blindness, nerve damage, and kidney damage. For a list of natural supplements used in blood sugar control, see diabetes. Mechanism of action Januvia is a prescription medication that prolongs the activity of proteins that increase the release of insulin after blood sugar rises, such as after a meal. Januvia does this by blocking an enzyme (dipeptidyl peptidase IV or DPP-IV) which breaks down these proteins, leading to better blood sugar control. Januvia won U.S. approval in October, 2006 to treat adults with type 2 diabetes. Januvia belongs to a new class of medicines called DPP-4 inhibitors that work by enhancing the body's own ability to lower blood sugar. It does not s Continue reading >>

Stopping Diabetes Medicines

Stopping Diabetes Medicines

“I want to get off some of these drugs,” Ellen told me. “But my doctor says I need them. I’m on three for glucose, two for blood pressure, and one for depression. They’re costing me hundreds every month. What can I do?” Ellen is a health-coaching client of mine, age 62 with Type 2 diabetes. She works as an executive secretary in an insurance company. It’s stressful. She’s usually there from 8 AM until 6 PM or later and comes home “too tired to exercise.” She mentioned that just “putting herself together” for work every day requires an hour of prep time. “You have to look good for these executives,” she says. I asked about her drugs. She said she takes metformin (Glucophage and others), sitagliptin ( brand name Januvia), and pioglitazone (Actos) for diabetes, lisinopril (Privinil, Zestril) for blood pressure, simvastatin (Zocor) for cholesterol, and paroxetine (Paxil) for depression. Her A1C is now at 7.3%, down from a high of 9.9% a year ago, when she was on only two medicines. “I think the drugs are depressing me,” she said. “The cost, the side effects… I have nausea most days, I have cough from the lisinopril. That doesn’t help at work. I don’t know what’s worse, the drugs or diabetes.” What would you have said to Ellen? Although I strongly believe in reducing drug use, I told her what most experts say, that she can get off some, possibly all diabetes drugs, but it will take a lot of work. Asqual Getaneh, MD, a diabetes expert who writes for Everyday Health, says that doctors want to be “assured that an A1C will stay down” if a person goes off medicines. She says doctors usually won’t reduce medicines until A1C drops below 7.0%. In the ADA publication Diabetes Forecast, pharmacist Craig Williams, PharmD, writes, “Unf Continue reading >>

Januvia

Januvia

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occu Continue reading >>

Januvia Smackdown

Januvia Smackdown

Get your ringside seats, Folks! A while back I posted about the Merck's new Type 2 oral drug Januvia (What It Doesn't Do), explaining how it apparently trumps competitors in terms of patient "tolerability." No other post has ever generated such ongoing reader energy, both positive and negative. Nearly every day, several new commentors weigh in, duking it out over the relative merits of Januvia. Most everyone seems to agree that Januvia reduces appetite, which is a good thing. But then again, Byetta is known for that effect as well. The key is question whether Januvia fulfills its core function of lowering blood glucose (BG) levels, and lives up to its no-side-effects promise. As of today, the score stands pretty much tied, as such: Total comments = 50 Positive = 10 Negative = 13 Mixed = 16 (liked some aspects of the drug but not others) Neutral = 11 (those asking or responding to questions only) Among the most vocal of the Pro Team: "I take Januvia and have for 6 months. I have no side effects. I have experienced a decrease in appetite. I have had no headaches or respiratory problems. My BG has gone down. It is a great drug." -- Mike "Januvia has been a positive thing for me. My sugar levels dropped from 240+ to 110 +/- 10 after fasting. I have taken 100 mg once per day for a month... I am not as hungry as before usage." -- Jim K. L. "I've been on Januvia for a little over three months and have lost over 15 pounds which I had put on with Actos. I've experienced no side effects, other than I am not hungry all of the time. For me it has been very effective..." -- Bill "I am substantially less hungry then I have felt in years ... and my BG hovers around 100 - 120 between meals/fasting, and 120 - 160 for a few hours after a heavy carb meal. The usual BG spikes of 180 - 200+ Continue reading >>

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