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Januvia Drug Class

2. Januvia | Fiercepharma

2. Januvia | Fiercepharma

Merck has experimented with pay-for-performance contracts linking Januvia costs to its performance. Mercks Januvia has faced its share of obstacles, but it remains a mainstay of diabetes treatmentand of Mercks revenue mix. The drug brought in $3.91 billion worldwide, $2.29 billion of that in the U.S., and that doesnt include its combo-med cousin, Janumet, which makes an appearance lower down on this list. Januvia sales suffered several years ago after safety questions hit the entire class of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitorsas well as the rival GLP-1 class; U.S. and European regulators later joined forces to sweep worries about pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer aside. Januvia since rebounded, and last year, its safety profile got a boost when a cardiovascular safety study turned up no additional risks. Importantly, that study didnt turn up an increase in the risk of heart failure, as some had feared after some red flags for AstraZenecas DPP-4 med, Onglyza. But that same studycalled TECOSdidnt show that Januvia conferred any CV benefits, either, and a couple of its competitors have: Eli Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheims SGLT2 drug Jardiance and Novo Nordisks GLP-1 med Victoza. Jardiances ability to cut CV risks won an FDA approval, and Novo is awaiting a decision on its own CV-risk update to Victozas label. Whats worse, the FDA refused to add the TECOS safety data to Januvias labeling. Merck has its own SGLT2 drug in the pipeline, partnered with Pfizer, and its also working on an SGLT2-Januvia combo. In the meantime, Januvia remains an important tool in doctors box of diabetes remedies, Merck executives say, pointing out that diabetes patients often need to try different drugs, or combinations of drugs, as their disease progresses. As payers press for discounts i Continue reading >>

Sitagliptin

Sitagliptin

Sitagliptin (INN; /sɪtəˈɡlɪptɪn/ ( listen), previously identified as MK-0431 and marketed as the phosphate salt under the trade name Januvia) is an oral antihyperglycemic (antidiabetic drug) of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor class. It was developed, and is marketed, by Merck & Co. This enzyme-inhibiting drug is used either alone or in combination with other oral antihyperglycemic agents (such as metformin or a thiazolidinedione) for treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2.[2] Adverse effects[edit] Side effects are as common with sitagliptin (whether used alone or with metformin or pioglitazone) as they were with placebo, except for rare nausea and common cold-like symptoms, including photosensitivity.[3] No significant difference exists in the occurrence of hypoglycemia between placebo and sitagliptin.[3][4][5] In those taking sulphonylureas, the risk of low blood sugar is increased.[6] The existence of rare case reports of renal failure and hypersensitivity reactions is noted in the United States prescribing information, but a causative role for sitagliptin has not been established.[7] Several postmarketing reports of pancreatitis (some fatal) have been made in people treated with sitagliptin and other DPP-4 inhibitors,[8] and the U.S. package insert carries a warning to this effect,[9] although the causal link between sitagliptin and pancreatitis has not yet been fully substantiated.[2] One study with lab rats published in 2009 concluded that some of the possible risks of pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer may be reduced when it is used with metformin. However, while DPP-4 inhibitors showed an increase in such risk factors, as of 2009, no increase in pancreatic cancer has been reported in individuals taking DPP-4 inhibitors.[10] The updated (August 20 Continue reading >>

Januvia (sitagliptin) Dosage, Indication, Interactions, Side Effects | Empr

Januvia (sitagliptin) Dosage, Indication, Interactions, Side Effects | Empr

Adjunct to diet and exercise in type 2 diabetes, as monotherapy or combination therapy. Not for treatment of type 1 diabetes or diabetic ketoacidosis. Not studied in patients with history of pancreatitis. 100mg once daily. Renal impairment: eGFR 30<45mL/min/1.73m2: 50mg once daily; eGFR <30mL/min/1.73m2 or ESRD on dialysis: 25mg once daily. Assess renal function before starting therapy and periodically thereafter. Consider risks/benefits in patients with known risk factors for heart failure; monitor for signs/symptoms; evaluate and consider discontinuing if develops. Monitor for signs/symptoms of pancreatitis, serious hypersensitivity reactions, severe joint pain, or bullous pemphigoid; discontinue if suspected or occurs. History of angioedema to other DPP-4 inhibitors. Severe hepatic impairment. Elderly. Pregnancy. Nursing mothers. May need lower dose of concomitant sulfonylurea or insulin to reduce risk of hypoglycemia. Monitor digoxin. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor. Upper respiratory tract infection, nasopharyngitis, headache; pancreatitis, heart failure, hypersensitivity reactions (eg, anaphylaxis, angioedema, Stevens-Johnson syndrome), severe and disabling arthralgia, bullous pemphigoid. Continue reading >>

Alternatives For Januvia

Alternatives For Januvia

Januvia is a brand name for an oral anti-hyperglycemic drug that lowers blood sugar or glucose levels. This prescription medication contains the active ingredient sitagliptin and belongs to a class of drugs called dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors. Januvia is taken once a day and works to regulate blood sugar levels in type 2 diabetics in two ways. Januvia.com notes that it helps increase the levels of insulin produced by the pancreas. Insulin is a hormone that is necessary to carry glucose from the blood into the cells of the body, where it can be used. Januvia also decreases blood glucose levels by decreasing the amount of glucose made by the liver. Like all medications, Januvia can cause side effects and may not be suitable for all patients. There are several alternative medications for treating type 2 diabetes. Video of the Day Metformin is commonly sold under the brand name Glucophage and is in the biguanide class of drugs. It is the most popularly prescribed medication and often the first line of treatment for patients with type 2 diabetes. Drugs.com notes that metformin works by reducing blood glucose levels as well as by heightening the sensitivity of body cells to the hormone insulin. Metformin is sometimes prescribed in combination with other diabetes medications or insulin. In individuals with pre-diabetes or a risk of becoming diabetic, metformin is often prescribed as a preventative measure, along with nutritional and exercise therapies. Glyburide is a medication in a class of diabetes drugs called sulfonylureas. These drugs bind to receptors on the beta cells of the pancreas to stimulate more production of insulin. DiabetesNet.com notes that sulfonylurea medications have been used for the treatment of diabetes for many years and are often prescribed with m Continue reading >>

Sitagliptin; Januvia

Sitagliptin; Januvia

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occu Continue reading >>

Sitagliptin

Sitagliptin

Sitagliptin is used along with diet and exercise and sometimes with other medications to lower blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes (condition in which blood sugar is too high because the body does not produce or use insulin normally). Sitagliptin is in a class of medications called dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. It works by increasing the amounts of certain natural substances that lower blood sugar when it is high. Over time, people who have diabetes and high blood sugar can develop serious or life-threatening complications, including heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, nerve damage, and eye problems. Taking medication(s), making lifestyle changes (e.g., diet, exercise, quitting smoking), and regularly checking your blood sugar may help to manage your diabetes and improve your health. This therapy may also decrease your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes-related complications such as kidney failure, nerve damage (numb, cold legs or feet; decreased sexual ability in men and women), eye problems, including changes or loss of vision, or gum disease. Your doctor and other healthcare providers will talk to you about the best way to manage your diabetes. Sitagliptin comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken once a day with or without food. Take sitagliptin at around the same time every day. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take sitagliptin exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor. Sitagliptin helps to control high blood sugar but does not cure diabetes. Continue to take sitagliptin even if you feel well. Do not stop taking sitagliptin withou Continue reading >>

What Is Januvia®?

What Is Januvia®?

JANUVIA (jah-NEW-vee-ah) is a once-daily prescription pill that, along with diet and exercise, helps lower blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUVIA should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUVIA. IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION Serious side effects can happen in people who take JANUVIA, including pancreatitis, which may be severe and lead to death. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you've ever had pancreatitis. Stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right away if you have pain in your stomach area (abdomen) that is severe and will not go away. The pain may be felt going from your abdomen through to your back. The pain may happen with or without vomiting. These may be symptoms of pancreatitis. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you have ever had heart failure (your heart does not pump blood well enough) or have problems with your kidneys. Contact your doctor right away if you have increasing shortness of breath or trouble breathing (especially when you lie down); swelling or fluid retention (especially in the feet, ankles, or legs); an unusually fast increase in weight; or unusual tiredness. These may be symptoms of heart failure. Do not take JANUVIA if you are allergic to any of its ingredients, including sitagliptin. Symptoms of serious allergic reactions to JANUVIA, including rash, hives, and swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty breathing or swallowing, can occur. If you have any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right Continue reading >>

Januvia And Janumet

Januvia And Janumet

Januvia (sitagliptin) is an oral Type 2 diabetes medication manufactured by Merck & Co. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the drug in 2006, and it is one of the most popular Type 2 diabetes drugs on the market. In 2007, the FDA approved a variation of Januvia called Janumet, which is a combination of sitagliptin and metformin. Janumet also comes in an extended-release formula called Janumet XR. Januvia and Janumet are known as dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors that work by helping the body produce more insulin. Both Januvia and Janumet belong to a class of drugs called dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors that work by helping the body produce more insulin. Januvia was the first DPP-4 approved by the FDA and is the top-selling brand in its class. Two million prescriptions were written for Januvia in 2011. Januvia brought in about $6 billion in 2014. Merck stands to benefit from the patent on the drug until 2022. In clinical trials, Januvia proved effective in controlling blood-sugar levels. However, some studies reported rare and serious side effects, including acute pancreatitis, severe joint pain, pancreatic cancer and thyroid cancer. How Do Januvia and Janumet Work? Januvia is designed to work with other Type 2 diabetes medications, like Byetta, to increase their effectiveness. It helps lower blood sugar in two ways. It helps the body increase insulin to stabilize blood sugar and decrease sugars that are made in the liver. It is a part of the class of diabetes medications called DPP-4 inhibitors. DPP-4 is a protein made by the body that plays a role in glucose metabolism. The process works like this: After a person eats and blood sugar rises, intestinal cells release hormones called incretin hormones. Incretin stimulates pancreatic cell Continue reading >>

Incretin Mimetic Drugs For Type 2 Diabetes

Incretin Mimetic Drugs For Type 2 Diabetes

Drugs in the incretin mimetic class include exenatide (Byetta, Bydureon), liraglutide (Victoza), sitagliptin (Januvia, Janumet, Janumet XR, Juvisync), saxagliptin (Onglyza, Kombiglyze XR), alogliptin (Nesina, Kazano, Oseni), and linagliptin (Tradjenta, Jentadueto). These drugs work by mimicking the incretin hormones that the body usually produces naturally to stimulate the release of insulin in response to a meal. They are used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Januvia Side Effects

Januvia Side Effects

What is Januvia? Januvia (sitagliptin) is an oral diabetes medicine that helps control blood sugar levels. It works by regulating the levels of insulin your body produces after eating. Januvia is for treating people with type 2 diabetes. Januvia is sometimes used in combination with other diabetes medications, but is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Important information You should not use Januvia if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). Before taking this medicine You should not use Januvia if you are allergic to sitagliptin, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). To make sure Januvia is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have ever had: kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis); heart problems; pancreatitis; high triglycerides (a type of fat in the blood); gallstones; or a history of alcoholism. Januvia is not expected to harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Your name may need to be listed on a Januvia pregnancy registry when you start using this medicine. It is not known whether sitagliptin passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Januvia is not approved for use by anyone younger than 18 years old. How should I take Januvia? Take Januvia exactly as it was prescribed for you. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. You may take Januvia with or without food. Follow your doctor's instructions. Your blood sugar will need to be checked often, and you may need othe Continue reading >>

Januvia

Januvia

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occu Continue reading >>

Januvia Side Effects

Januvia Side Effects

Januvia is the brand name of the drug sitagliptin, which is used to treat type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is a disease in which the body doesn't make or use the hormone insulin normally, so it can't properly control your blood sugar levels. Januvia belongs to a class of drugs called dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. It works by increasing levels of substances in the body that help lower blood sugar. Januvia may be taken alone or with other diabetes medications. It's often prescribed as a combination medicine called Janumet (which contains the drugs sitagliptin and metformin). Taking Januvia, along with adopting a healthy lifestyle, can reduce your risk of developing serious or life-threatening complications from diabetes, which may include heart disease, stroke, nerve damage, kidney problems, or eye problems. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Januvia in 2006. It's manufactured by Merck & Co. Januvia Warnings Januvia shouldn't be taken by people with type 1 diabetes (a disease in which the body doesn't produce any insulin) or diabetic ketoacidosis (a dangerous condition that can occur if high blood sugar is untreated). Before taking Januvia, tell your doctor if you have, or have ever had: Kidney disease Angioedema (swelling of the face, lips, tongue, throat, arms, or legs) Januvia may increase the risk of developing pancreatitis (swelling and inflammation of the pancreas). Be sure to tell your doctor if you've ever had any problems with your pancreas, or if you experience any of the following symptoms while taking Januvia: Severe pain in your upper stomach that spreads to your back Loss of appetite Fast heartbeat Severe nausea and vomiting Also, tell your doctor you're taking this medicine before having any type of surgery, including a dental Continue reading >>

Januvia

Januvia

Januvia is a prescription medication used to lower blood sugar levels in adult patients with type 2 diabetes. Januvia belongs to a group of drugs called dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, which help lower blood sugar levels in two ways. It helps the body increase insulin to stabilize blood sugar and decrease sugars that are made in the liver. This medication comes in tablet form and is taken once a day, with or without food. Common side effects include upper respiratory infection, stuffy nose, sore throat, nausea, and diarrhea. Januvia is a prescription medicine used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Pancreatitis. Serious side effects have occurred with Januvia use including inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis) which may be severe and lead to death. Stop taking Januvia and call your doctor right away if you have pain in your stomach area (abdomen) that is severe and will not go away. The pain may be felt going from your abdomen through to your back. The pain may happen with or without vomiting. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). If you take Januvia with another medicine that can cause low blood sugar, such as a sulfonylurea or insulin, your risk of getting low blood sugar is higher. The dose of your sulfonylurea medicine or insulin may need to be lowered while you use Januvia. Signs and symptoms of low blood sugar may include: headache drowsiness weakness dizziness confusion irritability hunger fast heart beat sweating feeling jittery Serious allergic reactions. If you have any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, stop taking Januvia and call your doctor right away. Your doctor may give you a medicine for y Continue reading >>

Januvia (sitagliptin)

Januvia (sitagliptin)

Tweet Januvia (Sitagliptin) is an oral gliptin drug used to lower blood glucose levels amongst people with type 2 diabetes. Sitagliptin is the first of a class of drugs to be approved that mimics the actions of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) enzyme. How does Januvia work? Sitagliptin works by inhibiting the DPP-4 enzyme that destroys GLP and GIP hormones, allowing both to function more effectively. Both glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) are released by the intestine and affect blood glucose levels. When more of these hormones are released blood sugar levels are reduced. Who is Januvia prescribed to? Sitagliptin is prescribed to people with type 2 diabetes, and is usually taken alongside a healthy diet and regular, appropriate exercise to help control diabetes. Furthermore, Sitagliptin is often prescribed alongside other diabetes drugs such as (trade name first, generic name in brackets): Avandia (Rosiglitazone) Metformin (Metformin Hydrochloride) Actos (Pioglitazone) What side effects are associated with Januvia? Common side effects relating to sitagliptin include: Infections of the upper respiratory tract Headaches More infrequently, Sitagliptin is associated with abdominal pain, nausea and diarrhoea. I want to know more about Sitagliptin, what should I do? If your question is urgent, you should contact your doctor or diabetes healthcare professional immediately. Please use the Diabetes forum to get an independent perspective from the community. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 Continue reading >>

Dpp-4 Inhibitors Januvia, Onglyza, Trajenta, Combiglyze, Janumet, And Jentadueto

Dpp-4 Inhibitors Januvia, Onglyza, Trajenta, Combiglyze, Janumet, And Jentadueto

The image I've chosen for this page is the Roman god, Janus, whose prime characteristic of facing in two directions seems very appropriate for the similarly named drug Januvia, which can be extremely effective and extremely dangerous. Januvia was the first of a family of diabetes drugs that works by increasing the levels of GLP-1 in the bloodstream. Newer drugs in this family include Onglyza and Trajenta, as well as combination drugs which mix the incretin drug in the same pill as metformin. These drugs are Janumet, Kombiglyze, and Jentadueto. GLP-1 is an incretin hormone that stimulates insulin secretion. Another kind of incretin drug, which includes Byetta and Victoza are artificially synthesized molecules that behave just like GLP-1 in the body but last longer. The DPP-4 inhibitors are quite different. They are pills that cause the GLP-1 your body secretes on its own to rise to a higher than normal level by inhibiting the action of DPP-4. DPP-4 is an enzyme (a.k.a. protease) which when it is left to its own devices, chops up GLP-1 and another hormone, GIP. When DPP-4 is inhibited, GLP-1 does not get chopped up and remains active in the body. When GLP-1 is active, it stimulates insulin secretion when blood sugars rise. The Fatal Flaw with These Drugs: They Cause Abnormal Cell Growth and Pre-cancerous Tumors in the Pancreas For several years the FDA has been getting reports that drugs in both families of incretin drugs were causing pancreatitis, a painful inflammation of the pancreas that can destroy large portions of it and lead to full-fledged Type 1 diabetes or even death. They recently decided to study the issue, though, in typical FDA fashion they merely asked for more research without warning doctors to take patients off these dangerous drugs. A study run by a bi Continue reading >>

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