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Januvia Donut Hole

Drug Finder: Find Which 2018 Medicare Part D Plans Best Covers Your Drugs

Drug Finder: Find Which 2018 Medicare Part D Plans Best Covers Your Drugs

Note: Your email will not be sold or shared! What does all this mean? Below are a few notes to help you understand the above 2018 Medicare Part D Plan Formulary. Plan Name: This is the official Medicare Part D prescription drug plan name from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The same Medicare Part D plan name generally has a different Plan ID in each state (or CMS Region). Monthly Premium: This is the amount you must pay each month for this prescription drug plan. This monthly premium must be paid even if you are in the initial deductible phase or the coverage gap (donut hole) phase. Deductible: If your Part D plan has an initial deductible, you are 100% responsible for your drug costs until your expenses exceed this value and you begin your Initial Coverage Phase. Many Medicare Part D plans use the the standard $405 deductible as provided by CMS in their Standard plan design. Some Part D plan providers offer an initial deductible lower than the Standard deductible. Many prescription drug plans do not have a deductible (also called first dollar coverage or a $0 deductible), however the monthly premium for a plan with a $0 deductible may be slightly higher. Gap Coverage: the Donut Hole: In the CMS Standard Plan, the beneficiary must pay the next $3,759 in drug costs (the Donut Hole). The Healthcare Reform provides that for Plan Year 2018, ALL formulary generics will have at least a 56% discount and ALL brand drugs will have at least a 65% discount in the coverage gap. The Gap Coverage Types discussed in this section are in addition to the Healthcare Reform mandated discounts. In our chart, you will see one of the following: No Rx Cov.: This plan does not include prescription drug coverage. You are 100% responsible for your medication costs. If you w Continue reading >>

Rx Help & Prescription Assistance Blog

Rx Help & Prescription Assistance Blog

An estimated 29.1 million people in the United States suffer from diabetes. That is nearly ten percent of America's entire population! The diagnosis rate has shown a steady incline in the past decade. With such staggering numbers and so many in our population effected by diabetes it is no wonder that pharmaceutical companies/medical researchers come up with new ways of managing diabetes. Our countries health depends on it! No doubt there is a stigma attached to the word "diabetes" which, for many, includes visions of insulin, needles, finger pricks, pain and expensive treatment. Luckily a diagnosis of diabetes doesn't always mean that the patient will be insulin resistant. With Type 2 diabetes in particular, oral medications can be used as the first line of defense again the havoc that diabetes can wreak on the body. Oral diabetes medications come in different forms and are used in different cases depending on a patient's individual needs. Like any name brand medication there are often times unwanted side effects that can be as daunting as dealing with the illness that they intended to improve. Two of the side effects commonly associated with oral diabetes medications are hypoglycemia and weight gain, and the fluctuation of blood pressure. Fortunately, there is a new class of medication for Type 2 diabetes called D-pp4 Inhibitors. D-pp4 inhibitors help improve glucose levels without causing hypoglycemia and weight gain. They also, have a neutral effect on blood pressure. This class of medications include the brand name medications Januvia(Merck Pharmaceuticals), Onglyza(Astra Zeneca), Tradjenta(Boehringer Ingelheim), and the newest addition is Nesina(Takeda Pharmaceuticals). As a full service advocate company, Rx Access offers assistance with these medications for thos Continue reading >>

Sitagliptin User Reviews For Diabetes, Type 2 At Drugs.com

Sitagliptin User Reviews For Diabetes, Type 2 At Drugs.com

Januvia (sitagliptin): "Very expensive and no help at all with maintaining blood sugar" rudelizard (taken for 6 months to 1 year) November 21, 2017 Januvia (sitagliptin): "Been taking this pill for 7 months and no change in blood sugar tests." Januvia (sitagliptin): "Well I was given a month sample of januvia just picked up my medication read the reviews and now I won't be taking them......Scared to swallow" Did you? Yes No | Report inappropriate Januvia (sitagliptin): "Took januvia for two months and started to get joint pain which got so severe I could hardly walk. I have been off it for one week but still have pain in my legs especially the right. Would never recommend this drug to anyone, the side effects are really bad. The medication is expensive." Januvia (sitagliptin): "Developed neck swelling within a week, could not breathe, went to ICU, trachea closed." Anonymous (taken for less than 1 month) July 7, 2017 Did you? Yes No | Report inappropriate Januvia (sitagliptin): "For years I was on no drugs for type 2 diabetes, only diet. My a1c test were always around 6.1, and then my dr put me on januvia. My sugars are now averaging 15.7.The dr has just upped my dose to 1-1/2 pills of januvia and added diaformin. WHY??From good control with no pills to out of control in 4 months. I'm really starting to doubt the doctors motives." Januvia (sitagliptin): "Great works for me 94pt avg" FBW (taken for 1 to 2 years) May 21, 2017 Did you? Yes No | Report inappropriate "I was prescribed sitaGLIPtin (Januvia) 50mg tab every morning and had my insulin reduced from 42 units in the morning and 26 units at night to 20 units and 12 units respectively. Metformin was taken out by the renal specialist.After taking this medication for 2 weeks, I noticed my blood sugar reduced from 9.5 t Continue reading >>

Covered And Excluded Drugs In The Medicare Part D Drug Formulary

Covered And Excluded Drugs In The Medicare Part D Drug Formulary

Speak with a licensed insurance agent: Speak with a Licensed Insurance Agent Covered and Excluded Drugs in the Medicare Part D Drug Formulary Medicare Prescription Drug Plansare available from private insurance companies contracted with Medicare to provide and coordinate prescription benefits to beneficiaries. As a Medicare beneficiary, there are two ways for you to get prescription drug coverage (Medicare Part D): through a stand-alone Medicare Prescription Drug Plan, if you have Original Medicare, or through a Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug plan. Because these plans are offered through Medicare-approved private insurance companies, this basically means that each Medicare Prescription Drug Plan will provide different types of prescription drug coverage. Its the insurance company that ultimately decides which drugs to cover under its prescription drug plan and at what benefit level. The different levels of covered drugs under the Prescription Drug Plan are called tiers. The tiers represent how much you pay out of pocket for the Part D drugs listed in each particular tier. For example, the plan may have one tier for generic drugs, another for brand-name drugs, and even a third tier for preventive drugs used to control certain medical conditions. This list of covered prescription drugs is called a formulary, and it contains all the drugs that the Medicare Prescription Drug Plan or Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug plan will cover. Keep in mind that formularies may change at any time; your Medicare plan will notify you if necessary. Generally, a plan covers drugs that cost less at a higher level, meaning you pay less out of pocket. Thus, its always in your interest to ask your doctor to prescribe drugs that are on your Medicare Prescription Drug Plans formulary. Continue reading >>

Need Help With U.s. Diabetes Supplies And Medications?

Need Help With U.s. Diabetes Supplies And Medications?

For anyone who has diabetes, the cost of staying alive is expensive. This is a current list of currently available programs, co-pay cards, organizations and manufacturers that may help, and the requirements to participate in the programs. Why did I create this? Every other “diabetes financial assistance/resource” page that I would visit would give you a link to supposed help – but you had to dig deep to find out if there were exclusions or restrictions. Some of the resource pages had links that no longer exist. Others had a single page that said: “We no longer offer a program.” (And I’m talking major diabetes organizations and manufacturers… they’re not keeping their own pages up to date…) This page will give you the restrictions/exclusions I’ve found and the contact information and site to get yourself started if you qualify. (And in some cases, all of us will qualify!) These links are up to date and I will be adding additional resources as they are made available. (If you have links or resources, please list them in the comment section and if they’re legitimate, I’ll add them.) Hope this helps you. Share it if you please – no one should be “sick” with diabetes from a lack of medication or supplies – let’s help each other by getting the word out. Diabetes Medications & Needles If you take BYDUREON, BYETTA, FARXIGA, KOMBIGLYZE XR, ONGLYZA, SYMLIN, XIGDUO XR, you may be eligible for free medications mailed to your home or provider. Requirements include: You must be resident of the US, or have a Work Visa or Green Card. You aren’t currently receiving prescription drug coverage under a private insurance or government program, or receiving any other assistance to help pay for medicine. Your annual income* should be at or below: $35,000 fo Continue reading >>

Paying Less For Drugs In The Part D 'doughnut Hole'

Paying Less For Drugs In The Part D 'doughnut Hole'

En español | Q. I hear the new health care law has given us a better deal in the Part D doughnut hole. How does this work? In the past, the gap in coverage known as the doughnut hole was always the biggest drawback for people enrolled in the Medicare Part D prescription drug program. But now, under a provision of the 2010 Affordable Care Act (“ObamaCare”), the gap is steadily shrinking and saving Part D enrollees a lot of out-of-pocket expenses. See also: Medicare Starter Kit: What you need to know. You fall into the gap if the total cost of your drugs since the beginning of the year reaches a certain level: $2,850 in 2014. (The "total cost" in this initial coverage period includes the amount you've spent yourself — your deductible, if your Part D plan has one, and copayments — and the amount your plan has contributed.) At that point, in the years before 2011, you would have had to pay 100 percent of the cost of your drugs in the gap, unless you had other coverage. And only when you had spent a large amount out of pocket since the beginning of the year ($4,550 in 2014) could you get out of the gap and qualify for low-cost catastrophic coverage until the end of the year. But between 2011, when this provision of the law kicked in, and 2020, your share of the costs in the doughnut hole is reducing each year. So in 2014: You'll receive a 52.5 percent discount on the cost of brand-name and biologic drugs (including insulin and vaccines, contributed by their manufacturers. You'll receive a 28 percent discount on generic drugs and Part D-covered supplies used to administer insulin, through a subsidy from the federal government. Over the next few years these discounts will get larger, so that by 2020 you will pay no more than 25 percent of the cost of any Part D-covere Continue reading >>

Wondering About Stopping Victoza

Wondering About Stopping Victoza

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I have been on Victoza since diagnosis and started on Medicare just this year. Am now in the "doughnut hole" and even with discounts 3 pens of Victoza is almost $300 and a pen lasts me approximately a week. And then we have January fast approaching with the yearly deductibles to deal with. My blood sugars have not been where I would like them lately, for various reasons. However, I am wondering about stopping the Victoza, purely for financial reasons, and how I could manage to get by without it. If blood sugars would be even higher. Am also on Metformin ER 2 x day. Calling my insurance company later to see if they have any ideas about how I can afford this stuff. I just wiped out my savings account putting a new roof on my house, an unexpected emergency. So sorry to hear your dilemma, Janet. Of course, it is a personal decision that only you can arrive at. This only points up the ridiculous healthcare choices people are forced to make in this country. Whatever decision you make, I know it will be well thought out and right for you. what about insulin? wouldn't that be cheaper? My new Endo won't recommend insulin for me. She wants me on Januvia. I priced it on my Part D plan and it was Tier 3 and I hit the donut hole in September. So I am not happy with even considering it. I priced Lantus and it was cheaper and kept me out of the donut hole. if zI have to add another drug I want it to be a generic like Glipizide or Prandin. I am not sure what I have to do to get her to consider insulin. I am very tempted to start eating high carb again and let my bgs go up just to show her what a normal carb Continue reading >>

Buy Januvia With Coupons - Januvia Side Effects And Uses

Buy Januvia With Coupons - Januvia Side Effects And Uses

Common side effects include: nausea, hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar) especially when using Actos with another medicines like Glucophage, constipation, flatulence, foot swelling, headache, cough, diarrhoea, vomiting, fungal skin infection, upper respiratory infection, swelling of the hands, stuffy or runny nose and sore throat, osteoarthritis, arm or leg pain. Allergic reactions, which may be serious, including rash, hives, and swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have an allergic reaction, stop taking Januvia and call your doctor right away. The cost of specialty meds in the US is un-affordable for many Americans. What would you do if you couldn't afford the medications that you need to stay alive and have the quality of life you deserve? For some people buying specialty medications online is a lifeline. With a chance of saving up to 70%, for many it's the only choice. Importing medications to the USA for personal use is not ideal but the cost of some medication in the US is astronomical and even if you could afford it, why should you be forced to pay more than you need for it? Were not just talking about the uninsured. Some insurance doesn't cover these medications at all, and some copay is still more than if you buy the drugs online anyway. Also, even if your insurance covers the majority of the specialty drug cost, you may find that your insurance premiums get pushed up.... Continue reading >>

How To Market Mapd Chronic Snp Plans

How To Market Mapd Chronic Snp Plans

I'm looking for a good angle for marketing and selling MAPD Chronic Care SNP's. I currently have Humana and UHC contracts. I do see a slight advantage with some of the drug costs. What other reasons would a person with DM or a chronic heart condition have for switching their plan (other than premium cost)? Also, do the same marketing rules apply as during AEP? Approx 30% or Medicare beneficiaries have either a heart condition or have some form of diabetes. There is a continuous Special Election Period so you can enroll these folks in a plan all year long not just during the AEP. Rx wise, I know the Humana plan has a very low co-pay for both Januvia and Janumet and since these are both brand oral diabetes meds, you can save those folks quite a bit of money, unltil they reach the coverage gap). I've studied the plans pretty closely and that seems to be the biggest feature when compared to other MAPD plans. So if you find folks that are diabetic, you can keep busy enrolling them during this time of year. They can indeed be helpful BUT we're still talking MA so all the marketing issues still exist. As usual, finding prospects willing to talk with you can be challenging. It's not like you can get a list and pick up the phone. All solicitation needs to be done via mail. You need to keep the mailing generic. "Additional benefits may be available for beneficiaries with diabetes, heart issues, etc." You may not specify that "januvia is avaiable for $30 with no donut hole." I understand that mailing lists are available for diabetics but I also understand they may not be terribly accurate. Perhaps just a mailing to older seniors (72-80) would generate similar results. Continue reading >>

Merck Programs To Help Those In Need - Product

Merck Programs To Help Those In Need - Product

If you have been prescribed a Merck medicine, you may be eligible for the program if all 3 of the following conditions apply: You are a US resident and have a prescription for a Merck product from a health care provider licensed in the United States.* You do not have insurance or other coverage for your prescription medicine. Some examples of other insurance coverage include private insurance, HMOs, Medicaid, Medicare, state pharmacy assistance programs, veterans assistance, or any other social service agency support. You cannot afford to pay for your medicine. You may qualify for the program if you have a household income of $48,560 or less for individuals, $65,840 or less for couples, or $100,400 or less for a family of 4. At Merck we realize that sometimes exceptions need to be made based on the patient's individual circumstances. If you do not meet the prescription drug coverage criteria, your income meets the program criteria, and there are special circumstances of financial and medical hardship that apply to your situation, you can request that an exception be made for you. * You do not have to be a US citizen. Legal residents of the United States, including US Territories, are also eligible. For income limits in Alaska and Hawaii, please call 1-800-727-5400. If you believe that you meet the eligibility criteria for the Merck Patient Assistance Program and you have received a prescription for a Merck product, call toll-free 1-800-727-5400 8 AM to 8 PM EST to obtain a brochure outlining the program and an enrollment application, or by clicking on the link on the right. After downloading the application or receiving your packet in the mail, follow these simple steps to submit your enrollment form for your free Merck medicines: Complete ALL information on the enroll Continue reading >>

Medicare Woes: Why The Meds Your Doctor Prescribes Are Outrageously Expensive

Medicare Woes: Why The Meds Your Doctor Prescribes Are Outrageously Expensive

Medicare woes: Why the meds your doctor prescribes are outrageously expensive Editors Note: Journalist Philip Moeller, who writes widely on health and retirement, is here to provide the Medicare answers you need in Ask Phil, the Medicare Maven. Send your questions to Phil . Moeller is a research fellow at the Center on Aging & Work at Boston College and co-author of How to Live to 100 . He wrote his latest book, How to Get Whats Yours: The Secrets to Maxing Out Your Social Security , with Making Sen$es Paul Solman and Larry Kotlikoff . He is now working on a companion book about Medicare. Follow him on Twitter @PhilMoeller or e-mail him at [email protected] . Medicare rules and private insurance plans can affect people differently depending on where they live. To make sure the answers here are as accurate as possible, Phil is working with the State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP). It is funded by the government but is otherwise independent and trains volunteers to provide consumer Medicare counseling in state and local offices around the country. The nonprofit Medicare Rights Center (MRC) is also providing ongoing help. Constance: My husband was recently prescribed Januvia [for type 2 diabetes] by his doctor. When he asked about the high cost of this drug, the doctor gave him a coupon from the drug manufacturer and said it would allow him to only have to pay $5 per month for it for up to 12 months. When we contacted our pharmacy, they said such coupons are not valid for those on any government insurance such as Medicare Part D. Further, because it is not on our formulary for the plan we are on, our insurance would approve it only with an elaborate petition, which only would result in our having to pay the entire cost of the drug anyway. What good is it Continue reading >>

2018 Medicare Part D Prescription Info

2018 Medicare Part D Prescription Info

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You will have to register before you can post: click the REGISTER link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. My only prescription coverage is Medicare Part D. I got info today about the rate increases for next year (2018). The current monthly premium is $86. Next year it will increase to $94.50 I wonder if the SS COLA will cover the increase? The "donut hole" this year is $3700. Next year (2018) it increases to $3750. One Single Life Shall Be Offered To Save Many CRAS INGENS ITEERBIMUS AEQUOR (Horace Odes 7:32) Tomorrow We Shall Set Out Upon The Vast Ocean Genesis 14:14 - 318 = TIH = Tau (300) Iota (10) Eta (8) Salvator Generis Romulei (Savior of the Race of Romulus) My only prescription coverage is Medicare Part D. I got info today about the rate increases for next year (2018). The current monthly premium is $86. Next year it will increase to $94.50 I wonder if the SS COLA will cover the increase? The "donut hole" this year is $3700. Next year (2018) it increases to $3750. I doubt it. There i extra help for premiums, the donut hole, and medications based on income. There are only two kinds of people in the end: those who say to God, Thy will be done, and those to whom God say, in the end, Thy will be done. The Great Divorce, C.S. Lewis Because of one med the doctor prescribed back in January and was so expensive I met the donut hole a few months ago. The co-pay was only $35 but the gross amount counts towards the donut hole. After the fact when I realized that I stopped taking it with my doctor's permission. I have found a provider where if I order through the mail for three months supply I can get free but of c Continue reading >>

About The Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Coverage Gap (donut Hole)

About The Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Coverage Gap (donut Hole)

Find Affordable Medicare Plans in Your Area The Medicare coverage gap is the phase of your Medicare Part D benefit when there is a gap in prescription drug coverage. You might not reach this stage at all; it starts if you and your plan spend a certain amount of money within a year, as described below. During this phase, you may have to pay more for your drugs, until you reach the catastrophic coverage phase.Note that some plans dont include this coverage gap. Most Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug plans and Medicare Prescription Drug Plans have a coverage gap, or donut hole. The coverage gap is reached when your total drug costs (what you and your plan pay) reach a certain amount ($3,750 in 2018). You then pay for a certain portion of prescription drug costsout-of-pocketuntil entering the plans catastrophic coverage phase. This is when your total out-of-pocket costs, including the annual deductible and copayments/coinsurance, reach $5,000 in 2018. Some Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug plans and stand-alone Medicare Prescription Drug Plans provide partial or full coverage during thecoverage gap. For example, some plans may not have a gap at all, while others may offer generic drug coverage in the gap. Plans with gap coverage often charge a higher monthly premium, so you may only want to consider one of these plans if you have high drug costs and expect to reach the coverage gap. How does the Affordable Care Act affect the coverage gap? Until 2020, when the coverage gap will be closed, youll pay gradually less for both generic and brand-name medications. In 2018, youll pay up to 35% for brand-name drugs and 44% for generic drugs. In 2019, youll pay up to 30% for brand-name drugs and 37% for generic drugs. In 2020, youll pay up to 25% for brand-name drugs and 25% f Continue reading >>

What Is Januvia®?[open]

What Is Januvia®?[open]

JANUVIA (jah-NEW-vee-ah) is a once-daily prescription pill that, along with diet and exercise, helps lower blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUVIA should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUVIA. IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION Serious side effects can happen in people who take JANUVIA, including pancreatitis, which may be severe and lead to death. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you've ever had pancreatitis. Stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right away if you have pain in your stomach area (abdomen) that is severe and will not go away. The pain may be felt going from your abdomen through to your back. The pain may happen with or without vomiting. These may be symptoms of pancreatitis. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you have ever had heart failure (your heart does not pump blood well enough) or have problems with your kidneys. Contact your doctor right away if you have increasing shortness of breath or trouble breathing (especially when you lie down); swelling or fluid retention (especially in the feet, ankles, or legs); an unusually fast increase in weight; or unusual tiredness. These may be symptoms of heart failure. Do not take JANUVIA if you are allergic to any of its ingredients, including sitagliptin. Symptoms of serious allergic reactions to JANUVIA, including rash, hives, and swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty breathing or swallowing, can occur. If you have any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right Continue reading >>

Januvia Coupons & Manufacturer Offers 2018 - 50% Off

Januvia Coupons & Manufacturer Offers 2018 - 50% Off

Januvia is a gliptin medication prescribed to control blood sugar levels in type 2 diabetes patients. This medication increases insulin released by your body and decreasing the amount of excess sugar made by your body. The quantity and dosage of... More Januvia is a gliptin medication prescribed to control blood sugar levels in type 2 diabetes patients. This medication increases insulin released by your body and decreasing the amount of excess sugar made by your body. The quantity and dosage of Januvia must be balanced with the type of food you eat and the amount of exercise you do. A one-month supply (30 tablets) of Januvia costs over $350 at your local pharmacy. This medication can be difficult to afford without a Januvia copay card or patient assistance. We provide Januvia coupons and access to other savings options to help you lower the retail price. Read more about Januvia and our discounts below. We also offer a free discount card for Januvia and many other prescription drugs, which give you the opportunity to save up to 75%. Just click FREE discount card on the right side of our home page or select Get card in mail when choosing your Januvia coupon form. The Januvia discount card will be sent to you in the mail within two weeks. Simply register to receive your card and start saving today! Read information about Januvia below to learn about its common uses. If you have questions about this medicine, please consult with your doctor or pharmacist and be sure to inform them of all the medications you are currently taking. Januvia is used to treat type 2 diabetes patients by lowering blood sugar levels and improving glycemic control. This medication is used in combination with a diet and exercise program. Do not take Januvia if you are a type 1 diabetes patient. Poss Continue reading >>

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