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Januvia Benefits

Januvia & Weight Loss

Januvia & Weight Loss

Januvia is the brand name for sitagliptin, a medication prescribed to improve blood sugar regulation in adults with type 2 diabetes. Produced by Merck and Co., Januvia is intended to be used along with diet and exercise. Evidence on whether Januvia is beneficial for weight loss is conflicting, but the medication does have some effects that might lead to weight loss. Video of the Day Januvia helps to regulate blood sugar by increasing the amount of two hormones that the body produces in response to food intake. This increase in hormones has several effects, and two effects may help with weight loss. The hormones decrease the transit time for food to move from the stomach into the intestines, slowing the absorption of glucose into the bloodstream, explains NetDoctor. They also cause a feeling of fullness that helps the person to eat less. In pre-approval research evaluating the effectiveness of Januvia for treating type 2 diabetes, the medication generally did not cause weight gain or weight loss, reports eMedTV. In addition, people taking Januvia along with metformin for treating type 2 diabetes did not lose more weight than those taking only metformin. In 2008, Merck and Co. presented an analysis of research on Januvia at the American Diabetes Association 68th Annual Scientific Sessions, as reported by "Medical News Today." In comparison with the type 2 diabetes medication glipizide, Januvia was much better at preventing hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, in type 2 diabetes patients needing medicine to control blood sugar. In addition, participants taking Januvia experienced significant weight loss, although the actual amounts were small on average. Some people experience side effects when taking Januvia that could cause weight loss. These effects include excess gas, dia Continue reading >>

Januvia Reviews & Ratings At Drugs.com

Januvia Reviews & Ratings At Drugs.com

For Diabetes, Type 2 "Very expensive and no help at all with maintaining blood sugar" rudelizard (taken for 6 months to 1 year) November 21, 2017 For Diabetes, Type 2 "Been taking this pill for 7 months and no change in blood sugar tests." For Diabetes, Type 2 "Well I was given a month sample of januvia just picked up my medication read the reviews and now I won't be taking them......Scared to swallow" Did you? Yes No | Report inappropriate For Diabetes, Type 2 "Took januvia for two months and started to get joint pain which got so severe I could hardly walk. I have been off it for one week but still have pain in my legs especially the right. Would never recommend this drug to anyone, the side effects are really bad. The medication is expensive." For Diabetes, Type 2 "Developed neck swelling within a week, could not breathe, went to ICU, trachea closed." Anonymous (taken for less than 1 month) July 7, 2017 Did you? Yes No | Report inappropriate For Diabetes, Type 2 "For years I was on no drugs for type 2 diabetes, only diet. My a1c test were always around 6.1, and then my dr put me on januvia. My sugars are now averaging 15.7.The dr has just upped my dose to 1-1/2 pills of januvia and added diaformin. WHY??From good control with no pills to out of control in 4 months. I'm really starting to doubt the doctors motives." For Diabetes, Type 2 "Great works for me 94pt avg" FBW (taken for 1 to 2 years) May 21, 2017 Did you? Yes No | Report inappropriate For Diabetes, Type 2 "Hi I took Januvia for 1 year and 1/2 it was helping me regulate my Diabetes. But I started to have a abnormal pain in my abdomen and didn't know why never though that it was caused because of this medication. one day I had the pain so bad that I couldn't walk or stand, I went to the Hospital got admitted Continue reading >>

Januvia Side Effects

Januvia Side Effects

Januvia is the brand name of the drug sitagliptin, which is used to treat type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is a disease in which the body doesn't make or use the hormone insulin normally, so it can't properly control your blood sugar levels. Januvia belongs to a class of drugs called dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. It works by increasing levels of substances in the body that help lower blood sugar. Januvia may be taken alone or with other diabetes medications. It's often prescribed as a combination medicine called Janumet (which contains the drugs sitagliptin and metformin). Taking Januvia, along with adopting a healthy lifestyle, can reduce your risk of developing serious or life-threatening complications from diabetes, which may include heart disease, stroke, nerve damage, kidney problems, or eye problems. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Januvia in 2006. It's manufactured by Merck & Co. Januvia Warnings Januvia shouldn't be taken by people with type 1 diabetes (a disease in which the body doesn't produce any insulin) or diabetic ketoacidosis (a dangerous condition that can occur if high blood sugar is untreated). Before taking Januvia, tell your doctor if you have, or have ever had: Kidney disease Angioedema (swelling of the face, lips, tongue, throat, arms, or legs) Januvia may increase the risk of developing pancreatitis (swelling and inflammation of the pancreas). Be sure to tell your doctor if you've ever had any problems with your pancreas, or if you experience any of the following symptoms while taking Januvia: Severe pain in your upper stomach that spreads to your back Loss of appetite Fast heartbeat Severe nausea and vomiting Also, tell your doctor you're taking this medicine before having any type of surgery, including a dental Continue reading >>

Adding Januvia To Insulin-treated Type 2 Diabetes Patients Could Have Cardiovascular Benefits

Adding Januvia To Insulin-treated Type 2 Diabetes Patients Could Have Cardiovascular Benefits

Adding Januvia to insulin-treated type 2 diabetes patients could have cardiovascular benefits Adding Januvia to insulin-treated type 2 diabetes patients could have cardiovascular benefits Adding vildagliptin and protein preload could benefit metformin-treated men with type 2 diabetes, study reports 25 January 2016 The addition of Januvia (sitagliptin) to insulin therapy could have benefits for adults with type 2 diabetes and no history of cardiovascular disease , a Japanese study finds. Januvia , the brand name for sitagliptin, is a DPP-IV inhibitor which is used to lower the blood glucose levels of people with type 2 diabetes. It can be taken alongside other medication, such as insulin. Researchers at Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, analysed data from 282 Japanese adults with type 2 diabetes. None of the participants had cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all were treated with insulin. They wanted to evaluate the effect of oral hypoglycemic agents on the progression of atherosclerosis , a condition which occurs when arteries become clogged up by fatty substances known as plaques. Atherosclerosis is a major risk factor for CVD. The participants were randomly allocated either to the sitagliptin group or a control group. In the drug group, patients took up to 100mg of sitagliptin once-daily. Patients in the control group either received increased insulin doses, or had a sulphonylurea , glinide, or alpha-glucosidase inhibitor added to their treatment. Echography was used to measure changes in mean and maximum intima-media thickness (IMT) of the common carotid artery (CCA) - which supplies blood to the head and neck - before the study and at 52 and 104 weeks. The IMT of the CCA is a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis and can increase with age. Sita Continue reading >>

Januvia Side Effects

Januvia Side Effects

Januvia diabetes treatment to lower blood sugar levels, side effects by Merck company Ray Sahelian, M.D. Januvia (sitagliptin phosphate) tablets are the first diabetes treatment approved in a new class of drugs known as DPP-4 inhibitors that enhances the body's own ability to lower elevated blood sugar. Januvia is used daily to improve blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes, alone or in combination with two other commonly prescribed oral diabetes medications, metformin or a PPAR (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma) agonist, when either of these drugs alone, along with diet and exercise, don't provide adequate blood sugar control. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of the disease, accounting for about 90 percent to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes (21 million in 2005). In type 2 diabetes, the body does not produce enough insulin or the cells ignore the insulin. Insulin is necessary to take sugar, the basic fuel for cells, from the blood into the cells. Over time, high blood sugar levels can increase the risk for serious complications, including heart disease, blindness, nerve damage, and kidney damage. For a list of natural supplements used in blood sugar control, see diabetes. Mechanism of action Januvia is a prescription medication that prolongs the activity of proteins that increase the release of insulin after blood sugar rises, such as after a meal. Januvia does this by blocking an enzyme (dipeptidyl peptidase IV or DPP-IV) which breaks down these proteins, leading to better blood sugar control. Januvia won U.S. approval in October, 2006 to treat adults with type 2 diabetes. Januvia belongs to a new class of medicines called DPP-4 inhibitors that work by enhancing the body's own ability to lower blood sugar. It does not s Continue reading >>

Who Really Benefits From Januvia?

Who Really Benefits From Januvia?

Home / Blogs / Denise Pancyrz's blog / Who Really Benefits from Januvia? The good news concerning diabetes drug, Januvia, is it works to increase insulin production from your pancreas and with your liver to decrease hepatic glucose production. [1] The bad news, side effects can be pancreatitis, which may be severe and lead to death; low blood sugar when used with other diabetes medication or insulin; you may develop joint pain that can be severe; acute renal failure, sometimes requiring dialysis. Reports of serious allergic and hypersensitivity reactions in patients treated with Januvia such as anaphylaxis, angioedema, and exfoliative skin conditions including Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Most common side effects of Januvia are upper respiratory tract infection, stuffy or runny nose and sore throat, and headache. [1] Various studies have linked Januvia and other similar drugs, to pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Researchers concluded that patients using Januvia experienced a 6.7-fold increased rate of pancreatitis and a 2.7-fold increased rate of pancreatic cancer when compared to those using different type 2 diabetes medications. [2] Hundreds have taken legal action against Merck & Co. for compensation for medical bills, funeral expenses and other damages. The lawsuits claim Januvia is defective and unreasonably dangerous with lack of proper warning from the manufacturer. [2] On the clinical side, there are many, many possible side effects. While some diabetics may not appear to have side effects, many do. The unknown is other health issues that may occur over long-term usage or attributing some of the common side effects to other reasons rather than this medication. Does the risk outweigh the benefit? That is for you to decide. Financially, there are big benefits fro Continue reading >>

Januvia Side Effects Center

Januvia Side Effects Center

Januvia (sitagliptin) is an oral diabetes medicine for people with type 2 diabetes (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes. Januvia is sometimes used in combination with other diabetes medications, but is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Many people using Januvia do not have serious side effects. Side effects that may occur with Januvia include: headache, joint or muscle pain, nausea, stomach pain, diarrhea, or constipation. Although Januvia by itself usually does not cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), low blood sugar may occur if Januvia is prescribed with other anti-diabetic medications. Symptoms of low blood sugar include sudden sweating, shaking, fast heartbeat, hunger, blurred vision, dizziness, or tingling hands/feet. Tell your doctor if you have serious side effects of Januvia including pancreatitis (severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite, fast heart rate), urinating less than usual or not at all, swelling, weight gain, shortness of breath, or severe skin reaction (fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads [especially in the face or upper body] and causes blistering and peeling). The recommended dose of Januvia is 100 mg once daily. Januvia may interact with digoxin, probenecid, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin or other salicylates, sulfa drugs, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), or beta-blockers. Tell your doctor all prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. During pregnancy Januvia should be used only when prescribed. Pregnancy may cause or worsen diabetes. Your doctor may change your diabetes treatment during pregnancy. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. Cons Continue reading >>

What Is Januvia®?

What Is Januvia®?

JANUVIA (jah-NEW-vee-ah) is a once-daily prescription pill that, along with diet and exercise, helps lower blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUVIA should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUVIA. IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION Serious side effects can happen in people who take JANUVIA, including pancreatitis, which may be severe and lead to death. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you've ever had pancreatitis. Stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right away if you have pain in your stomach area (abdomen) that is severe and will not go away. The pain may be felt going from your abdomen through to your back. The pain may happen with or without vomiting. These may be symptoms of pancreatitis. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you have ever had heart failure (your heart does not pump blood well enough) or have problems with your kidneys. Contact your doctor right away if you have increasing shortness of breath or trouble breathing (especially when you lie down); swelling or fluid retention (especially in the feet, ankles, or legs); an unusually fast increase in weight; or unusual tiredness. These may be symptoms of heart failure. Do not take JANUVIA if you are allergic to any of its ingredients, including sitagliptin. Symptoms of serious allergic reactions to JANUVIA, including rash, hives, and swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty breathing or swallowing, can occur. If you have any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right Continue reading >>

Pillwatch.com : The Benefits Of Januvia Novel Medication Against Diabetes

Pillwatch.com : The Benefits Of Januvia Novel Medication Against Diabetes

Home > Diabetes Center > Diabetes Medications > Januvia Health Benefits The Benefits of Januvia Novel Medication against Diabetes While insulin injections still remain the only treatment against type 1 diabetes, those people, who suffer from type 2 diabetes, which is a far more widely spread form of diabetes, receive new and new medications to prevent further development of their disorder and normalize blood sugar. Though the development of anti-diabetes oral pills, such as metformin or sulfonylurea drugs, brought many improvements and conveniences for patients, people with type 2 diabetes still have to stick to a tough regimen of taking pills in a particular time several times per day in order to maintain their blood sugar at the appropriate level. With the appearance of Januvia, a once-daily medication against type 2 diabetes, the last bulwark preventing diabetes treatment from being as easy as taking one pill per day, seems to vanish... Januvia is the prescription medication, which contains sitagliptin as the main working ingredient. Sitagliptin is an inhibitor or blocker of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) human protein, playing a major role in the regulation of glucose metabolism. The amazing fact about Januvia is that the medications has two-fold mode of action. First of all, Januvia increases the amount of insulin produced by human pancreas. It is of special importance during meal, when the level of blood sugar increases, and more insulin is required to provide proper processing sugar into energy. Januvia provides the increase of insulin production by cooperating with incretins, special hormones that directly tell pancreas to produce insulin in response to meal. By the way, the ability of Januvia to affect incretins makes it close to another brand-new medication ag Continue reading >>

Sitagliptin: An Oral Agent For Glucose Control

Sitagliptin: An Oral Agent For Glucose Control

Sitagliptin: An Oral Agent for Glucose Control Expert Rev Endocrinol Metab.2008;3(6):691-697. Sitagliptin (Januvia) is a new oral agent approved by the US FDA to treat Type 2 diabetes. This is the first approved agent in a new class of antihyperglycemics, dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors. Sitagliptin selectively inhibits the action of DPP-4, the primary enzyme degrading the incretin hormones, allowing glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide to facilitate glucose regulation in response to a meal. Studies demonstrate that sitagliptin decreases hemaglobin A1c, postprandial glucose excursion and fasting plasma glucose. Sitagliptin presents some advantages over other drugs used in the management of diabetes. One advantage is its oral administration; another, is its low incidence of hypoglycemia, similar to that of a placebo. Sitagliptin has a low incidence of adverse events, consisting of stomach discomfort, diarrhea, upper respiratory infection, stuffy or runny nose, sore throat and headache. Unlike many other drugs used to treat diabetes, sitagliptin does not cause weight gain. Animal studies have shown that it can help prevent -cell apoptosis and improve -cell functioning; therefore, it may have a role in preventing diabetes, although human data are currently lacking. According to the WHO, more than 180 million people worldwide have diabetes, with Type 2 diabetes accounting for 90-95% of all cases. By 2030, the prevalence of diabetes is predicted to double, driven by adverse lifestyle changes.[ 53 ] Obesity, aging, weight gain in adulthood and physical inactivity are environmental factors affecting the individual progression of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes progresses from an early asymptomatic state with insulin resistance, to mild postpr Continue reading >>

European Medicines Agency - Find Medicine - Januvia

European Medicines Agency - Find Medicine - Januvia

Januvia is used in patients with type-2 diabetes to improve the control of blood glucose (sugar) levels. It is used in addition to diet and exercise in the following ways: on its own, in patients who are not satisfactorily controlled on diet and exercise and in whom metformin (an antidiabetes medicine) is not suitable; in combination with metformin or a PPAR-gamma agonist (a type of antidiabetes medicine) such as a thiazolidinedione, in patients who are not satisfactorily controlled on metformin or the PPAR-gamma agonist used on its own; in combination with a sulphonylurea (another type of antidiabetes medicine) in patients who are not satisfactorily controlled with a sulphonylurea used on its own and in whom metformin is not suitable; in combination with both metformin, and a sulphonylurea or a PPAR-gamma agonist, in patients who are not satisfactorily controlled on the two medicines; in combination with insulin, with or without metformin, in patients who are not satisfactorily controlled on a stable dose of insulin. The medicine can only be obtained with a prescription. Januvia is taken at a dose of 100 mg once a day. If Januvia is taken with a sulphonylurea or insulin, the dose of the sulphonylurea or insulin may need to be lowered to reduce the risk of hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar levels). In patients with moderately or severely reduced kidney function the dose of Januvia should be reduced. Type-2 diabetes is a disease in which the pancreas does not make enough insulin to control the level of glucose in the blood or when the body is unable to use insulin effectively. The active substance in Januvia, sitagliptin, is a dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor. It works by blocking the breakdown of incretin hormones in the body. These hormones are released after a m Continue reading >>

Januvia (sitagliptin)

Januvia (sitagliptin)

Tweet Januvia (Sitagliptin) is an oral gliptin drug used to lower blood glucose levels amongst people with type 2 diabetes. Sitagliptin is the first of a class of drugs to be approved that mimics the actions of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) enzyme. How does Januvia work? Sitagliptin works by inhibiting the DPP-4 enzyme that destroys GLP and GIP hormones, allowing both to function more effectively. Both glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) are released by the intestine and affect blood glucose levels. When more of these hormones are released blood sugar levels are reduced. Who is Januvia prescribed to? Sitagliptin is prescribed to people with type 2 diabetes, and is usually taken alongside a healthy diet and regular, appropriate exercise to help control diabetes. Furthermore, Sitagliptin is often prescribed alongside other diabetes drugs such as (trade name first, generic name in brackets): Avandia (Rosiglitazone) Metformin (Metformin Hydrochloride) Actos (Pioglitazone) What side effects are associated with Januvia? Common side effects relating to sitagliptin include: Infections of the upper respiratory tract Headaches More infrequently, Sitagliptin is associated with abdominal pain, nausea and diarrhoea. I want to know more about Sitagliptin, what should I do? If your question is urgent, you should contact your doctor or diabetes healthcare professional immediately. Please use the Diabetes forum to get an independent perspective from the community. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 Continue reading >>

Januvia

Januvia

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occu Continue reading >>

The Pros And Cons Of Januvia And Janumet

The Pros And Cons Of Januvia And Janumet

Januvia (sitagliptin) doesnt usually cause weight loss or gain.(JASON REEKIE/ISTOCK/HEALTH)Januvia (sitagliptin) is a type 2 diabetes drug that was approved in 2006. It is also available in a combination pill (known as Janumet) that contains the drug metformin. They are the first drugs in a new class called the selective dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, or DPP-4 inhibitors. Januvia has a big advantage in that it can stimulate insulin production in the body, and may be less likely to cause hypoglycemia than other drugs. If blood glucose falls too low, the drug ceases to stimulate insulin production. The disadvantage? The price. The drug is "very expensive," says Glenn Cunningham, MD, an endocrinologist and professor at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. He notes that it costs $160 for a 30-day supply of 100-mg tablets. Nevertheless, "Januvia is becoming a much more popular drug," Dr. Cunningham says. It does not cause weight gain or weight loss, he explained, and is less likely to cause hypoglycemia. Continue reading >>

New Type 2 Drugs Januvia And Byetta Offer Big Benefits

New Type 2 Drugs Januvia And Byetta Offer Big Benefits

New Type 2 Drugs Januvia and Byetta Offer Big Benefits The 21st century may be remembered as the time when diabetes became a worldwide epidemic. However, it may also be known as the time when the disease was cured. Currently, new type 2 diabetes treatments are coming to market every six to nine months. With so many new treatment options on the market, things are quickly getting quite confused. How should a diabetes patient evaluate which therapy is best? Endocrinologists suggest a cautious approach. Weve got some good agents already on the market. So whatever youre starting needs to have more benefit than anything thats currently available, says Athena Philis-Tsimikas, MD, executive director of the Whittier Institute for Diabetes, of San Diego, Calif. The institute is a subsidiary of Scripps Health. Ill be the first to admit that Im relatively conservative about using new drugs, says Jonathan R. Anolik, MD, chief of the endocrinology section at Virtua Memorial Hospital, in Mt. Holly, N.J. When you have an old drug that has good tolerability, works well, and has good outcomes data associated with it, then it makes sense to use an old drug before a new drug. The biggest disadvantage to the new treatments is their cost. All of the new drugs coming to market are entering at a premium price point. Insurance companies can be charging anywhere from $20 to $40 per prescription in co-payments, says Tsimikas. But the costs of the actual agents to the insurance plan are large as well, and those costs will eventually get transferred to the patients. Theres no getting around that. It might not be a direct cost, but it will eventually contribute to what the health plan charges. Nevertheless, a great many endocrinologists are finding that the benefits of diabetes treatments that have Continue reading >>

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