diabetestalk.net

Itchy Fingertips Diabetes

Finger Numbness Could Mean Big Problems For Ckd And Diabetic Patients If Not Treated Timely

Finger Numbness Could Mean Big Problems For Ckd And Diabetic Patients If Not Treated Timely

"The tips of my fingers are constantly tingling and numb. Should I be worried?," a frequent reader writes. The simple answer is "Yes" and "No." Symptoms of finger numbness should not be ignored because it can be a sign of a serious untreated medical condition, and lead to permanent loss of sensation in fingers, chronic pain, and amputation; to name a few complications. However, in most cases, finger numbness is treatable and can be corrected before it gets serious. Recommended Reading: Obstruction in AV Fistula can cause Dialysis Patients to Lose Fingers or even a Hand The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) notes that a person with Diabetes may develop nerve damage throughout the body, and some individuals will experience symptoms such as pain, tingling and numbness in their upper and lower limbs. Similarly, as anyone with Chronic Kidney Disease can tell you, nerve pain can be quite common for them as well. While approximately 60% to 70% of people with diabetes suffer from some type of Neuropathy (nerve damage), these numbers can be as high as 70% to 90% in patients with Chronic Kidney Disease. Symptoms of Neuropathy include nausea and vomiting, diarrhea or constipation, dizziness upon standing, and a feeling of general weakness. If this describes you then talk to your Physician as soon as possible so that you can take corrective action. On the other hand, you may not experience any of the symptoms described above, but still you are losing the feeling in your fingertips. If this is the case, it may be that your potassium levels are out of balance. Due to diet restrictions, Chronic Kidney Disease patients (particularly those on Dialysis) are at risk of having low potassium levels (Hypokalemia) which may cause loss of sensation in you Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Diabetes: Seven Signs You Could Have The Condition

Symptoms Of Diabetes: Seven Signs You Could Have The Condition

The symptoms are not always obvious, and many people could be suffering with the condition for years before they learn they have it. Every week 4,500 people are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes across the UK. However, experts warn thousands could be living with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. The condition, which can be caused by being overweight and poor diet can cause blindness, limbs to be amputated - every week diabetes causes 150 amputations - and even kidney failure. It has even been linked to a reduce life expectancy if the condition it not managed well. People also need to ensure they look after their feet properly as high levels of blood glucose can cause foot problems. This can stop nerves working so people might not feel when they have cut their feet or burned themselves. The main symptoms of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are: Urinating more often than usual - particularly at night Excessive urination can be triggered by excess glucose in the blood which interferes with the kidney’s ability to concentrate urine. Feeling thirsty Kidneys have to work harder in people with type 2 diabetes. Puldisia is the term given to excessive thirst. Diabetes.co.uk said: “If you feel thirsty all the time or your thirst is stronger than usual and continues even after you drink, it can be a sign that not all is well inside your body.” If you feel thirsty all the time or your thirst is stronger than usual and continues even after you drink, it can be a sign that not all is well inside your body Feeling tired Feeling tired could be a symptom of many conditions - but it can be caused in people who have low blood sugar. Itching around the penis or vagina Thrush - a yeast infection - tends to affect warm, moist areas of the body such as the vagina, penis, mouth and certain areas Continue reading >>

Everything You Should Know About Diabetic Blisters

Everything You Should Know About Diabetic Blisters

If you have diabetes and experience the spontaneous eruption of blisters on your skin, they may well be diabetic blisters. These are also called bullosis diabeticorum or diabetic bullae. Although the blisters may be alarming when you first spot them, they’re painless and normally heal on their own without leaving scars. A number of skin conditions are associated with diabetes. Diabetic blisters are fairly rare. An article in the International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries notes that in the United States, the disorder occurs in only 0.5 percent of people with diabetes. Diabetic blisters are twice as likely to be found in men than in women. Diabetic blisters most often appear on your legs, feet, and toes. Less frequently, they show up on hands, fingers, and arms. Diabetic blisters can be as large as 6 inches, though they’re normally smaller. They’re often described as looking like blisters that occur when you get a burn, only without the pain. Diabetic blisters seldom appear as a single lesion. Rather, they are bilateral or occur in clusters. The skin surrounding the blisters isn’t normally red or swollen. If it is, see your doctor promptly. Diabetic blisters contain a clear, sterile fluid, and they’re usually itchy. Read about the eight best remedies for itching. Given the risk of infection and ulceration when you have diabetes, you may want to see a dermatologist to rule out more serious skin conditions. Diabetic blisters usually heal in two to five weeks without intervention, according to an article in Clinical Diabetes. The fluid in the blisters is sterile. To prevent infection, you shouldn’t puncture the blisters yourself, though if the lesion is large, your doctor may want to drain the fluid. This will keep the skin intact as a covering for Continue reading >>

Itchy Fingertips Meaning, Causes, And Treatment

Itchy Fingertips Meaning, Causes, And Treatment

We use the hands for a lot of everyday tasks. Itching on the fingertips can thus prove very limiting. It is not uncommon for other symptoms such as swelling, rash, and burning to accompany fingertips itching. Now, what causes itchy fingertips? Here is a breakdown of possible causes along with tips on how to treat and keep your fingers feeling their best. What Does Itchy Fingertips Mean? Itchy fingertips usually mean that the skin around your fingers has been exposed to an irritant, allergenic, or infectious agent. It can also be indicative of a bug bite. The skin has many itch receptors. These trigger an itching sensation when potentially harmful substances come into contact with your skin. Itching, in turn, elicits the urge to scratch and in so doing, you scrape off the offensive substance. In some cases, however, itching occur as a symptom of a skin disease or a systemic disease affecting the entire body, e.g., diabetes. What Causes Itchy Fingertips With that broad view of the meaning of itchy fingertips, let us now take a look at some specific factors that can cause itching on fingertips: The fingers are constantly exposed to different environmental and occupational elements. This exposure makes them vulnerable to damage. Itchy fingertips are a common symptom of contact dermatitis. The term is used to refer to skin inflammation resulting from contact with substances that aggravate the skin. There are two categories of contact dermatitis, which are: Irritant Contact Dermatitis Irritant contact dermatitis can affect anyone. It occurs when a skin damaging material – called an irritant – comes into contact with and irritate or inflame the skin. Common irritants include alkaline substances, acids, detergents and soaps, organic dust, solvents, bleach, and other industr Continue reading >>

Is Your Skin Warning You That You Have Diabetes?

Is Your Skin Warning You That You Have Diabetes?

When your body is in trouble, sometimes the warning signs are right in your face —literally. Skin complications can be the first indication of diabetes. If your skin starts flashing warning signs like the examples below, your body’s largest organ may be trying to tell you something. Although skin complications are often a package deal with a diabetes diagnosis, you can still prevent them from occurring and recurring. Diagnosing skin issues with a board-certified dermatologist is your first step toward conquering them. These are common skin complications linked to diabetes: Itchy, dry skin When your body can’t make enough insulin or can't use its own insulin well, sugars accumulate in blood. This high blood glucose is recognized by your body as dangerous, so it attempts to remove the excess by increasing urination. Loss of fluid puts your body into a rationed state, causing your skin to become dry. Dry skin triggers many related surface-symptoms, such as itchiness, cracking and redness. Bacterial infections One sign your diabetes isn’t being managed is frequent bacterial infections. High blood glucose levels make you more prone to infection. Research shows that more than 80 percent of diabetes-related hospitalizations due to infections are from bacterial infections. Most bacterial infections require a prescription for treatment. Fungal infections Bacterial infections aren’t the only infections to watch for if you have been diagnosed with diabetes. Diabetes is also linked to an increase in fungal infections from organisms such as tinea and candida. Most commonly, these fungal infections will occur in the feet, but they can also form in other areas of the body including the groin area. Athlete’s foot symptoms can be seen in the spaces between the toes and on th Continue reading >>

Itchy Hands And Feet At Night? Find Out The Problem Now

Itchy Hands And Feet At Night? Find Out The Problem Now

Do you often wake up in the middle of the night with itchy hands and feet? The reason could be anything — allergy, fungal infection or even dry skin. Moreover, Gout and diabetes can also cause itchy feet at night. However, other more serious conditions include certain blood disorders or a bile duct blockage. This is referred to as cholestasis. Here are some of the main causes of itchy hands and feet. Psoriasis This usually occurs when skin cells grow rapidly and then accumulate on the surface of the skin. This long-lasting disorder is usually hereditary and you could contract it from someone already suffering from the disease. Common symptoms of this disorder include itchy palms and soles. However, you may also suffer from the following: • Red skin patches, puss-filled bumps or even silver scales • Stiff or swollen joints • Soreness in and around the areas affected • Itchiness in other parts of the body – knees, elbows, lower back, and even the face Here’s how you can care for yourself when you have psoriasis. Eczema Itchy palms and feet could also mean eczema. This condition leads to inflammation of the skin. While there are many types of eczema that can affect other parts of your body, a form of eczema known as dyshidrotic dermatitis is the main cause for itchy hands and feet. Some of the symptoms of dyshidrotic dermatitis, apart from itchiness, include: • Blisters • Cracked and red or sore skin • Scales on the skin Suffering from eczema? Try this natural remedy. Scabies Itchy feet and hands can also be a result of a bite by the dreaded itch mite – the main cause of scabies. The pest penetrates the top layer of your skin to lay eggs, thereby causing itchiness. This condition is likely to spread to other parts of the body that are open to skin con Continue reading >>

Burning Sensation: What Could It Be?

Burning Sensation: What Could It Be?

"I'm a 46-year-old woman, and I'm getting terrible burning and itching in my hands and feet. There is no redness and no infection is apparent. What could it be?" Dr Fred Kavalier answers your health question: There is a long list of possible causes of burning and itching sensations in the hands and the feet. The first thing is to establish whether or not there is a rash. Skin infections and infestations, such as scabies, can cause intense itching. If you examine your skin carefully enough, you will always see some evidence of scabies in the form of small red bumps or lines, particularly between the fingers and around the wrists.If there is definitely no sign of skin inflammation, the next thing to think about is a possible drug side-effect. Are you taking any medications (either prescribed by a doctor or bought over the counter) that might have this as a side effect? Don't forget to consider herbal and alternative remedies - these too can have unusual side-effects.If it's not drugs or remedies, it may be a condition called peripheral neuropathy. This is caused by nerve damage, and it typically causes symptoms in the "glove and stocking areas". Peripheral neuropathies may be related to diabetes and vitamin deficiencies (vitamin B12 deficiency is certainly worth considering), and to lots of other medical conditions, including tumours and inflammatory diseases.I don't think you should ignore your symptoms. They are certainly worth investigating further, before anything more serious develops. As a first step, see your doctor and ask for some basic investigations, such as blood and urine tests. Please mail your questions for Dr Fred to [email protected] He regrets that he is unable to respond personally to questions. Reuse content Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational diabetes has become one of the most common pregnancy complications in the US, with about 7 percent of pregnant women developing the condition. But just because it’s more widespread doesn’t mean it comes without risks. So what is gestational diabetes—and how can you minimize your chances of getting it? In this article What is gestational diabetes? What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes symptoms Gestational diabetes treatment How to prevent gestational diabetes What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes means your body can’t properly regulate your blood sugar levels while you’re pregnant—either because you don’t produce enough insulin or your body can’t properly use the insulin it does produce. That causes your blood sugar levels to spike when you eat, leading to a condition called hyperglycemia. Most moms-to-be diagnosed with gestational diabetes experience diabetes only during pregnancy, and the condition clears up soon after birth. But 5 to 10 percent of women continue to have type 2 diabetes after pregnancy, and those whose diabetes clears up after childbirth are still at a 20 to 50 percent risk of developing type 2 diabetes within the next 10 years. So why are doctors so concerned about this condition? “Gestational diabetes puts the mom and baby at increased risk for pregnancy complications,” says Sherry A. Ross, MD, a Santa Monica, California-based ob-gyn and author of She-ology: The Definitive Guide to Women’s Intimate Health. Period. For moms, those include: High blood pressure Preeclampsia Preterm labor C-section Gestational diabetes effects on baby can increase the risk of: Higher birth weight Shoulder dystocia (when the shoulders get stuck in the birth canal) Congenital malformations (such as abnormal sp Continue reading >>

9 Early Signs Of Diabetes You Must Know (#2 Is So Often Overlooked)

9 Early Signs Of Diabetes You Must Know (#2 Is So Often Overlooked)

Diabetes is sneaky. The early symptoms can go unnoticed for months or years. In fact, 1 in 3 people with type 2 diabetes don’t know they have it. 1 in 3. Most actually do experience the early signs but don’t realise or understand what they are. Early detection and treatment can have a profound impact on your long-term health. A 3-year delay in diagnosis increases your relative risk of heart disease by 29% (1). Therefore by knowing what to look for, you can take control of the situation before it takes control of you. Diabetes Symptoms In Adults and Children Diabetes is the term given to blood sugar (glucose) levels that are too high for a sustained period of time. The signs or symptoms of high blood sugar are typically the same for both children and adults. Patients with type 1 diabetes usually develop symptoms over a sudden, short period of time. The condition is often diagnosed in an emergency setting. Type 2 diabetes on the other hand progresses quite slowly. Symptoms tend to come on gradually, which is why they are often overlooked. Some don’t experience any early symptoms at all. The following early signs of diabetes are the most common: 1. Increased urination is arguably the most common A significant increase in how often you urinate (Polyuria) is a tell-tale symptom of high blood sugar. As a point of reference, the average person pees 4 to 7 times in a 24-hour period. Waking up during the night to go, even though you already went right before bed, is a common red flag. Why does this happen?: Your kidneys are working overtime to expel the excess sugar in your blood. Sugar that the kidneys are unable to absorb must be urinated out. Therefore high sugar levels leads to more urination. 2. Excessive thirst is one of the classic early signs of diabetes Drinking u Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Skin- 5 Tips You Should Know To Take Care Of Diabetic Skin Problems

Diabetes And Your Skin- 5 Tips You Should Know To Take Care Of Diabetic Skin Problems

Please Share Why is skin care so important for diabetics? When you have diabetes simple things such as skin care can’t be taken for granted. The disease affects every part of your body including your skin and can be very dangerous if you are not aware of and take precautions with your daily routines to avoid complications. What skin problems do diabetics have? There are two types of skin disorders common to diabetics. Generic Skin Conditions/Disorders: These types of skin conditions are not a result of the disease but occur more frequently in people with high blood sugar. These include fungal and bacterial infections. Anyone can get them but if you have diabetes they present more often and with greater risk to your health. Diabetes Related Skin Diseases: These are the types of skin problems that are directly caused by your diabetes and do not develop in normal, healthy individuals. Generic Skin Conditions/Disorders Associated With Diabetes The main reason these types of skin conditions are so much more problematic for diabetics is because the organisms feed off of sugars. With your increased blood sugar levels, your skin is the perfect breeding ground and the bacteria or fungus can flourish and multiply at a more rapid rate than on a non-diabetic subject. Add to that the fact that most diabetics have decreased nerve sensation and impaired healing and you can see how something as simple as a stubbed toe can quickly become a health risk. Often the individual does not even feel the injury occur or the worsening of the infection until the infection is quite advanced. Bacterial Infections. Diabetics are more prone to having conditions such as styes (infection in the glands of the eyes), boils, carbuncles (similar to boils but in the deeper tissues), folliculitis (infection Continue reading >>

How To Stop Itching From Diabetes

How To Stop Itching From Diabetes

Edit Article Three Methods:Stopping the Itch with Lifestyle ChangesStopping the Itch with Home RemediesStopping the Itch with MedicationCommunity Q&A Diabetics frequently experience horrible itching. It is a common side effect of elevated blood glucose levels, which is the defining factor of diabetes. If you suffer from unbearable itchiness, this wikiHow article explains ways that you can soothe your irritated skin. 1 Prevent skin from getting dry. Keep your skin moist and healthy by using moisturizers and skin creams. Avoid scented creams and lotions, BECAUSE you could have a reaction to them, causing more itching. Moisturize twice a day. Every time you shower, use one ounce or two tablespoons to moisturize your whole body, or use as needed.[1] You should also avoid using scented soaps BECAUSE the chemicals in it can cause skin to get dry and irritated. Use mild, unscented soaps instead. 2 Change your bathing style. Too frequent bathing can cause itching to get worse. Limit baths to once every 2 days. Bathing frequency can vary depending on climate, weather and your activities. However, once in two days should suffice. Avoid using very hot water; it tends to make the skin more irritated. Use water at room temperature or lower. Hot water dilates vessels speeding up metabolism of insulin, which can trigger hypoglycemia.[2] Another reason why diabetics should not use hot water is diabetics suffering from nerve damage lose sensitivity to pain and temperature and may unknowingly burn themselves with hot water. 3 Care for your skin in the summer. Summer is a time of sun and fun, but sun can also seriously irritate skin. To lessen itching in the summer, wear clothes made from light materials like cotton, chiffon or linen. Certain cloths like wool and silk can cause irritation Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Skin Complications

Diabetes And Skin Complications

Copyright © 2005 American Diabetes Association From Reprinted with permission from The American Diabetes Association Diabetes can affect every part of the body, including the skin. As many as one third of people with diabetes will have a skin disorder caused or affected by diabetes at some time in their lives. In fact, such problems are sometimes the first sign that a person has diabetes. Luckily, most skin conditions can be prevented or easily treated if caught early. Some of these problems are skin conditions anyone can have, but people with diabetes get them more easily. These include bacterial infections, fungal infections, and itching. Other skin problems happen mostly or only to people with diabetes. These include diabetic dermopathy, necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum, diabetic blisters, and eruptive xanthomatosis. Bacterial Infections Several kinds of bacterial infections occur in people with diabetes. One common type is styes. These are infections of the glands of the eyelid. Another kind of infection is boils, or infections of the hair follicles. Carbuncles are deep infections of the skin and the tissue underneath. Infections can also occur around the nails. Inflamed tissues are usually hot, swollen, red, and painful. Several different organisms can cause infections. The most common ones are the Staphylococcus bacteria, also called staph. Once, bacterial infections were life threatening, especially for people with diabetes. Today, death is rare, thanks to antibiotics and better methods of blood sugar control. But even today, people with diabetes have more bacterial infections than other people do. Doctors believe people with diabetes can reduce their chances of these infections in several ways (see “Good Skin Care” on page 15). If you think you have a bac Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Diabetes

Symptoms Of Diabetes

It is possible to have diabetes with only very mild symptoms or without developing any symptoms at all. Such cases can leave some people with diabetes unaware of the condition and undiagnosed. This happens in around half of people with type 2 diabetes.1,2 A condition known as prediabetes that often leads to type 2 diabetes also produces no symptoms. Type 2 diabetes and its symptoms develop slowly.3 Type 1 diabetes can go unnoticed but is less likely to do so. Some of its symptoms listed below can come on abruptly and be accompanied by nausea, vomiting or stomach pains.2-4 It is important to see a doctor if there is any suspicion of diabetes or if any of the below signs and symptoms are present - prompt diagnosis and management lowers the likelihood of serious complications.5 The most common symptoms are related to hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels), especially the classic symptoms of diabetes: frequent urination and thirst. Fatigue related to dehydration and eating problems can also be related to high blood sugars.5,6 The International Diabetes Foundation highlight four symptoms that should prompt someone to get checked for diabetes as soon as possible:1 Common symptoms of diabetes The most common signs and symptoms of diabetes are: Frequent urination Have you been going to the bathroom to urinate more often recently? Do you notice that you spend most of the day going to the toilet? When there is too much glucose (sugar) in your blood you will urinate more often. If your insulin is ineffective, or not there at all, your kidneys cannot filter the glucose back into the blood. The kidneys will take water from your blood in order to dilute the glucose - which in turn fills up your bladder. Disproportionate thirst If you are urinating more than usual, you will need to r Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Type 2

Diabetes - Type 2

Description An in-depth report on the causes, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of type 2 diabetes. Alternative Names Type 2 diabetes; Maturity onset diabetes; Noninsulin-dependent diabetes Highlights Diabetes Statistics According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Diabetes Fact Sheet, nearly 26 million American adults and children have diabetes. About 79 million Americans aged 20 years and older have pre-diabetes, a condition that increases the risk for developing diabetes. Diabetes and Cancer Type 2 diabetes increases the risk for certain types of cancer, according to a consensus report from the American Diabetes Association and the American Cancer Society. Diabetes doubles the risk for developing liver, pancreatic, or endometrial cancer. Certain medications used for treating type 2 diabetes may possibly increase the risk for some types of cancers. Screening for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus The American Diabetes Association recommends that pregnant women without known risk factors for diabetes get screened for gestational diabetes at 24 - 28 weeks of pregnancy. Pregnant women with risk factors for diabetes should be screened for type 2 diabetes at the first prenatal visit. Aspirin for Heart Disease Prevention The American Diabetes Association now recommends daily low-dose (75 - 162 mg) aspirin for men older than age 50 and women older than age 60 who have diabetes and at least one additional heart disease risk factor (such as smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, family history, or albuminuria). Guidelines for Treatment of Diabetic Neuropathy The anticonvulsant drug pregabalin (Lyrica) is a first-line treatment for painful diabetic neuropathy, according to recent guidelines released by the American Academy of Neurol Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Skin

Diabetes And Your Skin

Protecting Your Outermost Layer The phrase “feeling comfortable in your own skin” is usually used figuratively to describe a level of self-confidence or self-acceptance. But when your skin itches, hurts, flakes, breaks out, changes color, or just doesn’t look or feel the way you’d like it to, the phrase can take on a new, very literal meaning. Diabetes can affect the skin in a number of ways that can make a person feel less than comfortable. In fact, as many as a third of people with diabetes will have a skin condition at some point in their lifetime. While some conditions may appear uniquely in people with diabetes, others are simply more common in people with diabetes. The good news is that a fair number of these conditions are treatable or can be prevented by maintaining blood glucose control and taking good daily care of your skin. Dry, itchy skin Dry skin can occur as a result of high blood glucose. When the blood glucose level is high, the body attempts to remove excess glucose from the blood by increasing urination. This loss of fluid from the body causes the skin to become dry. Dry skin can also be caused by neuropathy (damage to the nerves) by affecting the nerves that control the sweat glands. In these cases, neuropathy causes a decrease or absence of sweating that may lead to dry, cracked skin. Cold, dry air and bathing in hot water can aggravate dry skin. Dryness commonly leads to other skin problems such as itching (and often scratching), cracking, and peeling. Any small breaks in the skin leave it more exposed to injury and infection. It is therefore important to keep skin well moisturized. The best way to moisturize is to apply lotion or cream right after showering and patting the skin dry. This will seal in droplets of water that are present on t Continue reading >>

More in diabetes