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Itchy Feet At Night Diabetes

Diabetes: Foot & Skin Related Complications

Diabetes: Foot & Skin Related Complications

How can diabetes affect feet and skin? For people with diabetes, having too much glucose (sugar) in their blood for a long time can cause some serious complications, including foot and skin problems, as well as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, eye damage, and other problems. How can diabetes affect my feet? Diabetes can cause two problems that can affect your feet: Diabetic neuropathy — Uncontrolled diabetes can damage your nerves. If you have damaged nerves in your legs and feet, you might not feel heat, cold or pain. This lack of feeling is called diabetic neuropathy. If you do not feel a cut or sore on your foot because of neuropathy, the cut could get worse and become infected. Peripheral vascular disease — Diabetes also affects the flow of blood. Without good blood flow, it takes longer for a sore or cut to heal. Poor blood flow in the arms and legs is called peripheral vascular disease. (The word "peripheral" means "located away from a central point," and the word "vascular" refers to the blood vessels. Peripheral vascular disease is a circulation disorder that affects blood vessels away from the heart.) If you have an infection that will not heal because of poor blood flow, you are at risk for developing gangrene, which is the death of tissue due to a lack of blood. To keep gangrene from spreading, the doctor may have to remove a toe, foot, or part of a leg. This procedure is called amputation. Diabetes is the most common, non-traumatic cause of leg amputations. Each year, more than 56,000 people with diabetes have amputations. However, research suggests that more than half of these amputations can be prevented through proper foot care. What are some common foot problems of people with diabetes? Anyone can get the foot problems listed below. For people Continue reading >>

Learn The Symptoms Of Painful Diabetic Neuropathy In Phoenixville

Learn The Symptoms Of Painful Diabetic Neuropathy In Phoenixville

If you are suffering from diabetes, your doctor has probably warned you about possible diabetic neuropathy foot problems. After all, if you cannot feel your feet, you are much more likely to suffer an injury that could develop into a serious infection—and possibly cause you to lose the foot. But what you may not know is that there is another type of nerve damage that does not just cause you to lose feeling, but to feel pain and other unpleasant sensations in your feet. This is called painful neuropathy, and can cause as many as 10% of diabetic patients to suffer chronic foot pain issues. There are a number of diabetic neuropathy symptoms. Most often, they are felt in the feet, but you may also experience sensations in the legs and hands, including: Burning sensations on the soles of the feet Freezing or cold sensations in the feet and toes Stabbing pains like knives or glass in the feet Stinging, or a feeling of electric shocks Tingling, such as pins and needles or itching In most cases, the painful symptoms of neuropathy are short lived and last 12 months or less. They are usually experienced during periods of high blood glucose levels or when the blood glucose level fluctuates rapidly. Once the blood sugar has remained stable for a few months, the symptoms will often ease and may even disappear altogether. The causes of painful neuropathy are not fully understood. However, many doctors believe that if symptoms have persisted for more than 12 months, they are unlikely to disappear on their own—even with vigilant blood glucose control. To find out the best course of treatment for your diabetic foot problems, call the trusted Philadelphia podiatrists at HealthMark Foot & Ankle Associates today to set up your first consultation. We are ready to serve you in two locati Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Make You Itch?

Does Diabetes Make You Itch?

Diabetes can affect your skin in itchy ways. It can change your nervous system to sense itching you otherwise wouldn’t. How does this happen, and what can you do about it? Itching should not be ignored. It can lead to excessive scratching, which can cause discomfort, pain, and infection. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the higher-than-normal blood sugar levels common in diabetes promote skin infections. The causes can be ordinary fungi, yeast, or bacterial rashes like anyone can get. Some other skin diseases only happen to people with diabetes or happen mostly to people with diabetes. These tend to have long names such as diabetic dermopathy and eruptive xanthomatosis. WebMD says as many as one out of three people with diabetes will have some kind of skin condition. Diabetes increases skin dryness and damages circulation. “Localized itching can be caused by a yeast infection, dry skin, or poor circulation,” says WebMD. “When itching is caused by poor blood flow, you’ll likely feel it in your lower legs and feet.” Genital itching Diabetes can itch more than your skin. Diabetes.co.uk highlights genital yeast infections as a major problem in diabetes. This is because high glucose levels “provide ideal conditions for naturally present yeast to grow and diminishes the body’s ability to fight infection.” Diabetes can also deposit glucose in the urine, helping yeast to grow. Other causes of genital itching include lice, scabies, herpes, various skin diseases, chemical irritants, and allergies. These can affect anyone, but may be felt more strongly in people with diabetes. According to an article on Everyday Health, “diabetes affects the nervous system and alters the perception of sensation in the body.” A piece by Rachel Nall, RN, BS Continue reading >>

Is It Normal To Have Itchy Feet At Night If You Have Diabetes?

Is It Normal To Have Itchy Feet At Night If You Have Diabetes?

Is It Normal to Have Itchy Feet at Night If You Have Diabetes? People with diabetes often experience itchiness caused by poor circulation, yeast infections or dry skin, according to the American Diabetes Association. Poor circulation typically affects the lower legs and causes localized itchiness. A common fungal infection, known as Candida albicans, sometimes triggers moist, itchy rashes between the toes that are sometimes surrounded by scales or blisters. Skin discomfort is often among the earliest symptoms of diabetes. One common problem that causes itching in people with diabetes is athletes foot, a fungal infection that causes redness, itchiness and cracking of the skin, explains Cleveland Clinic. Eruptive xanthomatosis is another condition that sometimes causes itching on the feet and legs. A result of poorly managed blood sugar or high triglycerides in the blood, this condition causes patches of yellow, pea-like bumps ringed by red halos on the skin. Diabetics are at high risk of developing serious complications from minor skin problems, because high blood sugar impedes healing, Cleveland Clinic warns. However, they can prevent many skin-related complications if they practice careful hygiene, such as keeping the skin clean and dry and avoiding very hot water when washing, the American Diabetes Association notes. Experts also advise against bubble baths and recommend moisturizing soaps and lotions to prevent overly dry skin. However, they do not recommend using lotion between the toes because too much moisture aids fungal growth. Checking the feet every day for cuts or blisters, wearing properly fitting shoes and treating any problems promptly to protect against infections are very important as well. Continue reading >>

Surprising Symptoms Of Prediabetes

Surprising Symptoms Of Prediabetes

One of the best ways to prevent diabetes is to spot blood sugar (glucose) problems before the full-blown disease develops. But most people don’t realize that diabetes — and its precursor, prediabetes — can cause no symptoms at all or a wide range of symptoms that often are misinterpreted. Common mistake: Because diabetes is strongly linked to excess body weight, many people who are a normal weight assume that they won’t develop the disease. But that’s not always true. About 15% of people who are diagnosed with diabetes are not overweight. And paradoxically, even weight loss can be a symptom of this complex disorder in people (normal weight or overweight) who have uncontrolled high glucose levels. Shocking new finding: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now estimates that 40% of Americans ages 40 to 74 have prediabetes, and nearly two out of three Americans over age 65 have prediabetes or diabetes — most likely due to the increasing numbers of people who are overweight and inactive, both of which boost diabetes risk. However, most primary care doctors aren’t diagnosing and treating prediabetes early enough in their patients — often because they fail to order the necessary screening tests. And because the symptoms of prediabetes can be subtle, especially in its early stages, most people are not reporting potential red flags to their doctors. Fortunately, prediabetes can virtually always be prevented from progressing to diabetes if the condition is identified and treated in its early stages (by following a healthful diet, exercising regularly and taking nutritional supplements and medications, if necessary). Being overweight (defined as having a body mass index, or BMI, of 25 or higher) is perhaps the best-known risk factor for diabetes.* The mo Continue reading >>

Burning Feet

Burning Feet

A burning sensation in your feet may be caused by nerve damage in the legs, also called neuropathy. Although many medical conditions can cause burning feet, diabetes is the most common. Most burning feet treatments focus on preventing further nerve damage and reducing pain. Most often, neuropathy is the cause of burning feet. Damaged nerve fibers are more likely to become overactive and misfire. The damaged nerves send pain signals to the brain even though there is no wound. In most people with neuropathy, the leg nerves become damaged first. These people often have tingling and numbness in the feet as well. Many people complain that their feet are overly sensitive to touch (hyperesthesia) and can have varying degrees of burning pain. It can range from mild to disabling. Diabetes and alcohol abuse are by far the most common causes of neuropathy in the legs. Many other conditions can cause neuropathy or a burning sensation in the feet: Small fiber neuropathy Vitamin deficiency (vitamin B12, folate, and occasionally vitamin B6) Low thyroid hormone levels (hypothyroidism) Amyloid polyneuropathy Drug side effects, including chemotherapy drugs, vitamin B6 overdose, HIV medicines, amiodarone, isoniazid, metformin, and others Heavy metal poisoning (lead, mercury, arsenic) Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) Besides neuropathy, infections and inflammation of the feet can also cause a burning sensation. The most common of these is athlete's foot, an infection of the skin caused by fungus. Peripheral artery disease (PAD) also commonly causes burning feet. The poor circulation of blood to the feet may frequently cause pain, tingling, and burning feet, especially while walking. Weeks or months after gastric bypass surgery, some peo Continue reading >>

Itchy Skin And Diabetes

Itchy Skin And Diabetes

Tweet Itchy skin can be a sign of diabetes, particularly if other diabetes symptoms are also present. High blood sugar levels over a prolong period of time is one cause of itchy skin. In some cases, itchy skin may be caused by complications of diabetes such as nerve damage or kidney disease. Itching of the feet, legs or ankles is a common complaint in people with diabetes that may occur as a result of a period of too high sugar levels. Itching can range from being annoying to severe. Itching can be relieved through treatment, and may be eliminated if the underlying cause is treated. Causes of itchy skin Itchiness of the lower limbs can result from a number of causes including: Dry skin Poor circulation Dermatitis (eczema) Psoriasis Allergies Diabetic neuropathy Diabetic nephropathy Athletes foot Urticaria (hives) Chillblains A number of medications, such as antibiotics, antifungal drugs or opiate painkillers, may also lead to itchy skin. Diagnosis of the underlying problem It is advisable to see your doctor if itching is severe or persistent. You should also see your doctor if itching affects your whole body or if other symptoms accompany the itching. Diagnosis of the reason behind itching may be identified through taking a skin sample or through taking a blood sample to check for signs of an underlying cause. Itch, scratch cycle The itch, scratch cycle describes a process in which responding to an itch by scratching can damage or break the skin causing inflammatory chemicals to be released from the body which further intensify the need to itch. Itching may be relieved through avoiding chemicals with perfumes which may irritate the skin and avoiding exposure of your skin to hot water. Moisturising cream can be used to moisturise dry skin or as a preventative measure aga Continue reading >>

What Can I Do For Numb, Painful Feet And Legs?

What Can I Do For Numb, Painful Feet And Legs?

My husband was diagnosed with diabetes almost a year ago. At first he was experiencing numbness in his feet. Over the past few months, he began having pain as well, sometimes as far up his leg as his calf. What can we do to help these symptoms? I have read that vitamin E and even flaxseed oil are good for the circulation. Would those be helpful? Continue reading >>

10 Silent Symptoms Of Diabetes

10 Silent Symptoms Of Diabetes

Alexa Briers is currently a Dietetic Intern with REX Nutrition Services and REX Diabetes Education Center . She is a graduate of Virginia Tech. Do you have undiagnosed diabetes? The American Diabetes Association reported 29.1 million Americans had diabetes, with 8.1 million being undiagnosed in 2012. Additionally, 1.4 million Americans are newly diagnosed each year. In recognition of National Diabetes Awareness Month, we want you to monitor for these 10 subtle signs of diabetes. If you have questions or concerns about diabetes, talk with your doctor and ask about getting your blood glucose checked. Frequent urination: Your kidneys are working overtime to flush out excess sugar in the blood. Extra sugar not absorbed by the kidneys are filtered out through urine. High sugar equals more bathroom breaks. How do you know? People urinate 4-7 times in a day; are you making more trips to the bathroom? RED FLAG: Waking at night to use the bathroom. Excessive thirst: With frequent urination comes replacing the fluid lost. Your body feels parched and dried out! How do you know? 4 or more liters, over a gallon per day, is excessive. The average person needs approximately 2 liters a day. RED FLAG: Feeling thirsty just after drinking water. Extreme hunger:When blood sugar isnt properly regulated it leadsto fluctuations throughout the day. Low levels tell the brain to eat more calories and sugary food. How do you know? You find yourself eating more times a day than usual. RED FLAG: Extreme hunger even after a meal. Weakness/fatigue: Sugar is unable to get into your cells to energize them. The kidneys are also working overtime with sugar highs and lows. Add in interrupted sleep from night time urination and you are exhausted! How do you know? Your body and mind feel an ongoing exhaust Continue reading >>

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes can affect many parts of your body, including your skin. When diabetes affects the skin, it’s often a sign that your blood sugar (glucose) levels are too high. This could mean that: You have undiagnosed diabetes, or pre-diabetes Your treatment for diabetes needs to be adjusted If you notice any of the following warning signs on your skin, it’s time to talk with your doctor. This skin condition often begins as small raised solid bumps that look like pimples. As it progresses, these bumps turn into patches of swollen and hard skin. The patches can be yellow, reddish, or brown. You may also notice: The surrounding skin has a shiny porcelain-like appearance You can see blood vessels The skin is itchy and painful The skin disease goes through cycles where it is active, inactive, and then active again The medical name for this condition is necrobiosis lipodica (neck-row-by-oh-sis lee-poi-dee-ka). TAKE ACTION Get tested for diabetes if you have not been diagnosed. Work with your doctor to better control your diabetes. See a dermatologist about your skin. Necorbiosis lipodica is harmless, but it can lead to complications. A dark patch (or band) of velvety skin on the back of your neck, armpit, groin, or elsewhere could mean that you have too much insulin in your blood. AN is often a sign of prediabetes. The medical name for this skin condition is acanthosis nigricans (ay-can-THOE-sis NIE-gri-cans). TAKE ACTION: Get tested for diabetes. 3. Hard, thickening skin When this develops on the fingers, toes, or both, the medical name for this condition is digital sclerosis (sclear-row-sis). On the hands, you’ll notice tight, waxy skin on the backs of your hands. The fingers can become stiff and difficult to move. If diabetes has been poorly controlled for years, it can f Continue reading >>

Why Do My Hands And Feet Itch?

Why Do My Hands And Feet Itch?

When your hands and feet itch, the right treatment can bring you some relief. How you treat the itching, though, depends a lot on the cause of the problem. It may just be dry skin, which can be brought on by winter weather or too much scrubbing. But sometimes, itchy hands and feet can signal another health condition. Could It Be Psoriasis? Psoriasis happens when skin cells grow too fast and then pile up on the skin’s surface. It’s a long-lasting condition that usually runs in families. There are a few different types, and itchiness of the palms and soles is a common symptom. If you have psoriasis, you may also have: Patches of red skin, bumps filled with puss, or silver scales Painful, swollen, or stiff joints Soreness of the affected area Itchiness in other places like your elbows, knees, lower back, and face Could It Be Eczema? Eczema is a term for a group of conditions that inflame the skin. There are several different types that can show up anywhere on the body. But one type, called dyshidrotic dermatitis, affects only the hands and feet. Besides the urge to scratch, symptoms of dyshidrotic dermatitis include: Red, cracked skin Scaly skin Could It Be Scabies? An eight-legged bug, called the human itch mite, is the source of this common skin condition. The tiny pest digs into the top layer of your skin and lays eggs there, causing scabies. The condition tends to spread in very crowded areas, where people have a lot of skin-to-skin contact that happens over a long time. You usually can’t get scabies from quick touching, like a handshake or a hug. Itchy hands and feet are common in infants and young kids with scabies, but not adults. It also causes: Itchiness, especially at night, of the entire body or specific areas, like the wrist, elbow, armpit, and the webbin Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Cause Itching?

Does Diabetes Cause Itching?

People with diabetes experience skin itching at higher rates than those without the condition. Ultimately, itching can lead to excessive scratching, which can cause discomfort and pain. A study of nearly 2,700 people with diabetes and 499 without diabetes found that itching was a common diabetes symptom. An estimated 11.3 percent of those with diabetes reported skin itching versus 2.9 percent of people without diabetes. A person with diabetes should not ignore itchy skin. Dry, irritated, or itchy skin is more likely to become infected, and someone with diabetes may not be able to fight off infections as well as someone who does not have diabetes. There are a variety of treatments available that can help to reduce diabetes-related skin itching so that a person can be more comfortable and avoid other skin complications. Causes of diabetes itching There are many reasons why a person with diabetes might experience itching more often than someone else. Sometimes itching can result from damaged nerve fibers located in the outer layers of skin. Often, the cause of diabetes-related itching is diabetic polyneuropathy or peripheral neuropathy. This condition occurs when high blood glucose levels damage nerve fibers, particularly those in the feet and hands. Before the nerve damage occurs, the body experiences high levels of cytokines. These are inflammatory substances that can lead to a person's skin itching. Sometimes, persistent itchiness may indicate that someone with diabetes is at risk of nerve damage, so the itchiness should never be ignored. Also, people with diabetes can experience associated disorders that include kidney or liver failure. These conditions may also cause itching. A person with diabetes can experience skin itching related to a new medication they are takin Continue reading >>

Itchy Hands And Feet Preventing Sleep For Type 2 Diabetic? - Dlife

Itchy Hands And Feet Preventing Sleep For Type 2 Diabetic? - Dlife

Cant sleep because my feet and hands itch so bad. Whats causing this? I am a type 2 diabetic. Just recently I have not been able to sleep because my feet and hands itch so bad. What is causing this? Ive tried lotions but that doesnt help. Please help. Q:I am a type 2 diabetic. Just recently I have not been able to sleep because my feet and hands itch so bad. What is causing this? I've tried lotions but that doesn't help. Please help. I'm sorry to hear that you are having a problem with itching in your hands and feet. It could possibly be a symptom of nerve damage known as peripheral neuropathy, a common complication of diabetes. However, you would likely have other symptoms as well, such as pain and numbness. A more likely cause could be that your blood sugar levels are too high. If you've noticed that your blood sugar readings have been increasing, it's important to get them under control before permanent nerve damage occurs. On the other hand, if your blood sugar levels are consistently less than 140 mg at all times (fasting and after meals), the itching probably isn't related to diabetes. At any rate, it's important to follow up with your doctor to discuss your symptoms, receive a definitive diagnosis, and potentially have your diabetes treatment changed (along with making lifestyle changes like cutting back on carbs) if the cause is determined to be elevated blood sugar levels. I wish you the best of luck with everything. Answered By dLife Expert: Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE Certified diabetes educator and registered dietitian living in Southern California. The content of this website, such as text, graphics, images, and other material on the site (collectively, Content) are for informational purposes only. The Content is not intended to be a substitute for, and d Continue reading >>

Itchy Feet And Diabetes

Itchy Feet And Diabetes

Itchy feet and Diabetes often accompany one another. Even though there are plenty of other symptoms that disturb a diabetic, many people will tell you that the itchy feet — particularly at night — are simply intolerable! According to Diabetes.org, as many as 33 percent of diabetics suffer from a skin disorder. What Skin Conditions Cause Itchy Feet In Diabetics? If your feet are itching to high heaven, you may be suffering from one of the following conditions… Bacterial Infections – Usually a bacterial infection of the foot will be evidenced by liquid-filled boils. Inflamed tissue is red, hot, swollen and sometimes itchy. It is especially important that people do their best to avoid a diabetes foot infection, as unchecked infections can lead to amputations. Fungal Infections – Fungal infections like Athlete’s Foot usually starts with an intensely itchy red rash between the toes. Germs can enter cracks in the skin and cause a more widespread infection. Toenail fungus is also common in diabetics, which can be identified by a thickening and yellowing of the nail that results in crumbly edges. Yeast Infections – A common side effect of a yeast infection can be itchy skin — not just in the genital region, but also on the hands, feet, ears and scalp — where candida tends to accumulate. Doctors prescribe antibiotics for this. Peripheral Neuropathy – One of the most common causes of itchy feet for people with diabetes is a dysfunction of the nerves called “peripheral neuropathy.” Numbness, tremors, tingling, pain, pins-and-needles, itching — these are all words used to describe what diabetics face. Some people are prescribed drugs like morphine or oxycodone to deal with these symptoms. Liver Failure – According to Livestrong, “Liver diseases with bi Continue reading >>

Burning In Feet: 15 Causes, Home Remedies, In Diabetes, And More

Burning In Feet: 15 Causes, Home Remedies, In Diabetes, And More

The most common cause of a burning feeling in your feet is nerve damage, often related to diabetes. There are other possible causes though, too. The pain from burning feet can be intermittent or constant and range from mild to severe. Your feet may feel hot, tingling, prickling, or numb. The pain is often worse at night. Treatment for burning feet will depend on the underlying cause. Read on to learn more about what causes a burning sensation in the feet and when you should seek help. The sensation of burning feet can come from a wide range of conditions. Its important to determine a cause so you can receive treatment. Some causes, such as a foot fungus like athletes foot or shoes that are too tight, can be remedied easily. In some cases, the cause is unknown. Years of uncontrolled high blood sugar can gradually damage your blood vessels and nerves. High blood sugar reduces the transmission of signals from the nerves. This can affect sensation to various parts of the body, including the feet. High blood sugar also weakens the blood vessel walls that carry oxygen and nutrients to the nerves. The nerve damage can occur throughout your body. About 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes have some form of nerve damage, or neuropathy , according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Your risk for neuropathy increases if you: When the nerve damage is in your legs and feet, its known as peripheral neuropathy . Peripheral neuropathy is the most common type of diabetic neuropathy. This type of neuropathy can cause a burning feeling in your feet. Less frequently, peripheral neuropathy can affect the arms and hands. Additional symptoms of peripheral neuropathy include: numbness or tingling in your hands or feet a feeling like youre wearing a ti Continue reading >>

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