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Is Whole Wheat Bread Good For Diabetics?

What's The Best Bread For People With Diabetes?

What's The Best Bread For People With Diabetes?

By Brandon May Bread is perhaps one of the most widely used types of food on the planet. It can also be a food that poses a health risk for people with diabetes. Despite the risk, bread can be one of the hardest foods to give up. Fortunately, there are breads on the market that don't raise blood sugar to extreme levels. Whole-grain breads with high-fiber ingredients, like oats and bran, may be the best option for people with diabetes. Making bread at home with specific, diabetes-friendly ingredients may also help reduce the impact bread has on blood sugar levels. The role of nutrition in controlling diabetes Diabetes has two main types: type 1 and type 2. People with type 1 diabetes have difficulty producing insulin, which is a hormone that "captures" blood sugar (or glucose) and transfers it into cells. Glucose is the preferred energy source for cells. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. This type of diabetes is also the easier form to prevent and manage with lifestyle changes and medication. According to the World Health Organization, over 422 million people have type 2 diabetes worldwide. In the earlier phase of type 2 diabetes, the pancreas can produce insulin, but cells have become insensitive to its effects. This is sometimes due to poor diet, genetics, and lifestyle habits. Because of this, cells can't access blood sugar following a meal. Nutrition plays a crucial role in diabetes control. It's only through putting proper dietary planning into practice that good blood sugar management can be accomplished. A good diet must also be combined with lifestyle changes and medication. A carbohydrate is one of the three major nutrients essential to human health. However, carbohydrates also raise blood sugar and can reduce effective diabetes control. This Continue reading >>

Is Whole Wheat Bread Really Bad For Diabetics?

Is Whole Wheat Bread Really Bad For Diabetics?

Is WHOLE WHEAT bread REALLY bad for diabetics? Russell is correct. And it also helps to know that the amount of carbs in leafy green vegetables is so low that it's not an issue, the same goes for yogurt (lactose is eaten by the good bacteria) and some nuts. It's only processed foods that usually have carbs, even Atkins bars have quite a few. Carbohydrates are not in unprocessed meats, OR pure fats. Chicken, beef, turkey, duck, venison, ham, lamb, rabbit, pork, fish You can add cheeses, vegetables, legumes, fruits to these base foods, and limit carb intake to a level that allows you to have steady blood sugars, and lose weight. You don't need any wheat, or sugar. Please remember that Carbohydrates are found in EVERYTHING, sugar and wheat included " Type II diabetics many times produce way to much Insulin. The body just doesn't use it properly to control blood sugars. Diabetes is a carbohydrate induced disease. " Russell, thanks for pointing this out. It is crucial for understanding type 2 diabetes. The result of insulin resistance of our cells is the body producing too much of it and it still not being enough. The only way to reverse that is to cut the carbs very low and reduce the amount of insulin that the body needs. Over time, in most cases our cells insulin sensitivity will improve. For some this will take longer than for others. My H A1c is currently just out of the pre-diabetic range at 5.7, but I'm working on getting it closer to 5. Personally, I think any bread is bad for diabetics, but some people have problems with wheat on top of being diabetic. A few things on this thread are wrong. Type II diabetics many times produce way to much Insulin. The body just doesn't use it properly to control blood sugars. Diabetes is a carbohydrate induced disease. While I don' Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Whole Grains

Diabetes And Whole Grains

Whole grains are found in wheat, oats, barley, maize and brown rice People with diabetes are often advised to eat a good selection of whole grain food. However, people are often confused as to what counts as whole grain. Much of the produce which many of us have grown up with consists of refined wheat products lacking very much of the nutrition within better whole grain equivalents. If you have wheat or grain based foods, try to find whole grain varieties. They will be better for your sugar levels as well as your health in general. Whole grain foods are found in cereals such as wheat, oats, barley, maize, rye and brown rice, amongst others. The grain is made up of three constituent parts: Germ: the germ is the reproductive part of the grain and is packed with nutrients Endosperm: accounts for about 80% of the grain, this is the starchy part Bran: the fibre rich outside (shell) of the grain Much food sold these days is made from highly refined flour and wheat products. The more refined the food is, the less nutrition it carries. White bread for example is made from highly refined flour which has very little nutritional value as the refining process strips out much of the vitamins. Furthermore, products that are highly refined, such as white bread, are very quickly turned into glucose by the body and therefore they are best avoided by those with diabetes . For food to count as whole grain, it should include each of the three parts (germ, endosperm and bran). However, shop produce can make it very difficult to tell what is actually whole grain. Be wary of terms like wholemeal, granary and multigrain as these offer no guarantee that the bread is made from whole grains. Look instead for use of the term whole grain or wholegrain. As a general guide, look for items such as th Continue reading >>

Best Bread For People With Diabetes

Best Bread For People With Diabetes

The smell of a freshly baked bread, or the sight of bread, is enough to send your senses reeling. Though people with diabetes should eat bread in moderation, sometimes it can be easy to get carried away. After all, bread is one of the most popular foods all over the globe. Just because you have diabetes, it doesn’t mean that you have to miss out on all the great bread that life has to offer. In order to be able to eat bread if you have diabetes, there are a few things that you will need to know. Sonya’s Story Sonya sat across from me. She looked defeated. She hung her head low. “I don’t know how I’ll ever give up bread,” she said. “It’s my favorite food. Now that I have Type 2 Diabetes, I know I can’t eat bread, rice, or pasta.” “You can have bread, rice, and pasta in small amounts. I can teach you which kind of breads are best for you, so that you can get some of your favorite food,” I said. “That would be great,” said Sonya. “Wow, I feel a lot better! When can I come to class and learn about this?” “You can come tomorrow,” I said. “I’ll find you some bread recipes that you can make at home with diabetes-friendly ingredients, so that the bread you do eat is healthier. It will also be lower in carbohydrates than some other breads, and the carbohydrates will be good carbohydrates.” Sonya came to class where she learnt valuable information about making diabetes-friendly breads. Now she makes them for herself, and a few other friends with diabetes that she happened to have met in her diabetes classes. Breads with high fibers Breads that are whole grain, and high in fiber, such as oats or bran, are the best type of bread for people with diabetes to eat. While you can have a serving or two of bread, you still need to stay within the Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Whole Wheat Bread? August 23, 2011 Return To Blog

Can Diabetics Eat Whole Wheat Bread? August 23, 2011 Return To Blog

Diabetes is a metabolic disease, meaning there is a glitch in the way the body converts food energy into usable energy. A healthy reaction to eating carbohydrate is a rise in blood sugar (glucose) followed by insulin being released as a response. The insulin acts as a key to open up cells within the brain and organs to let glucose in to be used as an immediate source of energy. Any unused energy is then stored in the liver, muscle, and fat tissues. Someone with diabetes has a rise in blood glucose but insulin is either not released or cells are resistant to the insulin. This is why diabetics have difficulty returning their high blood sugar levels back down to normal and thus need to control how much carbohydrate (glucose source) they put into their body throughout the day. Control carbohydrates. With a little effort and control diabetes can easily be managed. Diabetics should not condemn, but rather control carbohydrates. They should focus on allowing their body only the amount of carbohydrates it can handle at one time (this can be determined by a doctor or registered dietitian). Despite being diabetic, the body still needs and uses carbohydrates as its preferred source of energy. In fact, it is the only source of fuel for the brain! So it should never be eliminated, just merely controlled so your body can handle the glucose load. Stick to an eating plan. There is no single ideal eating plan for those with diabetes; the recommended plan is specific to a person’s weight, medication, blood sugars, cholesterol, and other medical conditions or concerns. Despite the varying eating plans, all diabetics should be consistent with their eating habits. Also, they need to eat about every 4-5 hours to prevent blood sugars from getting too low. Additionally, breakfast is an impor Continue reading >>

What Are The Best Breads For People With Diabetes?

What Are The Best Breads For People With Diabetes?

Is bread an option for people with diabetes? Food may be one of life’s simple pleasures, but for people with diabetes, deciding what to eat can get complicated. Foods that contain a lot of carbohydrates can spike blood sugar levels. Carbohydrates are found in many different kinds of food, including desserts, grains, and bread. Giving up carbs completely isn’t realistic, healthy, or even necessary. What matters is that you’re aware of your carb intake and make nutritious food choices. Breads can often be high in carbs. Some are overly processed, high in sugar, and filled with empty calories. Healthier options can be part of a satisfying meal plan for people with diabetes. If you’re trying to figure out which breads work best for diabetes management, this information may help. When a person has diabetes, their body doesn’t make or use enough insulin to process food efficiently. Without enough insulin, blood sugar levels can spike. People with diabetes may also have high levels of cholesterol and triglycerides. This means that it’s important to keep an eye on fat and sugar intake. People with type 1 diabetes require insulin injections daily and follow a specific type of eating plan. This eating plan is geared towards keeping blood sugar levels low. People with type 2 diabetes often follow an eating and exercise regimen geared towards reducing blood sugar. If diet and exercise aren’t enough to control blood sugar, insulin injections or oral medication may be a part of a daily regimen. Creating a food plan, making smart nutritional choices, and watching carbohydrate intake is recommended for people with both types of diabetes. Creating a meal plan can help people with diabetes control blood sugar and provide satisfying nutrition. There isn’t a one-size-fits-a Continue reading >>

Whole Grain Bread Vs. Whole Wheat Bread For Diabetes

Whole Grain Bread Vs. Whole Wheat Bread For Diabetes

Just walk down the bread aisle of your local supermarket and you will be bombarded with health claims -- some of which are true and some are misleading. It can be difficult to muddle through all of the jargon on food labels, especially if you are a diabetic. One of the most confusing topics may be the difference between whole grain and whole wheat, especially when it comes to bread. But, with a little knowledge, you can identify the best bread choices for you. Video of the Day The Food and Drug Administration describes a whole grain food as one that contains grain that is whole, ground or flaked, but still contains the main anatomy of the endosperm, germ and bran. By this definition, whole wheat bread can also be considered a whole grain food. However, for it to qualify, whole wheat bread must be made with a whole wheat flour that is made from whole grains. A Carbohydrate is a Carbohydrate? To understand how carbohydrates affect your body, look at how your body digests them. Any carbohydrate you eat is broken down into its smallest possible molecules by your body. Most of this is glucose, which is why carbohydrates directly affect your blood glucose. However, the makeup of a carbohydrate, including how it is processed and what it is eaten with, can also affect your blood glucose. While both whole wheat and whole grain breads are less processed than their white bread counterparts, a whole grain bread may be the best for you. This is where the glycemic index comes into play. The Glycemic Index and Diabetes The glycemic index rates the effect a food -- more specifically, a carbohydrate within a food -- has on your blood glucose. This system takes into consideration the processing of the food as well as the other nutrients that accompany it. For example, a less-processed gr Continue reading >>

Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

Mom is still right: Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, especially when you have type 2 diabetes. Your diabetes diet needs to give you a healthy supply of energy to jumpstart your body in the morning. "Remember that first thing in the morning, you’ve gone many hours without eating and your body needs fuel," says Kelly O'Connor, RD, director of diabetes education at the endocrinology center at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. "If you’re not giving it any, it will create its own in the form of stored blood sugar that gets released into your bloodstream — which often results in blood sugar that’s too high." Healthy breakfast food is also a must when it comes to diabetes control and weight management. “Remember that when your body is fasting, you’re not giving it any energy, so it slows down to conserve what it has left, which is counterproductive," O'Connor says. The trick is to keep your metabolism going all day long at a steady rate. "The simple solution to both of these issues is to eat a good breakfast," she says. Avoiding Breakfast Mistakes Breakfast blunders can happen during the week when you wake up late and try eating breakfast while running out the door, or on the weekend when you go out for a big breakfast. However, the biggest mistake to avoid is skipping breakfast altogether. When you go too long without eating, your body goes into starvation mode. And when you finally give in to hunger later in the day (and probably overeat), your body will grab all the fat from your meal and store it. That's bad for anyone, especially for someone with type 2 diabetes. Here are some other breakfast mistakes to avoid: Don’t fly on a sugar high. If you don't have a lot of time in the morning for healthy breakfast foods, you may be tempted to wolf do Continue reading >>

The Whole Grain And Nothing But The Whole Grain (part 1)

The Whole Grain And Nothing But The Whole Grain (part 1)

Every day you make choices about what to eat. If you have diabetes, you’re likely thinking about how many carbs you can or should eat, and how you’ll spend those carb choices. Many of you are making a conscious effort to eat more fiber, too. And maybe some of you are even trying to fit more whole grains (whatever that means) into your eating plan. Nutrition and meal planning can be baffling enough without trying to have to decipher just what the term “whole grain” means. And it may not be quite what you think. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans urge us to “consume 3 or more ounce-equivalents of whole-grain products per day.” Unfortunately, most of us are lucky if we eat a single ounce-equivalent, or serving, of a whole-grain food per day. So, what are whole grains, anyway? Whole grains contain three layers: bran (outer layer), endosperm (middle layer), and germ (grain core). Each layer provides us with specific nutrients and health benefits. The bran provides fiber, phytonutrients, B vitamins, and minerals. The endosperm contributes carbohydrate, protein, and B vitamins. And the germ supplies vitamin E, B vitamins, unsaturated fat, phytonutrients, and antioxidants. Refined grains (think white flour and white rice) have the bran and germ layers removed, which means that many of the nutrition and health benefits have been removed, as well. Compare these examples of whole-grain and refined-grain foods: Whole Grains Amaranth Barley Brown rice Buckwheat Bulgur Oatmeal and whole oats Popcorn Quinoa 100% whole wheat bread Wild rice Refined Grains Cornflakes Couscous Grits Pasta, enriched Pretzels White bread White rice White flour Wheat flour Multigrain bread Are most of your “grain” choices from the top column or the bottom column? And are you surprised that Continue reading >>

What Kinds Of Bread Can A Diabetic Eat?

What Kinds Of Bread Can A Diabetic Eat?

Diabetics should avoid white bread and anything else made with white flour because it can raise their blood sugar levels quickly. White flour and glucose, or pure sugar, are used to rank foods according to how fast they raise blood glucose. When a diabetic eats white bread, it is just like eating sugar. Whole Grains Are Best Finding the glycemic index of foods containing carbohydrates is a good way to control your diet and blood sugar level. Bread that is 100 percent stone-ground whole-wheat or pumpernickel is best because of its low glycemic level. Diabetics should be very careful to choose only bread that is 100 percent whole-wheat. If the label says, "Wheat Bread," the bread could contain a high content of white flour. It is best to avoid oat bread and other breads as well because they often contain white flour, which should always be treated like pure sugar when you have diabetes. Although some other breads and foods that are a lot like bread may look darker, this does not mean that they are whole-wheat products. Some bagels look like they are stone-ground whole-wheat, but they could actually be made with mostly white flour. Crackers may also look like they have wheat in them, and they might be partially made from whole wheat. This does not make them safe for diabetics to eat, however, because they will likely cause a spike in their glucose levels. Whole-wheat bread, rye, and pita breads that are not made from 100 percent stone-ground whole-wheat or pumpernickel are considered by the American Diabetes Association to be medium GI foods. Other Foods to Avoid There are many other bread products full of carbohydrates that cause spikes in blood sugar. They have a high glycemic index and include mashed potatoes, corn flakes, instant oatmeal, puffed rice, bran flakes, and Continue reading >>

What Kind Of Bread Is Best For Diabetics?

What Kind Of Bread Is Best For Diabetics?

Diabetes and bread… So many questions come up about good ‘ol bread. And not surprisingly because it's a staple food that we've all grown up on. Toast for breakfast, sandwiches for lunch, a side of bread for dinner, it's a pretty common practice right? But if you're diabetic, should bread get the cut? Is it okay to eat? Are there certain types of breads that are better than others? These are all great questions so let's dig in and go over this together now. If you have any questions, just leave them at the bottom of the post and we'll chat about it. JUMP TO MENU: What Kind of Bread Is Best? | Wheat & Rye Breads | Sourdough Bread | Does Cutting Bread Help? | Making Low Carb Breads At Home | Is Bread Better Than Cereal? | Low Carb Bread Options You Can Buy | Free Bread Baking Class What Kind Of Bread Is Best For A Diabetic? We've recently covered the types of flours that are best for diabetes, so before we dig in and talk about breads, let's briefly look at the flour cheat sheet. See how everything above coconut flour goes up from 30 g net carbs and above, which is really getting up there. In reality, the best breads for you to eat are ones made from flaxseed, almond, chickpea or coconut flour, which are a bit more difficult to come by. Of course, the simplest way to overcome this is to make your own. But, I understand that not everyone wants to make their own, and thankfully, there are quite a number of companies that supply great low carb bread options you can buy. Whole Wheat & Rye Bread and Diabetes It's often recommended that you eat whole grains instead of the white stuff and it's true, whole grains are a better choice because they are complex carbs, rather than simple carbs. But, when you take the whole grain and grind it into a flour, it changes the way your bo Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

These foods can can cause blood sugar spikes or increase your risk of diabetes complications. White Bread Refined starches — white bread, white rice, white pasta, and anything made with white flour — act a lot like sugar once the body starts to digest them. Therefore, just like sugar, refined starches interfere with glucose control and should be avoided by those with diabetes. Whole grains are a better choice because they’re richer in fiber and generally cause a slower, steadier rise in blood sugar. Instead of white bread or a bagel for breakfast, opt for a toasted whole grain English Muffin (topped with a slice of reduced-fat cheese or scrambled egg for protein). At lunch and dinner, replace white carbs with healthier whole grain options such as brown or wild rice, barley, quinoa, and whole-wheat bread to minimize the impact on your blood sugar. Even high-quality, whole grain starches elevate blood glucose to some degree, so it’s still important to limit portions — stick with ½ to ¾ cup cooked grains or just 1 slice of bread at meals. Continue reading >>

Which Is Better For You — Whole Wheat Bread Or…

Which Is Better For You — Whole Wheat Bread Or…

A: Actually, whole wheat bread is a healthy choice, along with any whole grain bread. But not all whole grain breads are necessarily good choices. The way to determine if a bread, or any foodfor that matter, is truly “whole grain” is to read the ingredient list on the package. The first ingredient should be a whole grain food, such as whole wheat, whole rye, stoneground whole wheat, wheatberries, oats or oatmeal, or brown rice. The words “multigrain,” “wheat” or “stoneground” don’t necessarily mean that the food is a whole grain. For more information, visit the Whole Grains Councils website at www.wholegrainscouncil.org. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Power Foods: Whole Grains And Fiber

Diabetes Power Foods: Whole Grains And Fiber

Imagine this food: It's low in calories. It makes you feel full. And you can eat as much of it as you want. Too good to be true? It's fiber and it is real. You can find it in fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts, and whole grains. Most everyone should eat more fiber -- especially if you have diabetes. Even though fiber is a carbohydrate, your body can’t break it down. This means you don’t digest fiber, and it doesn't raise your blood sugar. And as fiber moves through your body, it helps with digestion, makes you feel full, and may help control your cholesterol and blood sugar levels. How Much Fiber? Think you eat enough fiber? Chances are you could stand to eat more. Men over age 50 should get at least 30 grams of fiber each day and women over 50 at least 21 grams daily. Most of us get less than recommended. There are lots of delicious ways to add fiber to your diet, but the key is to do it slowly. This will help prevent gas and bloating. Drinking more water can help, too. Eat Your Whole Grains Whole grains are loaded with fiber. Look for breads, cereals, tortillas, and crackers that have whole wheat flour, whole-grain cornmeal, whole oats, whole rye, or buckwheat flour on the ingredients list. Here are some tasty ways to add more whole grains to your diet: Start the day with a half-cup of high-fiber bran cereal topped with banana slices or berries (12 grams of fiber) or a whole wheat English muffin (4.4 grams). Choose whole wheat pasta (3 grams) over white. Serve it with your favorite vegetables for even more fiber. Make a sandwich on whole-grain bread. (Chose bread with 2 or 3 grams of fiber a slice.) Try recipes that use other types of whole grains, such as barley or bulgur (3 to 4 grams). Have brown rice or wild rice (3.5 grams) instead of white. Sprinkle with fres Continue reading >>

Is Whole Wheat Bread Good For Blood Sugar?

Is Whole Wheat Bread Good For Blood Sugar?

Your blood sugar fluctuates depending on what you last ate and when you ate it. The products of some foods enter the bloodstream more quickly than others, causing potentially harmful, rapid rises in blood glucose. Whole wheat bread has a more beneficial effect on your blood sugar than breads made with refined grains, since your body digests and absorbs it more slowly. But whole wheat breads can vary considerably in their benefit on blood sugar levels, depending on how much whole wheat they contain and how much sugar manufacturers add. Types of Bread While all bread is made with flour, the type of flour used has an impact on its nutritional value. White bread, made from bleached refined flour, has had its fiber and many nutrients removed during processing. Whole wheat bread, on the other hand, contains the most nutritious parts of the bread: the bran, the endosperm and the germ. White bread is also more likely to have added refined sugars such as high-fructose corn syrup, whose components enter your bloodstream very quickly. Manufacturers in the United States can call their bread "whole wheat" if it contains as little as 51 percent whole grains, according to the American Heart Association. The more whole wheat a bread contains, the more it moderates your blood sugar. Glycemic Index Foods containing carbohydrates, such as sugars and grains, can be categorized by their glycemic index. Foods with a high GI are absorbed more quickly into the bloodstream than those with a low GI. Foods with a lower GI cause a slower rise in blood sugar. For comparison purposes, pure glucose -- the most rapidly absorbed form of sugar -- is assigned a GI value of 100. White bread has a GI of 73, according to Harvard Health Publications. The GI of whole wheat bread varies considerably from brand Continue reading >>

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