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Is Weed Good For Diabetics

Marijuana And Diabetes: Can The Two Work Together?

Marijuana And Diabetes: Can The Two Work Together?

In the United States alone more than 30 million people are currently living with diabetes. That’s nearly 10 percent of the entire population. What’s worse is that two out of every three of those 30 million people will die from the disease (or it’s associated complications.) In this post we’ll explore the intricacies of how marijuana and diabetes interact with one another. What you’ll learn in this post: (Click any of the section titles below to jump right to it) Types of Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes, also known as “Juvenile Diabetes,” is actually a genetic condition in which the pancreas is incapable of creating sufficient amounts of insulin to meet the body’s needs. As a result, patients with type 1 diabetes often require insulin injections multiple times, every single day of their life. With type 2 diabetes, more widely known as “Adult Onset,” the body does produce insulin, it just doesn’t produce it properly. And that “improper” insulin production signals the pancreas to produce even more – more than the body needs, or can process. Feast or famine. With one out of every ten Americans affected, researchers are working hard to help patients better manage the potentially life-threatening disease, which from this perspective means taking a hard look at how marijuana and diabetes engage each other. The Research In 2005, the American Alliance for Medical Marijuana released a groundbreaking report detailing five key areas where medical marijuana was believed to benefit people living with diabetes. The AAMC stated that: cannabis was believed capable of stabilizing blood sugar; since cannabis was “neuro-protective” in nature, it was capable of reducing neuropathic pain by activating receptors located in the body and the brain; cannabis helps to kee Continue reading >>

Smoking Marijuana Linked To Lower Diabetes Risk In Study

Smoking Marijuana Linked To Lower Diabetes Risk In Study

You may have heard that marijuana smokers get hungry after using the drug, and the authors of a new study point out that marijuana users tend to take in more calories than their counterparts. But, their study found that pot smokers aren't any more likely to be obese than non-smokers. Equally surprising, the researchers found marijuana may actually be a tool in controlling blood sugar -- and may be key in helping diabetics keep their condition in check. The new study, which was published on May 15 in The American Journal of Medicine, showed that regular marijuana use was linked to significantly lower levels of fasting insulin. Smokers were also less likely to be insulin resistant, a condition where the body's cells no longer respond to a hormone that controls carbohydrates and fat metabolism called insulin. High levels of fasting insulin and insulin resistance could lead to diabetes. Marijuana (Cannabis sativa) has been known to relieve pain, improve mood and increase appetite for patients who are prescribed it medicinally. The study's authors estimate that there are 17.4 million users in the U.S. alone, and 4.6 million of them use pot daily or almost daily. The legitimacy of medical marijuana has been highly debated. Currently, nineteen states and the District of Columbia allow people to posses the Schedule 1 drug with a doctor's prescription. Washington and Colorado recently legalized pot for recreational purpose, but employees can still be fired if they test positive on a test according to their company's discretion. A synthetic form of the active ingredient, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), has also been approved to treat side-effects of chemotherapy, AIDS-induced anorexia, nausea, and other medical conditions. However, some opponents claim marijuana is a "gateway drug" t Continue reading >>

Drug And Alcohol Use With Diabetes

Drug And Alcohol Use With Diabetes

Comprehensive Guide to Research on Risk, Complications and Treatment Substance abuse is described as the excessive use of a substance such as alcohol or drugs that results in significant clinical impairments as well as the loss of ability to function academically, professionally, and socially [1]. An individual who was healthy before the substance abuse began will typically begin to experience serious health problems over time, but extensive damage may be avoided or reversed if effective substance abuse treatment is received. This is not the case, however, for individuals who have been diagnosed with diabetes, and although this is a manageable disease with proper treatment, substance abuse may cause it to become life-threatening. This guide will discuss, in detail, how substance abuse can negatively impact the life and health of a person with diabetes. Diabetes, also referred to as diabetes mellitus, is a condition in which the body is unable to properly regulate blood sugar levels. There are two forms known as type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but in order to better understand the difference between the two types, the role that insulin plays in the regulation of healthy blood sugar levels will be briefly described. During the digestive process, carbohydrates are broken down into glucose, which is a form of sugar that easily enters the bloodstream and is used by the body for energy. The pancreas normally responds to increasing blood sugar levels by initiating the production of the hormone known as insulin. As insulin levels increase, it signals the transfer of glucose into cells throughout the body and it also ensures that excess glucose will be stored in the liver in order to prevent high blood sugar levels. Type 1 diabetes, which is also called juvenile or insulin dependent Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Medical Marijuana

Diabetes And Medical Marijuana

Diabetes mellitus is a group of autoimmune diseases characterized by defects in insulin secretion resulting in hyperglycemia (abnormally high concentration of glucose in the blood). There are two primary types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes (also known as juvenile diabetes) are incapable of producing pancreatic insulin and must rely on insulin medication for survival. Type 2 diabetes (also known as adult onset diabetes) produce inadequate amounts of insulin. Type 2 diabetes is a less serious condition that typically is controlled by diet. Over time, diabetes can lead to blindness, kidney failure nerve damage, hardening of the arteries and death. The disease is the third leading cause of death in the United States after heart disease and cancer. A search of the scientific literature reveals no clinical investigations of cannabis for the treatment of diabetes, but does identify a small number of preclinical studies indicating that cannabinoids may modify the disease’s progression and provide symptomatic relief to those suffering from the disease. 2006 Study—5 mg. per day injection of CBD significantly reduced the incidence of diabetes in mice. Also delayed the onset of diabetes in mice. March 2006 American Journal of Pathology—Study done at the Medical College of Virginia—Rats treated with CBD (from 1-4 weeks) experienced protection from diabetic retinopathy (condition characterized by retinal oxygen deprivation and a breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier, is the leading cause of blindness in working age adults). Studies reported in the journal of Neuroscience Letters in 2004—Mice given a cannabis receptor agonist experienced a reduction in diabetic related tactile allodynia (pain resulting from non-injurious stimulus to the skin) compared to non-treated controls Continue reading >>

Type Ii Diabetes And Cannabidiol

Type Ii Diabetes And Cannabidiol

My first clinical experiences with Cannabidiol (CBD) and Type II Diabetes were generally with patients who were on Metformin. Within a couple of days of starting CBD the patients had a tendency to become hypoglycemic. After consultation with me and their primary care doctor, working together, most of these early patients ended up stopping their Metformin and continuing with cannabidiol. Generally, over the next six months, most of these patients had lower Hemoglobin A1C. Now I see patients who come in specifically to help their Diabetes. It is of course not just for glucose control. It is for treatment of their neuropathy and obesity. There are some early studies, with links at end of this article, showing retinal protection may also be a real benefit. As diabetes is such a multi system disease, adding CBD along with the patients’ other regimens can only be helpful. We are just talking about a plant extract that is highly neuro protective, often normalizes serum glucose and helps the patient lose weight. Not much to lose. These should keep you busy: Continue reading >>

Marijuana: The Next Diabetes Drug?

Marijuana: The Next Diabetes Drug?

Toking up may help marijuana users to stay slim and lower their risk of developing diabetes, according to the latest study, which suggests that cannabis compounds may help in controlling blood sugar. Although marijuana has a well-deserved reputation for increasing appetite via what stoners call “the munchies,” the new research, which was published in the American Journal of Medicine, is not the first to find that the drug has a two-faced relationship to weight. Three prior studies have shown that marijuana users are less likely to be obese, have a lower risk for diabetes and have lower body-mass-index measurements. And these trends occurred despite the fact that they seemed to take in more calories. Why? “The most important finding is that current users of marijuana appeared to have better carbohydrate metabolism than nonusers,” says Murray Mittleman, an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and the lead author of the study. “Their fasting insulin levels were lower, and they appeared to be less resistant to the insulin produced by their body to maintain a normal blood-sugar level.” The research included over 4,600 men and women participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2005 and 2010. Among them, 48% had smoked marijuana at least once in their lives, and 12% were current cannabis smokers. The authors controlled for other factors like age, sex, income, alcohol use, cigarette smoking and physical activity that could also affect diabetes risk. Even after these adjustments, the current marijuana users showed fasting insulin levels that were 16% lower than those of former or never users, along with a 17% reduction in another measure of insulin resistance as well. Higher levels on both tests are associated wit Continue reading >>

Cannabis For The Treatment Of Diabetes

Cannabis For The Treatment Of Diabetes

Diabetes, also called hyperglycemia, is a disease in which the body causes blood glucose (sugar) levels to rise higher than normal. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, “diabetes is [a] condition in which the body does not properly process food for use as energy.” According to the American Diabetes Association, in 2012, 29.1 million Americans (9.3 percent of the population) had diabetes. Of this number, 21.0 million were diagnosed, while 8.1 million were undiagnosed. Symptoms of diabetes include chronic fatigue, frequent urination, excessive thirst, unexplained weight loss, extreme hunger, sudden vision changes, tingling or numbness in hands or feet, very dry skin, sores that are slow to heal, and more infections than usual. Diabetes can result in heart disease, blindness, kidney failure, and lower-extremity amputations. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, with about 76,000 people dying each year from the disease. Blacks are 1.7 times more likely to develop the condition than whites. Of sufferers, 26 percent are age 65 or older. It is estimated that this disease costs Americans $245 billion per year — and this figure reflects only diagnosed cases. A 2005 research paper published by the American Alliance for Medical Cannabis (AAMC) states that cannabis has the following benefits for diabetes patients: Stabilizes blood sugars. Acts as an anti-inflammatory that may decrease arterial inflammation. Acts as a “vasodilator” to help keep blood vessels open and improve circulation. Lowers blood pressure (over time), a critical benefit for diabetics. Relieves neuropathic pain and tingling in the hands and feet when applied topically as creams, balms, and salves. Helps still diabetic “restless leg synd Continue reading >>

Can Using Medical Marijuana Help Lower My Cholesterol?

Can Using Medical Marijuana Help Lower My Cholesterol?

Millions of Americans live with high cholesterol, which can increase the risk of developing heart disease, developing peripheral artery disease, or having a stroke – all of which are potentially life-threatening. Research is being conducted to determine whether patients with high cholesterol could see health benefits from using marijuana. So far, scientists haven’t reached a conclusive verdict about whether Cannabis can lower cholesterol; but while more research is needed, existing studies have raised some interesting points about marijuana’s potential role in the fight against high cholesterol and cardiovascular disease. Medical Studies Show Mixed Results: Marijuana Can Lower, Raise Good Cholesterol (HDL) Cholesterol is an organic compound that naturally exists in all of your body’s cells. Cholesterol is critical to various bodily functions, such as synthesizing vitamin D, making hormones, and producing substances your body needs to digest food properly. But while some cholesterol is essential to life, too much can wreak havoc on your health. According to the CDC, about 73.5 million American adults – roughly a third of the population – have high cholesterol, which can double the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. A 2013 study published in Diabetes Care examined the relationship between Cannabis use, cholesterol levels, glucose (blood sugar), and insulin (a hormone that helps moderate glucose levels). It makes sense for researchers to study these variables together, because high cholesterol is associated with an increased risk of diabetes, which occurs when the body produces no insulin or insufficient insulin. However, before digging into the study, it’s important to know that cholesterol can be described as “good” or “bad.” “Bad choleste Continue reading >>

Marijuana Helps Control Diabetes, Promotes Good Cholesterol, Leads To Lower Waist Size, And Lowers Bladder Cancer Risk, New Studies Show

Marijuana Helps Control Diabetes, Promotes Good Cholesterol, Leads To Lower Waist Size, And Lowers Bladder Cancer Risk, New Studies Show

email Print Article AA Smoking marijuana has "remarkable" effect on diabetic problems and may lower risk of getting the disease, a study published on Wednesday states. This news comes a few days after a presentation at the annual conference of the American Urological Association that links heavy pot use to a much lower risk of bladder cancer. See also: Marijuana Is Real Medicine for a Long List of Ills Past studies have found potential harms caused by marijuana, such as an increased risk of testicular cancer or memory impairment. The popular drug, now used legally by millions under the laws of Arizona and other states, appears to have a major upside, health-wise. Besides the pain and suffering diabetes causes, diagnosing and treating the disease is a crushing healthcare expense in the United States, costing an estimated $245 billion last year alone. The new study published in the current issue of the American Journal of Medicine implies that one answer to the problem could be marijuana. Of the diabetics studied who used marijuana, "insulin resistance was decreased and diabetic control was improved," wrote Joseph Alpert, editor-in-chief of the AJM and a University of Arizona professor of medicine, in his introduction to the published article. Alpert goes on to say: Remarkably, fasting insulin levels were reduced in current cannabis users but not in former or never users. Two additional observations were that waist circumference was smaller and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol blood levels were higher in current cannabis users. These are indeed remarkable observations that are supported, as the authors note, by basic science experiments that came to similar conclusions. Is it possible that THC will be commonly prescribed in the future for patients with diabetes or met Continue reading >>

Marijuana Users May Be More Likely To Develop Diabetes, Research Finds

Marijuana Users May Be More Likely To Develop Diabetes, Research Finds

INDYPULSE Marijuana users may be more likely to develop diabetes, research finds People who use marijuana may be more likely to develop prediabetes than those who have never smoked it, according to new research. A sample of more than 3,000 people in America found that adults who currently used marijuana were 65 per cent more likely to have poor sugar control which can lead to type 2 diabetes. Those who no longer smoked the drug but had used it 100 times or more in their lifetime had a 49 per cent greater chance of developing the condition. The link was not affected by BMI and waist circumference, the paper published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes) found. The authors, led by the University of Minnesota School of Public Health’s Mike Bancks, said: “Marijuana use, by status or lifetime frequency, was not associated with incidence or presence of diabetes after adjustment for potential confounding factors. “However, marijuana use was associated with the development and prevalence of prediabetes after adjustment. Specifically, occurrence of prediabetes in middle adulthood was significantly elevated for individuals who reported using marijuana in excess of 100 times by young adulthood. “These results contrast with those previously reported on marijuana use and metabolic health. Future studies should look to objectively measure mode and quantity of marijuana use in relation to prospective metabolic health.” Despite showing a heightened incidence of prediabetes, the study failed to establish a direct connection to type 2 diabetes itself. The authors said: “It is unclear how marijuana use could place an individual at increased risk for prediabetes yet not diabetes.” The data was taken from a group of more than 3,00 Continue reading >>

Is Marijuana Good For Diabetes?

Is Marijuana Good For Diabetes?

Susan B. Sloane, BS, RPh, CDE, has been a registered pharmacist for more than 20 years and a Certified Diabetes Educator for more than 15 years. Her two sons were diagnosed with diabetes, and since then, she has been dedicated to promoting wellness and optimal outcomes as a patient advocate, information expert, educator, and corporate partner. Preliminary results of this study showed people who smoked marijuana seemed to have less insulin resistance, seen as lower fasting insulin levels, than those who did not use the substance. Marijuana users also seemed to have lower body mass indexes (BMIs) as well. The exact reasons for this remain unclear, but it appears to have something to do with cannaboid receptors being activated and then potentially deactivated with prolonged marijuana use. This study poses an interesting theory of how weight and brain chemistry are related, but in my opinion this is in no way conclusive evidence that marijuana can effectively lower weight and help treat diabetes. If anything, it may further assist researchers on finding better medications to treat chronic diseases. This is a controversial study, but it's interesting when we look at some of the mechanisms of how weight-loss drugs work. Personally, I am not in favor of marijuana being legalized, but I find the study compelling and worth understanding. To learn more on this topic: Pot for Pain? Treating Neuropathy Pain with THC Scientist: Marijuana May Treat Diabetes Discussion: Marijuana Use Tags: Treatment and Care marijuana alternative treatments Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 1 Patient Smoking Marijuana

Diabetes Type 1 Patient Smoking Marijuana

nonah31750 over a year ago Hi, diabetes type one is very serious condition. I can understand your friend is under a lot of stress because of her situation. However, marijuana is definitely not the answer. She may think that this substance is helping her, but I believe she is wrong. Marijuana is an illegal substance so therefore there are not any valid studies that show it can help with lowering blood glucose level. You have every right to worry about her condition. I think you should try talking to her about her habit and the effects of marijuana smoking. This is a drug that alters person's state of mind. Under the influence of marijuana your friend can even endanger her health, because she might forget to take her insulin injection on time. If she refuses to listen to you, you shouldn't hesitate to talk to her parents. Believe me, it is for her own good. Guest over a year ago Actually it is not true that marijuana does not help. It does not alter one's state of mind, nor is it habitual. You need to look at research being done. I don't have the facts on hand, but I would definitely look into otehr points of view before I went and told my 19 year old friends parents that she is smoking weed. The knee-jerk reactions to say that marijuana is bad and lump it in with hard dcrugs like heroin, etc. is really disengenuous at best. Go to your university and do some research, especially from countries where it has been researched quite a bit, like the Netherlands. BTW I have type II diabetes and I find it helps relieve the pressure off my eyes to smoke medical marijuana. Guest over a year ago I am diabetic and have neurothapy. My doctor put me on nurontin which helps but the only thing that stops the pain is smoking marijuana. If you dont smoke marijuana and you think it is bad b Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetic Smoke Marijuana?

Can A Diabetic Smoke Marijuana?

I love California. This November, Californians will have the opportunity to vote on a measure that would legalize marijuana use and sale in the state. Adults over the age of 21 would be allowed to carry up to an ounce of marijuana, and they would be allowed to cultivate for personal usage up to 25 square feet of cannabis plants. As of April 2009, 56% of Californians surveyed supported the legalization and taxation of pot. Let me be clear: I like this idea because I think it’s silly to have so much of our criminal justice system tied up with drug charges, and because I giggle at the absurdity of the fact that our state government is essentially saying, “Well, if you can’t beat ’em…” In other words, my reasons for liking this proposal, and for liking California, have nothing to do with the drug itself. In fact, pot itself is a big open question for me– namely: Can a diabetic smoke pot? I don’t mean “can” here as a verb of possibility or survivability. What I mean is– is it a good idea for a type 1 diabetic to smoke pot? How does marijuana affect blood sugar control and management, in terms of both behavior and biology? Lacking any personal experience in the matter, I first turn to the internet to answer these questions. The first thing I note: many other people are wondering the same thing. Rarely does Google pre-fill queries I have about diabetes, but this one Google is all over: “marijuana and diabetes,” “marijuana diabetes type 1,” “marijuana diabetes type 2,” “marijuana diabetes treatment,” and so on. The results of these queries are full of accounts from people with the personal experience I don’t have. There are apparently many message boards, either diabetes-focused or pot-focused, that have touched on the question of whether Continue reading >>

Drugs Know The Score

Drugs Know The Score

Learning when you are going to have a hypo, recognising the warning signs and knowing what your limits are could save your life, however if you decide to experiment with drugs this becomes difficult to do. You may already know the some of the risks with drugs and how that can affect your health and that there are legal and illegal drugs but you may not be aware of how they can affect you if you have diabetes. Know the facts! Different drugs affect people in different ways. It depends on how your body handles it, how much you have and what you are using. Most recreational drugs can be divided into 3 main groups depending on the effect they have on the body. The information below tells you how different drugs affect your diabetes and this is in addition to the usual effects of the specified drug. 1. Uppers (Stimulants) Includes drugs such as speed, ecstasy, cocaine and nicotine in cigarettes. They speed up your heart rate, affect the way you think and even how you speak. Cigarettes - how they will affect your diabetes The nicotine in cigarettes is a stimulant, smoking will make your heart beat faster and work harder, this can give you problems later on in life. With diabetes you need to take extra care of your heart and circulation. Remember that any drug that changes your rate of metabolism could also affect your blood glucose levels. Regular blood testing of your glucose is important to keep you in control. Speed - How It Will Affect Your Diabetes Borrowed sugar - Although dealers sometimes mix speed with glucose, its not enough to give you the extra energy you need to get through the night - that comes from your own blood glucose reserves. The more active you are, the more vulnerable you are to a hypo. Day and Night, because you won’t feel like eating or sleeping, yo Continue reading >>

Marijuana And Gestational Diabetes

Marijuana And Gestational Diabetes

I'm currentlly 23 weeks and have gestational diabetes, I wanna know if marijuana helps lower my blood sugar, I don't smoke it and haven't for 4 years but I have a neighboor who smokes constintly(health reasons) the smoke does come in to our appartment occasionaly. So weather I want to or not I inhale the smoke I want to know if it messes with my Gestational diabetes , I know girls who smoked weed while pregnant and nothing ever happend to their babies(not justifying) but I'm really interested in knowing what happends with marijuana and gestational diabetes. If you are going to be judgemental and stupid about you answer please don't bother. Just because other people have done it and nothing happened to their babies doesn't mean your baby will be healthy. Smoking weed while pregnant is like smoking cigarrettes while pregnant. Your baby could have low birth weight, asthma all kinds of things. You also have to remember that putting that drug in your system also puts it in your babies system and thats not good. I would find another way to deal with my gestational diabetes, plenty of other women have had it over the years and they all found a way to deal. I don't really think that marijana will do anything with your blood sugar anyway. It shouldn't have anything to do with your blood sugar levels, as GD is hormonal and not something that comes from exposure to some other environmental element. BUT, unless you're following the munchies the smoke wafts into your space and eating all kinds of stuff, your blood sugar shouldn't be effected. :) Anti-pot advocates would have you believe that pot is always evil, but there've been many studies done showing moderate amounts of pot during pregnancy have absolutely no negative effect on a baby. Pot and cigarettes are very different. For Continue reading >>

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