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Is V8 Good For Diabetics

Juices That Are Good For Type 2 Diabetics

Juices That Are Good For Type 2 Diabetics

Living with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) involves limiting foods that could raise blood sugar to high levels. Juice can be a part of an overall healthy diet in limited amounts. Keeping serving sizes to 4 ounces or less -- about 1/2 cup -- limits the carbohydrate load. Fruit juice is sometimes helpful to treat low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, due to the fast absorption of the sugar. The nutrient quality of juices varies, so it's helpful to know which juices are healthier choices. There are also alternatives to drinking plain juice that can help limit your carbohydrate intake. Video of the Day Vegetable juice is a lower-carbohydrate alternative to fruit juice. For example, a 4-ounce glass of a tomato-based vegetable juice contains 5.5 g of carbohydrate. However, a 4-ounce serving of a similar vegetable-fruit juice blend typically has 13.7 g of carbohydrate. Low-level inflammation is a contributing factor to insulin resistance and T2DM, particularly in people who are overweight. The authors of a June 2013 "British Journal of Nutrition" study report found that overweight and obese women experienced reduced inflammation after drinking about 1.5 cups of tomato juice daily for 3 weeks. These findings suggest that tomato-based vegetable juice and tomato juice can be good, low-carbohydrate juice options -- and might assist in reducing inflammation. When choosing a fruit juice, the American Diabetes Association recommends 100 percent fruit juice with no added sugar. Pomegranate, cranberry and grape juice all contain a high concentration of antioxidants, according to research published in January 2010 in "Nutrition Journal." Foods rich in antioxidants might help prevent or limit damage caused by an overabundance of free radicals, chemicals that can injure cells. Excess accumulation of Continue reading >>

According To A Doctor, You Shouldn't Have Had A V8

According To A Doctor, You Shouldn't Have Had A V8

If you've ever found yourself wondering when you last ate a real fruit or vegetable (and no, you can't survive on mimosas and avocado toast alone), listen up. The USDA recommends between the ages of 19 and 30, women have 2 1/2 cups and men have 3 cups of fruits and vegetables per day. But between school and work and going out for pizza with friends, it's not always possible to get all your fruits and veggies in. To make up for the missing nutrients, some people are quick to reach for vitamins or supplements, and juices like V8. However, like the commercial says, could you really just have had a V8? To get to the bottom of this, I asked my mom, who happens to be a family medicine doctor, and Annette Washington, a recent Masters of Nutrition graduate on the path to becoming a Registered Dietitian. Apparently everyone is trying to go the juice route, because both my mother and Annette said it was a very common question. My mother laughed when I asked her if drinking a V8 is healthy and said, "Compared to what? A Venti Frappacino from Starbucks? Yes. Whole fruits and vegetables? Definitely not." So, it's not exactly unhealthy, but there's definitely some pros and cons. Con: Sugar Content and Added Flavors "The problem with V8 is that when you juice fruits and vegetables, you are losing some of the "good stuff" like fiber, and with bottled juices, you end up getting extra things like added sugars and sodium," Washington says. You see, fruit is full of carbs — natural sugars and fiber. When they're blended or juiced, the sugars are released, which removes the insoluble fiber. When eating fruit, the fiber slows down the body's absorption of fructose (sugar), which is processed by your liver. But when it's juiced, the broken down fiber allows our body to quickly absorb the fr Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

Diabetic Snacking On The Go, Finding Good Snacks Away From Home

Diabetic Snacking On The Go, Finding Good Snacks Away From Home

Diabetic snacking on the go is a fact of life for a type 2 diabetic. Here are some ways to lower your stress about finding good food away from home. Running errands, taking kids places or waiting in doctor's offices means you may need to eat on the go. What can you do if that happens? You can find good snacks anywhere. If your kids want a Happy Meal, you do not have to do without. One of those fruit and yogurt parfaits makes a great diabetic snack. It has yogurt and berries. Leave off the super sweet granola topping for diabetic snacking without guilt. Are you shopping for groceries? Here are some super low calorie foods you can snack on there. Begin in the produce section with apples and pears, carrots and celery, or a small ready made salad. All of them take nearly as many calories to digest as there are in the foods themselves. A small container of strawberries, blueberries or fresh cherries has very few calories, and diabetic snacking on these superfoods is always a good idea. Or try one of the new yogurt smoothies in the dairy section. But first read the label to make sure the smoothie does not have lots of added sugar. For a good salty pretzel, try Newman's Own Organic Pretzels. In 22 pretzels there are 120 calories. You will also eat 4 grams of fiber and 5 of protein along with 22 grams of carbohydrate. Not bad for a crunchy snack. If you want chips, the baked ones are best. Look for whole grain or try the veggie chips. The best whole grain cracker at Walmart is a Wheat Thin or Ryvita. Read the labels and watch for added sugar in some of the flavored types. You could find a snack size bag and add some string cheese. The whole grain, protein and fat will keep you going for hours without the low that comes later from eating carbohydrates alone. Granola bars are ful Continue reading >>

Is V8 Good For You?

Is V8 Good For You?

Vegetable juices have become big business these days, and V8 is perhaps the best-known brand of vegetable juice. It’s portable, comes in all sorts of flavors, and is touted as being able to help you meet your daily vegetable quota. You’ve likely heard the brand’s slogan: “Could’ve had a V8,” but the question is, should you? While it contains nutrients from all sorts of vegetables, V8 should not take the place of eating vegetables. Nutrients are lost and most of the fiber is removed during processing of vegetable juices like V8. They also have added components that are of questionable nutritional value. Purported Benefits of V8 From soda to fruit-flavored juices, an array of clearly unhealthy drinks is available on the market. V8 is made from vegetables, and contains many of the same nutrients you’d find in whole vegetables. According to the company’s official website, V8 contains the juice of eight vegetables: beets carrots celery lettuce parsley tomatoes spinach watercress Due to the types of vegetables used, V8 is considered a source of vitamins A, C, and E. The juice also is considered low in cholesterol and fat. Given this nutritional information, many people seek out the convenience of V8 as an alternative to eating plain vegetables. The Pitfalls of Vegetable Juice Drinking V8 certainly isn’t as bad as drinking non-nutritive drinks like soda, but the juice may have some surprising drawbacks. The pureeing process used to juice the vegetables removes a large portion of their fiber content. Fiber, found in vegetables and other foods, is extremely important because it: keeps you full prevents weight gain caused by overeating regulates blood sugar prevents constipation protects against heart disease Whole raw, as well as cooked, vegetables offer a vari Continue reading >>

What To Drink With Diabetes?

What To Drink With Diabetes?

Is there anything good for diabetes you can buy in a bottle and drink? If not, what can you drink that’s healthy? Beverages to avoid First off, do not drink bottled fruit juice. Health author Joy Bauer rated fruit juice the number one worst food for diabetes. Most bottled juice is not 100% juice and has additional sugar added. But according to Bauer, “Fruit juices, even 100% fruit juices, are chock-full of fruit sugar and cause a sharp spike in blood sugar.” Juice has a very high glycemic index, which means the sugar gets into your blood very fast. According to diabetes.co.uk, unsweetened orange juice has a glycemic index between 66 and 76, higher than most chocolate cake. People with diabetes do not have enough insulin to keep up with such a fast surge of sugar. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) agrees. “Avoid sugary drinks like regular soda, fruit punch, fruit drinks, energy drinks, sports drinks, or sweet tea. They can provide several hundred calories in just one serving. ADA advises tea, coffee, water, or milk instead. They do say that less than 4 ounces of juice at a meal might be manageable for some people with diabetes. There are other problems with juice besides the sugar. Compared to whole fruits and vegetables, juice has almost no fiber. Bottled juice is usually stored in massive oxygen-depleted holding tanks for up to a year before it is packaged. Then lost flavor iss restored with “flavor packs.” Recent studies, however, have shown that juice does have some benefits. It helps prevent cancer and heart disease as well as whole fruits. It has more nutritional benefits than sodas, even if the sugar spike is just as bad. Dietitian Amy Campbell says vegetable juices such as V8 are healthier can be drunk in larger amounts than the sweeter juices. Continue reading >>

Simple Steps For Eating And Living Better With Diabetes

Simple Steps For Eating And Living Better With Diabetes

Registered dietitian Jackie Newgent, author of the newly-released The All-Natural Diabetes Cookbook, provides simple steps that people with diabetes (and everyone who wants to make positive lifestyle changes) can take to manage calories, lose weight and follow a balanced eating plan. Her steps are below; you can also get a free booklet from the Amercian Diabetes Association (ADA) by clicking the link below. Veg Out! The ADA recommends increasing vegetable intake, which can even include drinking your veggies! Research suggests that people who eat more vegetables do so in place of higher calorie foods, which can help spur weight loss. Here are ways to get more vegetables: Choose a ‘rainbow’ of colorful vegetables and fruits to add variety and enjoyment while maximizing nutrient consumption. Go for non-starchy vegetables like leafy greens, carrots, broccoli or tomatoes. Move veggies from the side to the center of the plate as the main entrée. Pile sandwiches high with your favorite fresh or grilled varieties. Drink your vegetables with V8® 100% vegetable juice – each 8-ounce glass provides two full servings (one cup) of veggies! If you’re cutting back on sodium, try the Low Sodium V8 100% vegetable juice. Join the Breakfast Club. Research suggests that people who regularly eat breakfast tend to be leaner compared to those who miss their morning meals. Go for a bowl of whole grain cereal like oatmeal topped with fruit and low-fat milk or, if you’re in a hurry, toast some whole grain bread, spread with 2 tablespoons of peanut butter and grab a 12-ounce bottle of Low Sodium V8 100% vegetable juice as you head out the door. Be Keen on Protein. Try to include lean protein such as fish and seafood, pork tenderloin, boneless/skinless chicken breast, lean beef, or bean Continue reading >>

V8 100% Vegetable Juice Aids In Weight Loss And Lowers Blood Pressure

V8 100% Vegetable Juice Aids In Weight Loss And Lowers Blood Pressure

Decades of studies have documented the link between eating a diet rich in vegetables and multiple health benefits, yet nearly eight out of 10 people worldwide fall short of the daily recommendation. Research presented at the International Symposium on Human Health Effects of Fruits and Vegetables suggests the best approach may be to focus on the factors that are often behind this vegetable gap: convenience and enjoyment. Two studies presented at the symposium found that the addition of vegetable juice in people's diets was a successful strategy to help them reach the vegetable guidelines (at least 4 servings per day). In fact, the addition of a portable drink, such as V8- 100% vegetable juice, was more successful than an approach that focused solely on nutrition education, or offering dietary counseling on ways to increase vegetable intake. Researchers at the University of California-Davis conducted a 12-week study among adults ages 40-65 years. All of the people in the study who drank at least two cups of vegetable juice met daily vegetable recommendations, yet only seven percent of the non-juice drinkers met the goal. The participants in the study with borderline high blood pressure who drank one to two servings of V8 juice lowered their blood pressure significantly. According to the research, the vegetable juice drinkers said they enjoyed the juice and felt like they were doing something good for themselves by drinking it. "Enjoyment is so critical to developing eating habits you can stick with for the long-term," said study co-author Carl Keen, PhD, Professor of Nutrition and Internal Medicine at the University of California-Davis. "Health and nutrition professionals must help people find simple ways for people to get their vegetables or they simply won't do it, and Continue reading >>

What Drinks Are Good And Bad For People With Diabetes?

What Drinks Are Good And Bad For People With Diabetes?

When a person has diabetes, insulin, a hormone that helps cells absorb glucose, is either nonexistent or in short supply. A person with diabetes is unable to use insulin properly, which causes sugars to build up in the blood. Diabetes can be dangerous if it is not properly managed. Different drinks can affect blood sugar levels in a number of ways. Contents of this article: The best drinks for people with diabetes The following drinks are good choices for people with diabetes. Things to look out for when choosing a drink Many drinks contain lots of sugars and carbohydrates. Paying attention to food labels and nutritional facts can provide important information. Labels should state the serving size and carbohydrate content of any drink. People with diabetes have different bodily needs, so there are no exact dietary rules. However, some tips can help. To make it easier to control blood sugar, it is important to: eat a balanced diet and manage the amount of carbohydrate consumed keep carbohydrate levels consistent from day to day consume managed amounts of carbohydrate, because the brain and body need some carbohydrate to function. Paying attention to food labels and nutritional facts can provide important information. Labels should state the serving size and carbohydrate content of any drink. The worst drinks for people with diabetes The following drinks are bad choices for people with diabetes. Soda and energy drinks Sodas and other sugar-sweetened beverages can increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. For people who already have diabetes, this type of drink provides large amounts of sugar and requires little digestion. Drinking sodas without healthy food can lead to large spikes in blood sugar levels. As it is important to spread carbohydrate intake out evenly, it would be Continue reading >>

Beverage Dos And Don'ts For Diabetes

Beverage Dos And Don'ts For Diabetes

To successfully manage type 2 diabetes, plan your beverages as carefully as you plan your food choices. That typically means taking sugary drinks — such as soda, sweet tea, and even juice — off the table. You might be surprised at how much a single drink can affect you when you have type 2 diabetes. Drinking just one soda a day is associated with developing type 2 diabetes, according to 2013 research in the journal PLoS One. When you are faced with so many new constraints on sugar and other carbs after a diabetes diagnosis, you may be left asking, “What can I still drink?” Fortunately, there’s a variety of refreshing, flavorful beverages you can enjoy, says Katherine Basbaum, RD, a clinical dietitian in the Cardiology and Cardiac Rehabilitation departments at the University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville. Before you take your next sip, here are the top drinking dos and don’ts for those with diabetes. Do Drink: Water Water is one of the few beverages you can drink without worry throughout the day and a great way to stay hydrated. If you often forget to drink as much water as you should, Basbaum has a suggestion for increasing your intake: Drink one 8-ounce glass of water for every other beverage you drink that contains sugar substitutes or caffeine. Shake things up with sparkling water or by squeezing lemon or lime juice into your glass. Do Drink: Skim Milk “Skim or low-fat milk is also a good beverage option, but it must be counted toward your carb total for a particular meal or snack,” Basbaum says. Cow’s milk also provides protein and calcium. Be aware that non-dairy options, such as almond milk, may have added sweeteners and flavorings. Don’t Drink: Sugar-Sweetened Soda or Tea “Sugar-sweetened drinks are absorbed into your bloodstr Continue reading >>

Can You Drink Vegetable Juice With Type 2 Diabetes?

Can You Drink Vegetable Juice With Type 2 Diabetes?

Juicing – both fruit juice and vegetable juice – is a popular health trend that claims to offer valuable benefits. After all, you're running whole fruits and vegetables through a juice machine. This liquefies the produce and removes most of the pulp and fiber, creating a smooth beverage that makes it easy for you to drink your nutrients. But, is juicing as healthy as it sounds? Particularly if you have type 2 diabetes? Well, the answer mostly depends on what you put in your juice! For instance, if you use only apples in your recipe, then your juice won’t really be diabetic friendly because apples are high in carbs and you'll be chugging down straight sugar. We've written previously on fruit juicing over here – and that's not something we recommend for you as a diabetic. But, if you purchase or make a juice that is heavy in leafy greens and other non starchy vegetables, and contains a small portion of low carb fruits, then you’ve got a great supplement to drink on the odd occasion. Drinking vegetable juice can be a good way to get in those daily vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants… just as long as you do it the right way! Store bought vs. homemade juice comparison Thankfully, juicing has become so common that you can walk into almost any grocery store and find juice made of vegetables, fruits, or a mixture of both. Health food stores and specialty stores may have fresh juice made in house, which is usually located in the refrigerator section. Or you can find a can or bottle of juice like V8 pretty much anywhere, even at convenience stores! So, is store bought juice any less healthy for you than homemade juice? The answer: not really. In theory, fresh juice is better for you, but you can buy a premade juice that contains just as much nutrition – if you choo Continue reading >>

What Juices Can Diabetics Drink?

What Juices Can Diabetics Drink?

Along with a diabetes-healthy diet, diabetics may consume certain fruit juices, but in moderation. Whole fruits, however, are a better and healthier choice than juices. Juice and Diabetes Juices, such as grapefruit juice, pineapple juice and orange juice, if taken in moderation, are considered appropriate for diabetics. All types of citrus fruit juices are superfood for diabetics as they are nutrient-rich, says American Diabetes Association (ADA). Apart from citrus juices, diabetics may also drink apple juice for it is rich in fibre, lemon juice as it is low on carbs, tomato juice as it is low on sugar content and carrot juice as it is juiced raw. All fruit juices, however, also contain significant amount of sugar, which can cause blood sugar levels to spike. Therefore, moderate consumption of fruit juices is advised. Carbs from juices also adds to your total intake of carbohydrates for the day. Having juice along with the meal can surely reduce the effects of sugar content of the juice. While citrus juices are low on Glycemic Index table, pineapple and orange juice is rated 46 and grapefruit juice is rated 48. Factors Diabetics should Consider Consumption of carbs present in the juices results in increased blood sugar levels, though the impact varies from individual to individual. Here are a few points that diabetics should consider if they wish to consume juices or other beverages. The recommended amount of a fruit or any other drink is 4 oz. per day. Drinking juices separately can lead to quicker spike in blood glucose level. Added sugar in the juices is a major concern for the diabetic’s well-being. Fruit and vegetable juice prepared with the original pulp is a good choice for diabetics. Two of the best juices for diabetics include apple and carrot juice. Recommen Continue reading >>

Should I Have A V8 Fusion Energy Drink?

Should I Have A V8 Fusion Energy Drink?

Popular energy drinks like Monster, Full Throttle, and Red Bull have helped create a $7.6 billion United States industry over the last decade. Continued growth is expected with an anticipated growth to $19.7 billion in sales by 2013. These drinks typically contain the stimulant caffeine as well as other ingredients such as taurine, guarana and B vitamins all claiming to provide energy. The term "energy drinks" was created by beverage industry companies but is not a category currently recognized by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). There is limited evidence that these drinks improve physical or mental performance, improve mental fatigue or alertness. It is also unclear in the literature whether any improvements were the result of caffeine, the other herbal ingredients, sugar present in some drinks, or some combination of these ingredients. Now two new energy drinks tempt us with the appeal of 100 percent vegetable and fruit juice in the new V8 Fusion Energy and V8 Energy Shot drinks. Offered in tempting flavor combinations such as pomegranate/blueberry or peach/mango some are already on shelves in over 2,400 Wal-Mart stores. Is the new mix of well-known vegetable juice with caffeine, vitamins, and green tea a source of energy packed fruit and vegetables servings you should including in your healthy eating plan? The new My Plate icon reminds us that half our meals should consist of healthy fruits and vegetables to ensure we are getting key nutrients such as folate, potassium, vitamins A, C and K as well as dietary fiber. Including fruits and vegetables in meals and snacks also help people meet weight goals and reduce risks of chronic disease. One way to meet the daily goal of five or more fruits and Continue reading >>

Unhealthy Drinks: Are These 11 'healthy' Drinks Good For Us?

Unhealthy Drinks: Are These 11 'healthy' Drinks Good For Us?

The shocking nutritional facts about many sugar-loaded drinks have been well telegraphed. You should probably stay away from a Starbucks Venti Iced White Chocolate Mocha and the number of calories in a Wendy's Caramel Frosy Shake will blow your mind. Meanwhile, a new Harvard study linked almost 200,000 deaths worldwide with consuming sugary drinks such as sodas, sports drinks and fruit drinks, as they contribute to diabetes, cancer and heart disease. But what about our go-to drinks for a healthy alternative? We've been told ginger teas can cure common colds and beet juice can cleanse our livers, but there are still many misconceptions about the health benefits of so-called diet or nourishing drinks. Registered dietitian Patricia Chuey of Vancouver says these days, it's common to be confused by nutritional labelling on healthy products like the latest coconut juice or "miracle tea." "Who doesn't like the idea of drinking something and having more energy?" Chuey says. "It seems like a quick way to get a boost in your day, although there is very little, if any, science to back up these notions." Eating fresh fruits and vegetables is the best option, but not everyone has the time to eat their recommended daily amount. Chuey says there are ways to see if you're getting the most nutritious beverage. "A healthy beverage supplies fluid for hydration that is not adulterated by excess sugar, salt, artificial colours, excess caffeine or additives," she tells The Huffington Post Canada. "Ideally, it should not be excessive in calories and offers some meaningful nutrients such as vitamin A or C." This may leave you few options to choose from, but Chuey says this doesn't have to be the case. Water — probably the healthiest drink for your body — should be a priority, but homemade Continue reading >>

Raw Vegetable Juice For Diabetics

Raw Vegetable Juice For Diabetics

A healthy diet is important in managing your diabetes, and vegetables are essential in a balanced diabetes diet. Rich in vitamins, minerals and dietary fiber, but low in calories and carbohydrates, vegetables make an excellent diabetes-friendly menu option. Juicing vegetables is an acceptable alternative to eating them whole. Video of the Day The American Diabetes Association recommends that you consume at least three to five servings of nonstarchy vegetables daily. A single serving of raw, whole vegetables is 1 cup, and a serving of vegetable juice is 1/2 cup. Nonstarchy vegetables have a low glycemic index and contain very few carbohydrates. This means they will not cause a sudden spike in your blood glucose. Nonstarchy vegetables help promote healthy and stable blood glucose levels. However, keep in mind that processing tends to increase a food’s glycemic index, so vegetable juice will likely have a higher glycemic index than whole vegetables. Juicing is a good way to fulfill your daily recommended intake of vegetables, especially if you don't care for the taste of vegetables. Vegetables and fruits can be juiced together for a juice that tastes like fruit, but also provides the benefits of vegetables. Vegetable juice does not contain nearly as much fiber as whole vegetables; a lot of the fiber in vegetables comes from skin and seeds, often are eliminated during juicing. So keep eating whole vegetables, too. Dark green leafy vegetables rank as superfoods with the American Diabetes Association. So try incorporating vegetables such as spinach, collards and kale into your juices. Prepare a juice from spinach, cucumber, celery, carrots and green apple. Another option is juicing kale with celery and pineapple, or carrots with kiwi. Or try a juice that includes beets, spi Continue reading >>

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