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Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible Nhs

Treatment

Treatment

Treatment for diabetes aims to keep your blood glucose levels as normal as possible and control your symptoms to prevent health problems developing later in life. If you've been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, your GP will be able to explain your condition in detail and help you understand your treatment. They'll also closely monitor your condition to identify any health problems that may occur. If there are any problems, you may be referred to a hospital-based diabetes care team. Making lifestyle changes If you're diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, you'll need to look after your health very carefully for the rest of your life. This may seem daunting, but your diabetes care team will be able to give you support and advice about all aspects of your treatment. After being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, or if you're at risk of developing the condition, the first step is to look at your diet and lifestyle and make any necessary changes. Three major areas that you'll need to look closely at are: You may be able to keep your blood glucose at a safe and healthy level without the need for other types of treatment. Lifestyle changes Diet Increasing the amount of fibre in your diet and reducing your sugar and fat intake, particularly saturated fat, can help prevent type 2 diabetes, as well as manage the condition if you already have it. You should: increase your consumption of high-fibre foods, such as wholegrain bread and cereals, beans and lentils, and fruit and vegetables choose foods that are low in fat – replace butter, ghee and coconut oil with low-fat spreads and vegetable oil choose skimmed and semi-skimmed milk, and low-fat yoghurts eat fish and lean meat rather than fatty or processed meat, such as sausages and burgers grill, bake, poach or steam food instead of frying Continue reading >>

Can We Really Prevent Type 2 Diabetes?

Can We Really Prevent Type 2 Diabetes?

The UK is making a serious attempt to prevent type 2 diabetes. We know that the development of type 2 diabetes is strongly driven by excess weight and low levels of physical activity. High quality trials have shown that this process is reversible through lifestyle change. The NHS England “One You ” national diabetes prevention programme aims to tackle this problem by offering support to help people who are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes to lose weight and get more physically active. In theory this sounds like a great idea and one that is very welcome in a service delivery landscape where prevention services that support healthy lifestyles (weight management, exercise on referral, smoking cessation) are being decimated as local authorities (who host public health services) respond to massive funding cuts. However, as always, the devil is in the detail. NHSE have tried to specify programmes based on evidence about what works or doesn’t work. However, evidence to date has shown that real world diabetes prevention programmes deliver only around a third to a half of the weight loss achieved in clinical trials and reduce diabetes incidence by around 25%. This may reflect differences in the populations treated (less motivated, higher deprivation, lower education levels, more barriers to change). Or it may reflect differences in quality of delivery and monitoring of quality when moving from highly monitored and expert-led clinical trial settings to real world delivery in a diverse range of community settings. The results from our ComPoD study (a multi-site trial of a prototype for the Living Well Taking Control programme – which is one of four programmes being used in the One You national programme) and the Norfolk Diabetes Prevention Study – will provide furth Continue reading >>

Is It Possible To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes?

Is It Possible To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes?

Once you have type 2 diabetes, is it possible to reverse it? I am a bit of a foodie and was diagnosed with it last year. I would do anything not to have it hanging over me. J Frinton, by email A Dr DAN RUTHERFORD WRITES: Most people with type 2 diabetes are overweight and their high blood glucose is due to two main factors. One is a drop in the ability of their pancreas gland to produce insulin (which lowers blood glucose), and the other is that the tissues of the body become “resistant” to the effect of insulin, so their blood glucose goes up. Losing weight improves blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetes and is a central part of the treatment. In some people, especially those who have not been diabetic for long and who have been successful at getting rid of excess weight, one does sometimes see the need for diabetes medication disappear. Regular exercise boosts this potential reversibility. This seems to be due to a partial recovery of the insulin-producing power of the pancreas combined with a drop in “insulin resistance”. Although some people who do this remain diabetes-free, this is mainly dependent on them not putting excess weight back on. One of the reasons that type 2 diabetes is usually not reversible, which is also one of the great challenges of this disease, is that by the time most people are diagnosed, they have actually been diabetic for several years and have already lost half or more of the insulin-producing cells from their pancreas. Type 1 diabetes, where no insulin is produced by the pancreas, is not reversible and always needs regular insulin injections. Related Articles Tom Hanks reveals he has Type 2 diabetes 08 Oct 2013 Safety alert for 20,000 diabetes sufferers 11 Apr 2013 Lifecoach: Do breathing exercises help with long-term asthma? 13 Continue reading >>

Changing Health Welcomes Direct Diabetes Research

Changing Health Welcomes Direct Diabetes Research

Media Statement Tuesday December 5 2017: Changing Health, the digital education and support service for people with Type 2 diabetes, has welcomed new research from Diabetes UK’s DiRECT programme announced today. ‘We welcome the new research from Diabetes UK. It suggests that they have made a breakthrough in understanding how to put Type 2 diabetes into remission. While we need to be cautious because this is only the first year of a two year trial, this trial is transforming how we think about type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is reversible for a significant proportion of people with the right lifestyle changes. The challenge is now about translating these findings at scale. ,’ said Professor Mike Trenell, one of the authors of the paper and Chief Science Officer at Changing Health. DiRECT is a two-year trial testing if a weight management programme based on a low-calorie diet can be used to put Type 2 diabetes into remission and be delivered entirely in primary care. Changing Health’s CEO, John Grumitt, said ‘The good news for the NHS and CCGs is that this is yet more evidence that effective, clinically driven education programmes can make a life changing difference to the lives of people at risk or suffering from Type 2 diabetes. What used to be a life sentence now looks like it may – in some circumstances – be reversible. At Changing Health we have demonstrated remission of Type 2 diabetes and have this available to the NHS today, at scale.’ Changing Health has contracts with 16 NHS organisations running across England reaching 241,675 people with Type 2 diabetes. Data from Changing Health’s programme shows average reduction in weight of 7.4kg, a mean reduction in HBA1c of 6.8mmol.mol. This would equate to a 34% remission rate based on DiRECT data. On Continue reading >>

Diabetes Increase Putting Nhs Future 'at Stake'

Diabetes Increase Putting Nhs Future 'at Stake'

INDYPULSE Diabetes increase putting NHS future 'at stake' Tackling diabetes is “fundamental” to the future of NHS as the number of adults with the condition nears four million, Public Health England has warned. Around 3.8 million adults in England now have diabetes, with at least 940,000 of those undiagnosed, new figures have revealed. About 90 per cent of the cases are Type 2 diabetes, which is linked to being overweight and obese and therefore largely preventable, PHE, who released the data, said. The other 10 per cent are Type 1, which usually develops in childhood and is often inherited. Diabetes can lead to serious health complications including limb amputation, kidney disease, stroke and heart attacks. Treating the disease and the complications arising from it costs the NHS around £10 billion annually. John Newton, chief knowledge officer at PHE, said: "The number of people with diabetes has been steadily increasing and tackling it is fundamental to the sustainable future of the NHS. "Diabetes can be an extremely serious disease for those that have it and treating it and its complications costs the NHS almost £10bn a year. "Developing Type 2 diabetes is not an inevitable part of ageing. We have an opportunity through public health to reverse this trend and safeguard the health of the nation and the future of the NHS." The new Diabetes Prevalence Model was launched ahead of PHE's conference at Warwick University. It shows that 9 per cent of people aged 45 to 54 have diabetes, but this rises to 23.8 per cent of those aged over 75. Earlier this month, senior health officials warned that smokers and obese people will be denied surgery on the NHS by cash-strapped hospital trying to save money. Vale of York Care Commissioning Group announced it will make people wa Continue reading >>

What Are The Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes?

What Are The Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes?

The 14th of November is World Diabetes Day! We’re highlighting the symptoms of type 2 diabetes ahead of this year’s World Diabetes Day campaign, which is focusing on women specifically. The International Diabetes Federation is promoting the importance of affordable and equitable access to the essential diabetes medicines and technologies, self-management education and information women require to achieve optimal diabetes outcomes and strengthen their capacity to prevent type 2 diabetes. At OurPath, we focus on helping people reduce their risk of type 2 diabetes or its complications. Type 2 diabetes affects over 4 million people in the UK, with a further 5 million at risk of developing it. It costs the NHS £9bn a year, and in most cases can actually be prevented or delayed through simple lifestyle changes. Our 12-week programme is designed to help people make those changes and stick to them in the long-term. So what is diabetes? In a nutshell diabetes means blood sugar levels are not regulated properly. It all comes down to the hormone known as insulin and what the body does with it. The purpose of insulin is to control the glucose levels in the bloodstream. Yet in people living with diabetes either the pancreas has trouble producing sufficient, or any, insulin, or cells in the body don’t respond correctly to insulin. The result: poorly regulated blood sugar levels. There are two types of diabetes, type 1 and type 2. The main difference is that type 1 is an autoimmune disease, whereas type 2 can be brought about due to multiple factors, including lifestyle. Both affect blood sugar regulation and can have very serious long-term implications if not managed properly. What are some of the possible complications of developing diabetes? People with diabetes have much hi Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Cured In Four Months — If You Cut Calories And Exercise, Research Shows

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Cured In Four Months — If You Cut Calories And Exercise, Research Shows

Type 2 diabetes can be reversed in just four months by cutting calories, exercising and keeping glucose under control, a trial has shown. The trial involved creating a personalized exercise regime for each participant and reducing their calories by between 500 and 750 a day. Participants also met regularly with a nurse and dietician to track progress and continued to take medication and insulin to manage their blood sugar levels. After just four months, 40 per cent of patients were able to stop taking their medication because their bodies had begun to produce adequate amounts of insulin again. The researchers said the program worked because it gave the insulin-producing pancreas “a rest and decreases fat stores in the body, which in turn improves insulin production and effectiveness.” Dr. Natalia McInnes, of McMaster University, Ontario, Canada, said: “The research might shift the paradigm of treating diabetes from simply controlling glucose to an approach where we induce remission and then monitor patients for any signs of relapse.” The number of people in the UK with type 2 diabetes has risen from 700,000 in the 1990s to 2.8 million today, according to new figures from Cardiff University. The condition costs the NHS about CAD$23 billion a year, but if the intervention worked at the same level for Britons, then more than one million people could be cured. The condition occurs when an individual does not produce enough insulin — the hormone that allows cells to absorb glucose into the blood — or when the insulin that is produced does not work properly. It can lead to kidney disease and blindness and increases the risk of a heart attack and stroke. Diabetes UK is currently funding a large trial to find out if a low calorie diet can put type 2 diabetes into re Continue reading >>

'more People Need To Know Type 2 Diabetes Is Reversible' Argues Report

'more People Need To Know Type 2 Diabetes Is Reversible' Argues Report

What is the issue? "Type 2 diabetes could be beaten into remission if patients shed around 15kg, [2.4 stones]," reports BBC News. In the past type 2 diabetes was thought to be a lifelong condition. There is increasing evidence that even if it can't be cured, it is possible to put the condition into remission through weight loss. A pressing problem is, as The Daily Telegraph reports, that "less than 1 in 1,000 people" achieve remission. Achieving weight loss through a combination of diet and exercise could mean that you do not have to start taking medication for type 2 diabetes. What is diabetes remission? Type 2 diabetes means the body can no longer maintain healthy blood sugar levels through production of the hormone insulin. When average blood sugar rises to harmful levels (usually described as 6.5% or 48mmol/moll HbA1c, a measure of long-term blood sugar control), people are diagnosed with diabetes. While improved diet and exercise is recommended, most people with diabetes are treated with anti-diabetic medicines to manage their blood sugar. The aim is to prevent the development of complications such as heart disease, leg ulcers and eye damage. Although many factors affect the development of type 2 diabetes, it often accompanies weight gain. In recent years, doctors have noticed that some obese patients who lose a lot of weight, whether through very low calorie diets or weight loss surgery, have blood sugar levels that drop back to normal, and stay that way without diabetes medicines. This has fueled interest in "reversing" diabetes through major weight loss. Instead of curing diabetes, doctors talk about diabetes being "in remission". This is because it can be a two-way process – if people put weight back on, they may become diabetic again. What is the basis for t Continue reading >>

Losing Weight Can Reverse Diabetes

Losing Weight Can Reverse Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is generally perceived as progressive and incurable, but for many patients it can be reversed with sustained weight loss of around 15 kg, say experts in The BMJ today. Louise McCombie at the University of Glasgow and colleagues including Professor Roy Taylor of Newcastle University say patients and doctors may not realise that type 2 diabetes can be reversed. They call for greater awareness, documentation, and surveillance of remissions to improve health outcomes and reduce healthcare costs. Type 2 diabetes now affects about 3.2 million people in the UK. The NHS currently spends almost £1bn (€1bn; $1.3bn) a year (£22m a day) on antidiabetes drugs, and costs are rising worldwide as diabetes rates and drug prices escalate. Current guidelines advise reducing blood sugar levels and cardiovascular risks, primarily with drugs and general lifestyle advice. But many patients still develop complications and life expectancy remains up to six years shorter than in people without diabetes, say the authors. The diagnosis also carries important social and financial penalties for individuals, as well as poor health prospects. In contrast, consistent evidence shows that weight loss is associated with extended life expectancy for people with diabetes, and that weight loss of around 15 kg often produces total remission of type 2 diabetes, they write. Achieving remission not only has health benefits, it produces a strong sense of personal achievement and empowerment, removes stigma, and may even reduce insurance premiums. Yet remission is rarely recorded, argue the authors. For example, a US study found remissions in only 0.14% of 120,000 patients followed for seven years, while the Scottish Care Information Diabetes database, which includes every patient in Scotland, Continue reading >>

Did ‘kuwtk’s Rob Kardashian Cure His Type 2 Diabetes? Reversible Claims Disputed

Did ‘kuwtk’s Rob Kardashian Cure His Type 2 Diabetes? Reversible Claims Disputed

In the media, Rob Kardashian has been cast as a shining example of someone that took control of their health to reach their goals with diabetes management. However, are the adjacent claims that Rob Kardashian “cured” his diabetes true in any way? For example, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the National Health Service (NHS) in the U.K. seem to agree that type 2 diabetes is not reversible and, therefore, Rob Kardashian cannot claim he cured his diabetes. Moreover, leading authorities seem to say that Rob Kardashian especially could not claim he had reversed his diabetes to the point that he could stop taking all medications simply by losing weight and changing his diet. In his announcement to TMZ, Rob Kardashian said that he followed the advice of doctors, and now he does not need to take his diabetes medication. This does not clarify if Rob Kardashian is now using non-insulin methods of controlling his blood sugar, monitoring his blood sugar levels, or improving insulin response with medications like Metformin. Adding to this, People says that Blac Chyna’s cooking “saved” Rob Kardashian, but this headline does not talk about curing him of diabetes. Instead, Black Chyna’s cooking helped Rob Kardashian with vital changes he needed to make to his diet following a full-blown diabetes health breakdown in December 2015. Sadly, the current evidence supported in 2016 by the National Institute of Health says researchers feel most people will develop type 2 diabetes due to genetics. On top of this, the ADA says type 2 diabetes can be worsened or brought on earlier than expected unless attention to lifestyle and diet is paid. Basic information guides about type 2 diabetes from reputable sources like Mayo Clinic also state that a person cannot simply lose we Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Is Reversible - Study Findings Mark ‘paradigm Shift’

Type 2 Diabetes Is Reversible - Study Findings Mark ‘paradigm Shift’

The Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial (DiRECT) – backed by an unprecedented £2.4m (€3.13m) grant from charity Diabetes UK – sought to test if a very low calorie diet could reverse type 2 diabetes mellitus and return glucose control to normal. In these first results a continuing remission of at least six months was seen in 40% of the participants who followed the eight-week weight loss programme – questioning the widely held belief that type 2 diabetes is an irreversible chronic condition. Co-author and professor of medicine and metabolism at Newcastle University, Roy Taylor, told us the data clearly shows when total body fat is decreased, people can store this fat safely under the skin and diabetes goes away. This stays in safe storage with normal glucose control provided weight does not increase again, he said. “T2DM [type 2 diabetes mellitus] can now be understood to be a metabolic syndrome potentially reversible by substantial weight loss, and this is an important paradigm shift,” ​wrote the researchers from the Newcastle University and University of Glasgow in the UK and Lagos State University in Nigeria. The participants were given Nestlé‘s OPTIFAST liquid diet formula product to be taken three times a day for eight weeks, which contained 43% carbohydrate, 34% protein and 19.5% fat amounting to 624 kcal per day before returning to a normal isocaloric diet. All oral drugs and insulins were stopped at the beginning of the trial. Twelve of the 30 participants achieved fasting plasma glucose of less than seven millimoles (mmol) per litre after returning to the isocaloric diet and 13 of the 30 after six months. Average baseline weight fell from 98 kg to 83.8 kg during the diet period and remained at 84.7 kg after six months. Professor Taylor said the n Continue reading >>

Fasting Diet Could Prove The Cure For Type 2 Diabetes

Fasting Diet Could Prove The Cure For Type 2 Diabetes

Periodic fasting could be used to reverse diabetes, scientists have said, after experiments showed that it “reset” pancreatic cells. The research in mice is the latest evidence that type 2 diabetes may be reversible after another team from Newcastle reported curing it in a small number of patients in 2015 using gastric band surgery and extreme weight loss. Three million people in the UK have type 2 diabetes. The number affected by the condition, which can be brought on by obesity, has soared in the past two decades but despite the cost to the NHS, it is still considered a chronic condition that can be managed but does not have a cure. However, scientists said yesterday that their “fasting mimicking diet” could be a way… Continue reading >>

We Need To Start Viewing Type 2 Diabetes As A Lifestyle Issue

We Need To Start Viewing Type 2 Diabetes As A Lifestyle Issue

Once patients are on the medical merry-go-round, there’s virtually no way off. Diabetes has got us in a quandary. Numbers of diabetics have more than doubled over the past two decades, with an estimated 3.5 million people currently diagnosed in the UK. Ten per cent of the entire NHS budget is spent treating it – there’s been an explosion of new, expensive pharmaceutical products capable of lowering blood sugar. And the medical profession is slowly waking up to the realisation that we are a large part of the problem. Diabetes comes in two types. Type 1 typically presents in childhood, when an aberrant immune system destroys the pancreas’s ability to make insulin. Type 1 diabetics need insulin therapy for life, and they’re a tiny minority of all diabetic patients. For the purposes of this column, forget about them. Type 2 diabetes is very different. It usually presents in mid- to late life, mostly as a consequence of obesity. In the early stages, the pancreas continues to make insulin, but the excess fat tissue in the body blunts its effect – so-called insulin resistance. Sugar levels rise, driving the pancreas to produce ever more insulin in a vain attempt to keep them under control. At this stage, type 2 diabetes is potentially reversible: if patients can lose weight then their insulin resistance reduces and demands on the pancreas decrease. Without weight loss, though, there comes a point when the escalating demand for insulin causes the pancreas to burn out, and insulin production begins to fail. At this stage, type 2 diabetes can no longer be reversed. Diabetes causes serious complications: blindness, kidney failure and heart disease, to name but three. Traditionally, doctors have doled out pills and injections to help prevent its sequelae. We perform reg Continue reading >>

News Changing Health Can Help Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

News Changing Health Can Help Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Tina C, 45, used the Changing Health service, which combines digital diabetes education with behavioural change coaching, to adopt a healthy diet she could sustain and an effective exercise plan over the 12 week study. She is now diabetes and medication free. Changing Health was also shown to have helped Tina lose 10% of her body weight, reduce her BMI from “overweight” classified 27 to “normal” classified 24, and reduce her body age by 15 years from 67 to 52. Over the 12 weeks her blood pressure dropped significantly from 121/81 to 100/63 and her cognition was shown to have improved. Tina said: “I was really shocked when Professor Trenell said the words ‘If Tina walked in now, I wouldn’t say Tina has type 2 diabetes – I’d say Tina had type 2 diabetes’. Before Changing Health I had to take a lot of medication to manage my diabetes, which made me feel terrible. I didn’t know I had the potential to take control of my health, this has changed my life.” Professor Trenell, who led the study, said: “Tina’s story demonstrates just how effective a lifestyle intervention can be in preventing diabetes. With the number of people at risk rapidly increasing year-on-year, we’re edging dangerously close to a full-blown public health crisis. It’s never been more important that people receive evidence-based education and personalised support to prevent or reverse their diabetes. That’s the solution Changing Health offers.” How to Stay Young airs at 9pm, Wednesday 27 September on BBC1 and is repeated on Sunday evening. Changing Health is prescribed by the NHS for people with, or at risk of Type 2 Diabetes. Find out more here: www.changinghealth.com Continue reading >>

Diabetes Fact Sheet

Diabetes Fact Sheet

The Big D: defeating diabetes through diet By Veronika Powell (formerly Charvatova) MSc, Viva!Health Campaigner As diabetes continues to spread all over the world, it is essential that an effective approach to its prevention and treatment is adopted. Current mainstream recommendations are not powerful enough and medication does not treat the condition. Diabetes mellitus is a health condition characterised by high levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood, which the body cannot use properly and eventually excretes in the urine (together with a lot of water). It is caused either by the pancreas not producing hormone insulin (or not enough of it) or by the body cells’ inability to react to insulin. Insulin is produced by the pancreas and acts as a key that lets glucose into the body’s cells. Glucose is a vital source of energy for the cells and thus the main fuel for the body’s processes. It comes from digesting carbohydrate and it’s also partially produced by the liver. Carbohydrates are the main nutrient in healthy foods such as wholegrain or rye bread, pasta, oats, brown rice, pulses (beans, peas, and lentils), sweet potatoes, and in not so healthy foods such as white bread, cakes, sweets and other sugary foods. If the body cannot use glucose as a source of energy, it uses fat instead but this inevitably disturbs biochemical balance of the body and leads to further health complications. Symptoms of diabetes include tiredness, irritability, nausea, hunger, weight loss, blurred vision, tingling sensations in the hands and feet and dry, itchy skin. Numbers skyrocketing In 1985 an estimated 30 million people worldwide had diabetes; a decade later this figure had increased to 135 million and by 2000 an estimated 171 million people had diabetes. It is predicted that at l Continue reading >>

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