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Is Type 2 Diabetes Is Reversible?

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Reversal of type 2 diabetes to normal metabolic control by either bariatric surgery or hypocaloric diet allows for the time sequence of underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms to be observed. In reverse order, the same mechanisms are likely to determine the events leading to the onset of hyperglycemia and permit insight into the etiology of type 2 diabetes. Within 7 days of instituting a substantial negative calorie balance by either dietary intervention or bariatric surgery, fasting plasma glucose levels can normalize. This rapid change relates to a substantial fall in liver fat content and return of normal hepatic insulin sensitivity. Over 8 weeks, first phase and maximal rates of insulin secretion steadily return to normal, and this change is in step with steadily decreasing pancreatic fat content. The difference in time course of these two processes is striking. Recent information on the intracellular effects of excess lipid intermediaries explains the likely biochemical basis, which simplifies both the basic understanding of the condition and the concepts used to determine appropriate management. Recent large, long-duration population studies on time course of plasma glucose and insulin secretion before the diagnosis of diabetes are consistent with this new understanding. Type 2 diabetes has long been regarded as inevitably progressive, requiring increasing numbers of oral hypoglycemic agents and eventually insulin, but it is now certain that the disease process can be halted with restoration of normal carbohydrate and fat metabolism. Type 2 diabetes can be understood as a potentially reversible metabolic state precipitated by the single cause of chronic excess intraorgan fat. Type 2 diabetes has long been known to progress despite glucose-lowering treatment, with 5 Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Is Reversible!

Type 2 Diabetes Is Reversible!

Diabetes is a huge subject in America and fingers are pointing everywhere. In order to live long, healthy, and productive lives, you should understand what it is and how to avoid it. Because the statistical chances of you getting it are growing every year! What is type 2 Diabetes? Type two is a case of high blood glucose caused by insulin resistance. Insulin is the substance our body secretes to change glucose (sugar) into energy. As sugar itself it not supposed to enter the blood stream, insulin breaks it down into transferable units to spread through the blood. However, your body can only naturally produce so much insulin before sugar levels can exceed insulin supply which can lead to hyperglycemia. Before the industrial sugar industry, most of our glucose came from fruits and carbohydrates in far smaller amounts. The body will experience health problems if it cannot balance out the level of glucose in your body. While type 1 diabetes is for people who cannot produce it, type 2 diabetes patients can produce the insulin but their body becomes resistant to the effects. Most cases of this type are now being attributed to diet rather than age as younger and younger people are being diagnosed. Diabetes Today Diabetes as we know it today did not exist 200 years ago. Sugar and other sweet substances were an indulgence and not a part of every day food. In saying that, our bodies were not designed by science or God to consume the amount of calories that an average American intakes. Obesity is not a new problem to our society and there’s far more to it than being fat. The human body is a miraculous machine but is not a body of miracles. It cannot turn lead into gold, or piles of burgers into muscle. Like a classic car, great care can produce great results. Diabetes is not a d Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Is A Reversible Condition

Type 2 Diabetes Is A Reversible Condition

A body of research putting people with Type 2 diabetes on a low calorie diet has confirmed the underlying causes of the condition and established that it is reversible. Professor Roy Taylor at Newcastle University, UK has spent almost four decades studying the condition and will present an overview of his findings at the European Association For The Study Of Diabetes (EASD 2017) in Lisbon. In the talk he will be highlighting how his research has revealed that for people with Type 2 diabetes: Excess calories leads to excess fat in the liver As a result, the liver responds poorly to insulin and produces too much glucose Excess fat in the liver is passed on to the pancreas, causing the insulin producing cells to fail Losing less than 1 gram of fat from the pancreas through diet can re-start the normal production of insulin, reversing Type 2 diabetes This reversal of diabetes remains possible for at least 10 years after the onset of the condition “I think the real importance of this work is for the patients themselves,” Professor Taylor says. “Many have described to me how embarking on the low calorie diet has been the only option to prevent what they thought – or had been told – was an inevitable decline into further medication and further ill health because of their diabetes. By studying the underlying mechanisms we have been able to demonstrate the simplicity of type 2 diabetes.” Get rid of the fat and reverse Type 2 diabetes The body of research by Professor Roy Taylor now confirms his Twin Cycle Hypothesis – that Type 2 diabetes is caused by excess fat actually within both liver and pancreas. This causes the liver to respond poorly to insulin. As insulin controls the normal process of making glucose, the liver then produces too much glucose. Simultaneousl Continue reading >>

Reversing Type 2 Diabetes

Reversing Type 2 Diabetes

Diagnosis of type 2 diabetes is on the rise along with its dire health prognosis and earlier death. The good news is it can be prevented and reversed. Diabetes has been cited as the most challenging health problem in the 21st century. Over 29 million people in the United States have diabetes.1 According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the prevalence of type 2 diabetes has more than tripled in the past 30 years, and if current trends continue unabated, one-fifth to one-third of all Americans will have diabetes by the year 2050.2,3 Excess weight promotes insulin resistance and is the chief risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Currently 68 percent of adults are overweight or obese.4,5 The number of people with this disease has been increasing steadily, largely due to the increasing numbers of overweight people in both the young and the old. Diabetes severely damages one’s health and shortens life expectancy More than 80 percent of adults with Type 2 diabetes die of heart attacks and stroke, and these deaths occur at a younger age compared to people without diabetes. Diabetes also ages the body more rapidly, causing harm to the kidney, nervous system and other body systems. Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure and blindness in older adults. Over seventy thousand amputations each year are performed due to complications of diabetes. Diabetes also increases cancer risk, especially colorectal cancer.1,6-8 Type 2 diabetes is a preventable, reversible lifestyle disease The heavier you are, the greater the risk you will develop type 2 diabetes. Whereas type 1 diabetes is a disease of insulin deficiency, type 2 diabetes typically develops because the body is insulin resistant and requires more insulin than normal. Our body’s cells are fueled Continue reading >>

Reversing Type 2 Diabetes

Reversing Type 2 Diabetes

Tweet Reversing diabetes is a term that usually refers to a significant long-term improvement in insulin sensitivity in people with type 2 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes that are able to get their HbA1c below 42 mmol/mol (6%) without taking diabetes medication are said to have reversed or resolved their diabetes. This also known as putting diabetes into remission. Loss of body weight can be particularly beneficial in helping to reverse the progression of diabetes. With time and dedication, type 2 diabetes can be reversed and the results can be very rewarding, with less tiredness and better all-round health. If you think you need to come off your diabetes medication, ensure you speak to your healthcare team before doing so. Understanding how diabetes progresses The most common cause of type 2 diabetes is obesity-related, which generally follows a vicious cycle pattern: Diet high in calories -particularly if high in refined carbohydrates. Insulin levels in the bloodstream rise to cope with the high- and quick-acting carb intake. Weight is gained around the belly (central or truncal obesity). Consistently high insulin levels lead to the body’s cells becoming resistant to insulin and commonly lead to weight gain. High insulin levels also increase weight gain. Insulin resistance leads to an increase in blood sugar levels, particularly after meals. The pancreas produces more insulin to cope with rising blood sugar levels. High sugar levels lead to feelings of lethargy and high insulin levels lead to increased hunger. Hunger often leads to overeating and lethargy, with less physical activity being taken. Overeating, less activity and high insulin levels all lead to further weight gain and more insulin resistance. Consistently high demand on the pancreas to produce ext Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes May Be Reversible With Weight Loss, Study Finds

Type 2 Diabetes May Be Reversible With Weight Loss, Study Finds

A British study has found that type 2 diabetes could potentially be reversed through weight loss and with the long-term support of a medical professional. The initial findings come from an ongoing trial study called DiRECT (Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial), which aims to find an effective accessible way to put type 2 diabetes into remission long-term. Led by Prof. Roy Taylor, from Newcastle University, and Prof. Mike Lean, from Glasgow University, the study recruited 298 people and gave half standard diabetes care from their GP, while the other half were placed on a structured weight management program which included a low calorie, nutrient-complete diet for three to five months, food reintroduction, and long-term support to maintain weight loss. The team found that diabetes remission was closely linked with weight loss, with almost nine out of 10 people (86 per cent) who lost 15kg or more putting their type 2 diabetes into remission. Over half (57 per cent) of those who lost 10 to 15kg also achieved remission, along with a third (34 per cent) of those who lost five to 10kg. In comparison, only 4 per cent of the control group, who received standard care, achieved remission. Prof. Taylor commented on the first year results saying, "These findings are very exciting. They could revolutionise the way type 2 diabetes is treated." "The study builds on the work into the underlying cause of the condition, so that we can target management effectively. Substantial weight loss results in reduced fat inside the liver and pancreas, allowing these organs to return to normal function. What we're seeing from DiRECT is that losing weight isn't just linked to better management of type 2 diabetes: significant weight loss could actually result in lasting remission." Type 2 diabetes is a Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Is 'reversible Through Weight Loss'

Type 2 Diabetes Is 'reversible Through Weight Loss'

Many doctors and patients do not realize that weight loss can reverse type 2 diabetes. Instead, there is a widespread belief that the disease is "progressive and incurable," according to a new report published in the BMJ. This is despite there being "consistent evidence" that shedding around 33 pounds (15 kilograms) often produces "total remission" of type 2 diabetes, note Prof. Mike E. J. Lean and other researchers from the University of Glasgow in the United Kingdom. The thrust of their paper is that greater awareness, when combined with better recording and monitoring of remissions, could result in many more patients no longer having to live with type 2 diabetes and a massive reduction in healthcare costs. The global burden of type 2 diabetes has nearly quadrupled over the past 35 years. In 1980, there were around 108 million people with the disease, and by 2014, this number had risen to 422 million. The vast majority of diabetes cases are type 2 diabetes, which is a disease that results when the body becomes less effective at using insulin to help cells to convert blood sugar, or glucose, into energy. Excess body weight is a main cause of this type of diabetes. In the United States, an estimated 30.3 million people, or around 9.4 percent of the population, have diabetes - including around 7.2 million who do not realize it. Diabetes accounts for a high portion of the national bill for taking care of the sick. The total direct and indirect cost of diagnosed diabetes in the U.S. was estimated to be $245 billion in 2012. In that year, of the $13,700 average medical spend for people with diagnosed diabetes, more than half (around $7,900) was directly attributed to the disease. Treatment 'focuses on drugs' Prof. Lean and colleagues note that the current management guideli Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Reversible, Doctors And Patients Unaware: Report

Type 2 Diabetes Reversible, Doctors And Patients Unaware: Report

A research report published in British Medical Journal has raised hopes of people suffering from Type 2 diabetes. The disease is reversible and can be beaten in remission, a University of Glasgow study has revealed. All a patient needs to do is shed around 15kg. The revelation has broken the generally accepted myth that type 2 diabetes, though controllable, is incurable, reported the BBC. There are close to 500 drugs worldwide which are currently licensed to treat type 2 diabetes by lowering blood glucose levels but they are not treating the disease process and are missing the point, said Professor Mike Lean, from Glasgow University's Human Nutrition Section. "Not only is type 2 diabetes preventable by not getting fat in the first place, but as long as you get in early after the disease is established - in the first five years or so - you have a better than even chance of becoming non-diabetic," he added. Multiple records across the world, however, have shown very low remission ratio, in tunes of less than one percent. According to the research report, the reason behind this is that few patients are attempting or achieving remission. “Patients and doctors may be unaware that type 2 diabetes can be reversed, despite recent publicity,” said the report. "It is in everybody's interest to reclassify people with type 2 diabetes when they become non-diabetic. Official guidelines and international consensus for recording diabetes in remission are needed." The research argued that remission not only has health benefits but it produces a strong sense of personal achievement and empowerment. According to a WHO report, Diabetes alone would lead to healthcare costs $2.2 trillion for India between 2012 and 2030. Continue reading >>

'more People Need To Know Type 2 Diabetes Is Reversible' Argues Report

'more People Need To Know Type 2 Diabetes Is Reversible' Argues Report

What is the issue? "Type 2 diabetes could be beaten into remission if patients shed around 15kg, [2.4 stones]," reports BBC News. In the past type 2 diabetes was thought to be a lifelong condition. There is increasing evidence that even if it can't be cured, it is possible to put the condition into remission through weight loss. A pressing problem is, as The Daily Telegraph reports, that "less than 1 in 1,000 people" achieve remission. Achieving weight loss through a combination of diet and exercise could mean that you do not have to start taking medication for type 2 diabetes. What is diabetes remission? Type 2 diabetes means the body can no longer maintain healthy blood sugar levels through production of the hormone insulin. When average blood sugar rises to harmful levels (usually described as 6.5% or 48mmol/moll HbA1c, a measure of long-term blood sugar control), people are diagnosed with diabetes. While improved diet and exercise is recommended, most people with diabetes are treated with anti-diabetic medicines to manage their blood sugar. The aim is to prevent the development of complications such as heart disease, leg ulcers and eye damage. Although many factors affect the development of type 2 diabetes, it often accompanies weight gain. In recent years, doctors have noticed that some obese patients who lose a lot of weight, whether through very low calorie diets or weight loss surgery, have blood sugar levels that drop back to normal, and stay that way without diabetes medicines. This has fueled interest in "reversing" diabetes through major weight loss. Instead of curing diabetes, doctors talk about diabetes being "in remission". This is because it can be a two-way process – if people put weight back on, they may become diabetic again. What is the basis for t Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Is Reversible, Says New Study

Type 2 Diabetes Is Reversible, Says New Study

Type 2 diabetes is most often looked upon as a chronic progressive disease which can only be managed by medications. But a new randomised-controlled trial published in The Lancet defies this belief, showing that it is reversible. Our findings show that, at 12 months, almost half of participants achieved remission to a non-diabetic state and off antidiabetic drugs. Remission of type 2 diabetes is a practical target for primary care. These results were achieved with a very-low-calorie formula diet, including fewer carbohydrates than before. This is not likely a method that is sustainable for life – not many people want to live on a formula diet for life. But the results clearly demonstrate that a diet change can reverse type 2 diabetes. Fortunately, science and experience suggests that many people can achieve similar type 2 diabetes reversal using a low-carb (ideally keto) diet and intermittent fasting. The Lancet: Primary care-led weight management for remission of type 2 diabetes (DiRECT): an open-label, cluster-randomised trial Type 2 diabetes Earlier Type 2 diabetes and obesity putting people at increased risk of cancer How insulin levels after a meal can predict type 2 diabetes earlier Continue reading >>

Turns Out Type 2 Diabetes Is Reversible, After All

Turns Out Type 2 Diabetes Is Reversible, After All

If you've been diagnosed with diabetes, no doubt you've been told to change your eating habits (more veggies, less sweets) and get more exercise. These actions were thought to control your diabetes but not to reverse it. But a paper published in The BMJ says that Type 2 diabetes is indeed reversible for many Type 2 diabetes patients who lose around 15 kilograms, or 33 pounds. Diabetes is a chronic disease that has been rising rapidly throughout the world. It affected 8.5 percent of the world's population in 2014 (about 422 million people), up from 4.7 percent in 1980. The most common form of diabetes is Type 2 diabetes, also known as adult-onset diabetes. It occurs when the body doesn't effectively use the insulin it produces (insulin is the hormone that regulates blood sugar.) If your blood sugar level is too high and not treated, it can lead to severe problems, like blindness, stroke, kidney failure and foot amputations. Type 2 diabetes is almost always directly tied to physical inactivity and extra body weight. "The belief amongst doctors and scientists is that Type 2 diabetes is irreversible, always gets steadily worse, demanding more and more drugs, then insulin. Patient groups advise that the first step for someone newly diagnosed is to get used to the idea of dealing with a life-long illness," explains paper co-author Roy Taylor, professor of medicine and metabolism at Newcastle University in the United Kingdom in an email interview. His research is the latest chapter in years' worth of investigation about Type 2 diabetes. In 2006, he noticed that liver function tests done in Type 2 patients were usually abnormal or on the high side. Then, he saw research that Type 2 patients who'd undergone bariatric surgery enjoyed normal fasting glucose levels within one week Continue reading >>

Is There A Cure For Type 2 Diabetes?

Is There A Cure For Type 2 Diabetes?

Unlike type 1 diabetes, which is a chronic condition, type 2 is preventable. Plus, recent studies show that it’s also reversible. Preventable and Reversible: It’s these two clinically proven facts that most healthcare systems choose to overlook when prescribing a treatment plan for their patients. If you have diabetes mellitus type 2, also known as type 2 diabetes (T2DM), your body makes insulin but it fails to recognize it. This is commonly called insulin resistance. It’s this condition that allows the glucose in your body to elevate, causing numerous health complications. Here’s the trouble with the U.S. healthcare system. It has been taught that T2DM is a blood sugar disease. It’s not. T2DM is a disorder of insulin and leptin signaling for glucose regulation. It starts as prediabetes and slowly progresses into full-blown diabetes. Without proper treatment it’s a killer, leading to heart disease, stroke, and more. Western medicine is failing to eradicate type 2 diabetes because it largely refuses to treat the condition with anything other than pharmaceuticals. With long-term use, drugs often worsen a patient’s condition by artificially increasing sensitivity to insulin. Our pancreas produces insulin, which is used by our cells as an energy source. In healthy people the pancreas provides the body with the right amount of insulin at the right time. However, certain conditions cause the pancreas to stop functioning properly. Risk factors include: Overweight or obese Family history of diabetes Hypertension Physical inactivity Depression History of gestational diabetes Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease HDL-C levels under 35mg/dL Fasting triglycerides over 250 mg/dL Treatment with atypical antipsychotics, glucocorticoids Obstructive sleep apnea and chroni Continue reading >>

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible?

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible?

I just wrote an answer to this question about 5 minutes ago and will answer it again because it is so very important for you and for millions of other people. The answer to your question is yes. From my personal experience Type 2 Diabetes can be reversed. In March of 2017 I was diagnosed with Type II Diabetes. It really scared me. My father was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes at 60 and I watched him have to inject insulin 2 times a day. His body still deteriorated due to the diabetes. I did not want to end up like that. I was a chocoholic and ate huge portions. I was too heavy for my height and did not get enough exercise. I immediately got on the internet and started researching for cures for Type II Diabetes. I read all the information at the American Diabetes Association website and was thoroughly depressed. I was being told that I had a progressive disease with no cure that would last the rest of my life and finally cause my death. I learned that I would have to take progressively stronger medications to control my diabetes and BG, (Blood glucose levels). I decided that this path was not for me. I knew there had to be a cure for this terrible disease even if all these doctors and pharmaceutical companies were saying that there is no cure. I read everything I could find on T2 Diabetes. Causes, treatments, reversal and cure. I decided that changing my diet drastically to a low carb high fat diet, LCHF, was the way to go. I found a great deal of good information at Diet Doctor - Making low carb simple. So I did it. I absolutely changed my diet completely from that day. It was very difficult. My body was craving carbohydrates, especially sweets. I had physical flu symptoms from the body adjusting to this new diet. I used meditation and mindful eating to get through those Continue reading >>

This Extreme Diet Reversed Type 2 Diabetes In Up To 86% Of Patients

This Extreme Diet Reversed Type 2 Diabetes In Up To 86% Of Patients

Type 2 diabetes isn't necessarily for life, with a new clinical trial providing some of the clearest evidence yet that the condition can be reversed, even in patients who have carried the disease for several years. A clinical trial involving almost 300 people in the UK found an intensive weight management program put type 2 diabetes into remission for 86 percent of patients who lost 15 kilograms (33 lbs) or more. "These findings are very exciting," says diabetes researcher Roy Taylor from Newcastle University. "They could revolutionise the way type 2 diabetes is treated." Taylor and fellow researchers studied 298 adults aged 20-65 years who had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes within the previous six years to take part in the Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial (DiRECT). Participants were randomly assigned to either an intensive weight management program or to regular diabetic care administered by their GP, acting as a control group. For the 149 individuals placed in the weight management program, participants had to restrict themselves to a low calorie formula diet consisting of things like health shakes and soups, limiting them to consuming 825-853 calories per day for a period of three to five months. After this, food was reintroduced to their diet slowly over two to eight weeks, and participants were given support to maintain their weight loss, including cognitive behavioural therapy and help with how to increase their level of physical activity. Not an easy lifestyle change to adapt to, perhaps; but where there's a will, there's a way. "We've found that people were really interested in this approach – almost a third of those who were asked to take part in the study agreed," says nutritionist Mike Lean from the University of Glasgow. "This is much higher than usu Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms, Signs, Diet, And Treatment

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms, Signs, Diet, And Treatment

Type 2 diabetes is a condition in which cells cannot use blood sugar (glucose) efficiently for energy. This happens when the cells become insensitive to insulin and the blood sugar gradually gets too high. There are two types of diabetes mellitus, type 1 and type 2. In type 2, the pancreas still makes insulin, but the cells cannot use it very efficiently. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas cannot make insulin due to auto-immune destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells. Type 2 can be caused by: Lack of activity (sedentary behavior) Genetics Risk factors include: Being overweight Being sedentary including watching more than 2 hours of TV per day Drinking soda Consuming too much sugar and processed food The signs and symptoms of this type of this type of diabetes are sometimes subtle. The major symptom is often being overweight. Other symptoms and signs include: Urinating a lot Gaining or losing weight unintentionally Dark skin under armpits, chin, or groin Unusual odor to urine Blurry vision Often there are no specific symptoms of the condition and it goes undiagnosed until routine blood tests are ordered. A blood sugar level more than 125 when fasting or more than 200 randomly is a diagnosis for diabetes. Treatment is with diet and lifestyle changes that include eating less sugary foods, and foods that are high in simple carbohydrates (sugar, bread, and pasta.) Sometimes a person will need to take drugs, for example, metformin (Glucophage). People with both types of diabetes need monitor their blood sugar levels often to avoid high (hyperglycemia) and low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia). Complications include heart and kidney disease, neuropathy, sexual and/or urinary problems, foot problems, and eye problems. This health condition can be prevented by following a Continue reading >>

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