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Is Type 2 Diabetes Is Reversible?

Doctors Now Show How Type 2 Diabetes Is Fully Reversible

Doctors Now Show How Type 2 Diabetes Is Fully Reversible

Today, medical doctors say that Type 2 diabetes is completely reversible. In a video titled “The Two Big Lies of Type 2 Diabetes”, Jason Fung, M.D. makes a very bold assertion. He says “Diabetes is not a chronic, progressive disease. It is completely reversible; not only that, it is very quickly reversible.” Take a minute. Let that sink in. “TYPE-2-DIABETES-IS-COMPLETELY-REVERSIBLE” A doctor with a mainstream medical degree who claims complete reversal of diabetes should attract debate, discussion and curiosity, right? Unfortunately, the video itself is quite technical in parts because it’s a presentation at a medical conference. So, that might have held back some popularity. Equally, if not more importantly, maybe it is because his assertion flies in the face of everything we have been taught about T2D. We all believe that: A.Diabetes is a disease for life B.All one can do is progressively increase their medication to control the blood sugar (even as diabetes complications continue to affect other organ systems – from the kidneys to the nerves to the eyes and the heart.) Those, according to Dr. Fung, are the Two Big Lies of Type 2 Diabetes. He’s taking on the American Diabetes Association with these assertions. Luckily, he’s not the only M.D. who believes this. Dr. Mark Hyman, Dr. Joseph Mercola, Dr. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Andrew Weil are just a few of the heavyweights in the small, but growing, pack of functional medicine doctors who are not just stating that Type 2 Diabetes is reversible, but are actually proving this at their clinics! Mantra #1 for Reversing Diabetes: Low Carbohydrate High Fat (LCHF) Diet Dr. Fung defines diabetes as a “curable dietary disease.” If the disease is dietary, it stands to reason that the cure would be dietary too. The Continue reading >>

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible? Yes, And For The Long Term, Say Researchers

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible? Yes, And For The Long Term, Say Researchers

It is possible to not only reverse Type 2 diabetes, but to stay free of the condition long term, according to a new study from Newcastle University in the United Kingdom. Approximately 29 million people in the United States have Type 2 diabetes, and another 86 million have prediabetes. Previous research by Professor Roy Taylor, MD, FRCP, indicated that following a roughly 800-calorie-a-day diet could reverse Type 2 diabetes. However, the study only lasted eight weeks, so it was not clear whether the diabetes would stay away for the long term. To evaluate this, Taylor and his team worked with 30 people who had had Type 2 for six months to 23 years and who were overweight or obese. During the first eight weeks of the study, the volunteers consumed three diet shakes per day, along with about 240 grams of nonstarchy vegetables, for a total of about 600 to 700 calories daily. After eight weeks, solid food was gradually reintroduced at weight-maintaining levels of roughly 1,600 to 2,000 calories per day, or roughly one-third less than the participants had been eating before the study. The volunteers were also seen once a month for six months and provided with an individualized weight maintenance program. On average, the participants lost 14 kilograms, or about 31 pounds, and did not regain any weight during the six-month study period. And although they remained overweight or obese despite the weight loss, 12 of the participants who had been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes within the last 10 years reversed their condition and remained diabetes-free six months later. And after six months, another subject reversed his diabetes. These participants, the researchers say, had lost enough weight to take the fat out of their pancreases and restore normal insulin function. “We have sh Continue reading >>

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible? Your Guide In 2017

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible? Your Guide In 2017

“Is type 2 diabetes reversible, doctor?” It’s a common question I get asked by many people that I meet. When I was back in medical school more than 10 years ago, we were all taught that type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease. Which means that it will be there with you 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and it doesn’t go away. Essentially, it is incurable. And once you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, the best you can do is to try to manage it as best as you can. Today, the answer is no longer clear cut. Thankfully, in a positive way. Let’s take a deeper look at what the science tells us. What is Type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes is a relatively common metabolic disorder that results in high blood glucose levels in your body. Did you know that over 415 million people today are living with diabetes globally? If you have diabetes, you’re far from being alone. The condition arises from a combination of high insulin resistance in the tissues of our body and decreased insulin secretion by the pancreas, an internal organ. Insulin is an important hormone that allows our cells to properly absorb and use glucose. Insulin serves to regulate our blood glucose levels and keep it at a constant, normal level. Some factors that can put you at higher risk of Type 2 diabetes include a strong family history of the disease (genetics), obesity (lifestyle) and age. If you’re worried that you may have diabetes, you can find out more about the symptoms of diabetes here. Is Type 2 diabetes reversible? Even though diabetes is commonly thought of as a chronic disease, our understanding of it has improved greatly over the past few years. Here is where I want to point to 2 particular areas that can shed some light on this matter: 1. Sustainable weight loss may answer the question “is type Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Is Reversible Condition, Researchers Claim

Type 2 Diabetes Is Reversible Condition, Researchers Claim

A body of research putting type 2 diabetes patients on a low calorie diet has confirmed that the condition is reversible. For many patients it can be reversed with sustained weight loss of around 15 kg, according to a paper published in the journal BMJ. Type 2 diabetes, generally perceived as progressive and incurable, now affects 5-10% of the population. Until complications develop, most patients are managed entirely within primary care, with diabetes comprising a major part of general practice activity. International figures suggest that medical costs for people with diabetes are twofold to threefold greater than the average for age and sex matched people without diabetes. Remission of diabetes (no longer having diabetes, at least for a period) is clearly attainable for some, possibly many, patients but is currently very rarely achieved or recorded. “The good news for people with type 2 diabetes is that our work shows that even if you have had the condition for 10 years, you are likely to be able to reverse it by moving that all important tiny amount of fat out of the pancreas. At present, this can only be done through substantial weight loss,” said co-author Professor Roy Taylor, of Newcastle University, UK. The body of research confirms his ‘Twin Cycle Hypothesis’ — that type 2 diabetes is caused by excess fat actually within both liver and pancreas. “This causes the liver to respond poorly to insulin,” Professor Taylor explained. “As insulin controls the normal process of making glucose, the liver then produces too much glucose. Simultaneously, excess fat in the liver increases the normal process of export of fat to all tissues. In the pancreas, this excess fat causes the insulin producing cells to fail.” “Patients and doctors may not realize th Continue reading >>

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible At Scale?

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible At Scale?

If you’re reading this, you probably know that I’m obsessed with longevity. But to really understand longevity, you must understand metabolic health, insulin resistance and, by extension, one of its end-results: type 2 diabetes (T2D). Though my medical practice does not focus on type 2 diabetes, I have taken care of several patients with T2D over the past few years. When I was in medical school I was taught many things about T2D, but one stands out most: T2D is incurable, I was told. Once you have it, you’ve always got it, and the best one can do is “manage” it as a chronic—but irreversible—condition. But is this really true? Asked another way, is T2D reversible? My obsession is partly due to my personal journey to better metabolic health, which I’ve documented elsewhere on this blog, and spoken about publicly. But those facts alone, don’t fully explain why I wanted to be involved with Virta Health (I’ll get to them shortly). T2D is a massive societal problem that has the potential to literally bankrupt countries: More than 29 million Americans have T2D and more than 80 million are pre-diabetic. And whether you view it through the lens of population health, or the lens of an individual patient, T2D is perhaps the biggest healthcare challenge of our generation. At the population level, T2D costs Americans more than $300 billion per year: one of every three Medicare dollars is spent on T2D, and one of every six healthcare dollars is spent on T2D. At the individual level, patients and payers (employers and insurance companies) spend thousands of dollars (often more than $10,000) in annual expenses for medications and procedures with significant side effects, and much higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, blindn Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Reversal of type 2 diabetes to normal metabolic control by either bariatric surgery or hypocaloric diet allows for the time sequence of underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms to be observed. In reverse order, the same mechanisms are likely to determine the events leading to the onset of hyperglycemia and permit insight into the etiology of type 2 diabetes. Within 7 days of instituting a substantial negative calorie balance by either dietary intervention or bariatric surgery, fasting plasma glucose levels can normalize. This rapid change relates to a substantial fall in liver fat content and return of normal hepatic insulin sensitivity. Over 8 weeks, first phase and maximal rates of insulin secretion steadily return to normal, and this change is in step with steadily decreasing pancreatic fat content. The difference in time course of these two processes is striking. Recent information on the intracellular effects of excess lipid intermediaries explains the likely biochemical basis, which simplifies both the basic understanding of the condition and the concepts used to determine appropriate management. Recent large, long-duration population studies on time course of plasma glucose and insulin secretion before the diagnosis of diabetes are consistent with this new understanding. Type 2 diabetes has long been regarded as inevitably progressive, requiring increasing numbers of oral hypoglycemic agents and eventually insulin, but it is now certain that the disease process can be halted with restoration of normal carbohydrate and fat metabolism. Type 2 diabetes can be understood as a potentially reversible metabolic state precipitated by the single cause of chronic excess intraorgan fat. Type 2 diabetes has long been known to progress despite glucose-lowering treatment, with 5 Continue reading >>

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible?

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible?

Katy Wiley began her struggle with Type 2 diabetes in 1990, when she was pregnant with her second child. The disease progressed, and at eight weeks she started insulin treatment, hoping that once her son was born, the diabetes would disappear. Instead, her condition steadily declined. Vision problems and nerve damage, common complications of diabetes, began to appear. Her A1C blood glucose (sugar) levels were increasing, she was at least 50 pounds overweight and the medication metformin had been added to her daily therapy routine of insulin injection. That's when she read about a Type 2 diabetes study at Cleveland Clinic that was recruiting patients to participate in one of three arms of treatments to study the effectiveness of methods to treat and possibly reverse Type 2 diabetes. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) says that Type 2 diabetes usually begins with insulin resistance or the inability of the fat, muscle and liver cells to use the insulin produced in the pancreas to carry sugar into the body's cells to use for energy. At first, the pancreas will work harder to make extra insulin, but eventually it won't be able to keep making enough to maintain normal blood glucose levels, and glucose will build up in the blood instead of nourishing the cells. That's when diabetes Type 2 has developed and needs to be treated. In the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control, 29.1 million people — 9.3 percent of the population — have diabetes. About 95 percent of those people have Type 2 diabetes, a disease that can be prevented, reversed and maybe even cured. "While lifestyle factors of obesity, poor diet and exercise are risk factors for Type 2 diabetes, a genetic component frequently predisposes an individual t Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Reversible, Doctors And Patients Unaware: Report

Type 2 Diabetes Reversible, Doctors And Patients Unaware: Report

A research report published in British Medical Journal has raised hopes of people suffering from Type 2 diabetes. The disease is reversible and can be beaten in remission, a University of Glasgow study has revealed. All a patient needs to do is shed around 15kg. The revelation has broken the generally accepted myth that type 2 diabetes, though controllable, is incurable, reported the BBC. There are close to 500 drugs worldwide which are currently licensed to treat type 2 diabetes by lowering blood glucose levels but they are not treating the disease process and are missing the point, said Professor Mike Lean, from Glasgow University's Human Nutrition Section. "Not only is type 2 diabetes preventable by not getting fat in the first place, but as long as you get in early after the disease is established - in the first five years or so - you have a better than even chance of becoming non-diabetic," he added. Multiple records across the world, however, have shown very low remission ratio, in tunes of less than one percent. According to the research report, the reason behind this is that few patients are attempting or achieving remission. “Patients and doctors may be unaware that type 2 diabetes can be reversed, despite recent publicity,” said the report. "It is in everybody's interest to reclassify people with type 2 diabetes when they become non-diabetic. Official guidelines and international consensus for recording diabetes in remission are needed." The research argued that remission not only has health benefits but it produces a strong sense of personal achievement and empowerment. According to a WHO report, Diabetes alone would lead to healthcare costs $2.2 trillion for India between 2012 and 2030. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Is Reversible, Says New Study

Type 2 Diabetes Is Reversible, Says New Study

Type 2 diabetes is most often looked upon as a chronic progressive disease which can only be managed by medications. But a new randomised-controlled trial published in The Lancet defies this belief, showing that it is reversible. Our findings show that, at 12 months, almost half of participants achieved remission to a non-diabetic state and off antidiabetic drugs. Remission of type 2 diabetes is a practical target for primary care. These results were achieved with a very-low-calorie formula diet, including fewer carbohydrates than before. This is not likely a method that is sustainable for life – not many people want to live on a formula diet for life. But the results clearly demonstrate that a diet change can reverse type 2 diabetes. Fortunately, science and experience suggests that many people can achieve similar type 2 diabetes reversal using a low-carb (ideally keto) diet and intermittent fasting. The Lancet: Primary care-led weight management for remission of type 2 diabetes (DiRECT): an open-label, cluster-randomised trial Type 2 diabetes Earlier Type 2 diabetes and obesity putting people at increased risk of cancer How insulin levels after a meal can predict type 2 diabetes earlier Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Month – Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible?

American Diabetes Month – Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible?

Diabetes has become one of the largest medical issues of our time. According to CDC statistics given in January 2014, an estimated 29.1 million adults and adolescence living in the United States have diabetes. Of that number, 7.2 million are not even aware they have it. Roughly 5% of all diabetic cases fall into the category of Type 1 with the remaining majority being Type 2. The primary difference between the two conditions is their relationship with insulin. Those with Type 1 diabetes don’t produce enough insulin whereas those with Type 2 diabetes produce enough insulin but the body has become resistant to it. Many believe that those with a predisposition of developing Type 2, or if they have already been diagnosed, have no hope of reversing it. However, this conclusion discounts the many causal factors that can be avoided or resolved through lifestyle change and reliance on standardized treatment methods. Understanding Type 2 diabetes, insulin, and relevant methods of treatment may help reduce a large number of diabetic cases in the United States and may even help you or a loved one! Overview of Type 2 Diabetes Both forms of diabetes are greatly influenced by hormonal and nutritional imbalances. Generally, Type 2 diabetes develops later in life and is sometimes called adult-onset diabetes (the reason for this delayed occurrence will be discussed later). Once diabetes has been diagnosed, the immediate threat level is relatively low. However, if you don’t act to reverse your condition you are putting yourself at greater risk from long-term health issues. Some of the most common issues that arise from Type 2 include increased risk of heart disease and stroke, weakened nervous system, and major organ failure. Diabetics are two to four times more likely to die from he Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms, Signs, Diet, And Treatment

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms, Signs, Diet, And Treatment

Type 2 diabetes is a condition in which cells cannot use blood sugar (glucose) efficiently for energy. This happens when the cells become insensitive to insulin and the blood sugar gradually gets too high. There are two types of diabetes mellitus, type 1 and type 2. In type 2, the pancreas still makes insulin, but the cells cannot use it very efficiently. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas cannot make insulin due to auto-immune destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells. Type 2 can be caused by: Lack of activity (sedentary behavior) Genetics Risk factors include: Being overweight Being sedentary including watching more than 2 hours of TV per day Drinking soda Consuming too much sugar and processed food The signs and symptoms of this type of this type of diabetes are sometimes subtle. The major symptom is often being overweight. Other symptoms and signs include: Urinating a lot Gaining or losing weight unintentionally Dark skin under armpits, chin, or groin Unusual odor to urine Blurry vision Often there are no specific symptoms of the condition and it goes undiagnosed until routine blood tests are ordered. A blood sugar level more than 125 when fasting or more than 200 randomly is a diagnosis for diabetes. Treatment is with diet and lifestyle changes that include eating less sugary foods, and foods that are high in simple carbohydrates (sugar, bread, and pasta.) Sometimes a person will need to take drugs, for example, metformin (Glucophage). People with both types of diabetes need monitor their blood sugar levels often to avoid high (hyperglycemia) and low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia). Complications include heart and kidney disease, neuropathy, sexual and/or urinary problems, foot problems, and eye problems. This health condition can be prevented by following a Continue reading >>

This Extreme Diet Reversed Type 2 Diabetes In Up To 86% Of Patients

This Extreme Diet Reversed Type 2 Diabetes In Up To 86% Of Patients

Type 2 diabetes isn't necessarily for life, with a new clinical trial providing some of the clearest evidence yet that the condition can be reversed, even in patients who have carried the disease for several years. A clinical trial involving almost 300 people in the UK found an intensive weight management program put type 2 diabetes into remission for 86 percent of patients who lost 15 kilograms (33 lbs) or more. "These findings are very exciting," says diabetes researcher Roy Taylor from Newcastle University. "They could revolutionise the way type 2 diabetes is treated." Taylor and fellow researchers studied 298 adults aged 20-65 years who had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes within the previous six years to take part in the Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial (DiRECT). Participants were randomly assigned to either an intensive weight management program or to regular diabetic care administered by their GP, acting as a control group. For the 149 individuals placed in the weight management program, participants had to restrict themselves to a low calorie formula diet consisting of things like health shakes and soups, limiting them to consuming 825-853 calories per day for a period of three to five months. After this, food was reintroduced to their diet slowly over two to eight weeks, and participants were given support to maintain their weight loss, including cognitive behavioural therapy and help with how to increase their level of physical activity. Not an easy lifestyle change to adapt to, perhaps; but where there's a will, there's a way. "We've found that people were really interested in this approach – almost a third of those who were asked to take part in the study agreed," says nutritionist Mike Lean from the University of Glasgow. "This is much higher than usu Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Is Reversible!

Type 2 Diabetes Is Reversible!

Diabetes is a huge subject in America and fingers are pointing everywhere. In order to live long, healthy, and productive lives, you should understand what it is and how to avoid it. Because the statistical chances of you getting it are growing every year! What is type 2 Diabetes? Type two is a case of high blood glucose caused by insulin resistance. Insulin is the substance our body secretes to change glucose (sugar) into energy. As sugar itself it not supposed to enter the blood stream, insulin breaks it down into transferable units to spread through the blood. However, your body can only naturally produce so much insulin before sugar levels can exceed insulin supply which can lead to hyperglycemia. Before the industrial sugar industry, most of our glucose came from fruits and carbohydrates in far smaller amounts. The body will experience health problems if it cannot balance out the level of glucose in your body. While type 1 diabetes is for people who cannot produce it, type 2 diabetes patients can produce the insulin but their body becomes resistant to the effects. Most cases of this type are now being attributed to diet rather than age as younger and younger people are being diagnosed. Diabetes Today Diabetes as we know it today did not exist 200 years ago. Sugar and other sweet substances were an indulgence and not a part of every day food. In saying that, our bodies were not designed by science or God to consume the amount of calories that an average American intakes. Obesity is not a new problem to our society and there’s far more to it than being fat. The human body is a miraculous machine but is not a body of miracles. It cannot turn lead into gold, or piles of burgers into muscle. Like a classic car, great care can produce great results. Diabetes is not a d Continue reading >>

Can I Reverse The Effects Of Type 2 Diabetes?

Can I Reverse The Effects Of Type 2 Diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes can be caused by many factors, and there is often a genetic link, but type 2 is often due to weight gain, poor eating habits and inactivity. So, to prevent type 2 diabetes in the first place and to cure it, if you’ve been diagnosed with it, you should talk to your doctor about eating nutritiously, losing weight and exercising regularly. In the early stages, Type 2 diabetes is reversible in that it can be controlled by diet; but over time, medication is often required. Watch endocrinologist Reza Yavari, MD, explain why it's so important to be monitored regularly by your doctor. Interesting question indeed! I will address the effect of diabetes as it relates to one's ability to produce insulin. From that point of view, I would have to say that you can stall the effects of Type II diabetes but not reverse them. This is dependent on how progressed a person's diabetes is. If a person has prediabetes, I would say yes, for some people, with diet and exercise the effects can be reversed. For others adding medication will help that process. Like cancer, Type II diabetes can go into remission if caught early enough during the prediabetes stage and lifestyle changes. However, by the time a person is diagnosed with Type II diabetes they have been living with diabetes for 5 to 15 years. Every person with diabetes is different chemically and physically so the effects of diabetes progress at different rates. For people with Type II diabetes it is very important to understand that, although it can not be reversed, the progression can be slowed down or even stopped with lifestyle change and proper medication management. So listen to your CDE's, doctor's, RN's, nutritionists & dietitians. Healthier eating and daily exercise will reduce your chances of getting further co Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Reversal — The Quick Start Guide

Type 2 Diabetes Reversal — The Quick Start Guide

Type 2 Diabetes Reversal — The Quick Start Guide How to Reverse Type 2 Diabetes — The Quick Start Guide Twenty years ago, when you bought a brand sparkly new VCR machine, you would also get a thick instruction manual. Read this thoroughly before you start, the manufacturer would implore. There would be detailed setup procedures and troubleshooting guides. Most of us ignored the manual, just plugged it in and tried to figure out the rest. That’s why we all had the blinking 12:00 on. Today, most new electronics now come with a quick start guide which has the most basic 4 or 5 steps to get your machine working and then anything else you needed, you could reference the detailed instruction manual. Instruction manuals are just so much more useful this way. Well, I don’t know much about VCRs, but I do know about type 2 diabetes. I could write an entire book about obesity (oh, wait, I did that already), or fasting (oh, wait, done too) or type 2 diabetes (next up for 2018). But many of you will not want to go through the entire instruction manual. So this is your quick start guide for reversing your type 2 diabetes. A Fully Reversible Disease Most doctors, dietitians and diabetes specialists claim that type 2 diabetes is a chronic and progressive disease. The American Diabetes Association, for example, almost proudly proclaims this on its website. Once you get the diagnosis, it’s a life sentence. But, it’s actually a great big lie. Type 2 diabetes is almost always reversible and this is almost ridiculously easy to prove. This is great news for the more than 50% of American adults who have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes or diabetes. Recognizing this truth is the crucial first step in reversing your diabetes or pre-diabetes. Actually, it something that most people a Continue reading >>

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