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Is Type 2 Diabetes Bad?

Is Sugar Bad For You? Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Is Sugar Bad For You? Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Is sugar bad for you? In short, yes it absolutely is bad for you–added sugar that is. Sugar derived directly from fruit is not bad for you. But, added sugar contains fructose which is not good for your body in any way. Added sugar contains a bunch of calories that are empty and provide zero nutritional assistance. This brief, yet insightful article tells about the negative effects of added sugar and provides some tips on a healthy diet for persons diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes. Added sugar is especially bad for your teeth because it gives easily digestible food to the bad bacteria in your mouth so that they can easily thrive which leads to tooth decay. An excess of fructose will be turned into fat and will cause non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. When a large amount of added sugar is consumed, it can lead to insulin resistance which leads to many different diseases. The decrease in resistance to insulin is the number one cause of type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes causes a variety of health problems including blindness, high blood pressure, heart attack and stroke, which can ultimately be fatal. The best way to maintain a healthy diet when you’ve been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes is to remain as abstinent as possible from added sugar. The trouble with this is that sugar is highly addictive, so remaining abstinent from added sugars becomes a huge challenge for many people. This is unfortunate and causes much heartache for persons worldwide and primarily in the United States. One of the best ways to combat this addiction is to fill up on healthy foods so that your brain thinks that you are full and will help you to decrease the amount of empty added sugar calories you consume in a single eating. If you’re looking for a bit of sweetness to add to your meals, then a Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

What Is Prediabetes? Prediabetes is a “pre-diagnosis” of diabetes—you can think of it as a warning sign. It’s when your blood glucose level (blood sugar level) is higher than normal, but it’s not high enough to be considered diabetes. Prediabetes is an indication that you could develop type 2 diabetes if you don’t make some lifestyle changes. But here's the good news: . Eating healthy food, losing weight and staying at a healthy weight, and being physically active can help you bring your blood glucose level back into the normal range. Diabetes develops very gradually, so when you’re in the prediabetes stage—when your blood glucose level is higher than it should be—you may not have any symptoms at all. You may, however, notice that: you’re hungrier than normal you’re losing weight, despite eating more you’re thirstier than normal you have to go to the bathroom more frequently you’re more tired than usual All of those are typical symptoms associated with diabetes, so if you’re in the early stages of diabetes, you may notice them. Prediabetes develops when your body begins to have trouble using the hormone insulin. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells via the bloodstream. In pre-diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or it doesn’t use it well (that’s called insulin resistance). If you don’t have enough insulin or if you’re insulin resistant, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps prediabetes. Researchers aren’t sure what exactly causes the insulin process to go awry in some people. There are several risk factors, though, that make it more likely that you’ll develop pre-diabetes. These are Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Complications

Type 2 Diabetes Complications

With type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus), if you don’t work hard to keep your blood glucose level under control, there are short- and long-term complications to contend with. However, by watching the amount and types of food you eat (your meal plan), exercising, and taking any necessary medications, you may be able to prevent these complications. And even if you have some of the long-term, more serious complications discussed below when you’re first diagnosed, getting tight control of your blood glucose will help prevent the complications from becoming worse. (It is possible with type 2 diabetes to already have some of these complications when you’re first diagnosed. That’s because type 2 develops gradually, and you may not realize that you have high blood glucose for quite some time. Over time, high blood glucose can cause serious damage. You can learn more about that in this article on the symptoms of type 2 diabetes.) Short-term Diabetes Complications Hypoglycemia is low blood glucose (blood sugar). It is possible for your blood glucose to drop, especially if you’re taking insulin or a sulfonylurea drug (those make your body produce insulin throughout the day). With these medications, if you eat less than usual or were more active, your blood glucose may dip too much. Other possible causes of hypoglycemia include certain medications (aspirin, for example, lowers the blood glucose level if you take a dose of more than 81mg) and too much alcohol (alcohol keeps the liver from releasing glucose). Rapid heartbeat Sweating Whiteness of skin Anxiety Numbness in fingers, toes, and lips Sleepiness Confusion Headache Slurred speech Mild cases of hypoglycemia can be treated by drinking orange juice or eating a glucose tablet—those will quickly rai Continue reading >>

How Type 2 Diabetes Can Be More Debilitating Than You Think

How Type 2 Diabetes Can Be More Debilitating Than You Think

One of the most common myths surrounding Type 2 diabetes is that it's a 'mild form' of diabetes. This, say Diabetes UK, is wrong. "There is no such thing as mild diabetes," says the charity. "All diabetes is serious and if not properly controlled it can lead to serious complications such as amputation, kidney failure, blindness and stroke." Diane Abbott MP knows just how tough the condition can be – it caused the shadow home secretary to step down from campaigning before the general election – at the time citing 'ill health' – after a series of criticised interviews. It's apt then that in Diabetes Week (June 11 -17), Abbott has spoken out about the problems she was having during the intense seven-week election campaign. In an interview with the Guardian, she revealed she’d been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes two years ago and said: "During the election campaign, everything went crazy – and the diabetes was out of control, the blood sugar was out of control." STORY: The symptoms and signs of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes How did Type 2 diabetes affect Diane Abbott? Type 2 diabetes happens when people don't produce enough insulin, (a hormone made by the pancreas which tells the body's tissues to absorb glucose from the blood), or the insulin they produce doesn't work properly. This means the amount of glucose (sugar) in the blood is too high, as the body’s not using it properly for energy. However, Kathryn Kirchner, Diabetes UK's clinical advisor, says: "Some medications for diabetes, and insulin, can cause blood sugar levels to go too low, below 4mmol/L. This is called hypoglycaemia. Hypoglycaemia must be treated immediately by taking quick-acting glucose, often in the form of glucose tablets, non-diet drinks or sweets." If you’ve been reading the news about D Continue reading >>

I Have Type 2 Diabetes – What Can I Eat?

I Have Type 2 Diabetes – What Can I Eat?

From the moment you are diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes you are likely to be faced with what seems like an endless list of new tasks... medical appointments, taking medication, stopping smoking, being more active and eating a healthy, balanced diet. No wonder it can all seem so daunting and overwhelming. One of your first questions is likely to be “what can I eat?” But, with so much to take in, you could still come away from appointments feeling unsure about the answer. And then there are lots of myths about diabetes and food that you will need to navigate, too. If you’ve just been diagnosed and aren’t sure about what you can and can’t eat, here’s what you need to know. I've just been diagnosed with Type 2 – what can I eat? In one word... anything. Or how about another? Everything. It may come as a surprise, but all kinds of food are OK for people with Type 2 diabetes to eat. In the past, people were sent away after their diagnosis with a list of foods they weren't allowed to eat, or often told to simply cut out sugar. Long gone are those days of “do's and don'ts”. The way to go nowadays is to eat a healthy, balanced diet. Try and make changes to your food choices that are realistic and achievable in the long term; this will be different for each person diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes depending on your current diet and the goals you want to achieve. Many people with Type 2 diabetes make changes to their diet in order to achieve: good blood glucose control good blood fat levels good blood pressure There's a lot of evidence to say that your diet can affect all of these, so see a registered dietitian for specific advice and an eating plan that is tailored to your needs. Is there anything I should avoid? Before your diabetes was diagnosed, you may have been Continue reading >>

What's The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What's The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

First, the formal name for what we commonly call diabetes is diabetes mellitus, which translates from the Greek as making lots of urine with sugar in it or making lots of sweet urine. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus are diseases that have in common, sugar in the urine and the increased urination. When there are high amounts of sugar in the blood, the kidneys filter sugar into the urine. Sugar can be measured in the urine through a lab test commonly called a urinalysis. Urine dipsticks are also used to show sugar in the urine. Patients who develop diabetes mellitus most commonly have initial symptoms of increased thirst, increased urination and blurred vision due to high amounts of sugar in the fluids of the eye. Type 1 diabetes results from a rheumatoid-like autoimmune reaction in which one's own body attacks and destroys the beta cells of the pancreas. These are the cells that normally produce insulin. Type 1 is a disease in which the patient in a relatively short time has no insulin production. All patients with type 1 diabetes can also develop a serious metabolic disorder called ketoacidosis when their blood sugars are high and there is not enough insulin in their body. Ketoacidosis can be fatal unless treated as an emergency with hydration and insulin. Type 1 was once commonly called juvenile diabetes mellitus because it is most commonly diagnosed in children. It should be noted that even older adults in their 60s have occasionally been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus. One should think of it as a disease of high blood sugars due to a deficiency of insulin production. It must be treated by administration of insulin. Insulin is given at least twice a day and is often given four times a day in type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes rates are growing dramatically Continue reading >>

Smoking And Diabetes

Smoking And Diabetes

What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is a group of diseases in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal. Most of the food a person eats is turned into glucose (a kind of sugar) for the body’s cells to use for energy. The pancreas, an organ near the stomach, makes a hormone called insulin that helps glucose get into the body’s cells. When you have diabetes, your body either doesn't make enough insulin or can't use the insulin very well. Less glucose gets into the cells and instead builds up in the blood.1 There are different types of diabetes. Type 2 is the most common in adults and accounts for more than 90% of all diabetes cases. Fewer people have type 1 diabetes, which most often develops in children, adolescents, or young adults.2 How Is Smoking Related to Diabetes? We now know that smoking causes type 2 diabetes. In fact, smokers are 30–40% more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than nonsmokers. And people with diabetes who smoke are more likely than nonsmokers to have trouble with insulin dosing and with controlling their disease.3 The more cigarettes you smoke, the higher your risk for type 2 diabetes.3 No matter what type of diabetes you have, smoking makes your diabetes harder to control. If you have diabetes and you smoke, you are more likely to have serious health problems from diabetes. Smokers with diabetes have higher risks for serious complications, including:4 Heart and kidney disease Poor blood flow in the legs and feet that can lead to infections, ulcers, and possible amputation (removal of a body part by surgery, such as toes or feet) Retinopathy (an eye disease that can cause blindness) Peripheral neuropathy (damaged nerves to the arms and legs that causes numbness, pain, weakness, and poor coordination) If you are a smoker with diabetes, quitting Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes occurs mostly in people aged over 40 years. However, an increasing number of younger people, even children, are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The first-line treatment is diet, weight control and physical activity. If the blood sugar (glucose) level remains high despite these measures then tablets to reduce the blood glucose level are usually advised. Insulin injections are needed in some cases. Other treatments include reducing blood pressure if it is high, lowering high cholesterol levels and also using other measures to reduce the risk of complications. Although diabetes cannot be cured, it can be treated successfully. If a high blood sugar level is brought down to a normal level, your symptoms will ease. You still have some risk of complications in the long term if your blood glucose level remains even mildly high - even if you have no symptoms in the short term. However, studies have shown that people who have better glucose control have fewer complications (such as heart disease or eye problems) compared with those people who have poorer control of their glucose level. Therefore, the main aims of treatment are: To keep your blood glucose level as near normal as possible. To reduce any other risk factors that may increase your risk of developing complications. In particular, to lower your blood pressure if it is high and to keep your blood lipids (cholesterol) low. To detect any complications as early as possible. Treatment can prevent or delay some complications from becoming worse. Type 2 diabetes is usually initially treated by following a healthy diet, losing weight if you are overweight, and having regular physical activity. If lifestyle advice does not control your blood sugar (glucose) levels then medicines are used to help lower your Continue reading >>

Dyslipidaemia In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Bad For The Heart

Dyslipidaemia In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Bad For The Heart

Purpose of review Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with increased coronary heart disease (CHD) morbidity and mortality. These patients are also more prone to heart failure, arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Furthermore, coronary interventions performed in such high-risk patients have worse outcomes. In this narrative review, we discuss the role of diabetic dyslipidaemia on the risk of CHD in patients with T2DM. The effects of hypolipidaemic, antihypertensive and antidiabetic drugs on lipid and glucose metabolism in T2DM are also considered. Recent findings Among CHD risk factors, diabetic dyslipidaemia characterized by moderately elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, increased triglycerides and small, dense LDL particles as well as decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels may contribute to the increased CHD risk associated with T2DM. Hypolipidaemic, antihypertensive and antidiabetic drugs can affect lipid and glucose parameters thus potentially influencing CHD risk. Such drugs may improve not only the quantity, but also the quality of LDL as well as postprandial lipaemia. Summary Current data highlight the importance of treating diabetic dyslipidaemia in order to minimize CHD risk. Both fasting and postprandial lipids are influenced by drugs in patients with T2DM; physicians should take this into consideration in clinical decision making. Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Overview Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. The hormone insulin – produced by the pancreas – is responsible for controlling the amount of glucose in the blood There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 – where the pancreas doesn't produce any insulin type 2 – where the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin or the body's cells don't react to insulin These pages are about type 2 diabetes. Read more about type 1 diabetes. Another type of diabetes, known as gestational diabetes, occurs in some pregnant women and tends to disappear after birth. Symptoms of diabetes The symptoms of diabetes occur because the lack of insulin means glucose stays in the blood and isn't used as fuel for energy. Your body tries to reduce blood glucose levels by getting rid of the excess glucose in your urine. Typical symptoms include: feeling very thirsty passing urine more often than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk See your GP if you think you may have diabetes. It's very important for it to be diagnosed as soon as possible as it will get progressively worse if left untreated. Causes of type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body doesn't produce enough insulin to function properly, or the body's cells don't react to insulin. This means glucose stays in the blood and isn't used as fuel for energy. Type 2 diabetes is often associated with obesity and tends to be diagnosed in older people. It's far more common than type 1 diabetes. Treating type 2 diabetes As type 2 diabetes usually gets worse, you may eventually need medication – usually tablets – to keep your blood glucose at normal levels. Complications of type 2 diabetes Diabetes can cause serious long-term heal Continue reading >>

Is A Liquid Diet Bad For You When You Are Type 2?

Is A Liquid Diet Bad For You When You Are Type 2?

There are different types of liquid diets. Although they're often often high in sugar and carbohydrates, liquid diets can be modified for people with type 2 diabetes. A clear liquid diet allows only easily-digested liquids that contain very little protein or fat, such as broth, juice, jello, coffee, and tea. Because a clear liquid diet is nutritionally inadequate, it should be followed for a maximum of three days following surgery, in preparation for a colonoscopy, or during intestinal illness. During a clear liquid diet, those with type 2 diabetes should minimize fruit juice consumption and choose sugar-free rather than regular jello. A full liquid diet includes all of the clear liquid choices and also allows dairy products like milk, yogurt, custard and pudding. Strained vegetable cream soups are also permitted. Sugar-sweetened custard and pudding are high in carbs, so choosing sugar-free alternatives is advised. Because a full liquid diet provides more protein and fat than a clear liquid diet, it can be consumed for a week or more, if needed. However, the diet will usually be advanced to a soft ore regular textured diet within a few days. The last category of liquid diets would be meal replacement shakes for weight loss purposes. These are not a good choice for people with diabetes because they typically contain sugar, high-fructose corn syrup, and other ingredients that can raise blood sugar. In addition, liquid meal replacements fail to foster a healthy relationship with food and a sustainable way of eating. Answered By dLife Expert: Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE Certified diabetes educator and registered dietitian living in Southern California. Disclaimer The content of this website, such as text, graphics, images, and other material on the site (collectively, “C Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes In Children: Signs, Symptoms And Prevention

Type 2 Diabetes In Children: Signs, Symptoms And Prevention

In 2009, more than 20,000 individuals under 20 years old were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. That’s probably lower than the actual number because some children or teenagers may not even know they have type 2 diabetes. Most of the new cases are in youth 10-19 years old. Type 2 diabetes is still pretty rare in children under 10 years. As with adults, the rates of type 2 diabetes are higher in certain populations. African-Americans, Hispanic and Latinos, Asian Americans and American Indians are at higher risk for developing this disease. What’s the sign? The signs and symptoms of diabetes are the same in youth as they are in adults. Drinking and urinating more than usual and having low energy are a few of the signs that may signal diabetes. Usually, but not always, there is a strong family history; a close relative, parent, aunt, uncle or grandparent has diabetes—so that’s a clue. "Teaching about proper nutrition and exercise in children can guide them in the right direction." The youth could be overweight or obese and may have a dark, velvety line around his or her neck, underarms, etc. This discoloration is called “acanthosis nigricans” and is linked with “insulin resistance” and type 2 diabetes. If any of these items are present, it’s important to see the doctor for proper evaluation. Hard consequences There is good news and bad news for type 2 diabetes and youth. We’ll start with the bad news first. In youth, the outcomes are not good if early diabetes or diabetes isn’t immediately managed. It appears that diabetes is more serious in children than in adults. There are also less treatment options. The good news is that bad habits in youth are not as deep rooted as they are in adults. Teaching about proper nutrition and exercise in children can gui Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

In this article we will cover what a Ketogenic diet is and if you can manage your diabetes while on this diet. Ketogenic diet for diabetics is a highly controversial topic, but we will break down everything here for you! As a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE), I have to tell you from the start I will have a biased view here. Sorry, but I feel that I need to be completely honest right up front! I will however, present all the evidence that is available currently on the subject. As a CDE, I have been taught to follow the American Diabetes Association Dietary Guidelines for Americans which is low in carbohydrates, high in fiber, with fresh vegetables, fruits and whole grains. The Ketogenic Diet this article will be discussing is much lower in carbohydrates, in order to promote the state of nutritional ketosis, or the fat burning state for weight loss. What is a Ketogenic Diet? The Ketogenic Diet is a low carbohydrate diet, consisting initially of less than 20 carbohydrates per day. Not per meal, yes, you heard me correctly, per day. It is not for the faint of heart and yes I am writing from experience. Of course I have tried it! Hasn’t everybody in America at some point who has wanted to lose weight? Does it work you ask? Of course it does! The problem is how long can you keep it up? Your body uses the carbohydrates you eat for energy, so if we restrict how many carbohydrates we eat, the body has to get its fuel source from fat. A byproduct of this fat burning state are ketones which are produced; this is called nutritional ketosis. You can determine if you are in this fat burning state by purchasing urine ketone testing strips from your local pharmacy. The Ketogenic Diet with Diabetes Some precautions must be made clear; this diet is not appropriate for people with any Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Differences Between Types 1 And 2

Diabetes: The Differences Between Types 1 And 2

Diabetes, or diabetes mellitus (DM), is a metabolic disorder in which the body cannot properly store and use sugar. It affects the body's ability to use glucose, a type of sugar found in the blood, as fuel. This happens because the body does not produce enough insulin, or the cells do not correctly respond to insulin to use glucose as energy. Insulin is a type of hormone produced by the pancreas to regulate how blood sugar becomes energy. An imbalance of insulin or resistance to insulin causes diabetes. Diabetes is linked to a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, vision loss, neurological conditions, and damage to blood vessels and organs. There is type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. They have different causes and risk factors, and different lines of treatment. This article will compare the similarities and differences of types 1 and 2 diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs in pregnancy and typically resolves after childbirth. However, having gestational diabetes also increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes after pregnancy, so patients are often screened for type 2 diabetes at a later date. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 29.1 million people in the United States (U.S.) have diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is much more common than type 1. For every person with type 1 diabetes, 20 will have type 2. Type 2 can be hereditary, but excess weight, a lack of exercise and an unhealthy diet increase At least a third of people in the U.S. will develop type 2 diabetes in their lifetime. Both types can lead to heart attack, stroke, nerve damage, kidney damage, and possible amputation of limbs. Causes In type 1 diabetes, the immune system mistakenly attacks the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. These cells are destro Continue reading >>

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic medical condition in which sugar, or glucose, levels build up in your bloodstream. The hormone insulin helps move the sugar from your blood into your cells, which are where the sugar is used for energy. In type 2 diabetes, your body’s cells aren’t able to respond to insulin as well as they should. In later stages of the disease your body may also not produce enough insulin. Uncontrolled type 2 diabetes can lead to chronically high blood sugar levels, causing several symptoms and potentially leading to serious complications. In type 2 diabetes your body isn’t able to effectively use insulin to bring glucose into your cells. This causes your body to rely on alternative energy sources in your tissues, muscles, and organs. This is a chain reaction that can cause a variety of symptoms. Type 2 diabetes can develop slowly. The symptoms may be mild and easy to dismiss at first. The early symptoms may include: constant hunger a lack of energy fatigue weight loss excessive thirst frequent urination dry mouth itchy skin blurry vision As the disease progresses, the symptoms become more severe and potentially dangerous. If your blood sugar levels have been high for a long time, the symptoms can include: yeast infections slow-healing cuts or sores dark patches on your skin foot pain feelings of numbness in your extremities, or neuropathy If you have two or more of these symptoms, you should see your doctor. Without treatment, diabetes can become life-threatening. Diabetes has a powerful effect on your heart. Women with diabetes are twice as likely to have another heart attack after the first one. They’re at quadruple the risk of heart failure when compared to women without diabetes. Diabetes can also lead to complications during pregnancy. Diet is an imp Continue reading >>

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