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Is Type 2 Diabetes Bad?

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In order to run cool on those hot summer days, your engine needs to have a consistent flow of coolant supplied from the radiator throughout the engine. The water pump is the primary component responsible for maintaining this flow. When it works properly, your car will maintain a consistent operating temperature, run smoothly, and take you anywhere you need to travel. When the water pump fails or is beginning to wear out, it can lead to complete engine failure. When the water cooled (as opposed to air cooled) engine was introduced, many automotive experts believed that the water pump circulating coolant through the engine block was just as critical to engine protection as oil. This philosophy holds true even as technology has improved over the years to create more efficient cooling systems in today's modern cars. Your cars water pump is the key to making the entire system work. It is an impeller pump and is usually buried under the timing belt cover on the side of the engine. The pump is operated by the engines drive belt as the belt turns, the pump turns. Blades on the pump force coolant to flow through the engine and back to the radiator to be cooled by a forced air cooling fan. Although the water pumps in most modern cars, trucks, and SUVs will last a long time, they are by no means indestructible. Like any other mechanical device, they will produce a few warning signs that they are wearing out, so that car owners can contact a local ASE certified mechanic to replace the water pump before additional engine components are damaged. 1. Coolant leak at the front-center of your car The water pump is comprised of multiple gaskets and seals that keep coolant contained and ensure that consistent flow of coolant is delivered from the radiator to the engine. Eventually, these gaskets and seals will wear out, dry up, crack or break entirely. When this happens, coolant will leak from the water pump and drop to the ground, typically in the front of your car and in the center of the motor's location. If you notice that there is a leak of coolant (which will appear to be green or sometimes red in color) under the center of your car, truck or SUV, contact a professional mechanic to inspect this problem. More often than not, it's a leak from the water pump that can be repaired before it gets worse. 2. Water pump pulley is loose and making whining sounds From time to time you might hear a high pitched sound that comes from the front of the motor. This is typically caused by a loose belt that creates a harmonic buzzing or whining sound as it circulates. The loose belt is commonly caused by a pulley that has become loose or that the bearings that operate the water pump assembly are wearing out. Once the bearings fail inside the water pump, it means the unit cannot be repaired and will need to be replaced entirely. If you notice that there is a loud whining sound coming from the front of your motor that increases in volume as you accelerate, contact a mechanic as soon as possible to inspect your vehicle. 3. Engine is overheating When the water pump fails completely, it will not be able to circulate coolant through the engine block. This results in an overheating situation and if not repaired or replaced quickly, can cause additional engine damage like cracked cylinder heads, pushed head gaskets, or burnt pistons. More About BundysGarage: https://goo.gl/qv3Wzc Questions, Comments, Concerns: [email protected] Twitter: https://twitter.com/bundysgarage @bundysgarage On The Web: http://www.bundysgarage.com Music by Randall Kent: As seen on NCIS https://youtu.be/iYwsjia4GtI All Rights Reserved 2018 Copyright 2018 Bundys Garage All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part with out the express written permission. Contact: [email protected] DISCLAIMER - DISCLAIMER - DISCLAIMER Due to factors beyond the control of BundysGarage, it cannot guarantee against unauthorized modifications of this information, or improper use of this information. BundysGarage assumes no liability for property damage or injury incurred as a result of any of the information contained in this video. BundysGarage recommends safe practices when working with power tools, automotive lifts, lifting tools, jack stands, electrical equipment, blunt instruments, chemicals, lubricants, or any other tools or equipment seen or implied in this video. Due to factors beyond the control of BundysGarage, no information contained in this video shall create any express or implied warranty or guarantee of any particular result. Any injury, damage or loss that may result from improper use of these tools, equipment, or the information contained in this video is the sole responsibility of the end user and not BundysGarage nor any of its subsidiaries.

Good Glucose Control Could Be Bad In Type 2 Diabetes

The common approach of intensive glucose control to achieve low blood sugar targets in type 2 diabetes can increase the risk of mortality, finds a study by Cardiff University. Looking at routine data from over 300,000 people in the UK, collected between 2004 and 2015, researchers found that lower levels of glycated haemoglobin—typically regarded as being good diabetes control—were associated with increased mortality risk, compared to moderate levels, especially in conjunction with intensive treatments that could cause hypoglycaemia. Professor Craig Currie from Cardiff University's School of Medicine said: "Treatment guidelines generally recommend therapeutic strategies that aim for low levels of glucose control, on the understanding that it reduces risk of macrovascular complications such as coronary artery disease and stroke. "Contrary to this belief, our findings show persuasively that there is an association with increased mortality risk and what is considered to be good glucose control, or low HbA1c." The findings of the study also suggest that neither randomised trials nor observational studies have been able to demonstrate a consistent pattern of association between level Continue reading >>

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  1. Sidiabetic

    Hi , I am 32 male was recently diagnosed with Type 2 with initial A1C of 12. I got it under control with diet and daily dose of 1000mg of metformin. My last A1c results showed 5.9. I have a family history and have seen it all. A distant cousin died at a young age and most of maternal side of family members have type 2 including my mom. I see them coping with it .
    I read somewhere that CDC says patients diagnosed at 30 will have their life shortened by 14.5 years on Average. This scares me a lot . I got married a couple of years back and God has blessed with a beautiful daughter and a loving wife. I have not shared my condition with any of my family members . Am I in control? Numbers say yes . Someted I feel like fast forwarding my life for the next 20 years or so . just want to make sure my daughter is doing ok.

  2. mollythed

    Sidiabetic wrote:
    Hi , I am 32 male was recently diagnosed with Type 2 with initial A1C of 12. I got it under control with diet and daily dose of 1000mg of metformin. My last A1c results showed 5.9. I have a family history and have seen it all. A distant cousin died at a young age and most of maternal side of family members have type 2 including my mom. I see them coping with it .
    I read somewhere that CDC says patients diagnosed at 30 will have their life shortened by 14.5 years on Average. This scares me a lot . I got married a couple of years back and God has blessed with a beautiful daughter and a loving wife. I have not shared my condition with any of my family members . Am I in control? Numbers say yes . Someted I feel like fast forwarding my life for the next 20 years or so . just want to make sure my daughter is doing ok.
    "On average" means everybody, no matter when they were diagnosed, and no matter how well they take care of themselves. If you had been diagnosed years ago, before home meters, so that you had no ready way to evaluate your success in managing diabetes, or if you choose now not to make the effort to change your diet, or to exercise, or take the meds you need, diabetes could easily have a big impact on your lifespan. As somebody newly diagnosed, you have the benefit of all the research of the last fifty years or more, and all the research that will continue to be done for the next fifty years. You are not average. Taking care of yourself greatly reduces your changes of compications and an early death. Doctors will continue to learn more and do better at helping to extend lives.

    My mom died at 86 from a stroke. My dad died at 50, from a ruptured aneurysm. My brother died at 62 from prostate cancer first diagnosed at 52. None of them had diabetes. At 72, and after 20 years of diabetes, I have already beat that family average, and I still don't know that diabetes will be the major contributor to my demise. Averages are just that, averages, and they don't tell us what will really happen to each of us. I would say exactly the same thing to my three sons who do have diabetes.

  3. lowcarbwalking

    Sidiabetic,
    I have read your post and have been considering it.
    I think it's terrific that you are motivated by your young daughter to live a healthy life with type 2 diabetes and be there for her throughout her life. and to be there for yr wife as well and any future children.
    I would urge you to read Dr Richard Bernstein's book titled, Diabetes Soluiton. In Dr Bernstien's view well controlled diabetes, meaning keeping your blood glucose in the normal range, leads to a normal, healthy lifespan. Btw. Dr Bernstein is a Type 1 himself and lives what he outlines in his book. His method and ideas work for controlling type 2 and type 1 diabetes.
    You have done a fantastic job getting your a1c down from 12 to 5.9. I would urge you to consider doing a bit more and getting you A1c down to the normal range and make your post meal 1 hour and 2 hour bg readings whiting the normal range.
    I strongly believe this will give you the absolutely best percentage shot at not ever experiencing diabetic complications. Read Dr Bernstein's book and consider what is possible.
    I wish you the best.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
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http://ehow2.co/diabetes-treatment - Visit the link and discover more about symptoms and treatment of diabetes type 1 in men and women. Diabetes Type 1 - Diabetes Type 1 Life Expectancy - Type 1 Diabetes - Living With Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition, which means your immune system attacks healthy body tissue by mistake. In this case, it attacks the cells in your pancreas. Your damaged pancreas is then unable to produce insulin, so that glucose cannot be moved out of your bloodstream and into your cells. Complications of Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes is the most common cause of vision loss and blindness in people of working age. Everyone with diabetes aged 12 or over should be invited to have their eyes screened once a year for diabetic retinopathy. Diabetes is the reason for many cases of kidney failure and lower limb amputation. People with diabetes are up to five times more likely to have cardiovascular disease, such as a stroke, than those without diabetes. Diabetes Type 1 Treatment If you have type 1 diabetes, you'll need to eat a healthy, balanced diet. Loose weight, if you're overweight, and maintaining a healthy weight. Stopping smoking (if you smoke) and drinking alcohol in moderation. Diabetes Type 1 - learn about the similarities and differences between diabetes type 1 and diabetes 2 with dr. type 1 diabetes | nucleus health. Type 1 diabetes (disease or medical condition) Video Download 3GP, MP4, HD MP4, And Watch type 1 diabetes (disease or medical condition) Video Learn about the similarities and differences between diabetes type 1 and diabetes 2 with dr. Alternative: diabetes type 1 is curable. The condition affects about 3 million people in the united states alone and everyone with type 1 diabetes — including celebrities — must replace their insulin every day.. This is my story on how i got type 1 diabetes 16 years ago and how i felt as well as how i dealt with it growing up. Gina was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when she was nine years and has been dependent on insulin ever since. Did you ask yourself why type 1 diabetes mellitus is incurable? Diabetes Mellitus (Disease Or Medical Condition) · Type 2 Diabetes (Disease Or Medical Condition) · Type 1 Diabetes (Disease Or Medical Condition). Type 1 diabetes (disease or medical condition) Video Download 3GP, MP4, HD MP4, And Watch type 1 diabetes (disease or medical condition) Video. Effects of chromium picolinate on food intake DIABETES TYPE 1 LIFE EXPECTANCY ] The REAL cause of Diabetes (and the solution) Donate Today. Medtronic Diabetes Supplies Diabetes Type 1 Life Expectancy ::The 3 Step Trick that Reverses Diabetes Permanently in As Little as 11 Days. Diabetes type 1 life expectancy borderline diabetes. The condition affects about 3 million people in the united states alone and everyone with type 1 diabetes — including celebrities — must replace their insulin every day.. This is my story on living with type 1 diabetes - i share with you how i got diagnosed the medication i take and what i need to do on a daily basis to keep healthy. Gina was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when she was nine years and has been dependent on insulin ever since. The condition affects about 3 million people in the united states alone and everyone with type 1 diabetes — including celebrities — must replace their insulin every day.. Gina was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when she was nine years and has been dependent on insulin ever since. Knowing the signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes can make a big difference in getting your child treatment before they become very ill. Type 1 diabetes is a condition in which your pancreas does not produce insulin a hormone your body needs to maintain proper blood sugar levels. In type 1 diabetes beta cells of the pancreas are destroyed by the immune system by mistake. In type 2 diabetes the pancreas produces enough insulin but something goes wrong either with receptor binding or insulin signaling inside the target cells. Typically obesity inactive lifestyle and unhealthy diet are associated with higher risk of type 2 diabetes. If you have type i diabetes your goal is to keep your blood glucose within a normal range. Diabetes mellitus pathophysiology and nursing nclex lecture review on diabetes type 1 and diabetes type 2. Diabetes Type 1 Diet,Diabetes Type 1,Living With Diabetes Type 1,Type 1 Diabetes,diabetes,health,type 1 diabetes (disease or medical condition),diabetes type 1 vs type 2,diabetes type 1 symptoms,diabetes type 1 cure,diabetes type 1 and 2 cure in 72 hrs,diabetes type 1 treatment,diabetes type 1 story,diabetes type 1 causes,type 1 diabetes cure,type 1 diabetes symptoms,type 1 diabetes diet,type 1 diabetes diagnosis story,type 1 diabetes ketogenic diet,piles

Type 2 Diabetes

Overview Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. The hormone insulin – produced by the pancreas – is responsible for controlling the amount of glucose in the blood There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 – where the pancreas doesn't produce any insulin type 2 – where the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin or the body's cells don't react to insulin These pages are about type 2 diabetes. Read more about type 1 diabetes. Another type of diabetes, known as gestational diabetes, occurs in some pregnant women and tends to disappear after birth. Symptoms of diabetes The symptoms of diabetes occur because the lack of insulin means glucose stays in the blood and isn't used as fuel for energy. Your body tries to reduce blood glucose levels by getting rid of the excess glucose in your urine. Typical symptoms include: feeling very thirsty passing urine more often than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk See your GP if you think you may have diabetes. It's very important for it to be diagnosed as soon as possible as it will get progressively worse if left untreated. Causes of Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Sidiabetic

    Hi , I am 32 male was recently diagnosed with Type 2 with initial A1C of 12. I got it under control with diet and daily dose of 1000mg of metformin. My last A1c results showed 5.9. I have a family history and have seen it all. A distant cousin died at a young age and most of maternal side of family members have type 2 including my mom. I see them coping with it .
    I read somewhere that CDC says patients diagnosed at 30 will have their life shortened by 14.5 years on Average. This scares me a lot . I got married a couple of years back and God has blessed with a beautiful daughter and a loving wife. I have not shared my condition with any of my family members . Am I in control? Numbers say yes . Someted I feel like fast forwarding my life for the next 20 years or so . just want to make sure my daughter is doing ok.

  2. mollythed

    Sidiabetic wrote:
    Hi , I am 32 male was recently diagnosed with Type 2 with initial A1C of 12. I got it under control with diet and daily dose of 1000mg of metformin. My last A1c results showed 5.9. I have a family history and have seen it all. A distant cousin died at a young age and most of maternal side of family members have type 2 including my mom. I see them coping with it .
    I read somewhere that CDC says patients diagnosed at 30 will have their life shortened by 14.5 years on Average. This scares me a lot . I got married a couple of years back and God has blessed with a beautiful daughter and a loving wife. I have not shared my condition with any of my family members . Am I in control? Numbers say yes . Someted I feel like fast forwarding my life for the next 20 years or so . just want to make sure my daughter is doing ok.
    "On average" means everybody, no matter when they were diagnosed, and no matter how well they take care of themselves. If you had been diagnosed years ago, before home meters, so that you had no ready way to evaluate your success in managing diabetes, or if you choose now not to make the effort to change your diet, or to exercise, or take the meds you need, diabetes could easily have a big impact on your lifespan. As somebody newly diagnosed, you have the benefit of all the research of the last fifty years or more, and all the research that will continue to be done for the next fifty years. You are not average. Taking care of yourself greatly reduces your changes of compications and an early death. Doctors will continue to learn more and do better at helping to extend lives.

    My mom died at 86 from a stroke. My dad died at 50, from a ruptured aneurysm. My brother died at 62 from prostate cancer first diagnosed at 52. None of them had diabetes. At 72, and after 20 years of diabetes, I have already beat that family average, and I still don't know that diabetes will be the major contributor to my demise. Averages are just that, averages, and they don't tell us what will really happen to each of us. I would say exactly the same thing to my three sons who do have diabetes.

  3. lowcarbwalking

    Sidiabetic,
    I have read your post and have been considering it.
    I think it's terrific that you are motivated by your young daughter to live a healthy life with type 2 diabetes and be there for her throughout her life. and to be there for yr wife as well and any future children.
    I would urge you to read Dr Richard Bernstein's book titled, Diabetes Soluiton. In Dr Bernstien's view well controlled diabetes, meaning keeping your blood glucose in the normal range, leads to a normal, healthy lifespan. Btw. Dr Bernstein is a Type 1 himself and lives what he outlines in his book. His method and ideas work for controlling type 2 and type 1 diabetes.
    You have done a fantastic job getting your a1c down from 12 to 5.9. I would urge you to consider doing a bit more and getting you A1c down to the normal range and make your post meal 1 hour and 2 hour bg readings whiting the normal range.
    I strongly believe this will give you the absolutely best percentage shot at not ever experiencing diabetic complications. Read Dr Bernstein's book and consider what is possible.
    I wish you the best.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

http://ehow2.co/diabetes-treatment - Visit the link and discover more about diabetes mellitus treatment & causes. Diabetes Mellitus - Diabetes Mellitus Treatment & Causes - Diabetes Mellitus Type 1 & Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Diabetes mellitus is a disease that prevents your body from properly using the energy from the food you eat. Diabetes occurs in one of the following situations: The pancreas (an organ behind your stomach) produces little insulin or no insulin at all. The pancreas makes insulin, but the insulin made does not work as it should which iscalled insulin resistance. Types of Diabetes There are trhee main types of diabetes: Type 1, Type 2 and Gestational: Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes occurs because the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas (beta cells) are damaged. In Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas makes little or no insulin, so sugar cannot get into the body's cells for use as energy. Type 1 is the most common form of diabetes in people who are under age 30, but it can occur at any age. Ten percent of people with diabetes are diagnosed with Type 1. Type 2 Diabetes In Type 2 diabetes, the pancreas makes insulin, but it either doesn't produce enough, or the insulin does not work properly. Nine out of 10 people with diabetes have Type 2. This type occurs most often in people who are over 40 years old and overweight. diabetes mellitus - what is diabetes mellitus? Diabetes mellitus type 2 is a long-term metabolic disorder that is characterized by high blood sugar, insulin resistance, and relative lack of insulin Diabetes mellitus type 1 is a form of diabetes mellitus in which not enough insulin is produced Diabetes mellitus can be split into type 1 type 2 as well as a couple other subtypes including gestational diabetes and drug-induced diabetes. If you have the symptoms of type 2 diabetes you can start practicing these yoga exercises to treat your diabetes mellitus type 2... In this video we discuss diabetes mellitus which is a collection of metabolic disorders characterised by chronic hyperglycaemia. Diabetes mellitus pathophysiology & nursing | diabetes nursing lecture nclex | type 1 & type 2. Diabetes mellitus (type 1, type 2) & diabetic ketoacidosis (dka) - causes & symptoms. Learn about diabetes mellitus type 1, a chronic disease that causes high levels of glucose in the blood due to a lack of insulin production. Diabetes mellitus type 1 is a form of diabetes mellitus in which not enough insulin is produced. Diabetes mellitus type 2 is a long-term metabolic disorder that is characterized by high blood sugar, insulin resistance, and relative lack of insulin. Home remedies for diabetes mellitus management - herbal treatment. One unexpected and unwanted outcome from modernization of society is the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus due to changes in lifestyles. Nesse vdeo o mdico maurcio aguiar de paula explica detalhadamente o que a diabetes mellitus. Metabolic disorders that are associated with a high blood sugar and glucose are collectively known as diabetes mellitus which you will see abbreviated as: dm. In this lecture i highlight the key players in diabetes mellitus causes different types of diabetes (type 1 type 2 and gestational) complications and nursing assessment of the diabetic patient. Diabetes mellitus and antidiabetic drugs part 1. Diabetes Mellitus Treatment,Diabetes Mellitus Type 1,Diabetes Mellitus,diabetes,type 2 diabetes,insulin,diabetes mellitus (disease or medical condition),type 1 diabetes,diabetes mellitus nursing,diabetes mellitus pathophysiology,diabetes mellitus type 2,diabetes mellitus pharmacology,diabetes mellitus by dr najeeb,diabetes mellitus pronunciation,diabetes mellitus symptoms,piles,mellitus,what is diiabetes mellitus,what is diabetes

Dyslipidaemia In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Bad For The Heart

Purpose of review Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with increased coronary heart disease (CHD) morbidity and mortality. These patients are also more prone to heart failure, arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Furthermore, coronary interventions performed in such high-risk patients have worse outcomes. In this narrative review, we discuss the role of diabetic dyslipidaemia on the risk of CHD in patients with T2DM. The effects of hypolipidaemic, antihypertensive and antidiabetic drugs on lipid and glucose metabolism in T2DM are also considered. Recent findings Among CHD risk factors, diabetic dyslipidaemia characterized by moderately elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, increased triglycerides and small, dense LDL particles as well as decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels may contribute to the increased CHD risk associated with T2DM. Hypolipidaemic, antihypertensive and antidiabetic drugs can affect lipid and glucose parameters thus potentially influencing CHD risk. Such drugs may improve not only the quantity, but also the quality of LDL as well as postprandial lipaemia. Summary Current data highlight the importance of treating diabetic Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Sidiabetic

    Hi , I am 32 male was recently diagnosed with Type 2 with initial A1C of 12. I got it under control with diet and daily dose of 1000mg of metformin. My last A1c results showed 5.9. I have a family history and have seen it all. A distant cousin died at a young age and most of maternal side of family members have type 2 including my mom. I see them coping with it .
    I read somewhere that CDC says patients diagnosed at 30 will have their life shortened by 14.5 years on Average. This scares me a lot . I got married a couple of years back and God has blessed with a beautiful daughter and a loving wife. I have not shared my condition with any of my family members . Am I in control? Numbers say yes . Someted I feel like fast forwarding my life for the next 20 years or so . just want to make sure my daughter is doing ok.

  2. mollythed

    Sidiabetic wrote:
    Hi , I am 32 male was recently diagnosed with Type 2 with initial A1C of 12. I got it under control with diet and daily dose of 1000mg of metformin. My last A1c results showed 5.9. I have a family history and have seen it all. A distant cousin died at a young age and most of maternal side of family members have type 2 including my mom. I see them coping with it .
    I read somewhere that CDC says patients diagnosed at 30 will have their life shortened by 14.5 years on Average. This scares me a lot . I got married a couple of years back and God has blessed with a beautiful daughter and a loving wife. I have not shared my condition with any of my family members . Am I in control? Numbers say yes . Someted I feel like fast forwarding my life for the next 20 years or so . just want to make sure my daughter is doing ok.
    "On average" means everybody, no matter when they were diagnosed, and no matter how well they take care of themselves. If you had been diagnosed years ago, before home meters, so that you had no ready way to evaluate your success in managing diabetes, or if you choose now not to make the effort to change your diet, or to exercise, or take the meds you need, diabetes could easily have a big impact on your lifespan. As somebody newly diagnosed, you have the benefit of all the research of the last fifty years or more, and all the research that will continue to be done for the next fifty years. You are not average. Taking care of yourself greatly reduces your changes of compications and an early death. Doctors will continue to learn more and do better at helping to extend lives.

    My mom died at 86 from a stroke. My dad died at 50, from a ruptured aneurysm. My brother died at 62 from prostate cancer first diagnosed at 52. None of them had diabetes. At 72, and after 20 years of diabetes, I have already beat that family average, and I still don't know that diabetes will be the major contributor to my demise. Averages are just that, averages, and they don't tell us what will really happen to each of us. I would say exactly the same thing to my three sons who do have diabetes.

  3. lowcarbwalking

    Sidiabetic,
    I have read your post and have been considering it.
    I think it's terrific that you are motivated by your young daughter to live a healthy life with type 2 diabetes and be there for her throughout her life. and to be there for yr wife as well and any future children.
    I would urge you to read Dr Richard Bernstein's book titled, Diabetes Soluiton. In Dr Bernstien's view well controlled diabetes, meaning keeping your blood glucose in the normal range, leads to a normal, healthy lifespan. Btw. Dr Bernstein is a Type 1 himself and lives what he outlines in his book. His method and ideas work for controlling type 2 and type 1 diabetes.
    You have done a fantastic job getting your a1c down from 12 to 5.9. I would urge you to consider doing a bit more and getting you A1c down to the normal range and make your post meal 1 hour and 2 hour bg readings whiting the normal range.
    I strongly believe this will give you the absolutely best percentage shot at not ever experiencing diabetic complications. Read Dr Bernstein's book and consider what is possible.
    I wish you the best.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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