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Is Type 2 Diabetes Bad?

Dangers Of Diabetes

Dangers Of Diabetes

Right now, you might be experiencing some of the symptoms of type 2 diabetes, which include: Frequent urination Unusual thirst Extreme hunger Unusual weight loss Extreme fatigue and irritability Blurred vision Cuts/bruises that are slow to heal Tingling/numbness in the hands and feet Skin, gum, or bladder infections As you bring your blood-glucose levels under control, these symptoms will begin to abate. However, like many people with type 2 diabetes, you might not have any symptoms at all — which can sometimes make it harder to grasp the seriousness of your diagnosis. Whether you have symptoms or not, over time uncontrolled levels of high blood sugar can lead to tissue damage throughout your body, from your eyes to your toes. When you have diabetes, you will be seeing your physician on a regular basis to monitor your progress. And it will become more important than ever to get regular dental and eye exams. That’s because diabetes can lead to a range of complications, which you need to know about and be on the lookout for because they are so serious. Fortunately, controlling your blood-glucose levels can help prevent many of these secondary problems. Diabetic Complications Gum disease and infections Vision problems, including a risk of cataracts, glaucoma, and eye infections; a condition called diabetic retinopathy can lead to vision loss or blindness Neuropathy, or nerve damage, that can cause pain or numbness in your hands and feet Circulatory problems that can eventually lead to amputations (feet, legs) Remember: Taking control of your blood-glucose levels can help prevent many of these secondary problems. Work closely with your care team to maintain a proper diabetes management plan and to watch carefully for troubling symptoms or signs of a developing problem. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes May Be Bad For Brain Health

Type 2 Diabetes May Be Bad For Brain Health

Excess weight appears to amplify the threat, study says HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, April 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Previous research has linked type 2 diabetes and memory loss. Now, new research may be closing in on some of the reasons why. The study found that people with type 2 diabetes -- particularly those who are overweight or obese -- have thinner gray matter in several areas of the brain. These brain regions are related to memory, executive function, movement generation and visual information processing, said the study's senior author, Dr. In Kyoon Lyoo. He's director of the Ewha University Brain Institute in Seoul, South Korea. "Obesity leads to increased risk of type 2 diabetes, metabolic dysfunction and is also associated with brain alterations independently," Lyoo said. "We aimed to investigate whether overweight/obesity influenced brain structure and cognitive function in individuals with early stage of type 2 diabetes." The study included: 50 overweight or obese people with type 2 diabetes; 50 normal-weight people with type 2 diabetes, and 50 normal-weight people without diabetes. The Korean study volunteers were between 30 and 60 years old. Those with diabetes had it for five years or less, and they were attempting lifestyle modifications and/or taking oral medication to lower blood sugar levels. No one was taking insulin. The normal-weight group with type 2 diabetes had slightly better blood sugar control -- a hemoglobin A1C level of 7 percent. The overweight folks with type 2 diabetes had hemoglobin A1C levels of 7.3 percent. Hemoglobin A1C is a two- to three- month estimate of average blood sugar levels. The American Diabetes Association generally recommends an A1C of 7 percent or less. All study participants underwent MRI brain scans and tests to Continue reading >>

Is A Liquid Diet Bad For You When You Are Type 2?

Is A Liquid Diet Bad For You When You Are Type 2?

There are different types of liquid diets. Although they're often often high in sugar and carbohydrates, liquid diets can be modified for people with type 2 diabetes. A clear liquid diet allows only easily-digested liquids that contain very little protein or fat, such as broth, juice, jello, coffee, and tea. Because a clear liquid diet is nutritionally inadequate, it should be followed for a maximum of three days following surgery, in preparation for a colonoscopy, or during intestinal illness. During a clear liquid diet, those with type 2 diabetes should minimize fruit juice consumption and choose sugar-free rather than regular jello. A full liquid diet includes all of the clear liquid choices and also allows dairy products like milk, yogurt, custard and pudding. Strained vegetable cream soups are also permitted. Sugar-sweetened custard and pudding are high in carbs, so choosing sugar-free alternatives is advised. Because a full liquid diet provides more protein and fat than a clear liquid diet, it can be consumed for a week or more, if needed. However, the diet will usually be advanced to a soft ore regular textured diet within a few days. The last category of liquid diets would be meal replacement shakes for weight loss purposes. These are not a good choice for people with diabetes because they typically contain sugar, high-fructose corn syrup, and other ingredients that can raise blood sugar. In addition, liquid meal replacements fail to foster a healthy relationship with food and a sustainable way of eating. Answered By dLife Expert: Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE Certified diabetes educator and registered dietitian living in Southern California. Disclaimer The content of this website, such as text, graphics, images, and other material on the site (collectively, “C Continue reading >>

5 Ways Type 1 Diabetes Is Different From Type 2

5 Ways Type 1 Diabetes Is Different From Type 2

When people hear that you have diabetes, they start to make assumptions that aren't always accurate. A lot of the confusion stems from the fact that there are two main types, yet many people don't understand how they're different. (Want to pick up some healthier habits? Sign up to get daily healthy living tips delivered straight to your inbox!) As someone with type 1 diabetes—I was diagnosed with it nearly 40 years ago—I'm all too familiar with the disease. I lived with it as a child, teen, and adult, and when I decided to have kids I had to figure out how to manage the condition while being pregnant. (I even wrote a book about it, Balancing Pregnancy With Pre-Existing Diabetes: Healthy Mom, Healthy Baby.) Having type 1 diabetes means I'm in the minority: Of the approximately 29 million Americans who have diabetes, only 1.25 million have type 1. Most have type 2, which is a totally different form. "Comparing type 1 to type 2 is like comparing apples to tractors," says Gary Scheiner, a Pennsylvania-based certified diabetes educator and author of Think Like a Pancreas. "The only thing they really have in common is that both involve an inability to control blood sugar levels." Here are 5 important distinctions. 1. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease; type 2 isn't. Diabetes happens when your body has trouble with insulin, a hormone that helps convert sugar from the food you eat into energy. When there isn’t enough insulin in your body, sugar builds up in the bloodstream and can make you sick. People with type 1 and type 2 both face this problem, but how they arrived there is quite different. If you have type 1, you don't make any insulin at all. That's because type 1 is an autoimmune disease in which your immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-making cells in your Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Type 2

Diabetes - Type 2

Description An in-depth report on the causes, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of type 2 diabetes. Alternative Names Type 2 diabetes; Maturity onset diabetes; Noninsulin-dependent diabetes Highlights Diabetes Statistics According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Diabetes Fact Sheet, nearly 26 million American adults and children have diabetes. About 79 million Americans aged 20 years and older have pre-diabetes, a condition that increases the risk for developing diabetes. Diabetes and Cancer Type 2 diabetes increases the risk for certain types of cancer, according to a consensus report from the American Diabetes Association and the American Cancer Society. Diabetes doubles the risk for developing liver, pancreatic, or endometrial cancer. Certain medications used for treating type 2 diabetes may possibly increase the risk for some types of cancers. Screening for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus The American Diabetes Association recommends that pregnant women without known risk factors for diabetes get screened for gestational diabetes at 24 - 28 weeks of pregnancy. Pregnant women with risk factors for diabetes should be screened for type 2 diabetes at the first prenatal visit. Aspirin for Heart Disease Prevention The American Diabetes Association now recommends daily low-dose (75 - 162 mg) aspirin for men older than age 50 and women older than age 60 who have diabetes and at least one additional heart disease risk factor (such as smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, family history, or albuminuria). Guidelines for Treatment of Diabetic Neuropathy The anticonvulsant drug pregabalin (Lyrica) is a first-line treatment for painful diabetic neuropathy, according to recent guidelines released by the American Academy of Neurol Continue reading >>

Articles Ontype 2 Diabetes

Articles Ontype 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a life-long disease that affects the way your body handles glucose, a kind of sugar, in your blood. Most people with the condition have type 2. There are about 27 million people in the U.S. with it. Another 86 million have prediabetes: Their blood glucose is not normal, but not high enough to be diabetes yet. Your pancreas makes a hormone called insulin. It's what lets your cells turn glucose from the food you eat into energy. People with type 2 diabetes make insulin, but their cells don't use it as well as they should. Doctors call this insulin resistance. At first, the pancreas makes more insulin to try to get glucose into the cells. But eventually it can't keep up, and the sugar builds up in your blood instead. Usually a combination of things cause type 2 diabetes, including: Genes. Scientists have found different bits of DNA that affect how your body makes insulin. Extra weight. Being overweight or obese can cause insulin resistance, especially if you carry your extra pounds around the middle. Now type 2 diabetes affects kids and teens as well as adults, mainly because of childhood obesity. Metabolic syndrome. People with insulin resistance often have a group of conditions including high blood glucose, extra fat around the waist, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol and triglycerides. Too much glucose from your liver. When your blood sugar is low, your liver makes and sends out glucose. After you eat, your blood sugar goes up, and usually the liver will slow down and store its glucose for later. But some people's livers don't. They keep cranking out sugar. Bad communication between cells. Sometimes cells send the wrong signals or don't pick up messages correctly. When these problems affect how your cells make and use insulin or glucose, a chain reac Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Overview Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. The hormone insulin – produced by the pancreas – is responsible for controlling the amount of glucose in the blood There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 – where the pancreas doesn't produce any insulin type 2 – where the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin or the body's cells don't react to insulin These pages are about type 2 diabetes. Read more about type 1 diabetes. Another type of diabetes, known as gestational diabetes, occurs in some pregnant women and tends to disappear after birth. Symptoms of diabetes The symptoms of diabetes occur because the lack of insulin means glucose stays in the blood and isn't used as fuel for energy. Your body tries to reduce blood glucose levels by getting rid of the excess glucose in your urine. Typical symptoms include: feeling very thirsty passing urine more often than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk See your GP if you think you may have diabetes. It's very important for it to be diagnosed as soon as possible as it will get progressively worse if left untreated. Causes of type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body doesn't produce enough insulin to function properly, or the body's cells don't react to insulin. This means glucose stays in the blood and isn't used as fuel for energy. Type 2 diabetes is often associated with obesity and tends to be diagnosed in older people. It's far more common than type 1 diabetes. Treating type 2 diabetes As type 2 diabetes usually gets worse, you may eventually need medication – usually tablets – to keep your blood glucose at normal levels. Complications of type 2 diabetes Diabetes can cause serious long-term heal Continue reading >>

How Serious Is Type 2 Diabetes? Is It More Serious Than Type 1 Diabetes?

How Serious Is Type 2 Diabetes? Is It More Serious Than Type 1 Diabetes?

A fellow caregiver asked... How serious is type 2 diabetes, and is it less or more serious than type 1 diabetes? My mom, just diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, keeps it under control without taking insulin. So is type 2 diabetes less of a problem than insulin-dependent type 1? Expert Answers No, definitely not. In fact, in some ways type 2 diabetes is a more serious disorder because your mom may have had it for years before she was diagnosed. So she may well have developed some of the long-term, debilitating complications linked to the condition without knowing it. In addition, since type 2 diabetes is a progressive disorder without a cure, over time her body may not be able to produce insulin or use it as well as it does now, and she may wind up needing insulin injections or pills. A person with type1 diabetes ignores it for a day at his own peril. He'll likely end up in the emergency room because his body can't absorb glucose without a continuous supply of insulin via injection or an insulin pump. People with type 1 diabetes typically develop such severe symptoms over a short time in childhood or early adulthood that they're forced to deal with it. Type 2 diabetes is a sneakier condition: Its harmful health effects can slowly build for years until full-blown complications, such as vision loss, heart disease, or foot problems, make it impossible to ignore. Plus it often comes with its own set of problems. For instance, people with type 2 diabetes are frequently diagnosed with high blood pressure and cholesterol along with high blood sugar. This damaging threesome can lead to progressive thickening of the arteries and reduced blood flow, putting your mom at greater risk for a slew of complications including heart disease, stroke, and nerve damage. If your mom is overweigh Continue reading >>

What Is Type 2 Diabetes?

What Is Type 2 Diabetes?

Understanding type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. For many people (but not all) it can be prevented through following a healthy lifestyle. While type 2 diabetes cannot be cured, it can be managed and people with type 2 diabetes can and do live active and healthy lives. Diabetes is the result of the body not creating enough insulin to keep blood glucose (sugar) levels in the normal range. Everyone needs some glucose in their blood, but if it’s too high it can damage your body over time. In type 2 diabetes, either the body doesn’t produce enough insulin, or the cells in the body don’t recognise the insulin that is present. The end result is the same: high levels of glucose in your blood. For many people (but not all) type 2 diabetes can be prevented by making healthy food choices and staying active. There is a clear link between type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure (hypertension) and / or disordered levels of fats (cholesterol) in the blood (the medical name for this is dyslipidaemia). This combination of diabetes with hypertension and dyslipidaemia is sometimes called ‘the Metabolic Syndrome’ or Syndrome X. When does type 2 diabetes normally occur? Type 2 diabetes most often occurs in adulthood usually after the ages of 30 – 40 years. However, increasing numbers of teenagers and children are developing type 2 diabetes. Who is most likely to develop type 2 diabetes? Some groups of people are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes: European 40 years of age or older Diabetes in your family (grandparents, parents, brothers or sisters) Maori, Asian, Middle Eastern or Pacific Island descent aged 30 years or older High blood pressure Overweight (especially if you carry most of your weight around your waist) Diagnosed as having pre Continue reading >>

What's The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What's The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

First, the formal name for what we commonly call diabetes is diabetes mellitus, which translates from the Greek as making lots of urine with sugar in it or making lots of sweet urine. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus are diseases that have in common, sugar in the urine and the increased urination. When there are high amounts of sugar in the blood, the kidneys filter sugar into the urine. Sugar can be measured in the urine through a lab test commonly called a urinalysis. Urine dipsticks are also used to show sugar in the urine. Patients who develop diabetes mellitus most commonly have initial symptoms of increased thirst, increased urination and blurred vision due to high amounts of sugar in the fluids of the eye. Type 1 diabetes results from a rheumatoid-like autoimmune reaction in which one's own body attacks and destroys the beta cells of the pancreas. These are the cells that normally produce insulin. Type 1 is a disease in which the patient in a relatively short time has no insulin production. All patients with type 1 diabetes can also develop a serious metabolic disorder called ketoacidosis when their blood sugars are high and there is not enough insulin in their body. Ketoacidosis can be fatal unless treated as an emergency with hydration and insulin. Type 1 was once commonly called juvenile diabetes mellitus because it is most commonly diagnosed in children. It should be noted that even older adults in their 60s have occasionally been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus. One should think of it as a disease of high blood sugars due to a deficiency of insulin production. It must be treated by administration of insulin. Insulin is given at least twice a day and is often given four times a day in type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes rates are growing dramatically Continue reading >>

Is Sugar Bad For You? Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Is Sugar Bad For You? Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Is sugar bad for you? In short, yes it absolutely is bad for you–added sugar that is. Sugar derived directly from fruit is not bad for you. But, added sugar contains fructose which is not good for your body in any way. Added sugar contains a bunch of calories that are empty and provide zero nutritional assistance. This brief, yet insightful article tells about the negative effects of added sugar and provides some tips on a healthy diet for persons diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes. Added sugar is especially bad for your teeth because it gives easily digestible food to the bad bacteria in your mouth so that they can easily thrive which leads to tooth decay. An excess of fructose will be turned into fat and will cause non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. When a large amount of added sugar is consumed, it can lead to insulin resistance which leads to many different diseases. The decrease in resistance to insulin is the number one cause of type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes causes a variety of health problems including blindness, high blood pressure, heart attack and stroke, which can ultimately be fatal. The best way to maintain a healthy diet when you’ve been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes is to remain as abstinent as possible from added sugar. The trouble with this is that sugar is highly addictive, so remaining abstinent from added sugars becomes a huge challenge for many people. This is unfortunate and causes much heartache for persons worldwide and primarily in the United States. One of the best ways to combat this addiction is to fill up on healthy foods so that your brain thinks that you are full and will help you to decrease the amount of empty added sugar calories you consume in a single eating. If you’re looking for a bit of sweetness to add to your meals, then a Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Differences Between Types 1 And 2

Diabetes: The Differences Between Types 1 And 2

Diabetes, or diabetes mellitus (DM), is a metabolic disorder in which the body cannot properly store and use sugar. It affects the body's ability to use glucose, a type of sugar found in the blood, as fuel. This happens because the body does not produce enough insulin, or the cells do not correctly respond to insulin to use glucose as energy. Insulin is a type of hormone produced by the pancreas to regulate how blood sugar becomes energy. An imbalance of insulin or resistance to insulin causes diabetes. Diabetes is linked to a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, vision loss, neurological conditions, and damage to blood vessels and organs. There is type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. They have different causes and risk factors, and different lines of treatment. This article will compare the similarities and differences of types 1 and 2 diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs in pregnancy and typically resolves after childbirth. However, having gestational diabetes also increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes after pregnancy, so patients are often screened for type 2 diabetes at a later date. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 29.1 million people in the United States (U.S.) have diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is much more common than type 1. For every person with type 1 diabetes, 20 will have type 2. Type 2 can be hereditary, but excess weight, a lack of exercise and an unhealthy diet increase At least a third of people in the U.S. will develop type 2 diabetes in their lifetime. Both types can lead to heart attack, stroke, nerve damage, kidney damage, and possible amputation of limbs. Causes In type 1 diabetes, the immune system mistakenly attacks the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. These cells are destro Continue reading >>

Dyslipidaemia In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Bad For The Heart.

Dyslipidaemia In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Bad For The Heart.

Abstract PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with increased coronary heart disease (CHD) morbidity and mortality. These patients are also more prone to heart failure, arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Furthermore, coronary interventions performed in such high-risk patients have worse outcomes. In this narrative review, we discuss the role of diabetic dyslipidaemia on the risk of CHD in patients with T2DM. The effects of hypolipidaemic, antihypertensive and antidiabetic drugs on lipid and glucose metabolism in T2DM are also considered. RECENT FINDINGS: Among CHD risk factors, diabetic dyslipidaemia characterized by moderately elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, increased triglycerides and small, dense LDL particles as well as decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels may contribute to the increased CHD risk associated with T2DM. Hypolipidaemic, antihypertensive and antidiabetic drugs can affect lipid and glucose parameters thus potentially influencing CHD risk. Such drugs may improve not only the quantity, but also the quality of LDL as well as postprandial lipaemia. SUMMARY: Current data highlight the importance of treating diabetic dyslipidaemia in order to minimize CHD risk. Both fasting and postprandial lipids are influenced by drugs in patients with T2DM; physicians should take this into consideration in clinical decision making. Continue reading >>

How Type 2 Diabetes Can Be More Debilitating Than You Think

How Type 2 Diabetes Can Be More Debilitating Than You Think

One of the most common myths surrounding Type 2 diabetes is that it's a 'mild form' of diabetes. This, say Diabetes UK, is wrong. "There is no such thing as mild diabetes," says the charity. "All diabetes is serious and if not properly controlled it can lead to serious complications such as amputation, kidney failure, blindness and stroke." Diane Abbott MP knows just how tough the condition can be – it caused the shadow home secretary to step down from campaigning before the general election – at the time citing 'ill health' – after a series of criticised interviews. It's apt then that in Diabetes Week (June 11 -17), Abbott has spoken out about the problems she was having during the intense seven-week election campaign. In an interview with the Guardian, she revealed she’d been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes two years ago and said: "During the election campaign, everything went crazy – and the diabetes was out of control, the blood sugar was out of control." STORY: The symptoms and signs of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes How did Type 2 diabetes affect Diane Abbott? Type 2 diabetes happens when people don't produce enough insulin, (a hormone made by the pancreas which tells the body's tissues to absorb glucose from the blood), or the insulin they produce doesn't work properly. This means the amount of glucose (sugar) in the blood is too high, as the body’s not using it properly for energy. However, Kathryn Kirchner, Diabetes UK's clinical advisor, says: "Some medications for diabetes, and insulin, can cause blood sugar levels to go too low, below 4mmol/L. This is called hypoglycaemia. Hypoglycaemia must be treated immediately by taking quick-acting glucose, often in the form of glucose tablets, non-diet drinks or sweets." If you’ve been reading the news about D Continue reading >>

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

By some estimates, diabetes cases have increased more than 700 percent in the last 50 years. One in four Americans now have either diabetes or pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose) Type 2 diabetes is completely preventable and virtually 100 percent reversible, simply by implementing simple, inexpensive lifestyle changes, one of the most important of which is eliminating sugar (especially fructose) and grains from your diet Diabetes is NOT a disease of blood sugar, but rather a disorder of insulin and leptin signaling. Elevated insulin levels are not only symptoms of diabetes, but also heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, stroke, high blood pressure, cancer, and obesity Diabetes drugs are not the answer – most type 2 diabetes medications either raise insulin or lower blood sugar (failing to address the root cause) and many can cause serious side effects Sun exposure shows promise in treating and preventing diabetes, with studies revealing a significant link between high vitamin D levels and a lowered risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome By Dr. Mercola There is a staggering amount of misinformation on diabetes, a growing epidemic that afflicts more than 29 million people in the United States today. The sad truth is this: it could be your very OWN physician perpetuating this misinformation Most diabetics find themselves in a black hole of helplessness, clueless about how to reverse their condition. The bigger concern is that more than half of those with type 2 diabetes are NOT even aware they have diabetes — and 90 percent of those who have a condition known as prediabetes aren’t aware of their circumstances, either. Diabetes: Symptoms of an Epidemic The latest diabetes statistics1 echo an increase in diabetes ca Continue reading >>

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