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Is Type 1 Diabetes Worse Than Type 2

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar (glucose) level to become too high. It's important for diabetes to be diagnosed as soon as possible. This is because it will get progressively worse if left untreated. There are two main types for diabetes, type 1 and type 2. This page has information about type 2 diabetes. Types of diabetes The hormone insulin, produced by the pancreas, controls the amount of glucose (blood sugar) in the blood. Glucose is an important source of energy for the body. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 – where the pancreas doesn't produce any insulin type 2 – where the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin or the body's cells don't react to insulin Type 2 diabetes is often associated with obesity and tends to be diagnosed in older people. It's more common than type 1 diabetes. Another type of diabetes, known as gestational diabetes, occurs in some pregnant women and tends to disappear after birth. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes The symptoms of diabetes occur because the lack of insulin means glucose stays in the blood and isn't used as fuel for energy. Your body tries to reduce blood glucose levels by getting rid of the excess glucose in your urine. Typical symptoms include: feeling very thirsty passing urine more often than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk These signs and symptoms aren't always obvious, however, and it's often diagnosed during a routine check-up. This is because they are often mild and develop gradually over a number of years. This means you may have type 2 diabetes for many years without realising it. See your GP if you think you may have diabetes. Diagnosing type 2 diabetes It's important for diabetes to be diagnosed early. This is so trea Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Facts

Type 1 Diabetes Facts

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease that occurs when a person’s pancreas stops producing insulin, the hormone that controls blood-sugar levels. T1D develops when the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells are mistakenly destroyed by the body’s immune system. The cause of this attack is still being researched, however scientists believe the cause may have genetic and environmental components. There is nothing anyone can do to prevent T1D. Presently, there is no known cure. Who T1D affects Type 1 diabetes (sometimes known as juvenile diabetes) affects children and adults, though people can be diagnosed at any age. With a typically quick onset, T1D must be managed with the use of insulin—either via injection or insulin pump. Soon, people who are insulin dependent may also be able to use artificial pancreas systems to automatically administer their insulin. How T1D is managed Type 1 diabetes is a 24/7 disease that requires constant management. People with T1D continuously and carefully balance insulin intake with eating, exercise and other activities. They also measure blood-sugar levels through finger pricks, ideally at least six times a day, or by wearing a continuous glucose monitor. Even with a strict regimen, people with T1D may still experience dangerously high or low blood-glucose levels that can, in extreme cases, be life threatening. Every person with T1D becomes actively involved in managing his or her disease. Insulin is not a cure While insulin therapy keeps people with T1D alive and can help keep blood-glucose levels within recommended range, it is not a cure, nor does it prevent the possibility of T1D’s serious effects. The outlook for treatments and a cure Although T1D is a serious and challenging disease, long-term management options cont Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes is a long-term condition caused by too much glucose, a type of sugar, in the blood. It is also known as diabetes mellitus. There are two main types of diabetes, which are explained below: In Ireland, diabetes affects approximately 200,000 people. What are the symptoms? The main symptoms of diabetes are: feeling very thirsty going to the toilet a lot, especially at night extreme tiredness weight loss and muscle wasting (loss of muscle bulk) Symptoms of type 1 diabetes can develop quickly, over weeks or even days. Many people have type 2 diabetes for years without knowing it because type 2 diabetes may be associated with no symptoms. How does diabetes occur? Normally, the amount of sugar in the blood is controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is produced by the pancreas. The pancreas is a gland behind the stomach. When food is digested and enters your bloodstream, insulin moves any glucose out of the blood and into cells, where it is broken down to produce energy. However, in people with diabetes, the body is unable to break down glucose into energy. This is because there is either not enough insulin to move the glucose, or because the insulin that is there does not work properly. What is type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body produces no insulin. It is often referred to as insulin-dependent diabetes. It is also sometimes known as juvenile diabetes or early-onset diabetes because it usually develops before the age of 40, often during the teenage years. Type 1 diabetes is far less common than type 2 diabetes. People with type 1 diabetes make up only 10% of all people with diabetes. If you have type 1 diabetes, you will need to take insulin injections for life. You must also make sure that your blood glucose levels stay balanced by eating a hea Continue reading >>

12 Myths About Insulin And Type 2 Diabetes

12 Myths About Insulin And Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin facts vs. fiction When you hear the word “insulin,” do you picture giant needles (ouch!) or pop culture portrayals of insulin users with low blood sugar (like Julia Roberts losing it in Steel Magnolias)? Either way, most people think of insulin as a difficult, painful, or potentially scary medical treatment. The problem is that if you have type 2 diabetes, you need to know the real deal before you can make an informed choice about whether or not this potentially lifesaving therapy is right for you. Here, we take a look at the facts and fiction about insulin when it comes to treating type 2 diabetes. Diabetics always need insulin Not necessarily. People with type 1 diabetes (about 5% to 10% of diabetics) do need insulin. If you have type 2, which includes 90% to 95% of all people with diabetes, you may not need insulin. Of adults with diabetes, only 14% use insulin, 13% use insulin and oral medication, 57% take oral medication only, and 16% control blood sugar with diet and exercise alone, according to the CDC. The point is to get blood sugar—which can be a highly toxic poison in the body—into the safe zone by any means necessary. Taking insulin means you’ve ‘failed’ “This is a big myth,” says Jill Crandall, MD, professor of clinical medicine and director of the diabetes clinical trial unit at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, in the Bronx, N.Y. “Many people who try very hard to adhere to a diet, exercise, and lose weight will still need insulin.” The fact is that type 2 diabetes is a progressive illness, meaning that over time you may need to change what you do to make sure your blood sugar is in a healthy range. Eating right and exercise will always be important, but medication needs can vary. “A large percentage of people with ty Continue reading >>

'i'd Rather Have Hiv Than Diabetes': Doctor Says People Can Live With The Virus - But Type 2 Diabetes Reduces Life Expectancy By 10 Years

'i'd Rather Have Hiv Than Diabetes': Doctor Says People Can Live With The Virus - But Type 2 Diabetes Reduces Life Expectancy By 10 Years

He says it can cause heart disease, strokes, blindness and amputations The thought of HIV strikes fear into the hearts of many people. In contrast, Type 2 diabetes is rapidly becoming normalised and many people see it as a mere inconvenience, or even an inevitable part of ageing. But now, one doctor has claimed he would rather have HIV than Type 2 diabetes. Writing in The Spectator, Dr Max Pemberton said: ‘As a doctor I can tell you that, medically speaking, I’d rather have HIV than diabetes. ‘While this might sound shocking or surprising, the facts speak for themselves: the prognosis for those with Type 2 diabetes is much worse than for those with HIV.’ Dr Pemberton goes on to explain that it is now very rare for someone to die of HIV in the UK and that, in fact, people with the virus have a very similar life expectancy to people who are HIV-negative. He says that, assuming patients take their medication, they experience very few problems as a result of being HIV-positive. In contrast, he says the situation is very different for people with Type 2 diabetes. Dr Pemberton, a psychiatrist in the NHS, says people with Type 2 diabetes are more than twice as likely to have a stroke as people without the disease. He says they are also four times more likely to have heart disease and that 20 to 30 per cent of patient have kidney problems which can lead to the need for regular dialysis. He added that diabetes can also lead to blindness, foot ulcers and amputations. He explained that HIV can be treated very successfully with highly active antiretroviral therapy (Haart) which prevents the development of the opportunistic infections that kill people with untreated HIV/AIDs. He says many people believe that Type 2 diabetes can also be easily treated with medication but that Continue reading >>

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes Which Is More Dangerous

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes Which Is More Dangerous

1. Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes which is more dangerous www.plus100years.com 2.  Diabetes is the word commonly heard everywhere. It is a disease caused to all irrespective of age and gender.  We all knew how danger this disease is and how our beloved ones are facing day-by-day problems with this disease.  So, here let’s discuss on this serious issue today with detailed information on diabetes and others like type 1 and type 2 diabetes which is more dangerous? Let’s start from the roots. 3. What is diabetes?  According to the best diabetic doctor in Hyderabad, Diabetes is caused due to the raise in glucose or sugar levels in the body than normal.  It is a complex problem which needs everyday care. A diabetic person should be in medication always.  If it is ignored, it may impact on healthy life and can also reduce the longevity. 4. Types of Diabetes There are 3 types of diabetes depending upon the complexity of the disease. Type 1 Diabetics: This type causes when auto-immune system stimulates to shatter the cells of pancreas. Pancreas produces insulin to the body and diabetes occurs when auto-immune system damages cells. Among 10% of diabetes effected people are children who are affected by chronic disorder and it also seen most commonly in young age people. Type1 diabetics affected people undergo insulin intake every day to survive their life 5. Type 2 Diabetics: This type diabetes is caused generally in middle-age people. This happens due to not enough produce of insulin in the pancreas of the body and effects the insulin production. This can be controlled through medication and there is no need of insulin. It is commonly caused diabetes to most of the people. Many studies proved that there would be more impact from family history or family backgrou Continue reading >>

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

By some estimates, diabetes cases have increased more than 700 percent in the last 50 years. One in four Americans now have either diabetes or pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose) Type 2 diabetes is completely preventable and virtually 100 percent reversible, simply by implementing simple, inexpensive lifestyle changes, one of the most important of which is eliminating sugar (especially fructose) and grains from your diet Diabetes is NOT a disease of blood sugar, but rather a disorder of insulin and leptin signaling. Elevated insulin levels are not only symptoms of diabetes, but also heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, stroke, high blood pressure, cancer, and obesity Diabetes drugs are not the answer – most type 2 diabetes medications either raise insulin or lower blood sugar (failing to address the root cause) and many can cause serious side effects Sun exposure shows promise in treating and preventing diabetes, with studies revealing a significant link between high vitamin D levels and a lowered risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome By Dr. Mercola There is a staggering amount of misinformation on diabetes, a growing epidemic that afflicts more than 29 million people in the United States today. The sad truth is this: it could be your very OWN physician perpetuating this misinformation Most diabetics find themselves in a black hole of helplessness, clueless about how to reverse their condition. The bigger concern is that more than half of those with type 2 diabetes are NOT even aware they have diabetes — and 90 percent of those who have a condition known as prediabetes aren’t aware of their circumstances, either. Diabetes: Symptoms of an Epidemic The latest diabetes statistics1 echo an increase in diabetes ca Continue reading >>

Differences Between Type 1 And Type 2

Differences Between Type 1 And Type 2

Tweet Whilst both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are characterised by having higher than normal blood sugar levels, the cause and development of the conditions are different. Confused over which type of diabetes you have? It's not always clear what type of diabetes someone has, despite what many people think. For instance, the typical assumption is that people with type 2 diabetes will be overweight and not inject insulin, while people with type 1 diabetes will be, if anything, underweight. But these perceptions just aren't always true. Around 20% of people with type 2 diabetes are of a healthy weight when diagnosed, and many of them are dependent on insulin. Similarly, people with type 1 diabetes will in some cases be overweight. Because both types of diabetes can be so varied and unpredictable, it's often difficult to know which type of diabetes someone has. It's not safe to assume that an overweight person with high blood glucose levels has type 2 diabetes, because the cause of their condition might in fact be attributable to type 1. In some cases, when the type of diabetes is in doubt, your health team may need to carry out specialised tests to work out which type of diabetes you have. This way, they can recommend the most appropriate treatment for your diabetes. Common differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes Despite the uncertainty that often surrounds a diagnosis of diabetes, there are a few common characteristics of each diabetes type. Please note that these differences are based on generalisations - exceptions are common. For instance, the perception of type 1 diabetes isn't strictly true: many cases are diagnosed in adulthood. This table should be seen as a rough guide to the differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, rather than hard and fast rules. Co Continue reading >>

Which Statistical Error Is Worse: Type 1 Or Type 2?

Which Statistical Error Is Worse: Type 1 Or Type 2?

People can make mistakes when they test a hypothesis with statistical analysis. Specifically, they can make either Type I or Type II errors. As you analyze your own data and test hypotheses, understanding the difference between Type I and Type II errors is extremely important, because there's a risk of making each type of error in every analysis, and the amount of risk is in your control. So if you're testing a hypothesis about a safety or quality issue that could affect people's lives, or a project that might save your business millions of dollars, which type of error has more serious or costly consequences? Is there one type of error that's more important to control than another? Before we attempt to answer that question, let's review what these errors are. The Null Hypothesis and Type 1 and 2 Errors When statisticians refer to Type I and Type II errors, we're talking about the two ways we can make a mistake regarding the null hypothesis (Ho). The null hypothesis is the default position, akin to the idea of "innocent until proven guilty." We begin any hypothesis test with the assumption that the null hypothesis is correct. We commit a Type 1 error if we reject the null hypothesis when it is true. This is a false positive, like a fire alarm that rings when there's no fire. A Type 2 error happens if we fail to reject the null when it is not true. This is a false negative—like an alarm that fails to sound when there is a fire. It's easier to understand in the table below, which you'll see a version of in every statistical textbook: These errors relate to the statistical concepts of risk, significance, and power. Reducing the Risk of Statistical Errors Statisticians call the risk, or probability, of making a Type I error "alpha," aka "significance level." In other words Continue reading >>

Is Pregnancy Outcome Worse In Type 2 Than In Type 1 Diabetic Women?

Is Pregnancy Outcome Worse In Type 2 Than In Type 1 Diabetic Women?

Most research on pregestational diabetes has focused on type 1 diabetes, and surprisingly little knowledge exists concerning outcomes of pregnancies of women with type 2 diabetes. A dearth of published data suggest outcomes similar to those of type 1 diabetic women (1,2), although recent studies report poorer outcomes in women with type 2 diabetes (3–7). We retrospectively compared maternal and perinatal outcomes of 93 consecutive singleton pregnancies in women with type 2 diabetes and 532 consecutive singleton pregnancies in women with type 1 diabetes referred to the Diabetes and Pregnancy Unit at University Hospital La Paz from 1984 to 2004. Women with type 2 diabetes were significantly older ([means ± SD] 31.8 ± 5.5 vs. 29.4 ± 4.7 years, P < 0.001), were more frequently obese (45.2 vs. 9%, P < 0.001), and had a shorter duration of diabetes (5.7 ± 6 vs. 11.8 ± 7.1 years, P < 0.001). The rate of preconceptional care (16.1 vs. 22.6%, P = 0.175) and gestational age at first visit (12.1 ± 6.8 vs. 11.5 ± 6.9 weeks’ gestation, P = 0.529) did not differ between type 2 and type 1 diabetic women. Maternal and perinatal outcomes are shown in Table 1. Insulin requirements and HbA1c (A1C) were lower during all three trimesters of pregnancy in type 2 diabetic women. Maternal weight gain and the rate of caesarean deliveries were lower in type 2 diabetes. Gestational age at birth was significantly higher and the rate of large infants for gestational age lower in infants of women with type 2 diabetes. The rates of perinatal mortality and major congenital malformations were comparable in both groups. First-trimester A1C in type 2 and type 1 diabetic mothers with perinatal mortality was 9.9 and 8.1 ± 1.2%, respectively. Among pregnancies complicated by major congenital malf Continue reading >>

About Type 2 Diabetes

About Type 2 Diabetes

There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form. About 3.3 million people in the UK have been diagnosed with diabetes, and of these, more than 9 out of 10 have type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is more common among older people, but you can develop it at any age. It’s becoming more common in young adults and children. It’s usually associated with being overweight and not very active. If you have type 2 diabetes, your body stops reacting to insulin properly, and you may also not produce enough of insulin. Insulin is a hormone (a chemical made by your body) that controls the amount of glucose in your blood. It helps glucose move from your blood into your body tissues – like your muscle cells – when you need a quick form of energy. If your body is not responding to insulin properly, your blood glucose level can become too high. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes If you have type 2 diabetes, you may not have any obvious symptoms. Your diabetes may be discovered during a routine medical check-up with your GP. If you do have symptoms of type 2 diabetes, you may: pass urine more often than usual be constantly thirsty lose weight for no obvious reason be extremely tired have blurred vision have itchy skin around your genitals or get regular genito-urinary infections, such as thrush If you have any of these symptoms, see your GP. Diagnosis of type 2 diabetes Your GP will ask about your symptoms and examine you. They may ask you to have a blood test for glucose. Other tests can include the following. A fasting blood glucose test. You will need to have this test at a time when you haven’t eaten anything for at least eight hours. Glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1C) test. Your HbA1C level is a measure of how much glucose has been taken Continue reading >>

How Serious Is Type 2 Diabetes? Is It More Serious Than Type 1 Diabetes?

How Serious Is Type 2 Diabetes? Is It More Serious Than Type 1 Diabetes?

A fellow caregiver asked... How serious is type 2 diabetes, and is it less or more serious than type 1 diabetes? My mom, just diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, keeps it under control without taking insulin. So is type 2 diabetes less of a problem than insulin-dependent type 1? Expert Answers No, definitely not. In fact, in some ways type 2 diabetes is a more serious disorder because your mom may have had it for years before she was diagnosed. So she may well have developed some of the long-term, debilitating complications linked to the condition without knowing it. In addition, since type 2 diabetes is a progressive disorder without a cure, over time her body may not be able to produce insulin or use it as well as it does now, and she may wind up needing insulin injections or pills. A person with type1 diabetes ignores it for a day at his own peril. He'll likely end up in the emergency room because his body can't absorb glucose without a continuous supply of insulin via injection or an insulin pump. People with type 1 diabetes typically develop such severe symptoms over a short time in childhood or early adulthood that they're forced to deal with it. Type 2 diabetes is a sneakier condition: Its harmful health effects can slowly build for years until full-blown complications, such as vision loss, heart disease, or foot problems, make it impossible to ignore. Plus it often comes with its own set of problems. For instance, people with type 2 diabetes are frequently diagnosed with high blood pressure and cholesterol along with high blood sugar. This damaging threesome can lead to progressive thickening of the arteries and reduced blood flow, putting your mom at greater risk for a slew of complications including heart disease, stroke, and nerve damage. If your mom is overweigh Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Complications

Type 2 Diabetes Complications

With type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus), if you don’t work hard to keep your blood glucose level under control, there are short- and long-term complications to contend with. However, by watching the amount and types of food you eat (your meal plan), exercising, and taking any necessary medications, you may be able to prevent these complications. And even if you have some of the long-term, more serious complications discussed below when you’re first diagnosed, getting tight control of your blood glucose will help prevent the complications from becoming worse. (It is possible with type 2 diabetes to already have some of these complications when you’re first diagnosed. That’s because type 2 develops gradually, and you may not realize that you have high blood glucose for quite some time. Over time, high blood glucose can cause serious damage. You can learn more about that in this article on the symptoms of type 2 diabetes.) Short-term Diabetes Complications Hypoglycemia is low blood glucose (blood sugar). It is possible for your blood glucose to drop, especially if you’re taking insulin or a sulfonylurea drug (those make your body produce insulin throughout the day). With these medications, if you eat less than usual or were more active, your blood glucose may dip too much. Other possible causes of hypoglycemia include certain medications (aspirin, for example, lowers the blood glucose level if you take a dose of more than 81mg) and too much alcohol (alcohol keeps the liver from releasing glucose). Rapid heartbeat Sweating Whiteness of skin Anxiety Numbness in fingers, toes, and lips Sleepiness Confusion Headache Slurred speech Mild cases of hypoglycemia can be treated by drinking orange juice or eating a glucose tablet—those will quickly rai Continue reading >>

5 Things A Disgruntled Diabetic Wants You To Know About Diabetes

5 Things A Disgruntled Diabetic Wants You To Know About Diabetes

Whenever I talk or write about being a diabetic, I feel obligated to clarify that in terms of autoimmune diseases, I got off lucky. And if I’m being honest, I only have three major complaints about being being a diabetic. The first complaint is that I’m not able to serve in the military, while the second is that I’m unable to donate blood. Finally, my third major complaint is that most people don’t know anything about diabetes. Or worse, they have infuriating misconceptions about what it means to be diabetic. But unlike my other two major complaints about being diabetic, I can actually do something about these misconceptions. With that said, here are five things you should know about diabetes. 1. There Are Two Types of Diabetes Thanks for the visual aid, Count. Technically, there are three types if you include gestational diabetes, but that’s usually a temporary condition. Most of the time, any diabetic you meet will be either a Type 1 diabetic or a Type 2 diabetic. Type 1 Diabetes is when your immune system goes haywire and destroys the beta cells in your pancreas. These beta cells produce insulin, which regulates the glucose from any food or drink you consume. Without insulin, you will suffer a slow, agonizing death. This why Type 1 diabetics like myself have to rely on either insulin injections or an insulin pump to stay alive. 2. Most Diabetics Are Type 2 Diabetics If someone tells you that they are diabetic, they most likely have Type 2 Diabetes. Unlike Type 1 Diabetes, Type 2 is not caused by your immune system going haywire and destroying your insulin-producing beta cells. Instead, Type 2 Diabetes is mostly caused by a poor diet and lack of physical activity, which results in your body becoming resistant to insulin, not deprived of it. Type 2 Diabetes i Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes May Be More Dangerous Than Type 1

Type 2 Diabetes May Be More Dangerous Than Type 1

Australian researchers compared the health of individuals who developed type 2 diabetes (T2DM)at a relatively young age with that of people who had developed type 1 (T1DM) diabetes at a similar age. Dr. Jencia Wong of the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney and the University of Sydney Medical School and colleagues, examined the hospital s records between 1986 and 2011. They matched those records with the Australian National Death Index to determine the mortality for subjects with one of the two types of diabetes, and also examined their health records. Their report was published in the journal Diabetes Care. People with T1DM have lost the ability to produce insulin, the hormone that allows body cells to take up glucose from the blood and use it for myriad body processes. In contrast, people with T2DM do produce insulin, but it is not effective their cells are resistant to insulin s action. The result is the same without insulin s action glucose remains in the blood and can rise to dangerous levels. Long term, if the disease is not well controlled, people with either type of diabetes can suffer from damage to both small and large blood vessels and to nerves, and have increased risk of cardiovascular disease, blindness, and kidney failure. The researchers followed 354 people with T2DM for on average 21 years and 470 people with T1DM for about 23 years, both of which groups were between 15 and 30 years old when their diseases began. They found there was a significantly increased mortality rate for the group with T2DM, and that those individuals died after a shorter disease duration than the people with T1DM. Those with T2DM also suffered significantly more deaths from cardiovascular events (e.g., heart attacks and strokes). Further, large blood vessel disease and nerve Continue reading >>

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