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Is Type 1 Diabetes A Terminal Condition

[life Expectancy Of People With Type 1 Diabetes In The Past And Today].

[life Expectancy Of People With Type 1 Diabetes In The Past And Today].

Abstract The life expectancy of Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) dramatically improved after the discovery of insulin in 1922, but was still 25 years shorter than that of non-diabetic population. Some people with T1DM, however, lived to the same age as a non-diabetic population and had no late complications of diabetes. They began to be awarded medals in appreciation of their long life with diabetes. They also became the subject of a research examining why they lived so long and what was the difference between them and those patients with T1DM, whose lives were much shorter. The paper deals with the differences observed in the ´medallists´ and discusses various hypotheses that might account for them. It seems that reliable control of diabetes within the first 20 years following the diagnosis is very important, in relation to the existence of "glycemic memory" which may significantly affect life expectancy in the following years. Human lifespan in general has been linearly extended since the early 19th century and the same holds for lifespans of people with T1DM. This is due to the higher quality control of glycemia on the one hand, and a better prevention and treatment of complications. It is observed that the incidence of terminal stages of diabetic nephropathy has been dropping, the primary as well as secondary prevention of cardiovascular complications, cardiological treatment and heart surgery have been improving. Manifest proteinuria, diabetic neuropathy and hypertension appear to be major prognostic factors of increased mortality. If these indicators are not present, the life expectancy of patients with T1DM does not significantly differ from that of the non-diabetic population.Key words: diabetic nephropathy - glycemia - glycemic memory - ICHS - late complicatio Continue reading >>

Thinking About Diabetes With Every Bite

Thinking About Diabetes With Every Bite

Well | Thinking About Diabetes With Every Bite When I look at food, I dont see food. I see sugar in the form of carbohydrates plotted on a multidimensional graph with proteins and fat and serving sizes and sickness and exercise and times of day. I didnt always do this. Before I received the diagnosis that I had Type 1 diabetes, I saw food as food, and ate it as such simply, casually, with no real thought attached. The winter of my senior year of college, after a bad cold and painful breakup, I began eating more not to cope, but to feel full. I was hungry, always hungry. Hungry and thirsty and tired, piling my tray in the dining hall with pasta, cheese, dessert, getting up in the middle of the night to slurp water from my dorms bathroom faucet. I gorged myself and yet my pants were looser, my arms thinner, my stomach flatter. One afternoon I threw it all up, convinced I had food poisoning. My stomach eventually settled, but my mind did not. The world swirled. I couldnt stand without stumbling. On Feb. 17, 2001, I entered the hospital, and since that day, food has never been the same. To live with Type 1 diabetes means to be aware, constantly aware, of insulin a hormone produced in the pancreas that unlocks your cells so they can use the energy in your food, which circulates in your blood as glucose. A healthy persons pancreas pumps out insulin in exact, perfect doses, masterfully managing the level of available glucose so that it never rises too high, which could lead to complications, or too low, which could kill you on the spot. My pancreas, however, doesnt make insulin. It cant. For reasons no one can fully explain, my own immune system killed off the cells that produce it. Thats what Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which your body turns against itself. I Continue reading >>

Management Of Diabetes In Terminal Illness Related To Cancer | Qjm: An International Journal Of Medicine | Oxford Academic

Management Of Diabetes In Terminal Illness Related To Cancer | Qjm: An International Journal Of Medicine | Oxford Academic

The management of diabetes during terminal illness is complex, with lack of agreement and consensus among physicians and multidisciplinary teams. Despite the plethora of guidelines available for the management of diabetes, there exists no agreed, evidence-based strategy for managing diabetes during terminal illness and at the end of life. A number of physiological factors may influence glycaemic control during terminal illness. These include anorexia, cachexia, malabsorption, renal and hepatic failure. Furthermore, controversy exists on the frequency of blood glucose monitoring, the optimum blood glucose range and how to achieve this. We review the factors influencing blood glucose during terminal illness and provide a suggested approach to managing patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during the early and late stages of terminal illness. Diabetes mellitus is a common and increasingly prevalent condition, with a prevalence of 45% in the UK. 1 Furthermore, estimates suggest that there is one person with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes (T2DM) for every two patients with a diagnosis. 2 The Health Survey for England 2003 suggests that 3.1% of men and 1.5% of women over the age of 35 years have undiagnosed diabetes. 3 T2DM, like other chronic conditions, such as degenerative diseases and cancer, becomes more prevalent with age. 46 In the population over 65 years of age, the prevalence of T2DM is 10% 1 and in patients with newly diagnosed cancer the prevalence of T2DM is between 8% and 18%. 7 Furthermore diabetes is associated with certain cancer types. 810 Therefore, it is likely that there will be an increase in the prevalence of diabetes and cancer as the older proportion of the population increases. Traditionally, these two conditions have been managed by different speci Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Differences Between Types 1 And 2

Diabetes: The Differences Between Types 1 And 2

Diabetes, or diabetes mellitus (DM), is a metabolic disorder in which the body cannot properly store and use sugar. It affects the body's ability to use glucose, a type of sugar found in the blood, as fuel. This happens because the body does not produce enough insulin, or the cells do not correctly respond to insulin to use glucose as energy. Insulin is a type of hormone produced by the pancreas to regulate how blood sugar becomes energy. An imbalance of insulin or resistance to insulin causes diabetes. Diabetes is linked to a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, vision loss, neurological conditions, and damage to blood vessels and organs. There is type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. They have different causes and risk factors, and different lines of treatment. This article will compare the similarities and differences of types 1 and 2 diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs in pregnancy and typically resolves after childbirth. However, having gestational diabetes also increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes after pregnancy, so patients are often screened for type 2 diabetes at a later date. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 29.1 million people in the United States (U.S.) have diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is much more common than type 1. For every person with type 1 diabetes, 20 will have type 2. Type 2 can be hereditary, but excess weight, a lack of exercise and an unhealthy diet increase At least a third of people in the U.S. will develop type 2 diabetes in their lifetime. Both types can lead to heart attack, stroke, nerve damage, kidney damage, and possible amputation of limbs. Causes In type 1 diabetes, the immune system mistakenly attacks the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. These cells are destro Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Is Not Terminal

Type 2 Diabetes Is Not Terminal

Ask Your Chiropractor&body=Link: | Jamaican News Online - JamaicaObserver.com"> This is the third of a four-part piece exploring the impact of chiropractic care on diabetics. ASIDE from drugs to lower blood sugar, many physicians will advise diabetic patients to take a statin cholesterol-lowering drug to lower heart disease risk. This is wrong on many levels (not the least of which is the fact that cholesterol is not the cause of heart disease), including the fact that statin drugs may actually contribute to diabetes. A meta-analysis, published in JAMA, concluded that those taking higher doses of statins were at increased risk of diabetes compared to those taking moderate doses. Statins appear to provoke diabetes through a few different mechanisms, the most important being that they increase your insulin levels, which can be extremely harmful to your health. Statins also increase your diabetes risk by raising your blood sugar and robbing your body of certain valuable nutrients, which can also impact your blood sugar levels. Two nutrients in particular, vitamin D and CoQ10, are both needed to maintain ideal blood glucose levels. It's important for awareness of this connection because GlaxoSmithKline, the maker of the prescription-strength fish oil medication, sold under the name Lovaza, has a new combination statin-fish oil drug which reportedly passed the required FDA testing. While high-quality, animal-based omega-3 fats are essential for preventing type 2 diabetes, prescription-strength fish oil combined with a statin drug is not. Please don't let anyone tell you that type 2 diabetes has no cure, as this is not true. What they mean is that medicine has no cure or is not willing to cure this condition. Type 2 diabetes is not terminal. Most type 2 diabetics can be succ Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Classed As Terminal Illness | Yahoo Answers

Is Diabetes Classed As Terminal Illness | Yahoo Answers

Are you sure that you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: No, a terminal illness is a condition that will end in death because there is no medication that can prevent it's progression. Terminal illnesses are generally cancers or malignant tumours. Diabetes is a chronic condition. This means that, although at the moment there is not a cure, it is well controlled by medication or in some cases just dietary changes. Source(s): Two Weeks Diabetes Cure : No diabetes itself is not percieved as terminal, however it can get worse if the condition is not treated, or if the severity of it is bad,for example there are different types of diabetes, type A etc... Also people can turn diabetes into more serious illnesess if they do not look after themselves, such as the diabetics that are forbidden to eat sugar, if they chose to disobey this rule, it can lead to problems like blindess(happened to a neighbour of mine) So if not treated properly, diabetes can be transformed into a terminal illness but is classed a chronic illness when first diagnosed. Source(s): Cure Diabetes At Home - Source(s): Help to Solve Diabete Source(s): diabetes classed terminal illness: Terminal illness is a medical term popularized in the 20th century to describe an active and malignant disease that cannot be cured or adequately treated and that is reasonably expected to result in the death of the patient. This term is more commonly used for progressive diseases such as cancer or advanced heart disease than for trauma. Diabetes Mellitus can not be termed as a terminal illness. Diabetes is among the most common disorders in the world today. Here are a few natural remedies that can be helpful in reducing the sugar levels in a diabetic patient Despite various researches done and precautions taken, one cann Continue reading >>

Just Wondering? Does Make A Wish Consider Type 1

Just Wondering? Does Make A Wish Consider Type 1

This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Just wondering? Does Make A Wish consider Type 1 life threatening? Has anyone ever sighned thier child up for this? I'm pretty sure it qualifies. There has been much debate on here, but I think you just need a referral from a dr. or nurse, or something like that. I'm not sure if it is the same with Make a Wish and the Children's wish foundation, but I've seen them give wishes to all kinds of diseases that "seem" less life threatening. However, I say that cautiously, as diabetes can "seem" to be not life threatening as well. Look into it. A child with a life-threatening medical condition who has reached the age of 2? and is under the age of 18 at the time of referral, is potentially eligible for a wish. After a child is referred to the Make-A-Wish Foundation?, the Foundation will contact the child's treating physician to determine whether the child is medically eligible for a wish, based on the medical criteria established by the Make-A-Wish Foundation of America. In addition, a child cannot have received a wish from another wish-granting organization. (eta: I'd say yes, they do CONSIDER it. Which is the answer to your question. By that I don't mean that I would do it, that I think it's a good use of the program, or it's intent.) You can ask your local organization. Some do consider it, some don't, preferring to grant wishes to those in more dire situations, such as uncurable cancer or a rare disease with no cure and a predicted very short life span. My youngest has had a wish granted for his disease, not T1. I self referred for Make a Wish and recieved a letter back that was gracious but basically said Type 1 did not qualify. I think we need a Make a Wish for our Continue reading >>

Living Well With Type 1 Diabetes Over Four Decades…

Living Well With Type 1 Diabetes Over Four Decades…

In July of 1972, I was on vacation with my family for a few weeks, camping in Florida. That’s when the symptoms came on. Somehow we rationalized away the thirst (it was hot in Florida), the weight loss (I was swimming every day and walking around Disney World), and the frequent urination (caused by all the water I was drinking to combat Florida’s heat). My mother had to set up a pail outside the trailer, since it was too long a walk to the camp restroom during the night. Near the end of vacation, I was feeling quite unwell, and deep down I wondered if I had a terminal illness. Upon my return home from vacation, my mother made an appointment to see my pediatrician immediately. My pediatrician called an endocrinologist when the urine test for sugar (Clinitest) done in her office, produced a bright yellow bubbling liquid in the test tube. I was driven to the hospital, where the diagnosis of “juvenile diabetes” (the old-fashioned term for type 1 diabetes) was confirmed by a blood test. The endocrinologist looked very somber when he came in to give me the bad news that I had an incurable, chronic illness. He warned me that my life was going to be very different from then on. I actually was very relieved deep down because I knew I wasn’t going to die. In the hospital I was given a book which explained that prior to the discovery of insulin in the early 1920’s, type 1 diabetes was a death sentence. Starvation diets had been prescribed as a way of prolonging life back then. I realized how fortunate I was to have been diagnosed after the discovery of insulin. I vowed to think of every day beyond the day of my diagnosis as a gift. In those days, there were no blood glucose meters, so doctors in the hospital (where I remained for about 2 weeks) determined my twice-dail Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: Causes And Symptoms

Type 1 Diabetes: Causes And Symptoms

While type 2 diabetes is often preventable, type 1 diabetes mellitus is not.1 Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system destroys cells in the pancreas. Typically, the disease first appears in childhood or early adulthood. Type 1 diabetes used to be known as juvenile-onset diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), but the disease can have an onset at any age.2 Type 1 diabetes makes up around 5% of all cases of diabetes.3,4 What is type 1 diabetes? In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is unable to produce any insulin, the hormone that controls blood sugar levels.2,3 Insulin production becomes inadequate for the control of blood glucose levels due to the gradual destruction of beta cells in the pancreas. This destruction progresses without notice over time until the mass of these cells decreases to the extent that the amount of insulin produced is insufficient.2 Type 1 diabetes typically appears in childhood or adolescence, but its onset is also possible in adulthood.2 When it develops later in life, type 1 diabetes can be mistaken initially for type 2 diabetes. Correctly diagnosed, it is known as latent autoimmune diabetes of adulthood.2 Causes of type 1 diabetes The gradual destruction of beta cells in the pancreas that eventually results in the onset of type 1 diabetes is the result of autoimmune destruction. The immune system turning against the body's own cells is possibly triggered by an environmental factor exposed to people who have a genetic susceptibility.2 Although the mechanisms of type 1 diabetes etiology are unclear, they are thought to involve the interaction of multiple factors:2 Susceptibility genes - some of which are carried by over 90% of patients with type 1 diabetes. Some populations - Scandinavians and Sardinians, Continue reading >>

Which Is Worse: Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes?

Which Is Worse: Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes?

Late Update: To be completely clear, the goal of this post is to point out how unproductive this question is. It comes up from time to time in the forums, but only leads to division. We all, regardless of type, have plenty to share with each other. Now, on to the original article. On our Facebook page, we discussed the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In the process, some type 1s and type 2s both suggested that they had it worse. Before we look at this question, let’s review the difference between the two types. The Difference Between Type 1 & Type 2 Imagine insulin is the key that opens your cells and lets sugar enter. If sugar can’t enter, it builds up in the blood, makes you hungry and thirsty, and causes your body to turn to fat for energy. The symptoms of diabetes. In type 1, your pancreas stops making keys. You need to put keys in your body (i.e. inject insulin) or sugar can’t get into your cells. In type 2 diabetes, the keyhole is rusty. You have keys, but they have trouble opening the cells. You either need more keys or a way to make the lock work better. You can take a little rust off the lock by exercising, losing weight, or taking medication. This is an imperfect analogy, but hopefully it highlights the basic difference. So Which Type Is Worse? This is a maddening question. Every person is unique, and neither type is a cake walk! Type 1s need insulin to live – but type 2s can require enormous amounts of insulin as their resistance to it increases and their insulin production declines. Type 2s can walk around undiagnosed for 5 years and have complications when diagnosed. People with type 1 usually get diagnosed quickly and can take immediate action. But don’t type 1s live with diabetes for a longer period of time? Not always! Some type Continue reading >>

Palliative Care And Advanced Terminal Illness Care For Patients With Diabetes

Palliative Care And Advanced Terminal Illness Care For Patients With Diabetes

Monika contacted TheDiabetesCouncil requesting information about diabetes management for patients who are in palliative care. Monika’s husband is in Memory Care for Alzheimer’s disease, and the staff was only checking his blood sugars two times per week for his Type 2 diabetes. They were not giving him his metformin anymore either, and they had started him on once daily injections of long acting insulin. Monika wasn’t sure if the steps taken by the staff to manage his diabetes were enough. His blood sugars were going up to 200 mg/dl, and sometimes even higher. She did state that he wasn’t having any low blood sugars. This was comforting to her because he gets more confused when his blood sugar goes low. They were also giving him desserts, and other unhealthy things, like fried chicken, on his tray. Was this ok, she asked? We decided to look into this for Monika. We found that the guidelines are less stringent in palliative care, and it was not so important to avoid long term complications for her husband. However, if Monika is uncomfortable with the palliative care, she should speak with the palliative care team at her husband’s Memory Care facility. They will usually work with the family to provide care that is more in line with what the family would want for the patient in palliative care. We hope this article on palliative care for those with severe illness, and those who are terminally ill, will help family members and patients alike. Now let’s take a closer look at what to expect in palliative care if you or your family member has diabetes. Distribution of Adults in need of palliative care The difference between palliative care and hospice Unlike hospice, a person can receive palliative care at any age, and you do not need to be in the terminal phase of Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is an auto-immune condition in which the immune system is activated to destroy the cells in the pancreas which produce insulin. We do not know what causes this auto-immune reaction. Type 1 diabetes is not linked to modifiable lifestyle factors. There is no cure and it cannot be prevented. Type 1 diabetes: Occurs when the pancreas does not produce insulin Represents around 10% of all cases of diabetes and is one of the most common chronic childhood conditions Onset is usually abrupt and the symptoms obvious Symptoms can include excessive thirst and urination, unexplained weight loss, weakness and fatigue and blurred vision Is managed with insulin injections several times a day or the use of an insulin pump. What happens to the pancreas? In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas, a large gland behind the stomach, stops making insulin because the cells that make the insulin have been destroyed by the body’s immune system. Without insulin, the body’s cells cannot turn glucose (sugar), into energy. People with type 1 diabetes depend on insulin every day of their lives to replace the insulin the body cannot produce. They must test their blood glucose levels several times throughout the day. The onset of type 1 diabetes occurs most frequently in people under 30 years, however new research suggests almost half of all people who develop the condition are diagnosed over the age of 30. About 10-15% of all cases of diabetes are type 1. What happens if people with type 1 diabetes don’t receive insulin? Without insulin the body burns its own fats as a substitute which releases chemical substances in the blood. Without ongoing injections of insulin, the dangerous chemical substances will accumulate and can be life threatening if it is not treated. This is a condition call Continue reading >>

Outlander Makes Type 1 Diabetes Terminaland Useful

Outlander Makes Type 1 Diabetes Terminaland Useful

Outlander Makes Type 1 Diabetes Terminaland Useful The time-traveling television show advances the plot by featuring a woman dying from Type 1 diabetes. When a character with Type 1 diabetes appears in a show set in the 18th century, you know its not going to end well. In a recent episode of Outlander, we barely get to meet someone with diabetes before we learn she is going to die. It makes some sense, I guess, since the show involves a woman from the 20th century traveling back to the 18th century, long before insulin therapy was discovered. As the episode (Useful Occupations and Deceptions) begins, the 20th century heroine, Claire, finds herself at loose ends in Paris as her 18th century husband tries to undo a conspiracy to invade Scotland (its complicated). Having worked as a nurse, Claire decides to volunteer at the local hospital for the poor. Unfortunately, the head nun in charge of the hospital, Mother Hildegard, frowns mightily at Claire and puts her to work emptying bedpans. No nursing for her. Luckily for Claire, she encounters a woman suffering from untreated diabetes, presumably late-blooming Type 1. You can watch some of the scene here: Mother Hildegard catches Claire tasting the womans urine, and asks her the diagnosis. Claire asks the woman if shes thirsty, and the woman says she is, and adds shes hungry all the time. Claire doesnt bother to give this woman water. Instead, she tells Mother Hildegard that the woman suffers from sugar sickness. Just to confirm Claires medical chops, the nun asks if the woman will die. Claire says she will, and soon. This conversation, although conducted in English, happens way too close to the womans bedside for comfort. And no one gives this poor woman a drink of water. In the end, Mother Hildegard looks at Claire with n Continue reading >>

Late Stage Complications Of Diabetes And Insulin Resistance

Late Stage Complications Of Diabetes And Insulin Resistance

1Department of Microbiology, Chaitanya Postgraduate College, Kakatiya University, Warangal, India 2Department of Biotechnology, Presidency College, Bangalore University, India *Corresponding Author: Department Of Microbiology, Chaitanya Postgraduate College affiliated to Kakatiya University, Warangal, India E-mail: [email protected] Citation: Soumya D, Srilatha B (2011) Late Stage Complications of Diabetes and Insulin Resistance. J Diabetes Metab 2:167. doi:10.4172/2155-6156.1000167 Copyright: © 2011 Soumya D, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Visit for more related articles at Journal of Diabetes & Metabolism Abstract Diabetes mellitus is considered one of the main threats to human health in the 21st century. Diabetes is a metabolic disorder or a chronic condition where the sugar levels in blood are high. Diabetes is associated with long-term complications that affect almost every part of the body and often leads to blindness, heart and blood vessel disease, stroke, kidney failure, amputations, and nerve damage. Also it is associated with significantly accelerated rates of several debilitating microvascular complications such as nephropathy, retinopathy, and neuropathy, and macrovascular complications such as atherosclerosis and stroke. In the present article it has been discussed about the resistance of insulin and its consequences in diabetic patients. Insulin resistance results in various disorders. Metabolic syndrome is predicted to become a major public health problem in many developed, as well as developing countries. Keywords Diabetes; Complications Continue reading >>

Terminal And Scared | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Terminal And Scared | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I Guess many of you guys will think me weak, silly and pathetic, but honestly, other than that, I hope I'm a nice guy, I'm very very happily married, we have a 23 year old butter of a son, he's the apple of our eye, My darling wife is the sweetest, kindest, most understanding person EVER to have walked this earth, and to me the MOST Beautiful too, OK except I'm in a wheelchair now, I have to take phone number quantities of drugs each day, just to take the edge from the PAIN I am and never will be free of, Why ? Well the truth is that almost 19 years of excuses, no real effort, and leaving things too late, I am amongst many other things a Type 2 Diabetic, with almost an entire collection of complications of the Diabetes, I sit here in the dark, at 6.49 am in terrible pain having had less than an hour's sleep, and I'm balling my eyes out, crying like a new born baby because I'm SCARED, I'm dying, amongst many things it's due to Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy, I also have End Organ Damage, and a multitude of other problems, Really because I needed to scream, and I guess to warn you all, PLEASE look after yourselves, DON'T let you'd Diabetes get out of control, be GOOD, be SAFE, I'm so sorry to read your story. Sometimes life just sucks. Is there anything we can do as a group to help you? Will managing your diabetes help alleviate some of your symptoms or slow progression? We are quite a helpful bunch and I am certain we can help and support you in some way. If you want to post more, as an outlet then do so. Sometimes the act of typing everything down can be helpful. Your post certainly go me thinking because I am one of those people who thinks, 'well, it Continue reading >>

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