diabetestalk.net

Is Type 1 Diabetes A Death Sentence?

Diabetes Is Not A Death Sentence

Diabetes Is Not A Death Sentence

David, now in his 47th of living with diabetes, reflects on how treatment has changed over the years and puts success of his management down to a positive frame of mind. I am now on the eve of my 70th birthday and was diagnosed with diabetes in 1966 when I was 23. For the first couple of years I was treated with tablets, but then had to start taking insulin. David's 'Battle of Britain' project is now in possession of Kelvingrove Museum, Glasgow. At the time of my diagnosis, I was at the start of my career and had gone back to university for post-graduate qualifications. I was pretty despondent about my condition - more for my parents' sake as my older sister had been similarly diagnosed some time before. In fact, when we compared notes we found that allowing for age difference, we had both been diagnosed at almost the same time as each other. I was pretty despondent about my condition - more for my parents' sake as my older sister had been similarly diagnosed some time before. In fact, when we compared notes we found that allowing for age difference, we had both been diagnosed at almost the same time as each other. In those days, insulin treatment and control was somewhat less sophisticated than it is today, and I well remember using what looked like horse needles for my jabs and using more or less uselss urine tests to estimate my BS levels. Then came the digital revolution and micro-engineering, plus more effective insulin and I have been a majot beneficiary. After university, I went to work as director of research for a trade union and was later a senior union official - forever on call and travelling all over the UK for meetings etc - all at quite unsociable hours which did not sit easily with the diabetic condition and the corresponding need for a degree of regula Continue reading >>

Pricks And Needles: What Living With Type 1 Diabetes Is Like

Pricks And Needles: What Living With Type 1 Diabetes Is Like

Type 1 diabetes, a rarer form of the chronic disease, affects three million Americans. Here's one of them. Back in early 2001, I was a happy, but slightly overweight, 13-year-old boy. Just before the summer I decided to start eating less junk food in hopes of shedding a couple of pounds from my 135-pound frame. I got results quickly -- and my weight kept dropping. Looking back, the signs that something was amiss were obvious. I couldn't make it through 50-minute class periods in middle school without having to run off and pee. It felt like my thirst could never be satiated. I was always tired. But the weight loss was the most obvious sign. Weight kept coming off. 125 pounds, 120, 115. My parents called my pediatrician, but diabetes never came up as a potential cause. An unusual teenage growth spurt prior to puberty was a possibility. An eating disorder was also suggested. By the time I arrived for my annual physical on Nov. 6, 2001, none of my clothes fit and I weighed just 98 pounds -- nearly 30 percent less than my peak weight. More phone calls and doctors' appointments revealed nothing. Back at home after the appointment, I hopped in the shower but was almost immediately interrupted by my mom. The doctor's office called with results from my blood test and I had to get to the emergency room. When I checked into the hospital, my blood sugar was 971. The normal range is 80-150. The doctors said I would have fallen into a diabetic coma within another week. Back then, diabetes seemed like a death sentence. My whole life routine would have to change. I would have to check my blood glucose at least five times a day and stick myself with needles at least four times a day. But for the past ten years, I've been living with an illness that could shorten my life expectancy by 15 Continue reading >>

Living Well With Type 1 Diabetes Over Four Decades…

Living Well With Type 1 Diabetes Over Four Decades…

In July of 1972, I was on vacation with my family for a few weeks, camping in Florida. That’s when the symptoms came on. Somehow we rationalized away the thirst (it was hot in Florida), the weight loss (I was swimming every day and walking around Disney World), and the frequent urination (caused by all the water I was drinking to combat Florida’s heat). My mother had to set up a pail outside the trailer, since it was too long a walk to the camp restroom during the night. Near the end of vacation, I was feeling quite unwell, and deep down I wondered if I had a terminal illness. Upon my return home from vacation, my mother made an appointment to see my pediatrician immediately. My pediatrician called an endocrinologist when the urine test for sugar (Clinitest) done in her office, produced a bright yellow bubbling liquid in the test tube. I was driven to the hospital, where the diagnosis of “juvenile diabetes” (the old-fashioned term for type 1 diabetes) was confirmed by a blood test. The endocrinologist looked very somber when he came in to give me the bad news that I had an incurable, chronic illness. He warned me that my life was going to be very different from then on. I actually was very relieved deep down because I knew I wasn’t going to die. In the hospital I was given a book which explained that prior to the discovery of insulin in the early 1920’s, type 1 diabetes was a death sentence. Starvation diets had been prescribed as a way of prolonging life back then. I realized how fortunate I was to have been diagnosed after the discovery of insulin. I vowed to think of every day beyond the day of my diagnosis as a gift. In those days, there were no blood glucose meters, so doctors in the hospital (where I remained for about 2 weeks) determined my twice-dail Continue reading >>

My Sister Died Because She Didn't Take Diabetes Seriously

My Sister Died Because She Didn't Take Diabetes Seriously

When Yolanda Acuna Ocana was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, her family was almost relieved. She was 14 and had been suffering from inexplicable weight loss, constant thirst and tiredness, and they were grateful for a diagnosis. Now — sadly — they feel very differently about diabetes. Last April, aged just 39, Yolanda died as a result of the disease, leaving behind a loving husband and devoted family. ‘No one expects diabetes to kill someone so young in this day and age,’ says Yolanda’s sister, Nicky Dixon, 38, a company director from Surbiton, Surrey. People often think diabetes, type 1 or type 2, is not a serious condition, says Dr Jeremy Allgrove, a paediatric endocrinologist at Barts and the London NHS Trust. ‘But if you don’t look after yourself, it’s a killer.’ The figures are stark: type 1 diabetes reduces life expectancy on average by 20 years. The condition is caused by the body attacking the cells of the pancreas responsible for making insulin. Insulin helps the body break down glucose from food and turn it into energy; without it, blood sugar levels become dangerously high, causing damage to blood vessels. Around 300,000 Britons have the condition. It can run in families, but experts believe the condition is usually triggered, possibly by some sort of virus. Unlike type 2 diabetes, type 1 is characterised by insulin dependence — once diagnosed, a patient must inject themselves daily for the rest of their life. The problem is that many people don’t take their insulin as they should, with potentially fatal consequences. Yolanda was supposed to inject herself seven times a day, but when she left home for university at 18, she reduced her intake because the jabs were causing her to put on weight. This growing trend has even been given a name Continue reading >>

A Death Sentence Changing The Outlook Of Type 1 In Developing Nations

A Death Sentence Changing The Outlook Of Type 1 In Developing Nations

A Death Sentence Changing the Outlook of Type 1 in Developing Nations Beyond Type 1 is a proud sponsor of Marjories Fund, providing funding for their outreach programs in some of the greatest need regions of the world. Our partnership is a central part of the Beyond Type 1 portfolio to provide those living with Type 1 everything theyneed to manage, live + thrive with Type 1 diabetes today, ensuring a cure tomorrow. To learn more about the work of Beyond Type 1, visit HERE . Dr. Jason Baker, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Attending Endocrinologist at Cornell Medical College in New York, is a Type 1 diabetes patient and theFounder of Marjories Fund , a non-profit that emphasizes the need for medical care and education for the mostneglected populations of Type 1 adolescents and adults. Working within the means of local governments in sub-sahara Africa and parts of Asia, the group teaches skill sets that can be used in local economies so that the individual with Type 1can not only survive but thrive. With vital supplies like insulin and testing strips being extremely expensive and scarce, Marjories Fund provides classes that help patients understand what their blood glucose levels will do with certain native foods in order to improvetheir diabetes management. Working with local governments, they continue to raise awareness of the Type 1 population needs in some of the poorest areas of the world. A large part of their work focuses on removing the stigma of Type 1, whichis often seen as a death sentence and thus renders theconditionashopeless socare needless. As an adult Type 1 diabetes patient, Marjorieadvocated for things to be different. She suffered greatly and eventually died due to diabetes complications that could have been prevented with better resources and edu Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Whether you have type 1 diabetes, are a caregiver or loved one of a person with type 1 diabetes, or just want to learn more, the following page provides an overview of type 1 diabetes. New to type 1 diabetes? Check out "Starting Point: Type 1 Diabetes Basics," which answers some of the basic questions about type 1 diabetes: what is type 1 diabetes, what are its symptoms, how is it treated, and many more! Want to learn a bit more? See our “Helpful Links” page below, which provides links to diaTribe articles focused on type 1 diabetes. These pages provide helpful tips for living with type 1 diabetes, our patient-perspective column by Adam Brown, drug and device overviews, information about diabetes complications, and some extra pages we hope you’ll find useful! Starting Point: Type 1 Diabetes Basics What is the risk of developing type 1 diabetes if it runs in my family? What is Type 1 Diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is disease in which the body can no longer produce insulin. Insulin is normally needed to convert sugar (also called glucose) and other food sources into energy for the body’s cells. It is believed that in people with type 1 diabetes, the body’s own immune system attacks and kills the beta cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Without insulin, the body cannot control blood sugar, and people can suffer from dangerously high blood sugar levels (called hyperglycemia). To control their blood glucose levels, people with type 1 diabetes take insulin injections. Before the discovery of insulin, type 1 diabetes was a death sentence (and it still is for patients with poor access to insulin). Can Type 1 Diabetes Be Prevented? Unfortunately, the genetic and environmental triggers for the immune attack that causes type 1 diabetes are not well understood, althoug Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetics Living 50-plus Years, Study Seeks To Know Why

Type 1 Diabetics Living 50-plus Years, Study Seeks To Know Why

Type 1 diabetics living 50-plus years, study seeks to know why This Jan. 3, 2009 file photo shows a diabetic testing his level of blood sugar in Kamen, Germany. TORONTO I never expected to live this long. Thats a refrain thats become increasingly common among people with Type 1 diabetes, many of whom were told as children or teens that their lives would likely be shortened due to a complication of the disease, such like kidney failure, heart attack or a stroke. But a growing number of diabetics have defied the odds, living with the disease for 50 years or more and often remaining otherwise healthy and a Canadian study is underway to find out the secrets to their longevity. We are now seeing that people with Type 1 diabetes can live for a lot longer than we had initially thought, says Dr. Bruce Perkins, an endocrinologist at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto who is heading the national study. It is true, what Ive learned from talking to people whove had diabetes for many, many decades, that is what they were told when they were children: Youre not going to be the one thats going to lead a full life and you are likely going to have these problems, Perkins says. And theres an amazing sort of mentality that a lot of these patients have because they went through their lives believing that or fighting that. READ MORE: New breed of guide dog helps patients with Type 1 diabetes The Canadian Study for Longevity in Type 1 Diabetes, which began about a year ago and has so far enrolled about 300 patients, asks participants to fill out a detailed questionnaire and to provide the results of their most recent lab tests and eye exam. The researchers want to look at their insulin use; whether they self-inject or use an insulin pump; and if a family doctor or endocrinologist, a specialist Continue reading >>

Why Type 2 Diabetes Is No Longer A Death Sentence

Why Type 2 Diabetes Is No Longer A Death Sentence

(Shutterstock.com) Type 2 diabetes, though a serious disease, is not the death sentence it once was thanks to a better understanding of causes as well as advances in health care. Yet, diabetes is the seventh-leading cause of death in the U.S. and the number of those newly diagnosed is expected to rise, according to the 2014 National Diabetes Statistics Report. If the increase in Type 2 diabetes diagnoses continues at the present, alarming rate, the number of Americans diagnosed could jump from about 29 million today to 48 million in 2050. So what can we do to try to avoid becoming a diabetes statistic? Experts say we need to understand what diabetes is and its effects on the body and then make the necessary lifestyle adjustments to try to prevent it. What is diabetes? Diabetes occurs when the body can’t make enough insulin or properly use it to maintain normal blood sugar levels. The disease can lead to a litany of complications including blindness and kidney damage. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports the total medical cost of the disease was $245 billion in 2014. Type 1 diabetes is widely thought to be genetic. It can start at any age but most often begins in adolescence. In this form of the disease, the body does not produce insulin, and patients must monitor their blood sugar levels and administer multiple daily injections of the hormone. Type 2 diabetes, also called late-onset, is the most common form of the disease, accounting for up to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases, according to Healthline, a medical information site. Type 2 diabetes is often preventable. What are the causes? “(Type 2 diabetes) is predominantly from excess carbohydrates and lack of exercise,” says Peter Beilenson, M.D., CEO of Evergreen Health Care. “Your metabolism Continue reading >>

Is Type 1.5 Diabetes An Early Death Sentence When Controlled?

Is Type 1.5 Diabetes An Early Death Sentence When Controlled?

Is Type 1.5 diabetes an early death sentence when controlled? Is Type 1.5 diabetes an early death sentence when controlled? I am new to all of this. Does it mean that I am going to get complications down the line if I am well-controlled? Or does it all depend on if I have other medical conditions? As of right now diabetes is the only medical condition I have. Never took drugs for anything apart from the occassional Tylenol and cough medicine. D.D. Family diabetic since 1997, on insulin 2000 Predicting the future is a difficult task. But I think you are too negative. You can manage to keep your blood sugar in control you will be fine. We have members who have been Diabetic for 50 years or more. The better you control your BG the better off you are. A1C---1/25/2016 7.0 , 5/26/2017 6.7, 12/4/2017 6.3 NORCO 7.5/325 3/DAY DICLOFENAC 75mg 2/DAY METFORMIN 500MG 2/DAY ATORVASTATIN 10mg 1/DAY LASIX 20 mg 1/DAY TAMSULOSIN .4MG 1/DAY FINASTERIDE 5MG 1/DAY LD Aspirin 81mg 1/Day D.D. Family Getting much harder to control I see you are very new to this. Just having diabetes is not the issue it's high BG that does. As was posted you can live a very long life. You can get complications with Type 1 or Type 2. There is really no way to know who will get the complications. I developed complications when my HbA1 c was in the mid 6's and I am a Type 2. 115 pounds, Breast Cancer dx'd 6/16, 6 months of chemo and 6 weeks of radiation 2000 metformin ER, 100 mg Januvia,Glimperide, Prolia, Gabapentin, Meloxicam, Probiotic with a Prebiotic, , Lisinopril, B-12, B-6, Tumeric, Magnesium, Calcium, Vit D, and Occuvite mostly vegan diet, low fat and around 125 carbs a day, walk 5-6 miles every other day and 1 hour of yoga and light weights. D.D. Family Type 2 since 1993, on pump since 3/10 I am 75 and Continue reading >>

Living With Type 1 Diabetes

Living With Type 1 Diabetes

World Diabetes Day is marked every year on November 14 and is a day when people come together to raise awareness of the condition. To mark the day this year, three young people from across England will share their own stories on NHS England and explain what it is really like to live with diabetes. The first up is Ellie Huckle, here’s her story. World Diabetes Day; the birthday of Frederick Banting. Banting was the man who co-discovered insulin and is the reason that everyone with Type 1 diabetes is alive today. He and Charles Best discovered insulin in 1922, completely turning around the prognosis for someone diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. It went from being a slow and painful death to being a disease that can be controlled and one people can live with. I live with Type 1. I have done since I was 11 years old. I decided from the moment I was diagnosed that I would do something with my diagnosis and be a voice for other people who live with Type 1. Diabetes is just an umbrella term for two main types of diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease; it occurs when the immune system attacks the insulin-producing beta cells and renders our bodies unable to produce insulin. Without insulin, people die. That is a fact and is the reason that people with Type 1 depend on insulin injections. Type 1 has nothing to do with diet or lifestyle and normally presents in childhood and adolescence but also affects adults. Type 2 is far more prevalent in those over age 40. It is insulin resistance; their pancreas still produces insulin but the body doesn’t utilise it as it should. Type 2 can also occur naturally because of old age. I just thought it would be helpful to provide a little bit of background information to kick off this series of blogs because it Continue reading >>

People With Type 1 Diabetes Are Living Longer

People With Type 1 Diabetes Are Living Longer

Better blood sugar control may be the key to longer survival Ninety years ago, type 1 diabetes was a death sentence: half of people who developed it died within two years; more than 90% were dead within five years. Thanks to the introduction of insulin therapy in 1922, and numerous advances since then, many people with type 1 diabetes now live into their 50s and beyond. But survival in this group still falls short of that among people without diabetes. A Scottish study published this week in JAMA shows that at the age of 20, individuals with type 1 diabetes on average lived 12 fewer years than 20-year-olds without it. A second study in the same issue of JAMA showed that people with type 1 diabetes with better blood sugar control lived longer than those with poorer blood sugar control. Types of diabetes There are three main types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. The immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys cells in the pancreas that make insulin. This usually happens before age 20. Insulin is needed to get blood sugar (glucose) into cells for energy. Without insulin, glucose builds up in the bloodstream. This damages cells and tissues throughout the body. People who develop type 1 diabetes need to take insulin via shots or a pump for life. Type 2 diabetes tends to occur later in life, usually among individuals who are overweight or inactive. It accounts for about 90% of all diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes often make enough insulin, at least at first, but their cells don’t respond to it. As with type 1 diabetes, glucose builds up in the bloodstream, damaging cells and tissues throughout the body. Type 2 diabetes is initially treated with lifestyle changes such as weight loss, more exercise, and a healthier diet. Medications that make the Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Was A Death Sentence Before Insulin

Type 1 Diabetes Was A Death Sentence Before Insulin

Type 1 Diabetes Was A Death Sentence Before Insulin Sir Frederick Banting, the scientist who co-discovered insulin as a treatment for diabetes, is being celebrated byGoogleon what would have been his 125th birthday. TheCanadianscientist, along with his colleague Dr Charles Best, spent years experimenting with ways to extract insulin from the pancreas, which had previously been thought to be an impossible task. In 1921, the pair extracted the first anti-diabetic substance and in 1922 adiabeticteenager called Leonard Thompson became the first person to receive an insulin injection as a treatment for Type 1 diabetes. Until insulin was made clinically available, Type 1 diabetes was a death sentence, with many sufferers dying from the condition within weeks. In 1923, Sir Frederick was awarded the Noble Prize in Medicine for the discovery and was knighted by King George V in 1934. Here are five facts you may not know about the revolutionary scientist : 1) The youngest Nobel Laureate in Physiology or Medicine Sir Frederick was 32-years old when he was awarded the Nobel Prize for his discovery, making him the youngest Nobel Laureate in Physiology or Medicine to date. He was jointly awarded the accolade with J J R Macleod, Professor of Physiology at the University of Toronto, who Sir Frederick initially approached with his theories about the pancreas and who provided experimental facilities and the assistance of one of his students Dr Best. Sir Fredrick is understood to have been deeply unhappy upon hearing he would share the prize with Dr Macleod, who he felt had not contributed to the discovery enough to deserve the award. He decided to split the prize money with Dr Best. Before Sir Frederick began saving lives with insulin, he served in the Canadian Army Medical Service duri Continue reading >>

Diabetes Is Not A Death Sentence But A Lifestyle

Diabetes Is Not A Death Sentence But A Lifestyle

Diabetes is not a death sentence but a lifestyle Diabetes is not a death sentence but a lifestyle Despite struggling with injections and high emotions at the time of his diagnosis, Christian is now training to be a nurse so he can help other young people accept their diabetes like he has. As a teenager youd expect to live life trouble free especially when it comes to your health. I was just 17 and used to attend a college studying A levels. One day I contracted a fever and it was an unusual one as it lasted for abouttwo weeks for me to recover from it (usually it would only take me three days to recover). About a week after I recovered I started losing weight and losing my appetite (I only wanted to eat food with a lot of sugar) . Aftertwo days I increased my fluid intake and started feeling dehydrated even though I was drinking nearly seven litres every day. From around 95kg I got down 75 kg in justtwo weeks. Things started to get worst the lasttwo days before we called ourGP. I started feeling nauseous and later started vomiting. We called theGP and he checked myBGM and it was 27.0 mmgol and he tested my urine. The results showed therewere a lot of ketones in my body. I was diagnosed with Type1 diabetes, which my Grandpa also had so it meant it was genetic. It took me around a week and a half in hospital to recover. It was not easy for me to accept that I had to injectfour times a day apart from pricking myself everyday to check my sugar levels. I used to get easily offended, cry easily and suffered from wild depression. It took me aroundtwo months to accept it. It was while surfing trough the Internet that I realized that diabetes is not the end of the world. it was this quote that helped me diabetes is not a death sentence but a lifestyle. I realized I was now livi Continue reading >>

Diabetes Is No Death Sentence

Diabetes Is No Death Sentence

Mpolokeng Mudau visited her gynaecologist for a routine checkup two months before she was to deliver her son, only to return home disappointed that she had been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Mpolokeng Mudau (pictured) visited her gynaecologist for a routine checkup two months before she was to deliver her son, only to return home disappointed that she had been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Although this happened in 2009, she remembers the incident vividly, saying she had complained to her doctor about an insatiable thirst during the consultation. No matter how much water I drank, I could not feel quenched, recalls Mudau. I also experienced blurred vision. When the doctor ran some tests, he realised my sugar level was high, she said, adding that when her blood sample was examined, she was found to have type 1 diabetes. Mudau is one of more than 199 million women worldwide living with diabetes. Some of them will mark World Diabetes Day on Tuesday. The day is meant to promote diabetes care, prevention and a cure worldwide. This years theme is Women and Diabetes our right to a healthy future. Globally, there are 366 million people living with diabetes, and the International Diabetes Federation has predicted that this number could rise to 552 million by 2030. Mudau (31) tells City Press that what frightens her most about diabetes is the thought of losing her eyesight. The minute the sugar levels in my body go up, my eyes become blurry, she says, adding that the fear of losing her eyesight has kept her motivated to take her medication religiously. She has familiarised herself with facts about the disease to such an extent that she now runs an empowerment community programme where, once a week, she holds regular talks with young girls about the illness to dispel the false Continue reading >>

My First Year Of Type 1 Diabetes (as Seen Through Ruins And Literature)

My First Year Of Type 1 Diabetes (as Seen Through Ruins And Literature)

My First Year of Type 1 Diabetes (as seen through ruins and literature) During my first trip to Rome, I spent one evening walking around the bridges by The Vatican. At midnight, as I wandered back to my hostel, I stopped to look at the ruins. It was eerie, an echo of what was once the worlds greatest empires (of the 18 countries I visited during my year studying abroad in London, there were Roman ruins in 16 of them!) but now reduced to ruins. It felt like there was still an echo of their civilizations, some hidden story tucked around the corners. Pompeii was even stranger. I visited their pool and exercise area, complete with a surprisingly recognizable locker rooms. As our tour guide said, There is nothing new under the sun! Separated only by time. Despite the 2000 year difference, there were so many similar cultural aspects. Ironic, isn't it, that the destruction of their city, led to it being one of the best preserved ancient cities? Maybe my type 1 diabetes diagnosis would do the same for me. I hoped that maybe the damage to my body would be worth it, because I could touch other lives. Throughout the millennia, there have been so many lost stories, entire civilizations summed up in a single paragraph in a high school history textbook. But some works of literature have survived the test of time, read in English classes across the centuries and civilizations. I always wanted to contribute to this. When I was diagnosed and I felt like I would die within days, the first thing I thought of was that I hadn't left my literary mark on the world yet. Upon my diagnosis, I was hyperaware of the fact that had I been born a century prior, this would have been a death sentence by now, exactly one year out of my diagnosis. All because my body suddenly started to attack itself. A Continue reading >>

More in diabetes