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Is There Glucose In Orange Juice?

How Much Sugar Does Your Orange Juice Have?

How Much Sugar Does Your Orange Juice Have?

How Much Sugar Does Your Orange Juice Have? With anywhere from 20 gm or more of natural sugars in a 248 gm serving of orange juice, and about 25 gm or over of carbs (that turns into sugars too on digestion!), orange juice may be giving you more sugar than you realize. Your best bet is to stick to freshly squeezed juice or to try and opt for a brand that says 100% pure orange juice with no added sugars. A glass of orange juice feels like a great way to start your day. Packing in those vitamins and antioxidants, you probably feel especially healthy. But if youre wary about the amount of sugar in the drink, you may well find reasons to cut your intake or change the kind of juice you drink. So how much sugar is there in a glass of orange juice? The answer isnt as straightforward as you may think. The quantity of sugar in a glass of orange juice can vary greatly depending on whether youre having it fresh squeezed with no sugar added in, or sweetened, or packaged with or without sugar. A single cup of about 248 gm of unsweetened orange juice even though it may not have any added sugars already contains natural sugars. And youre likely to get, on an average, about 20.83 gm of sugar in this serving size.1 A similar-sized serving of canned unsweetened orange juice has 21.81 gm of sugar.2 Some organic orange juice brands listed on the USDA database had as much as 41.67 gm of sugar in a 100 ml serving3, others had 33.8 gm in a 100 gm serving4 If youre watching your sugar intake and more so if youre diabetic you should know that it isnt just important to know how much sugar or added sugar there is in orange juice. The carbohydrate content can be just as important. Why? Thats because your body digests carbohydrates and converts them to blood sugar or glucose. In other words, it isn Continue reading >>

Natural Sugars In Oranges

Natural Sugars In Oranges

Sandi Busch received a Bachelor of Arts in psychology, then pursued training in nursing and nutrition. She taught families to plan and prepare special diets, worked as a therapeutic support specialist, and now writes about her favorite topics nutrition, food, families and parenting for hospitals and trade magazines. A close-up of an orange slice.Photo Credit: Iamthatiam/iStock/Getty Images The natural sugars you get from eating an orange are the same type as granulated sugar, but you don't have to worry as much about their impact on your health. Oranges actually contain three different forms of natural sugar, but the sugar gives you an energy boost without spiking blood sugar because it's part of a whole food. Youll also get a significant amount of vitamin C and other beneficial nutrients. Fructose is commonly known as fruit sugar, but its not the only type of natural sugar in fruits. In fact, its usually found with other sugars, according to Elmhurst College. That holds true for oranges because they contain fructose, glucose and sucrose. Fructose and glucose consist of a single unit of sugar, so theyre called monosaccharides. When glucose and fructose bind together, they create the disaccharide sucrose. Each sugar imparts a different level of sweetness. Sucrose, which you know as table sugar, has a sweetness score of 100. Compared to sucrose, fructose has a score of 140, while glucose is not as sweet and only rates 70 to 80. One medium-sized navel orange contains 17.56 grams of total carbohydrates, which includes 11.9 grams of natural sugar. Sucrose accounts for half of the total sugar. Another 23 percent of the total comes from glucose, while fructose represents 27 percent of the sugar in an orange. One navel orange has 69 calories. Almost 48 of the total calories co Continue reading >>

The #1 Reason To Avoid Orange Juice

The #1 Reason To Avoid Orange Juice

When discussing sources of “hidden sugars” with my patients I find that they are often very surprised at my position on orange juice. Essentially, I have taken it off the table. Frequently, the response I get is, “But what about the vitamin C?” The reality of the situation is that yes, a glass of orange juice does indeed contain some vitamin C, but that fact hardly outweighs the fact that O.J. is just loaded with sugar. A single 12 ounce glass of O.J. contains an incredible 9 teaspoons of sugar, about the same as a 12 ounce can of Coke! This equates to 36 grams of carbs, about half of what you should consume in a day. Let’s do a little math. If a person were to drink just one glass of orange juice each day, that would mean that he or she would be consuming an extra 3,285 teaspoons (close to 70 cups) of sugar in a year or about 53,000 extra calories. This likely translates to unwanted weight gain., and as we’ve just learned from a study published last week, sugar consumption worsens blood pressure and cardiovascular risk markers, even in the absence of weight gain. So if you’re concerned about vitamin C, sleep easy knowing that you’re probably getting enough in your multivitamin. The cost to your health from the sugar load in a glass of orange juice should justify your decision to opt out. Read Next Continue reading >>

What Fruit Juice Can People With Diabetes Drink?

What Fruit Juice Can People With Diabetes Drink?

Tweet Fruit juice has, until recently, been considered a great way to get your five a day. people with diabetes need to moderate their fruit juice intake as larger glasses of juice can substantially raise blood sugar levels. The key is to In addition, more recently, regular consumption of fruit juice has been linked with an increase in type 2 diabetes risk. What's in fruit juice? Aside from vitamin C and calcium, fruit juice contains: Calories - 250ml glass of unsweetened orange juice typically contains around 100 calories, compared to the 60 calories in an actual orange Fructose (a form of sugar) - half a pint of fruit juice contains more sugar than the World Health Organisation recommends ideally having in a day (30g of sugar for men, 24g for women) A lack of fibre - juice always contains less fibre than whole fruit and highly processed juices may not contain any fibre How does this affect my diabetes? Badly, is the short answer. Sugar levels in fruit juice can cause a significant spike in blood sugar levels, increasing the risk of hyperglycemia. The glycemic index, which is used to reflect the impact on blood sugar levels of individual foods, places orange juice between 66 and 76 on a scale of 100. Compared to whole fruits and vegetables, juice doesn't offer much fibre. (it's stripped away in the juicing process). Fibre is a kind of carbohydrate that, because the body doesn't break it down, is calorie-free, so it doesn't affect your blood sugar, making it important for people with diabetes. Soluble fibre can help lower your cholesterol levels and improve blood glucose control if eaten in large amounts. Apples, oranges, and pears all contain soluble fibre, but not when juiced. Is fruit juice all bad for people with diabetes? Fruit juice has some benefits for people wi Continue reading >>

Does Orange Juice Raise Blood Sugar Levels?

Does Orange Juice Raise Blood Sugar Levels?

One cup of orange juice provides you with an impressive 140 percent of the daily value for vitamin C, as well as 20 percent of the DV for thiamine and 10 percent of the DV for folate. However, diabetics need to take care when consuming orange juice, as it can quickly cause a rise in blood sugar levels. The glycemic index is used to measure the effect of carbohydrate-containing foods on blood sugar levels. The higher the glycemic index, the more a particular food affects blood sugar levels. Orange juice has a glycemic index rating of between 66 and 76 on a scale of 100, depending on the type of juice. Many factors can influence the glycemic index of orange juice, including the freshness of the fruit used to make the juice, whether it is fresh or made from concentrate and whether it has pulp. Use During Hypoglycemia Orange juice is one of the recommended sources of carbohydrate for treating low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, in diabetics because it quickly increases your blood sugar levels. For this condition, drink 4 ounces of orange juice and recheck blood sugar levels after 10 to 15 minutes, repeating the treatment if blood sugar levels are still too low. Recommended Intake Even if you are diabetic, you should still consume at least two servings of fruit per day. Although fruits contain carbohydrates that can raise your blood sugar, they are very nutritious and tend to be low in calories and fat. They also contain essential nutrients, including dietary fiber, vitamins C and A and folate. Considerations What you eat with orange juice or other fruits will alter how they affect your blood sugar levels. Always eat fruits, juices and other foods high on the glycemic index with meals instead of on their own. Combining foods high in carbohydrates with foods high in protein, fa Continue reading >>

The Science Behind Orange Juice

The Science Behind Orange Juice

A recent article in The Atlantic, Misunderstanding Orange Juice as a Health Drink , got a number of things wrong.Adee Brauns article neglects the science behind orange juice. The author cites Alissa Hamilton and her book, Squeezed: What You Dont Know About Orange Juice . The industry is trying to revive its healthy reputation against all odds, Hamilton writes. Not only is orange juice heavily processed, but its straight sugar which today people recognize as contributing to obesity and diabetes. While a majority of drinks widely sold in stores contain abnormal high levels of sugar, orange juice does not. Orange juice is full of other highly beneficial components and the sugar in orange juice is a combination of fructose, glucose and sucrose. Roughly half is sucrose, which is what is in table sugar. Roughly 25% is fructose and 25% is glucose. Sucrose breaks down into half glucose and half fructose. There is a significant difference between that and pure glucose. A scientific journal article, Orange juice or fructose intake does not induce oxidative and inflammatory response , suggests: Caloric intake in the form of orange juice or fructose does not induce either oxidative or inflammatory stress(For those who read further, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are various forms of oxygen that will react quickly. NF-kappaB is a primary pathway for inflammation in cells. The P value gives the statistical probability that this result is due to chance alone. A P value of 0.001 is a 1 in 1000 chance. That is very good.) What that article says is that fructose and water do not induce oxidative stress the way glucose and water does. Unless glucose is added to orange juice, orange juice wont either. Fructose sugar has a different structure. In addition to the difference between glucose a Continue reading >>

Orange Juice - Wikipedia

Orange Juice - Wikipedia

For other uses, see Orange juice (disambiguation) . Orange juice is the liquid extract of the fruit of the orange tree, produced by squeezing oranges. It comes in several different varieties, including blood orange , navel oranges , valencia orange , clementine , and tangerine . As well as variations in oranges used, some varieties include differing amounts of juice vesicles , known as "pulp" in American English, and "juicy bits" in British English. These vesicles contain the juice of the orange and can be left in or removed during the manufacturing process. How juicy these vesicles are depend upon many factors, such as species, variety, and season. In American English, the beverage name may be abbreviated as "OJ". Due to the importance of oranges to the economy of the state of Florida , "the juice obtained from mature oranges of the species Citrus sinensis and hybrids thereof" was adopted as the official beverage of Florida in 1967. [1] [2] Orange juice (along with grapefruit juice) is offered to every visitor at each of the state's five Florida Welcome Centers . Commercial orange juice with a long shelf life is made by drying and later rehydrating the juice, or by concentrating the juice and later adding water to the concentrate. Prior to drying, the juice may also be pasteurized and oxygen removed from it, necessitating the later addition of a flavor pack, generally made from orange products. The health value of orange juice is debatable. It has a high concentration of vitamin C , but also a very high concentration of simple sugars, comparable to soft drinks . [3] [4] [5] As a result, some government nutritional advice has been adjusted to encourage substitution of orange juice with raw fruit, which is digested more slowly, and limit daily consumption. [6] [7] Durin Continue reading >>

Fruit Juice Is Just As Unhealthy As A Sugary Drink

Fruit Juice Is Just As Unhealthy As A Sugary Drink

Fruit Juice Is Just as Unhealthy as a Sugary Drink Written by Kris Gunnars, BSc on June 4, 2017 Fruit juice is often perceived as healthy. That's understandable, given that it is natural and has the word "fruit" in it. However... what many people fail to realize is that fruit juice is also loaded with sugar . In fact, fruit juice contains just as much sugar and calories as a sugary soft drink... and sometimes even more ( 1 ). The small amounts of vitamins and antioxidants in the juice do not make up for the large amount of sugar. Unfortunately, food and beverage manufacturers aren't always honest about what is in their products. The fruit juice you find at the supermarket may not be what you think it is... even if it's labelled as "100% pure" and "not from concentrate." After being squeezed from the fruit, the juice is usually stored in massive oxygen-depleted holding tanks for up to a year before it is packaged. The main problem with this method is that it tends to remove most of the flavor, so the manufacturers need to add so-called " flavor packs " to the juice, to bring back the flavor that was lost during processing. So even if you're buying the highest quality juices at the supermarket, they are still far from their original state. Some of the lowest quality ones don't even resemble fresh-squeezed fruit juice at all... they are basically just fruit-flavored sugar water. Bottom Line: Fruit juice isn't always what it seems, even the higher quality types have gone through processing methods that remove the flavor, making it necessary to add "flavor packs" to bring them back to their original state. Fruit Juice Contains Vitamins, Minerals and Antioxidants, But It Lacks Fiber and Is Loaded With Sugar Fruit juice is missing a lot of the stuff that makes whole fruit hea Continue reading >>

Oranges And Grapes: More On Insulin And Glucose After Fruit Or Juice

Oranges And Grapes: More On Insulin And Glucose After Fruit Or Juice

The effects of eating whole fruit or drinking fruit juice on blood glucose and insulin appears to be of some interest to people. As my last post on a study comparing apples, smoothies, and juice garnered some attention, I thought I would follow this up by looking a later study by the same researchers: “The role of dietary fiber in satiety, glucose, and insulin: studies with fruit and fruit juice“. This study expanded on the previous research on apples by comparing the effects of both oranges and grapes on blood glucose and insulin as either whole fruit or juice. Oranges South African Navel oranges were used for both the fruit and the juice. As the oranges had a lower amounts of sugar than the apples, the total sugar in each test meal was reduced to 50 grams, to avoid over-stuffing their volunteers with fruit. Even so, it took over 600 grams of peeled oranges to reach 50 gram dose of sugar. The equivalent 600 ml of orange juice was produced by hand using an orange reamer (some task!) and the fibre removed using a pectinase enzyme. As in the previous study, both test meals were fed to ten volunteers, on separate occasions, and after being fasted overnight. Glucose There wasn’t any difference in the spike in blood sugar after eating oranges or drinking the orange juice. While blood sugar dipped below fasting levels for both fruit and juice, it returned to normal rapidly after eating the oranges but the reactive hypoglycemia persisted to the end of the experiment after drinking juice. Insulin Insulin increased significantly more after drinking orange juice than after eating the oranges. The total insulin produced, calculated as the area under the curve, was also quite a bit larger after drinking the juice. Both the blood glucose spike and the insulin response were qui Continue reading >>

100% Fruit Juices And Sugar

100% Fruit Juices And Sugar

Sugars include all simple carbohydrates, monosaccharides and disaccharides, both those occurring naturally in a food as well as those added during production. The simple sugars contained in whole fruit, and fruit juices, are mostly fructose but also include glucose and sucrose. The sugars in 100% fruit juices always come directly from the fruits that have been juiced, and are never added. The nutritional composition of the fruit depends on various aspects linked to the botanical variety and cultivar, the climate conditions during the ripening phases and the conditions of storage and preservation. In general, fruit is an important source of carbohydrates in the form of simple sugars and dietary fibre. In whole fruits, fructose makes up a significant proportion of the simple sugars, followed by glucose and sucrose (which is composed of a glucose molecule plus a fructose molecule). The content and proportions of these simple sugars vary considerably based on the type of fruit. Fruits with the highest total sugar content are: cherries, grapes, mangoes, pomegranates, figs and bananas. In bananas, starch represents about 10% of all available carbohydrates . 100% fruit juices never contain added sugar, as per the European regulation, but nevertheless have a sugar content corresponding to that of the fruits from which they were derived (on average, about 24g per standard 200ml portion). In particular, fruit juices contain fructose, to a highly variable extent as they are more or less equivalent (as regards portion) to the corresponding fruit (0.5 to 7g per 100g). Juices extracted from fruits with a higher sugar content contain more sugar than juices obtained from less sugary fruits. The WHO classifies simple sugars as intrinsic sugars, i.e. those naturally occurring in the int Continue reading >>

Faqs: 100% Oj And Sugar

Faqs: 100% Oj And Sugar

100% orange juice contains no added sugars. Instead, the sweetness of 100% OJ is from naturally occurring sugars that develop in the orange as it grows on the tree. How does that sugar compare to the sugar in the sugar bowl? The naturally occurring sugar found in fruit, or in 100% fruit juice made from them, comes along with many nutrients, vitamins, antioxidants, and plant nutrients. Think of it as a package deal. By contrast, table sugar or high fructose corn syrup which are added sugars and not naturally occurring sugarsprovide calories but no other nutrients. Is the sugar in 100% orange juice considered added sugar? There is no added sugar in 100% orange juice. The sugar in 100% orange juice is naturally occurring as is the sugar in milk. The new food label announced by the FDA will show that there are 0 grams of added sugar in 100% orange juice. Is the sugar in orange juice worse for you than other sugars? Too many added sugars can fill your diet with empty calories or calories which dont typically bring any nutrition or health benefits. Naturally occurring sugars like those found in 100% orange juice and fruits are some of natures most nutrient-rich packages, delivering a bevy of benefits such as vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and more. Does the sugar in orange juice make you gain weight and is that why I hear people say not to drink a lot of orange juice? The calorie level of all types of sugars is the same so its all about balance, moderation, and maximizing intake of vitamins, nutrients and other health benefits. When choosing orange juice, make sure the label specifically says 100% orange juice to avoid selecting beverages that may contain added sugar, other juices and fewer nutrients. Beware of labels that say drinks, -ades, punches, and cocktails because Continue reading >>

How Fruit Juice Went From Health Food To Junk Food

How Fruit Juice Went From Health Food To Junk Food

How fruit juice went from health food to junk food For decades fruit juice has been seen as a healthy option. Then this week a primary school banned it after claims that it's as bad for you as Coca-Cola. But how big a health risk does it pose? First published on Fri 17 Jan 2014 17.34EST 'Fruit juice isnt the same as intact fruit and it has as much sugar as many classical sugar drinks,' says medical researcher Susan Jebb. Photograph: Deborah Pendell/Getty Images/Flickr Open This week, it looked as if fruit juice might finally lose its claim to healthiness and be put into the same category as fizzy drinks. It emerged that a headteacher, Elizabeth Chaplin, who runs Valence primary school in Dagenham, wrote to parents about a new rule to confiscate juice cartons from children's lunch boxes. Instead, pupils would only beallowed to drink water. Days earlier, Susan Jebb, a government advisor and head of the dietand obesity research group at the Medical Research Council's Human Nutrition Research unit at Cambridge University, told the Sunday Times that the government's official advice that a glass counts towards your recommended minimum five-a-day servings of fruit and vegetables should be changed. "Fruit juice isn't the same as intact fruit and it has as much sugar as many classical sugar drinks," said Jebb, who has stopped drinking juice. "It is also absorbed very fast, so by the time it getsto your stomach your body doesn'tknow whether it's Coca-Cola ororange juice, frankly. I have to say itisa relatively easy thing to give up. Swap it and have a piece of real fruit. Ifyou are going to drink it, you shoulddilute it." This comes on top of a year or so of stories about the high sugar content of fruit juice. The same US scientists who warned about the use of high-fructose corn Continue reading >>

Should I Drink Fruit Juice?

Should I Drink Fruit Juice?

If my blood glucose goes low, drinking orange juice can help raise it. But how about drinking orange juice when my blood sugar level is normal? I’m concerned that it will raise my sugar too much. So I’ve been staying away from fruit juices and just eat the fruit itself. Continue reading >>

The Sugar Content Of Chilled Orange Juice

The Sugar Content Of Chilled Orange Juice

the sugar content of chilled orange juice such as Tropicana or Simply Orange. there is a lot of sugar. is that natural sugar from the orange. or is sugar added?? Want to stay up to date with this post? Sign Up Now Chef/Owners Stuart Brioza and Nicole Krasinski visit one of San Franciscos most celebrated dim sum houses to discuss the inspiration for their popular restaurant State Bird Provisions. We go behind the scenes at the Varsity, one of the oldest and biggest drive-ins in the country. Read more . Acclaimed Chefs Joanne Chang and Karen Akunowicz meet rising-star Brian Moy for a tour of his restaurants, to trace the evolution of this iconic neighborhood. The taste of Malort has been described as baby aspirin wrapped in grapefruit peel, bound with rubber bands and soaked in well gin - so why do Chicagoans claim to love it? Read more . Speakeasies are all the rage, but few can claim to be as storied as New York Citys Back Room. Read more . Bartender Duggan McDonnell of San Francisco bar Cantina shows how to chill down a glass for a better cocktail experience. Continue reading >>

Effect Of Fruit Juice On Glucose Control And Insulin Sensitivity In Adults: A Meta-analysis Of 12 Randomized Controlled Trials

Effect Of Fruit Juice On Glucose Control And Insulin Sensitivity In Adults: A Meta-analysis Of 12 Randomized Controlled Trials

Effect of Fruit Juice on Glucose Control and Insulin Sensitivity in Adults: A Meta-Analysis of 12 Randomized Controlled Trials Bin Wang ,#1 Kai Liu ,#1 Mantian Mi ,1 and Jian Wang 2,* 1Research Center for Nutrition and Food Safety, Institute of Military Preventive Medicine, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Nutrition and Food Safety, Chongqing Medical Nutrition Research Center, Chongqing, P. R. China 1Research Center for Nutrition and Food Safety, Institute of Military Preventive Medicine, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Nutrition and Food Safety, Chongqing Medical Nutrition Research Center, Chongqing, P. R. China 1Research Center for Nutrition and Food Safety, Institute of Military Preventive Medicine, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Nutrition and Food Safety, Chongqing Medical Nutrition Research Center, Chongqing, P. R. China 1Research Center for Nutrition and Food Safety, Institute of Military Preventive Medicine, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Nutrition and Food Safety, Chongqing Medical Nutrition Research Center, Chongqing, P. R. China 2Department of Nutrition, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, P. R. China Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist. Conceived and designed the experiments: BW MTM JW. Performed the experiments: BW KL JW. Analyzed the data: BW KL JW. Contributed reagents/materials/analysis tools: BW KL. Wrote the paper: BW KL MTM JW. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credit Continue reading >>

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